History Main / AuthorVocabularyCalendar

16th Oct '17 4:56:25 AM PetroleumJerry
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* Creator/NealStephenson characters have a thing for referring to Japanese people as Nipponese. "Nippon" is a more accurate English translation of the country's name, but it's not nearly as popular a term as Stephenson's writing makes it appear. The word also gets discussed a few times. A character in ''Literature/SnowCrash'' corrects another character's incorrect usage of the slur "nip," which is taken from the word Nipponese. In another book, a character notes that the Colonel's use of the word "jap" instead of "nip" indicated that he did not serve in Asia.

to:

* Creator/NealStephenson characters have a thing for referring to Japanese people as Nipponese. "Nippon" is a more accurate English translation of the country's name, but it's not nearly as popular a term as Stephenson's writing makes it appear. The word also gets discussed a few times. A character in ''Literature/SnowCrash'' corrects another character's incorrect usage of the slur "nip," which is taken from the word Nipponese. In another book, ''[[Literature/CryptoNomicon Cryptonomicon]]'', a character notes that the Colonel's use of the word "jap" instead of "nip" indicated that he did not serve in Asia.
4th Oct '17 9:29:07 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* Creator/DavidEddings had an obscurely peculiar fascination with the words "obscure," "peculiar," and "fascination." Also "prosaic", and don't even get me started on how many times a character will say something "blandly".
** Also seem to have abruptly discovered, and fallen in love with, the word "genuflect" during the writing of ''Polgara the Sorceress''.
* [[Literature/InheritanceCycle Christopher Paolini]] has this habit when he writes: characters, many of whom do not have any sort of formal education (or are even downright illiterate), strangely have college level vocabularies, even when their status or profession would have them calling something differently. In text, he'll often pull a [[TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}} 25 point word]] from nowhere because, while he could have used several smaller words, or different ones altogether, he just ''had'' to use that big one, even if it chunks up the sentence, ruins the flow, and really has no place being there among such other common words.
** Nobody ever camps out--they "bivouac." (It isn't even used correctly half the time, as "bivouac" refers to a strictly no-tents-no-nothing military operation and not just setting up bedrolls and a fire in the woods.)
** He also has a tendency to use words that seriously clash with the Tolkienesque fantasy setting, such as parachuting obviously ''modern'' words like "psychedelic" into the middle of a passable imitation-KJV spiel.
** Christopher Paolini basically does this ''in spades''. It's like every ''character'' has a Vocabulary Calendar…and no one in-universe seems to notice how bizarre it is. The [[OurElvesAreBetter most excusably eloquent creatures in the world]] even tell the farmboy that his mastery of the elusive and ancient magical language is "perfect" after only a few months' practice ''of being literate''. Not to mention the rough draft of his apparent anachronistic invention of quasi-autobiographical, modern free-verse poetry.

to:

* Creator/DavidEddings had an obscurely peculiar fascination with the words "obscure," "peculiar," and "fascination." Also "prosaic", and don't even get me started on how many times a character will say something "blandly".
** Also
"blandly". He also seem to have abruptly discovered, and fallen in love with, the word "genuflect" during the writing of ''Polgara the Sorceress''.
* [[Literature/InheritanceCycle Christopher Paolini]] has this habit when he writes: characters, many of whom do not have any sort of formal education (or are even downright illiterate), strangely have college level vocabularies, even when their status or profession would have them calling something differently. In text, he'll often pull a [[TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}} 25 point word]] from nowhere because, while he could have used several smaller words, or different ones altogether, he just ''had'' to use that big one, even if it chunks up the sentence, ruins the flow, and really has no place being there among such other common words.
**
Paolini's ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'': Nobody ever camps out--they "bivouac." (It isn't even used correctly half the time, as "bivouac" refers to a strictly no-tents-no-nothing military operation and not just setting up bedrolls and a fire in the woods.)
** He also has a tendency to use words that seriously clash with the Tolkienesque fantasy setting, such as parachuting obviously ''modern'' words like "psychedelic" into the middle of a passable imitation-KJV spiel.
** Christopher Paolini basically does this ''in spades''. It's like every ''character'' has a Vocabulary Calendar…and no one in-universe seems to notice how bizarre it is. The [[OurElvesAreBetter most excusably eloquent creatures in the world]] even tell the farmboy that his mastery of the elusive and ancient magical language is "perfect" after only a few months' practice ''of being literate''. Not to mention the rough draft of his apparent anachronistic invention of quasi-autobiographical, modern free-verse poetry.
)



* Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''Literature/{{Timeline 191}}'' does this with a made-up word ("flabble", roughly synonymous with "whine") that was eventually invented and popularized in the alternate America of the series.

to:

* Creator/HarryTurtledove's Creator/HarryTurtledove
**
''Literature/{{Timeline 191}}'' does this with a made-up word ("flabble", roughly synonymous with "whine") that was eventually invented and popularized in the alternate America of the series.



