History Main / BMovie

3rd Aug '17 10:11:21 AM TheJayman49
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* ''Film/FleshEater'' (1988): A group of teens go partying at a farm on Halloween, only the be attacked a zombie which soon causes more to start appearing. The film is notable for being directed by Bill Hinzman, who played the famous Cemetery Zombie in the above mentioned ''Night of the Living Dead''.
25th Jul '17 12:45:22 PM Wynauttica
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25th Jul '17 12:45:20 PM Wynauttica
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As the studio system collapsed, beginning in the late 1940s and continuing through the 1950s, the double feature faded from profitability and, thus, the need for major studio–distributed Bs declined. On the other hand, the overall decline of the majors left room for independents with a B mentality -- Creator/AmericanInternationalPictures and Creator/RogerCorman being by far the most prominent -- to flourish. In the [[TheSixties 1960s]] and [[TheSeventies 1970s]], the term B-movie came to be synonymous with what was now called "{{exploitation film}}s" -- low-budget [[FollowTheLeader cash-ins]] with an emphasis on sensationalism, sexuality, and gore -- and the phrase is understood in those terms to this day. During the "Golden Age" of the B-movie in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, the films were widely distributed and screened in older cinemas colloquially called "grindhouses," supposedly because the movies would be shown over and over again, grinding down the film. Since the dawning of cable TV and home video in TheEighties, few B-movies see theatrical release, but are typically produced as [[MadeForTVMovie TV movies]] or DirectToVideo releases, or released [[WebOriginal directly over the internet]]. Creator/{{Syfy}} (formerly the Sci Fi Channel) in particular [[SyFyChannelOriginalMovie produces many original B-movies]], and ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' maintained interest in the genre throughout the '90s, with its rereleases of classic B-movies with three characters making snarky comments on the action. While many B-movies are "bad" in terms of writing and execution, some prove to be SoBadItsGood. Those that attempt seriousness are usually full of {{narm}}.

to:

As the studio system collapsed, beginning in the late 1940s and continuing through the 1950s, the double feature faded from profitability and, thus, the need for major studio–distributed studio-distributed Bs declined. On the other hand, the overall decline of the majors left room for independents with a B mentality -- Creator/AmericanInternationalPictures and Creator/RogerCorman being by far the most prominent -- to flourish. In the [[TheSixties 1960s]] and [[TheSeventies 1970s]], the term B-movie came to be synonymous with what was now called "{{exploitation film}}s" -- low-budget [[FollowTheLeader cash-ins]] with an emphasis on sensationalism, sexuality, and gore -- and the phrase is understood in those terms to this day. During the "Golden Age" of the B-movie in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, the films were widely distributed and screened in older cinemas colloquially called "grindhouses," supposedly because the movies would be shown over and over again, grinding down the film. Since the dawning of cable TV and home video in TheEighties, few B-movies see theatrical release, but are typically produced as [[MadeForTVMovie TV movies]] or DirectToVideo releases, or released [[WebOriginal directly over the internet]]. Creator/{{Syfy}} (formerly the Sci Fi Channel) in particular [[SyFyChannelOriginalMovie produces many original B-movies]], and ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' maintained interest in the genre throughout the '90s, with its rereleases of classic B-movies with three characters making snarky comments on the action. While many B-movies are "bad" in terms of writing and execution, some prove to be SoBadItsGood. Those that attempt seriousness are usually full of {{narm}}.
24th Jul '17 9:04:03 PM PaulA
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* ''[[Film/ECComics The Vault of Horror]]'' (1973) : Five men wind up trapped in the basement of an office building and pass the time by recounting nightmares they've each been having in which they die to each other. Adapted from short stories from the eponymous comic series. Sequel to ''Tales from the Crypt''.

