History Main / AutomatedAutomobiles

15th Oct '17 1:02:21 PM Discar
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-->-- ''Manga/ExcelSaga'', volume 5.

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-->-- ''Manga/ExcelSaga'', volume 5.
5



-->-- ''"I can remember when there wasn't an automobile in the world with brains enough to find its own way home. I chauffeured dead lumps of machines that needed a man's hand at their controls every minute. Every year machines like that used to kill tens of thousands of people. The automatics fixed that. A positronic brain can react much faster than a human one, of course, and it paid people to keep hands off the controls. You got in, punched your destination and let it go its own way. We take it for granted now, but I remember when the first laws came out forcing the old machines off the highways and limiting travel to automatics. Lord, what a fuss. They called it everything from communism to fascism, but it emptied the highways and stopped the killing, and still more people get around more easily the new way. Of course, the automatics were ten to a hundred times as expensive as the hand-driven ones, and there weren't many that could afford a private vehicle. The industry specialized in turning out omnibus-automatics. You could always call a company and have one stop at your door in a matter of minutes and take you where you wanted to go. Usually, you had to drive with others who were going your way, but what's wrong with that?"''

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-->-- ''"I -->I can remember when there wasn't an automobile in the world with brains enough to find its own way home. I chauffeured dead lumps of machines that needed a man's hand at their controls every minute. Every year machines like that used to kill tens of thousands of people. The automatics fixed that. A positronic brain can react much faster than a human one, of course, and it paid people to keep hands off the controls. You got in, punched your destination and let it go its own way. We take it for granted now, but I remember when the first laws came out forcing the old machines off the highways and limiting travel to automatics. Lord, what a fuss. They called it everything from communism to fascism, but it emptied the highways and stopped the killing, and still more people get around more easily the new way. Of course, the automatics were ten to a hundred times as expensive as the hand-driven ones, and there weren't many that could afford a private vehicle. The industry specialized in turning out omnibus-automatics. You could always call a company and have one stop at your door in a matter of minutes and take you where you wanted to go. Usually, you had to drive with others who were going your way, but what's wrong with that?"''that?
15th Oct '17 12:58:05 PM Discar
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--> You know those signs that say "don't putz around with this system -- serious injury or death could result?" Well, they were talking about YOUR death, and it is now resulting.

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--> ---> You know those signs that say "don't putz around with this system -- serious injury or death could result?" Well, they were talking about YOUR death, and it is now resulting.resulting.
** Later, Kathryn is annoyed that her [[LeParkour Parkata Urbatsu]] training is useless when she tries to fly through traffic, since all the cars are programmed to avoid collisions, and won't let her use them as jumping-off points. Schlock, on the other hand, notes that they are actually programmed to ''prevent injuries'', and is able to steal a van by jumping into traffic without a flight suit.
--->'''Schlock:''' The van swooped under me and carried me off, so it's more like ''it'' stole ''me''.
28th Jun '17 6:03:37 PM Antigone3
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* Technology like this appears to exist in ''Literature/HonorHarrington''. When investigating a character's death by aircar collision, the examiners have a discussion which implies that it's the standard mode for aircars, at least in Haven, and that switching over to manual mode requires the user to pass a blood-alcohol test. Of course, the books also make a side-mention that Havenites routinely [[FailSafeFailure tamper with the built-in blood-alcohol testing equipment.]]

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* Technology like this appears to exist This technology exists in ''Literature/HonorHarrington''.the [[Literature/HonorHarrington Honorverse]]. When investigating a character's death by aircar collision, the examiners have a discussion which implies that it's the standard mode for aircars, at least in Haven, and that switching over to manual mode requires the user to pass a blood-alcohol test. Of course, the books also make a side-mention that Havenites routinely [[FailSafeFailure tamper with the built-in blood-alcohol testing equipment.]]]]
** Mesa, judging by some scenes in ''Cauldron of Ghosts'', has very tight regulations on when you can switch your car from the onboard [[ArtificialIntelligence A.I.]] to manual control.
28th Jun '17 12:19:28 PM greshnak
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* The genesis of everything ''Killdozer'' is based on Theodore Sturgeon's as-titled novella. A driller bulldozer unearths an ancient spirit, possessing it beyond usability; such that it becomes a half sentient human only killing machine.
* Kathleen Ann Goonan provides the, if only briefly, driverless taxis of a post-2034 China in ''The Bones of Time''.