* In the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse, we have Troy Denning's "efflux"

to:

* In the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse, we have Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse:
**
Troy Denning's "efflux"



** "Singular" is also very common in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'' mysteries. It's usage borders on OnceAnEpisode.

to:

** "Singular" is also very common in * Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'' mysteries. It's usage borders on mysteries seem to use "singular" OnceAnEpisode.



* ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'' stories get a lot of miles out of "lithe" and "supple." And you can always identify the titular barbarian: he's the one who's described as "bronzed" and "tigerish" (or "wolfish") with eyes like "balefire."
** Creator/RobertEHoward was rather fond of "dynamic" as a heroic adjective.
%%** Don't forget his "mighty thews".

to:

* Creator/RobertEHoward's ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'' stories get a lot of miles out of "lithe" and "supple." And you can always identify the titular barbarian: he's the one who's described as "bronzed" and "tigerish" (or "wolfish") with eyes like "balefire."
** Creator/RobertEHoward
" was rather fond of "dynamic" as a heroic adjective.
%%** Don't forget his
adjective. There's also the hero's "mighty thews".thews."



* Creator/IsaacAsimov seems to really like the word "sardonic".
* Creator/TimothyZahn likes to refer to conversations as " 'words' Character said to ''the other''". He is also a fan of the PunctuationShaker for alien names.
* [[Literature/ArtemisFowl Orion Fowl]] seems to have a thing about bivouacs. (A RunningGag?)

to:

* Creator/IsaacAsimov seems to really like the word "sardonic".
"sardonic."
* Creator/TimothyZahn likes to refer to conversations as " 'words' Character said to ''the other''". He is also a fan of the PunctuationShaker for alien names.\n
* [[Literature/ArtemisFowl ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'': Orion Fowl]] Fowl seems to have a thing about bivouacs. (A RunningGag?)



* The Literature/CiaphasCain book ''Duty Calls'' may create an allergy to the word "scuttling" (as in "scuttling horrors", "scuttling movement", "scuttling noises" and everything else related to Tyranids) in its readers.

to:

* The Literature/CiaphasCain book ''Duty Calls'' may Calls'':
** May
create an allergy to the word "scuttling" (as in "scuttling horrors", "scuttling movement", "scuttling noises" and everything else related to Tyranids) in its readers.



* Creator/GeorgeRRMartin has a thing for using the word “song” in book titles. His novel series is called ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', and his other works include ''A Song for Lya'', ''Songs of Stars and Shadows'', and ''Songs Dead Men Sing''. Not to mention two story collections he edited, ''Songs of The Dying Earth'' and ''Songs of Love and Death''.
** It comes up within ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' as well. Turnips and the use of "jape" (occasionally "jest") instead of "joke" stand out most in the latest novel. It's not always clear whether they are deliberate attempts to get a more old-fashioned feeling for his medieval-esque world, or this trope.

to:

* Creator/GeorgeRRMartin Creator/GeorgeRRMartin
** He
has a thing for using the word “song” in book titles. His novel series is called ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', and his other works include ''A Song for Lya'', ''Songs of Stars and Shadows'', and ''Songs Dead Men Sing''. Not to mention two story collections he edited, ''Songs of The Dying Earth'' and ''Songs of Love and Death''.
** It comes up within ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' as well. Turnips and the use of "jape" (occasionally "jest") instead of "joke" stand out most in the latest novel.stands out. It's not always clear whether they are deliberate attempts to get a more old-fashioned feeling for his medieval-esque world, or this trope.



* [[Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen Steven Erikson]] seems to have his seasonal favourite words from book to book, though 'potsherds', 'detritus', 'must needs', 'efficacy', 'desiccated', 'burgeoning' and 'pate' (nobody has a scalp, only pates) span the entire length of his main series. 'Egregious' pops up quite a lot in ''Literature/TollTheHounds'', and other words of the season include 'equity', 'mien', 'sunder/asunder', 'lass', 'misshapen', 'febrile', 'billowing', 'gelid', 'crepuscular', 'singular', 'despond' and 'hoary'. And characters have the tendency to growl, drawl and scamper about instead of talking and walking.

to:

* [[Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'': Steven Erikson]] Erikson seems to have his seasonal favourite words from book to book, though 'potsherds', 'detritus', 'must needs', 'efficacy', 'desiccated', 'burgeoning' and 'pate' (nobody has a scalp, only pates) span the entire length of his main series. 'Egregious' pops up quite a lot in ''Literature/TollTheHounds'', and other words of the season include 'equity', 'mien', 'sunder/asunder', 'lass', 'misshapen', 'febrile', 'billowing', 'gelid', 'crepuscular', 'singular', 'despond' and 'hoary'. And characters have the tendency to growl, drawl and scamper about instead of talking and walking.