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* ''[[Film/ECComics The Vault of Horror]]'' ''Film/VaultOfHorror'' (1973) : Five men wind up find themselves trapped in the basement of an office building and pass the time by recounting nightmares they've each been having in which they die to each other. Adapted from short stories from the Creator/ECComics horror comics (although ironically none actually from the eponymous comic series. series). Sequel to ''Tales from the Crypt''.''Film/TalesFromTheCrypt''.
24th Jul '17 10:06:53 AM ultimomant
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* ''Film/Sharknado5GlobalSwarming'' (2017): The entire world is beseiged by tornadoes made of sharks, so the couple must battle them for a fifth time, and it becomes personal when their son gets sucked into a sharknado.
12th Jul '17 1:39:55 PM JulianLapostat
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Critics noted that the low-budget and limited resources often provided an avenue for film-makers to compensate by technical innovation and heavy use of style, and this meant that the old fashioned B-Movie [[MyRealDaddy is a truer ancestor]] of the modern independent film, in form, even if the latter's content, is closer to the A-Movie of old. The reverse is also true however. The [[UsefulNotes/TheBlockbusterAgeOfHollywood modern blockbuster cinema]] is A-Movie in terms of its cast and large budgets, the chastity of its storyline and aesthetic, but it is B-Movie in terms of its content (Science-Fiction, Action Movie, Superhero films) which were [[EveryoneHasStandards considered low]] even by the standards of the B-Movies (many of them being serials and usually not played as part of a Double Bill). Starting with ''Film/StarWars'', many blockbusters were, initially, derisively named "a B-movie with A-Budget" and many of these blockbusters carry the same stigma of the original BMovie but in an inverted fashion. These films actually make more money and are seen by more people in America and the world, [[AwardSnub but rarely win any awards]], compared to the under-seen OscarBait. Actual B-movies tend not to get too widely noticed these days, many of them going direct to video on VHS and later DVD-BR. They existed for a bit longer in other markets, in Hong Kong, and parts of India, but gentrification spread there eventually. Today, the style of B-Movie has come to be appreciated by some for its {{camp}} value, there have been a number of successful big-budget movies that emulate B-movie tropes and production values in a sort of AffectionateParody. In addition, there have been film-makers who seek to revive and update the old B-Movie aesthetic for what they value as its low-budget inventiveness and sincerity. The style saw a resurgence in the late 2000s as the rise of streaming video and ready access to video recording and editing made low-budget filmmaking and distribution easier than ever.

to:

Critics noted that the low-budget and limited resources often provided an avenue for film-makers to compensate by technical innovation and heavy use of style, and this meant that the old fashioned B-Movie [[MyRealDaddy is a truer ancestor]] of the modern independent film, in form, even if the latter's content, is closer to the A-Movie of old. The reverse is also true however. The [[UsefulNotes/TheBlockbusterAgeOfHollywood modern blockbuster cinema]] is A-Movie in terms of its cast and large budgets, the chastity of its storyline and aesthetic, but it is B-Movie in terms of its content (Science-Fiction, Action Movie, Superhero films) which were [[EveryoneHasStandards considered low]] even by the standards of the B-Movies (many of them being serials and usually not played as part of a Double Bill). Starting with ''Film/StarWars'', many blockbusters were, initially, derisively named "a B-movie with A-Budget" and many of these blockbusters carry the same stigma of the original BMovie but in an inverted fashion. These films actually make more money and are seen by more people in America and the world, world (whereas the original B-Movie rarely enjoyed wide-distribution compared to its A-counterpart), [[AwardSnub but rarely win any awards]], compared to the under-seen OscarBait. Actual B-movies tend not to get too widely noticed these days, many of them going direct to video on VHS and later DVD-BR. They existed for a bit longer in other markets, in Hong Kong, and parts of India, but gentrification spread there eventually. Today, the style of B-Movie has come to be appreciated by some for its {{camp}} value, there have been a number of successful big-budget movies that emulate B-movie tropes and production values in a sort of AffectionateParody. In addition, there have been film-makers who seek to revive and update the old B-Movie aesthetic for what they value as its low-budget inventiveness and sincerity. The style saw a resurgence in the late 2000s as the rise of streaming video and ready access to video recording and editing made low-budget filmmaking and distribution easier than ever.
12th Jul '17 1:36:55 PM JulianLapostat
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Some of the ground rules for B-movies date back to these early origins: they were and are produced on a limited budget with cast who are not exactly household names. While B-movies may occasionally have very well-written scripts and gripping plots, the primary goal is not art or staying power, but cheap, disposable entertainment. As such, B-movies tend to be genre pieces, in such categories as [[TheWestern western]] (by far the most popular B-genre in Hollywood's Golden Age), {{horror|Tropes}}, ScienceFiction, or {{crime|AndPunishmentSeries}}. B-movies are often heavily [[{{Troperiffic}} trope]]-[[ClicheStorm laden]], and a particularly successful one can become a [[TropeMakers trope maker]] for big-budget films in the future. During the 30's and 40's, also, B-series were often highly successful; for example, Film/AndyHardy, CharlieChan, Series/TheCiscoKid, Franchise/TheSaint, and even Franchise/SherlockHolmes (in the sequels produced by Universal).