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24th May '17 7:30:44 PM PaulA
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* In Creator/HarryHarrison's ''Homeworld'' (the first novel of the ''To the Stars'' trilogy), cars of the upper classes in most of the developed world can drive themselves provided they're on roads that have special wires under them. At the beginning of the novel, the protagonist is coming home from an inspection of a factory in another city. Upset, he gets drunk and then tries to drive. The car "smells" alcohol and refuses to allow him to drive manually until he's almost home. Later on, when he's trying to find out how the lower classes live in this 1984-esque world, he has to leave his car a few blocks away from the end of the "wire" territory, so as not to arouse [[StateSec Security's]] suspicions. When Security later decides to arrest him, they shut down his car by remote control -- he forces the doors to open by lighting a fire inside, tripping the safety mechanisms.

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* In Creator/HarryHarrison's ''Homeworld'' (the first novel of the ''To the Stars'' trilogy), ''Literature/{{Homeworld}}'', cars of the upper classes in most of the developed world can drive themselves provided they're on roads that have special wires under them. At the beginning of the novel, the protagonist is coming home from an inspection of a factory in another city. Upset, he gets drunk and then tries to drive. The car "smells" alcohol and refuses to allow him to drive manually until he's almost home. Later on, when he's trying to find out how the lower classes live in this 1984-esque world, he has to leave his car a few blocks away from the end of the "wire" territory, so as not to arouse [[StateSec Security's]] suspicions. When Security later decides to arrest him, they shut down his car by remote control -- he forces the doors to open by lighting a fire inside, tripping the safety mechanisms.
19th Mar '17 3:41:03 AM shadowbeast
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* ''ComicBook/WackyRaceland'', DC's post-apocalyptic reboot of the ''WesternAnimation/WackyRaces'', has the racers' cars issued with AIs that are as surly and sour as their crews: all hard, grizzled veterans of the wasteland. In one issue they are parked outside a bush pub where their crews are drinking, and... indulging in less healthy chemical stimulations (willingly or not), while talking smack and dealing with wasteland critters. A six-legged mutant lizard jumps up and urinates on the Mean Machine, which fries it alive.

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* ''ComicBook/WackyRaceland'', DC's post-apocalyptic reboot of the ''WesternAnimation/WackyRaces'', has the racers' cars issued with AIs that are as surly and sour as their crews: all hard, grizzled veterans of the wasteland. In one issue they are parked outside a bush pub where their crews are drinking, and... indulging in less healthy chemical stimulations (willingly or not), while talking smack and dealing with wasteland critters. A six-legged An eight-legged mutant lizard jumps up and urinates on the Mean Machine, which fries it alive.
19th Mar '17 3:36:16 AM shadowbeast
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* ''ComicBook/WackyRaceland'', DC's post-apocalyptic reboot of the ''WesternAnimation/WackyRaces'', has the racers' cars issued with AIs that are as surly and sour as their crews, all hard, grizzled veterans of the wasteland. In one issue they are parked outside a bush pub where their crews are drinking, and... indulging in less healthy chemical stimulations (willingly or not), while talking smack and dealing with wasteland critters. A six-legged mutant lizard jumps up and urinates on the Mean Machine, which fries it alive.

to:

* ''ComicBook/WackyRaceland'', DC's post-apocalyptic reboot of the ''WesternAnimation/WackyRaces'', has the racers' cars issued with AIs that are as surly and sour as their crews, crews: all hard, grizzled veterans of the wasteland. In one issue they are parked outside a bush pub where their crews are drinking, and... indulging in less healthy chemical stimulations (willingly or not), while talking smack and dealing with wasteland critters. A six-legged mutant lizard jumps up and urinates on the Mean Machine, which fries it alive.
19th Mar '17 1:52:44 AM shadowbeast
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Added DiffLines:

--->''The other cars point and laugh''
19th Mar '17 1:49:49 AM shadowbeast
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Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/WackyRaceland'', DC's post-apocalyptic reboot of the ''WesternAnimation/WackyRaces'', has the racers' cars issued with AIs that are as surly and sour as their crews, all hard, grizzled veterans of the wasteland. In one issue they are parked outside a bush pub where their crews are drinking, and... indulging in less healthy chemical stimulations (willingly or not), while talking smack and dealing with wasteland critters. A six-legged mutant lizard jumps up and urinates on the Mean Machine, which fries it alive.
--->'''Mean Machine''': I've got to put up with a driver who gets me trashed in every single race and a biomechanical dog who wipes his wormy tailpipe on my seats on a daily basis. I sure as hell don't have to take crap from an eight-legged lizard.
--->'''Convert-O-Car''': Technically, that was urine.
--->''A drunk vomits on the Mean Machine''
--->'''Mean Machine''': Hey!
12th Mar '17 1:51:32 AM Doug86
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* The automated 18-wheelers in Solar Crisis. They put a motorcycle on the road to try to stop one and the truck just runs right over it, but when one of them stands out in the path of the next one that comes along, this truck does stop. The truck has a fail-safe to prevent it from running over people.

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* The automated 18-wheelers in Solar Crisis.''Solar Crisis''. They put a motorcycle on the road to try to stop one and the truck just runs right over it, but when one of them stands out in the path of the next one that comes along, this truck does stop. The truck has a fail-safe to prevent it from running over people.



* In a future presented in Hot Tub Time Machine 2, all cars are automated smart cars, no one owns one anymore and they always seem to know when to pick someone up who needs a drive. They're generally respected because their onboard AIs get a little vengeful when mistreated.

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* In a future presented in Hot Tub Time Machine 2, ''Film/HotTubTimeMachine 2'', all cars are automated smart cars, no one owns one anymore and they always seem to know when to pick someone up who needs a drive. They're generally respected because their onboard AIs [=AIs=] get a little vengeful when mistreated.



* In the sci-fi novel (part of the NightsDawn trilogy) by Peter F. Hamilton ''The Neutronium Alchemist'', the intelligence agents pursuing Dr Alkad Mzu have to switch to manual driving when the electronic-warfare abilities of the possessed glitch their vehicles.
* ''The Dream Master'' by RogerZelazny takes this to an extreme, with people joyriding in the things by repeatedly changing the destination before they arrive, sometimes with the windows blacked out.
** In one case a ''seeing eye dog'' made use of one, when going to get help for his mistress from the titular character.

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* In the sci-fi novel (part of the NightsDawn trilogy) Literature/TheNightsDawnTrilogy) by Peter F. Hamilton ''The Neutronium Alchemist'', the intelligence agents pursuing Dr Alkad Mzu have to switch to manual driving when the electronic-warfare abilities of the possessed glitch their vehicles.
* ''The Dream Master'' by RogerZelazny Creator/RogerZelazny takes this to an extreme, with people joyriding in the things by repeatedly changing the destination before they arrive, sometimes with the windows blacked out.
** In one case a ''seeing eye dog'' made use of one, when going to get help for his mistress from the titular character.



* These had just been invented in ''{{Remnants}}'' when [[KillEmAll the rock hit]]. It mentions that the legal driving age was reduced to twelve if you're driving an automated car.

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* These had just been invented in ''{{Remnants}}'' ''Literature/{{Remnants}}'' when [[KillEmAll the rock hit]]. It mentions that the legal driving age was reduced to twelve if you're driving an automated car.



* In Creator/StephenBaxter's ''Manifold'' series, "[=SmartDrive=]" automated cars is a recurring mention, pioneered some time in the early [=2020s=]. In ''Literature/ManifoldTime'', the [=SmartDrive=] is only shown activated when Emma is driving through Death Valley at over 100 miles per hour.
* ''Literature/ChakonaSpace'': This type of vehicle is routinely seen in this 'Verse. One story discusses the advantages. One article discusses the development of these vehicles. The same article also discusses the in-universe fiction centered on these vehicles.

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* In Creator/StephenBaxter's ''Manifold'' series, "[=SmartDrive=]" automated cars is a recurring mention, pioneered some time in the early [=2020s=]. In ''Literature/ManifoldTime'', the [=SmartDrive=] is only shown activated when Emma is driving through Death Valley at over 100 miles per hour.
hour.
* ''Literature/ChakonaSpace'': This type of vehicle is routinely seen in this 'Verse. One story discusses the advantages. One article discusses the development of these vehicles. The same article also discusses the in-universe fiction centered on these vehicles.



