History Main / AuthorVocabularyCalendar

13th Jul '17 1:52:49 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Creator/GaryGygax put a noticeable stamp on the first edition ''Advanced TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' books. "Dweomer," "geas" and "weal" win for obscurity; "notwithstanding" for frequency. Also "former" and "latter." He also loved (i.e., used all the time) Latin abbreviations (e.g., e.g. and i.e.), even really academic ones, (e.g., Ibid. and Op. cit.) placed in ordinary text (Ibid.) The first edition Dungeon Master's Guide is full of these. Most memorable: referring a built-in ability to swim as "innate natatorial ability". The Prostitute Table in the City appendix has about a dozen different synonyms for prostitute (trollop, streetwalker, etc.)

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* TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons
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Creator/GaryGygax put a noticeable stamp on the first edition ''Advanced TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' Dungeons and Dragons'' books. "Dweomer," "geas" and "weal" win for obscurity; "notwithstanding" for frequency. Also "former" and "latter." He also loved (i.e., used all the time) Latin abbreviations (e.g., e.g. and i.e.), even really academic ones, (e.g., Ibid. and Op. cit.) placed in ordinary text (Ibid.) The first edition Dungeon Master's Guide is full of these. Most memorable: memorable is referring to a built-in natural ability to swim as "innate natatorial ability". The Prostitute Table in the City appendix Appendix has about a dozen different synonyms for prostitute (trollop, streetwalker, etc.)



** The retroclone ‘‘Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea'' (based directly on the edition above) also suffers heavily from this. It uses the same obscure abbreviations (q.v.), british spelling, the archaic Old English ligture æ even in places where it makes no sense, and the author apparently used search and replace to replace every instance of "between" with "betwixt". And it's especially jarring because the rest of the text is otherwise obvious modern American English.

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** The retroclone ‘‘Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea'' (based directly on the edition above) 2nd Edition but published in 2012) also suffers (or indulges) heavily from this. It uses the same obscure abbreviations (q.v.), british British spelling, the archaic Old English ligture æ even in places where it makes no sense, and the author apparently used search and replace to replace every instance of "between" with "betwixt". And it's especially jarring because the rest of the text is otherwise obvious modern American English. This might all be a play on the original book's style.
11th Jun '17 12:13:39 PM nombretomado
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* {{Wikipedia}} falls victim to it occasionally, too. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=2002_in_baseball&oldid=461531847#May See here,]] with the word "calcimine". This is common enough with some words that ''xkcd'' [[http://xkcd.com/739/ made fun of it.]]

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* {{Wikipedia}} Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} falls victim to it occasionally, too. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=2002_in_baseball&oldid=461531847#May See here,]] with the word "calcimine". This is common enough with some words that ''xkcd'' [[http://xkcd.com/739/ made fun of it.]]
29th Apr '17 10:58:27 AM nombretomado
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* TimothyZahn likes to refer to conversations as " 'words' Character said to ''the other''". He is also a fan of the PunctuationShaker for alien names.

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* TimothyZahn Creator/TimothyZahn likes to refer to conversations as " 'words' Character said to ''the other''". He is also a fan of the PunctuationShaker for alien names.
18th Jan '17 10:08:04 AM Ezclee4050
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* Music/BobbyBrown's "My Prerogative". The joke was that he'd just learned the word and was using it to impress people.
* "Two Story House" by Music/GeorgeJones and Tammy Wynette. The way Jones sings the word "splendor" in the chorus makes it sound like he wasn't too familiar with that word.
10th Jan '17 10:59:57 AM eleanorofaquitaine
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* Creator/LeoTolstoy uses "handsome" to describe many characters in "Literature/WarandPeace."
2nd Jan '17 2:53:21 PM Twiddler
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* Diane Castle of the Literature/WhateleyUniverse trots out some new vocab in every Phase novel. Since when does a fourteen year old use the word 'propaedeutic' or 'fictile'?
** Since said fourteen year old has an eidetic memory, the best schooling his billionaire parents could buy, a need to appear mature and intelligent among businessmen and politicians, and a personal preference for sounding smarter than those he's talking to. Note that Ms. Castle only uses words like that when writing from Phase's perspective, dropping back to a more normal vocabulary when writing as Aquerna or other more normal teenagers.

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* Diane Castle of the Literature/WhateleyUniverse trots out some new vocab in every Phase novel. Since when does a fourteen year old use the word 'propaedeutic' or 'fictile'?
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'fictile'? Since said fourteen year old has an eidetic memory, the best schooling his billionaire parents could buy, a need to appear mature and intelligent among businessmen and politicians, and a personal preference for sounding smarter than those he's talking to. Note that Ms. Castle only uses words like that when writing from Phase's perspective, dropping back to a more normal vocabulary when writing as Aquerna or other more normal teenagers.
30th Nov '16 10:56:14 PM lucy24
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* Creator/GeorgeRRMartin has a thing for using the word song in book titles. His novel series is called ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', and his other works include ''A Song for Lya'', ''Songs of Stars and Shadows'', and ''Songs Dead Men Sing''. Not to mention two story collections he edited, ''Songs of The Dying Earth'' and ''Songs of Love and Death''.

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* Creator/GeorgeRRMartin has a thing for using the word song “song” in book titles. His novel series is called ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', and his other works include ''A Song for Lya'', ''Songs of Stars and Shadows'', and ''Songs Dead Men Sing''. Not to mention two story collections he edited, ''Songs of The Dying Earth'' and ''Songs of Love and Death''.
4th Oct '16 7:20:24 AM Morgenthaler
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* [[Literature/InheritanceCycle Christopher Paolini]] has this habit when he writes: characters, many of whom do not have any sort of formal education (or are even downright illiterate), strangely have college level vocabularies, even when their status or profession would have them calling something differently. In text, he'll often pull a [[{{Scrabble}} 25 point word]] from nowhere because, while he could have used several smaller words, or different ones altogether, he just ''had'' to use that big one, even if it chunks up the sentence, ruins the flow, and really has no place being there among such other common words.

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* [[Literature/InheritanceCycle Christopher Paolini]] has this habit when he writes: characters, many of whom do not have any sort of formal education (or are even downright illiterate), strangely have college level vocabularies, even when their status or profession would have them calling something differently. In text, he'll often pull a [[{{Scrabble}} [[TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}} 25 point word]] from nowhere because, while he could have used several smaller words, or different ones altogether, he just ''had'' to use that big one, even if it chunks up the sentence, ruins the flow, and really has no place being there among such other common words.
2nd Oct '16 10:47:10 AM nombretomado
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* Ever notice that EdgarAllanPoe seems to like the word "arabesque"? Also "singular"

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* Ever notice that EdgarAllanPoe Creator/EdgarAllanPoe seems to like the word "arabesque"? Also "singular"
4th Sep '16 9:09:50 AM jakobitis
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* Bernard Cornwell, in the {{Sharpe}} series and elsewhere, likes using the word "flensed" in the context of battle wounds.

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* Bernard Cornwell, in the {{Sharpe}} series and elsewhere, likes using the word "flensed" in the context of battle wounds. Those who suffer said wounds frequently 'mew' instead of the more common whimpering, groaning etc.
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