As the studio system collapsed, beginning in the late 1940s and continuing through the 1950s, the double feature faded from profitability and, thus, the need for major studio–distributed Bs declined. On the other hand, the overall decline of the majors left room for independents with a B mentality -- Creator/AmericanInternationalPictures and Creator/RogerCorman being by far the most prominent -- to flourish. In the [[TheSixties 1960s]] and [[TheSeventies 1970s]], the term B-movie came to be synonymous with what were previously called "{{exploitation film}}s" -- low-budget [[FollowTheLeader cash-ins]] with an emphasis on sensationalism, sexuality, and gore -- and the phrase is understood in those terms to this day.

During the "Golden Age" of the B-movie in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, the films were widely distributed and screened in older cinemas colloquially called "grindhouses," supposedly because the movies would be shown over and over again, grinding down the film. Since the dawning of cable TV and home video in TheEighties, few B-movies see theatrical release, but are typically produced as [[MadeForTVMovie TV movies]] or DirectToVideo releases, or released [[WebOriginal directly over the internet]]. Creator/{{Syfy}} (formerly the Sci Fi Channel) in particular [[SyFyChannelOriginalMovie produces many original B-movies]], and ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' maintained interest in the genre throughout the '90s, with its rereleases of classic B-movies with three characters making snarky comments on the action. While many B-movies are "bad" in terms of writing and execution, some prove to be SoBadItsGood. Those that attempt seriousness are usually full of {{narm}}.

However, several B-Movies of the 1940s and 1950s, came to be VindicatedByHistory. The restrictions of TheHaysCode often focused more heavily on the A-Picture, with the B-Movie falling BeneathSuspicion, this meant that directors, paradoxically, had more freedom on a B-Movie than an A-Picture. Several films, especially FilmNoir, which today are regarded as classics were B-Movies in their day. For example, ''Detour'', by Edgar G. Ulmer, would later be cited by the likes of Creator/MartinScorsese, Creator/FrancoisTruffaut and Creator/ErrolMorris as a major masterpiece of cinema.

A lot of later movies could be called B-movies -- if not for their A-list cast and large budgets, then for their hammy acting and cheesy lines. (See ''Film/{{Krull}}'', ''Film/{{Flash Gordon|1980}}'' and the ''Film/{{Dune}}'' movie.) Starting with ''Film/StarWars'', many blockbusters were derisively named "a B-movie with a budget." Actual B-movies tend to not get too widely noticed these days, but as the style has come to be appreciated for its {{camp}} value, there have been a number of successful big-budget movies that emulate B-movie tropes and production values in a sort of AffectionateParody. The style saw a resurgence in the late 2000s as the rise of streaming video and ready access to video recording and editing made low-budget filmmaking and distribution easier than ever.

