History Main / BatDeduction

20th Aug '16 10:27:21 PM Ghilz
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* ''Film/BlackDynamite'' brilliantly parodies the entire concept [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t96R1JKrg98 here]]. The logic ([[InsaneTrollLogic if you can call it that]]) goes like this: "Melt in mouth-M&Ms (not in yo hands)-Mars Candy Co- Mars-Ares-Mars backwards drop the S-Ram-Aries-Athena-Athens-Capit­al of Greece-785 B.C.-Topeka Kansas-CODE KANSAS-ASNAKEDOK-Aesclepius-Ap­ollo-Serpent at Delphi-Big ass snake-South American Anaconda- ANACONDA MALT LIQUOR-WHOOO-Little Richard-ANACONDA MALT LIQUOR GIVES YOU Little richard?-ANACONDA MALT LIQUOR GIVES YOU A TINY DICK!"

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* ''Film/BlackDynamite'' brilliantly parodies the entire concept [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t96R1JKrg98 here]]. The logic ([[InsaneTrollLogic if you can call it that]]) goes like this: "Melt They are at a diner that serves waffles who melt in mouth-M&Ms (not your mouth. [=M&Ms=] also melt in yo hands)-Mars your mouth (And not in your hand) and are made by the Mars Candy Co- Mars-Ares-Mars Company. Mars is the Roman God of War, and his Greek counterpart is Ares. Mars backwards drop without the S-Ram-Aries-Athena-Athens-Capit­al S reads "Ram", which is the symbol for Aries. Ares' half sister is Athena, who is the namesake for Athens, Greece. Zodialogical Astronomy was invented by the Greeks in 785 BC (everyone around the table knows this). 785 is the area code of Greece-785 B.C.-Topeka Kansas-CODE KANSAS-ASNAKEDOK-Aesclepius-Ap­ollo-Serpent Topeka Kansas. Which can be shortened to Code Kansas. Code Kansas backwards without one of the S gives Snake Doc. AKA Snake Doctor. Aesculapius is the Greek Demigod of Medecine who believed snakes' tongues had mystical healing power and whose staff surrounded by snakes is the symbol for medicine. Apollo is Aesculapius' father, and a legend involving him and snakes is in both Greek and Roman mythology - Apollo slew the serpent at Delphi-Big Delphi. The Serpent was a big ass snake-South snake. The South American Anaconda- ANACONDA MALT LIQUOR-WHOOO-Little Richard-ANACONDA MALT LIQUOR GIVES YOU Little richard?-ANACONDA MALT LIQUOR GIVES YOU A TINY DICK!"anaconda is the biggest snake in the world. Anaconda Malt Liquor has the slogan "Anaconda Malt Liquor gives you Whooooooooooo!" "Whooooooooooooo!" sounds like Music/LittleRichard. So the motto really is: "Anaconda Malt Liquor gives you Music/LittleRichard". Dick is another name for Richard. So the real motto (and the sinister plot) is that Anaconda Malt Liquor gives you a small dick. And their conclusion is immediately proven correct.
1st Aug '16 7:47:33 PM Kandarihu
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* In Episode 4 of the Simgm Productions PrettyLittleLIars spoof Spencer deducing Meet from Chicken being a Meat and Abandoned Warehouse from "one" because Rosewood only has one.

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* In Episode 4 of the Simgm Productions PrettyLittleLIars PrettyLittleLiars spoof Spencer deducing Meet from Chicken being a Meat and Abandoned Warehouse from "one" because Rosewood only has one.
21st Jul '16 11:56:33 AM MrDeath
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* The witch/duck scene in ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail''. The "deduction" is: Wood, ducks, and witches all float in water. Wood and witches both burn. So if a woman weighs the same as a duck, then she's made of wood, and therefore a witch. It seems like merely InsaneTrollLogic, but the world conforms to this absurdity, because it turns out that she somehow weighs the same as a duck ''and'' she really is a witch.

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* The witch/duck scene in ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail''. The "deduction" is: Wood, ducks, and witches all float in water. Wood and witches both burn. So if a woman weighs the same as a duck, then she's made of wood, and therefore a witch. It seems like merely InsaneTrollLogic, but the world conforms to this absurdity, because it turns out that she somehow weighs the same as a duck ''and'' she really is a witch.
16th Jul '16 3:53:26 PM BenOfHouston
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Added DiffLines:

** This was done quite often in short stories, where Holmes would guess the conclusions with only the barest of facts in the introduction, and is almost completely refuted within a few pages. It's treated as a WildMassGuessing amusement.
13th Jul '16 2:46:16 PM kkhohoho
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* The 1966-68 ''Series/{{Batman}}'' series made liberal use of this, as the various villains would usually leave clues for World's Greatest Detective, and the correct solution almost always required Bat Deductions. This turned pretty often with the Riddler.
** Once, Batman solved one of the riddler's riddles that wasn't even spoken or written. Riddler used a wax-based solvent to dissolve a hole through the wall of a vault, and on doing a forensic investigation of the crime scene, Batman's chemical analysis revealed it to contain Nitrogen, Uranium, and Sodium:

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* The 1966-68 ''Series/{{Batman}}'' series made liberal use of this, as the various villains would usually leave clues for World's Greatest Detective, and the correct solution almost always required Bat Deductions. This turned up pretty often with the Riddler.
** Once, Batman solved one of the riddler's Riddler's riddles that wasn't even spoken or written. Riddler used a wax-based solvent to dissolve a hole through the wall of a vault, and on doing a forensic investigation of the crime scene, Batman's chemical analysis revealed it to contain Nitrogen, Uranium, and Sodium:
18th Jun '16 12:20:46 AM gewunomox
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* {{ARG}}s often work like a combination of this and TrialAndErrorGameplay. Each clue can be extrapolated from in order to lead to the next, usually in some completely random way. For example, a set of numbers could symbolize any number of different things. Often the only way to figure out where the trail leads is to try every possibility until you find something that looks like another clue.

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* {{ARG}}s {{Alternate Reality Game}}s often work like a combination of this and TrialAndErrorGameplay. Each clue can be extrapolated from in order to lead to the next, usually in some completely random way. For example, a set of numbers could symbolize any number of different things. Often the only way to figure out where the trail leads is to try every possibility until you find something that looks like another clue.
17th Jun '16 11:54:22 AM WillKeaton
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* Justified in ''ComicBook/GrantMorrisonsBatman'', where Batman points out that he ''needs'' to use half-mad logic and bizarre connective leaps to "match wits" with a rotating group of homicidal, delusional sociopaths, or people will die. Likewise, the Joker himself admits that Batman may have driven him to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apophenia apophenia]], as he has to constantly wonder whether or not the Bat will solve anything he plans, no matter how random everything seems.

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* Justified in ''ComicBook/GrantMorrisonsBatman'', where Batman points out that he ''needs'' to use half-mad logic and bizarre connective leaps to "match wits" with a rotating group of homicidal, delusional sociopaths, or people will die. Likewise, the Joker himself admits that Batman may have driven him to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apophenia apophenia]], apophenia,]] as he has to constantly wonder whether or not the Bat will solve anything he plans, no matter how random everything seems.
10th Jun '16 6:56:16 AM LentilSandEater
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** The series was so aware that it was going to rely on this sort of thing that [[InvokedTrope invoking the trope]] formed the backbone of the plot of the ''very third episode''. The Penguin, being out of ideas for a heist, sends a random umbrella to Batman. His plan: Batman will analyze the "clue", use Bat Deduction to figure out what the Penguin is planning, and the Penguin will hear it through the radio transmitter hidden in the umbrella, and then go and commit that crime! A brilliant {{inver|tedTrope}}sion, {{lampshad|eHanging}}ing, and {{subver|tedTrope}}sion all in one, though one wonders how the Penguin figured he would get away with a crime that Batman knew he would commit before he himself did...
*** Simple since he ''knew'' Batman was there already, he was [[CrazyPrepared prepared]] for any problems.

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** The series was so aware that it was going to rely on this sort of thing that [[InvokedTrope invoking the trope]] formed the backbone of the plot of the ''very third episode''. The Penguin, being out of ideas for a heist, sends a random umbrella to Batman. His plan: Batman will analyze the "clue", use Bat Deduction to figure out what the Penguin is planning, and the Penguin will hear it through the radio transmitter hidden in the umbrella, and then go and commit that crime! A brilliant {{inver|tedTrope}}sion, {{lampshad|eHanging}}ing, and {{subver|tedTrope}}sion all in one, though one wonders how the Penguin figured he would get away with a crime that Batman knew he would commit before he himself did...
*** Simple since he ''knew'' Batman was there already, he was [[CrazyPrepared prepared]] for any problems.
one.
4th Jun '16 3:43:21 PM mariic
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Added DiffLines:

* An early episode of WebAnimation/InternationalMoronPatrol parodied the Series/{{Batman}} show's use of this trope.
3rd Jun '16 9:40:22 PM billybobfred
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** Example: Playing Mage: The Ascension, this troper's character discovered deep tire-tracks in the woods near a demolished tree with a bit of white fur attached. He immediately determined that The Technocracy was experimenting in cybernetically controlling werewolves, and one got loose. He was correct.
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