* R. Scott Bakker's ''Literature/SecondApocalypse:

to:

* R. Scott Bakker's ''Literature/SecondApocalypse: ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'':



** Creator/GaryGygax put a noticeable stamp on the first edition ''Advanced Dungeons and Dragons'' books. "Dweomer," "geas" and "weal" win for obscurity; "notwithstanding" for frequency. Also "former" and "latter." He also loved (i.e., used all the time) Latin abbreviations (e.g., e.g. and i.e.), even really academic ones, (e.g., Ibid. and Op. cit.) placed in ordinary text (Ibid.) The first edition Dungeon Master's Guide is full of these. Most memorable is referring to a natural ability to swim as "innate natatorial ability". The Prostitute Table in the City Appendix has about a dozen different synonyms for prostitute (trollop, streetwalker, etc.)

to:

** Creator/GaryGygax put a noticeable stamp on the first edition ''Advanced Dungeons and Dragons'' books. "Dweomer," "geas" and "weal" win for obscurity; "notwithstanding" for frequency. Also "former" and "latter." He also loved (i.e., used all the time) Latin abbreviations (e.g., e.g. and i.e.), even really academic ones, (e.g., Ibid. and Op. cit.) placed in ordinary text (Ibid.) The first edition Dungeon Master's Guide is full of these. Most memorable is referring to a natural ability to swim as "innate natatorial ability". The Prostitute Table in the City Appendix has about a dozen different synonyms for prostitute (trollop, streetwalker, etc.)



** The retroclone ‘‘Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea'' (based on 2nd Edition but published in 2012) also suffers (or indulges) heavily from this. It uses the same obscure abbreviations (q.v.), British spelling, the archaic Old English ligture æ even in places where it makes no sense, and the author apparently used search and replace to replace every instance of "between" with "betwixt". And it's especially jarring because the rest of the text is otherwise obvious modern American English. This might all be a play on the original book's style.

to:

** The retroclone ‘‘Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea'' (based on 2nd Edition but published in 2012) also suffers (or indulges) heavily from this. It uses the same obscure abbreviations (q.v.), British spelling, the archaic Old English ligture æ even in places where it makes no sense, and the author apparently used search and replace to replace every instance of "between" with "betwixt". And it's especially jarring because the rest of the text is otherwise obvious modern American English. This might all be a play on the original book's style.
4th Oct '17 9:13:09 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** "Hooked," used abstractly as a verb and adjective to describe something clinging in a violent or unpleasant way, such as muscle on a creature's physique, a or smile on a mouth.

to:

** "Hooked," used abstractly as a verb and adjective to describe something clinging in a violent or unpleasant way, such as muscle on a creature's physique, a or a smile on a mouth.face.
4th Oct '17 9:09:26 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* [[Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen Steven Erikson]] seems to have his seasonal favourite words from book to book, though 'potsherds', 'detritus', 'must needs', 'efficacy', 'desiccated', 'burgeoning' and 'pate' (nobody has a scalp, only pates) span the entire length of his main series.
** 'Egregious' pops up quite a lot in ''Literature/TollTheHounds'', and other words of the season include 'equity', 'mien', 'sunder/asunder', 'lass', 'misshapen', 'febrile', 'billowing', 'gelid', 'crepuscular', 'singular', 'despond' and 'hoary'. And characters have the tendency to growl, drawl and scamper about instead of talking and walking.

to:

* [[Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen Steven Erikson]] seems to have his seasonal favourite words from book to book, though 'potsherds', 'detritus', 'must needs', 'efficacy', 'desiccated', 'burgeoning' and 'pate' (nobody has a scalp, only pates) span the entire length of his main series.
**
series. 'Egregious' pops up quite a lot in ''Literature/TollTheHounds'', and other words of the season include 'equity', 'mien', 'sunder/asunder', 'lass', 'misshapen', 'febrile', 'billowing', 'gelid', 'crepuscular', 'singular', 'despond' and 'hoary'. And characters have the tendency to growl, drawl and scamper about instead of talking and walking.



* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse: R. Scott Bakker likes using the word "marmoreal" a whole lot. It crops up maybe ten times a book, particularly because many scenes are set in marble palaces, catacombs or ruins.

to:

* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse: R. Scott Bakker likes using the word "marmoreal" a whole lot. It Bakker's ''Literature/SecondApocalypse:
** "Marmoreal"
crops up maybe ten times a book, particularly because many scenes are set in marble palaces, catacombs or ruins.ruins.
** "Hooked," used abstractly as a verb and adjective to describe something clinging in a violent or unpleasant way, such as muscle on a creature's physique, a or smile on a mouth.