to:

Some of the ground rules for B-movies date back to these early origins: they were and are produced on a limited budget with cast who are not exactly household names. While B-movies may occasionally have very well-written scripts and gripping plots, the primary goal is not not, deliberate, art or staying power, widespread commercial success, but cheap, disposable entertainment. As such, B-movies tend to be genre pieces, in such categories as [[TheWestern western]] (by far the most popular B-genre in Hollywood's Golden Age), {{horror|Tropes}}, ScienceFiction, or {{crime|AndPunishmentSeries}}. B-movies are often heavily [[{{Troperiffic}} trope]]-[[ClicheStorm laden]], and a particularly successful one can become a [[TropeMakers trope maker]] for big-budget films in the future. During the 30's and 40's, also, B-series were often highly successful; for example, Film/AndyHardy, CharlieChan, Series/TheCiscoKid, Franchise/TheSaint, and even Franchise/SherlockHolmes (in the sequels produced by Universal).

As the studio system collapsed, beginning in the late 1940s and continuing through the 1950s, the double feature faded from profitability and, thus, the need for major studio–distributed Bs declined. On the other hand, the overall decline of the majors left room for independents with a B mentality -- Creator/AmericanInternationalPictures and Creator/RogerCorman being by far the most prominent -- to flourish. In the [[TheSixties 1960s]] and [[TheSeventies 1970s]], the term B-movie came to be synonymous with what were previously was now called "{{exploitation film}}s" -- low-budget [[FollowTheLeader cash-ins]] with an emphasis on sensationalism, sexuality, and gore -- and the phrase is understood in those terms to this day.

day. During the "Golden Age" of the B-movie in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, the films were widely distributed and screened in older cinemas colloquially called "grindhouses," supposedly because the movies would be shown over and over again, grinding down the film. Since the dawning of cable TV and home video in TheEighties, few B-movies see theatrical release, but are typically produced as [[MadeForTVMovie TV movies]] or DirectToVideo releases, or released [[WebOriginal directly over the internet]]. Creator/{{Syfy}} (formerly the Sci Fi Channel) in particular [[SyFyChannelOriginalMovie produces many original B-movies]], and ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' maintained interest in the genre throughout the '90s, with its rereleases of classic B-movies with three characters making snarky comments on the action. While many B-movies are "bad" in terms of writing and execution, some prove to be SoBadItsGood. Those that attempt seriousness are usually full of {{narm}}.

However, Having said all that, in the same period as that outlined above and much later, B-Movies came to be seen with respect and admiration by several film-critics, first [[UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave in France]], and [[UsefulNotes/TheAuteurTheory then Britain and the United States]]. Several B-Movies of the 1940s and 1950s, came to be VindicatedByHistory. The VindicatedByHistory and were embraced for their subversion of the restrictions of TheHaysCode UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode. The code often focused more heavily on the A-Picture, with A-Picture and this meant the B-Movie falling BeneathSuspicion, this fell BeneathSuspicion. This meant that directors, paradoxically, had more freedom on a B-Movie than an A-Picture. Several films, especially FilmNoir, which today are regarded as classics were B-Movies in their day. For example, ''Detour'', ''Film/{{Detour}}'', by Edgar G. Ulmer, would later be cited by the likes of Creator/MartinScorsese, Creator/FrancoisTruffaut and Creator/ErrolMorris as a major masterpiece of cinema.cinema. The likes of Creator/WilliamCastle were admired by his more high profile peers like Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/AlfredHitchcock. Hitchcock in fact took inspiration from the popularity of Castle's low-budget productions to bring ''Film/{{Psycho}}'' OutOfTheGhetto. Creator/RogerCorman likewise became celebrated for providing many aspiring film-makers entry into making Hollywood films, everyone from Creator/FrancisFordCoppola to Creator/JamesCameron. As a film-maker, Corman also made stylish film adaptations of Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's horror films as well as anti-racist films like ''The Intruder''. Indeed, Corman often insisted, as did many other B-Film-makers that they made "A-Movies on B-Budgets".