* On ''TopGear'', Jeremy supervises an fully automated BMW 330i after it has "learned" the test track, noting that if you really want to terrify yourself, the automation system can be fitted on an M3.

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* On ''TopGear'', ''Series/TopGear'', Jeremy supervises an a fully automated BMW 330i after it has "learned" the test track, noting that if you really want to terrify yourself, the automation system can be fitted on an M3.



* Downplayed in ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40K'': the Imperium doesn't use AI ever since a RobotUprising millennia ago, so instead they use servitors, lobotomized humans with various cybernetic replacement body parts, who function more or less as autopilots. There's also the question of Machine Spirits, which range from simple automatic systems to full-on sentient entities (one Land Raider went berserk after its entire crew was killed and brutally avenged them) DependingOnTheWriter.

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* Downplayed in ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40K'': ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': the Imperium doesn't use AI ever since a RobotUprising millennia ago, so instead they use servitors, lobotomized humans with various cybernetic replacement body parts, who function more or less as autopilots. There's also the question of Machine Spirits, which range from simple automatic systems to full-on sentient entities (one Land Raider went berserk after its entire crew was killed and brutally avenged them) DependingOnTheWriter.



* In ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', automated automobiles are the norm, and AIs are easily advanced enough to drive them. In fact, manual driving under influences is a crime punishable by death, as discussed [[http://www.schlockmercenary.com/2002-08-29 here]].

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* In ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', automated automobiles are the norm, and AIs [=AIs=] are easily advanced enough to drive them. In fact, manual driving under influences is a crime punishable by death, as discussed [[http://www.schlockmercenary.com/2002-08-29 here]].



--->'''Carl''': [[CrowningMomentOfFunny One of those]] ''[[TakeThat American]]'' [[CrowningMomentOfFunny robot cars]]!

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--->'''Carl''': [[CrowningMomentOfFunny [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments One of those]] ''[[TakeThat American]]'' [[CrowningMomentOfFunny [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments robot cars]]!



* The the "Car Trouble" episode of ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'', there is a self-driving car named '''S'''ystemized '''A'''utomotive '''D'''riving '''I'''ntelligence, or "Sadie".

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* The the "Car Trouble" episode of ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'', there is a self-driving car named '''S'''ystemized '''A'''utomotive '''D'''riving '''I'''ntelligence, or "Sadie".



--> IT'S 8 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008, and you are headed for a business appointment 300 miles away. You slide into your [[CoolCar sleek, two-passenger air-cushion car]], press a [[BillionsOfButtons sequence of buttons]] and the national traffic computer [[BigBrotherIsWatching notes your destination]], figures out the current traffic situation and signals your car to slide out of the garage. Hands free, you sit back and begin to read the morning paperówhich is flashed on a flat TV screen over the carís dashboard. Tapping a button changes the page.
--> The car accelerates to 150 mph in the city's suburbs, then hits 250 mph in less built-up areas, gliding over the smooth plastic road. You whizz past a string of cities, many of them [[DomedHometown covered by the new domes]] that keep them evenly climatized year round. Traffic is heavy, typically, but there's [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong no need to worry]]. The [[MasterComputer traffic computer]], which feeds and receives signals to and from all cars in transit between cities, keeps vehicles at least 50 yds. apart. There [[FinaglesLaw hasnít been an accident since the system was inaugurated]].

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--> IT'S 8 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008, and you are headed for a business appointment 300 miles away. You slide into your [[CoolCar sleek, two-passenger air-cushion car]], press a [[BillionsOfButtons sequence of buttons]] and the national traffic computer [[BigBrotherIsWatching notes your destination]], figures out the current traffic situation and signals your car to slide out of the garage. Hands free, you sit back and begin to read the morning paperówhich is flashed on a flat TV screen over the carís car's dashboard. Tapping a button changes the page.
--> The car accelerates to 150 mph in the city's suburbs, then hits 250 mph in less built-up areas, gliding over the smooth plastic road. You whizz past a string of cities, many of them [[DomedHometown covered by the new domes]] that keep them evenly climatized year round. Traffic is heavy, typically, but there's [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong no need to worry]]. The [[MasterComputer traffic computer]], which feeds and receives signals to and from all cars in transit between cities, keeps vehicles at least 50 yds. yards apart. There [[FinaglesLaw hasnít hasn't been an accident since the system was inaugurated]].
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