* Creator/LeoTolstoy uses "handsome" to describe many characters in "Literature/WarandPeace."

to:

* Creator/LeoTolstoy uses "handsome" to describe many characters in "Literature/WarandPeace."''Literature/WarAndPeace.''
* Joe Abercrombie of ''Literature/TheFirstLaw'' uses the words "squelch," "grimace" and "dour" at least once a chapter.
18th Sep '17 11:53:21 AM Xtifr
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** Creator/CharlesStross parodied this in ''[[Literature/TheLaundrySeries The Atrocity Archives]]'', where "squamous and rugose" is apparently a RunningGag in the house Bob Howard shares with Pinky and the Brain.

to:

** Creator/CharlesStross parodied this in ''[[Literature/TheLaundrySeries The Atrocity Archives]]'', ''Literature/TheLaundryFiles'', where "squamous and rugose" is apparently a RunningGag in the house Bob Howard shares with Pinky and the Brain.
13th Jul '17 1:52:49 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Creator/GaryGygax put a noticeable stamp on the first edition ''Advanced TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' books. "Dweomer," "geas" and "weal" win for obscurity; "notwithstanding" for frequency. Also "former" and "latter." He also loved (i.e., used all the time) Latin abbreviations (e.g., e.g. and i.e.), even really academic ones, (e.g., Ibid. and Op. cit.) placed in ordinary text (Ibid.) The first edition Dungeon Master's Guide is full of these. Most memorable: referring a built-in ability to swim as "innate natatorial ability". The Prostitute Table in the City appendix has about a dozen different synonyms for prostitute (trollop, streetwalker, etc.)

to:

* TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons
**
Creator/GaryGygax put a noticeable stamp on the first edition ''Advanced TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' Dungeons and Dragons'' books. "Dweomer," "geas" and "weal" win for obscurity; "notwithstanding" for frequency. Also "former" and "latter." He also loved (i.e., used all the time) Latin abbreviations (e.g., e.g. and i.e.), even really academic ones, (e.g., Ibid. and Op. cit.) placed in ordinary text (Ibid.) The first edition Dungeon Master's Guide is full of these. Most memorable: memorable is referring to a built-in natural ability to swim as "innate natatorial ability". The Prostitute Table in the City appendix Appendix has about a dozen different synonyms for prostitute (trollop, streetwalker, etc.)



** The retroclone ‘‘Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea'' (based directly on the edition above) also suffers heavily from this. It uses the same obscure abbreviations (q.v.), british spelling, the archaic Old English ligture æ even in places where it makes no sense, and the author apparently used search and replace to replace every instance of "between" with "betwixt". And it's especially jarring because the rest of the text is otherwise obvious modern American English.

to:

** The retroclone ‘‘Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea'' (based directly on the edition above) 2nd Edition but published in 2012) also suffers (or indulges) heavily from this. It uses the same obscure abbreviations (q.v.), british British spelling, the archaic Old English ligture æ even in places where it makes no sense, and the author apparently used search and replace to replace every instance of "between" with "betwixt". And it's especially jarring because the rest of the text is otherwise obvious modern American English. This might all be a play on the original book's style.
11th Jun '17 12:13:39 PM nombretomado
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* {{Wikipedia}} falls victim to it occasionally, too. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=2002_in_baseball&oldid=461531847#May See here,]] with the word "calcimine". This is common enough with some words that ''xkcd'' [[http://xkcd.com/739/ made fun of it.]]

to:

* {{Wikipedia}} Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} falls victim to it occasionally, too. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=2002_in_baseball&oldid=461531847#May See here,]] with the word "calcimine". This is common enough with some words that ''xkcd'' [[http://xkcd.com/739/ made fun of it.]]
29th Apr '17 10:58:27 AM nombretomado
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* TimothyZahn likes to refer to conversations as " 'words' Character said to ''the other''". He is also a fan of the PunctuationShaker for alien names.

to:

* TimothyZahn Creator/TimothyZahn likes to refer to conversations as " 'words' Character said to ''the other''". He is also a fan of the PunctuationShaker for alien names.
18th Jan '17 10:08:04 AM Ezclee4050
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Added DiffLines:

* Music/BobbyBrown's "My Prerogative". The joke was that he'd just learned the word and was using it to impress people.
* "Two Story House" by Music/GeorgeJones and Tammy Wynette. The way Jones sings the word "splendor" in the chorus makes it sound like he wasn't too familiar with that word.
10th Jan '17 10:59:57 AM eleanorofaquitaine
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Added DiffLines:

* Creator/LeoTolstoy uses "handsome" to describe many characters in "Literature/WarandPeace."
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