A lot of later movies could be called B-movies -- if not Critics noted that the low-budget and limited resources often provided an avenue for their A-list film-makers to compensate by technical innovation and heavy use of style, and this meant that the old fashioned B-Movie [[MyRealDaddy is a truer ancestor]] of the modern independent film, in form, even if the latter's content, is closer to the A-Movie of old. The reverse is also true however. The [[UsefulNotes/TheBlockbusterAgeOfHollywood modern blockbuster cinema]] is A-Movie in terms of its cast and large budgets, then for their hammy acting the chastity of its storyline and cheesy lines. (See ''Film/{{Krull}}'', ''Film/{{Flash Gordon|1980}}'' aesthetic, but it is B-Movie in terms of its content (Science-Fiction, Action Movie, Superhero films) which were [[EveryoneHasStandards considered low]] even by the standards of the B-Movies (many of them being serials and the ''Film/{{Dune}}'' movie.) usually not played as part of a Double Bill). Starting with ''Film/StarWars'', many blockbusters were were, initially, derisively named "a B-movie with a budget." A-Budget" and many of these blockbusters carry the same stigma of the original BMovie but in an inverted fashion. These films actually make more money and are seen by more people in America and the world, [[AwardSnub but rarely win any awards]], compared to the under-seen OscarBait. Actual B-movies tend to not to get too widely noticed these days, many of them going direct to video on VHS and later DVD-BR. They existed for a bit longer in other markets, in Hong Kong, and parts of India, but as gentrification spread there eventually. Today, the style of B-Movie has come to be appreciated by some for its {{camp}} value, there have been a number of successful big-budget movies that emulate B-movie tropes and production values in a sort of AffectionateParody. In addition, there have been film-makers who seek to revive and update the old B-Movie aesthetic for what they value as its low-budget inventiveness and sincerity. The style saw a resurgence in the late 2000s as the rise of streaming video and ready access to video recording and editing made low-budget filmmaking and distribution easier than ever.
ever.
25th Jun '17 6:03:43 AM jamespolk
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[[/index]]
* TheOtherWiki calls [[index]]''Film/{{Crossfire}}'', a 1947 murder mystery shot in three weeks for $500K, the first B-movie nominated for Best Picture.

to:

[[/index]]
* TheOtherWiki calls [[index]]''Film/{{Crossfire}}'', ''Film/{{Crossfire}}'', a 1947 murder mystery shot in three weeks for $500K, the first B-movie nominated for Best Picture.
25th Jun '17 5:07:53 AM jamespolk
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* TheOtherWiki calls ''Film/{{Crossfire}}'', a 1947 murder mystery shot in three weeks for $500K, the first B-movie nominated for Best Picture.

to:

[[/index]]
* TheOtherWiki calls ''Film/{{Crossfire}}'', [[index]]''Film/{{Crossfire}}'', a 1947 murder mystery shot in three weeks for $500K, the first B-movie nominated for Best Picture.
24th Jun '17 5:57:06 PM jamespolk
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* ''Detour'' (1945): Directed by Edgar G. Ulmer, the "B" director who gave the world ''Film/TheBlackCat'', this Poverty Row piece is considered by some to be the first true FilmNoir. Sadly, for leading man Tom Neal, the film would prove a case of LifeImitatesArt. In a further oddity, the 1992 remake starred Neal's son, Tom Neal Jr.

to:

* ''Detour'' ''Film/{{Detour}}'' (1945): Directed by Edgar G. Ulmer, the "B" director who gave the world ''Film/TheBlackCat'', this Poverty Row piece is considered by some to be the first true FilmNoir. Sadly, for leading man Tom Neal, the film would prove a case of LifeImitatesArt. In a further oddity, the 1992 remake starred Neal's son, Tom Neal Jr.
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