History Main / Auction

25th Mar '17 11:00:16 AM nombretomado
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* The 2000 edition of ''Pay Day'' (which is in the Game Boy Advance version that also comes with Yahtzee and the TabletopGame/GameOfLife) has "Deal" cards that are "Auction Deals": instead of the Auction Deal only for the player who drew it, ''all the players'' can bid on it, highest bidder winning it. The catch is, only the player who drew it (or only the human players in the Game Boy Advance version as they must use the GB Advance or NintendoDS that the game is played on) knows the true value of the Deal. Getting other players (especially the AI players) to bid where they either lose money on the Deal or don't make enough in proportion to the bid and how much time is left to redeem the Deal (which can only be done on a "Found A Buyer" space or a mail card that lets you move to the next "Found a Buyer" space) for can be game-changing (any Deal, especially an Auction Deal, drawn late in the game might get no buyers if a player doesn't think he can get a roll that would let him land on "Found a Buyer" in time; games can be as long as six 31-day months to as few as just '''one''') as a Deal still held at the end of the game is worth '''NOTHING.'''

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* The 2000 edition of ''Pay Day'' (which is in the Game Boy Advance version that also comes with Yahtzee and the TabletopGame/GameOfLife) has "Deal" cards that are "Auction Deals": instead of the Auction Deal only for the player who drew it, ''all the players'' can bid on it, highest bidder winning it. The catch is, only the player who drew it (or only the human players in the Game Boy Advance version as they must use the GB Advance or NintendoDS UsefulNotes/NintendoDS that the game is played on) knows the true value of the Deal. Getting other players (especially the AI players) to bid where they either lose money on the Deal or don't make enough in proportion to the bid and how much time is left to redeem the Deal (which can only be done on a "Found A Buyer" space or a mail card that lets you move to the next "Found a Buyer" space) for can be game-changing (any Deal, especially an Auction Deal, drawn late in the game might get no buyers if a player doesn't think he can get a roll that would let him land on "Found a Buyer" in time; games can be as long as six 31-day months to as few as just '''one''') as a Deal still held at the end of the game is worth '''NOTHING.'''
9th Feb '17 4:57:19 AM Ccook1956
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** ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' is a whole game show built around this trope, with a twist: many games require the players to guess as close as possible to a prize's correct price without going over. The original show (1956-65) was piloted as "Auction-Aire" (having first appeared on local New York City TV as ''The Sky's The Limit'') as it took the form of a modified auction.

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** ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' is a whole game show built around this trope, with a twist: many games require the players to guess as close as possible to a prize's correct price without going over. The original show (1956-65) was piloted as "Auction-Aire" (having first appeared on local New York City TV as ''The Sky's The Limit'') as it took the form of a modified auction.auction. Creator Bob Stewart developed it after seeing an auction house moderator conduct a contest using this format, only the closest bidder to the price without going over got to buy the item at the winning bid price.
8th Jan '17 5:49:09 PM MyFinalEdits
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* In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', Quark held an auction for items Vash brought over from the Gamma Quadrant. Q had a little fun with it.
** "In The Cards" also had an auction where Jake and Nog tried to buy a 1951 Willie Mays baseball card for Captain Sisko. Unfortunately the card is part of a lot that another bidder wins, which sets off the ChainOfDeals plot to get it.

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* In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
**
Quark held holds an auction for items Vash brought over from the Gamma Quadrant. Q had has a little fun with it.
** "In The Cards" also had has an auction where Jake and Nog tried try to buy a 1951 Willie Mays baseball card for Captain Sisko. Unfortunately the card is part of a lot that another bidder wins, which sets off the ChainOfDeals plot to get it.
8th Jan '17 4:10:48 PM Spotts1701
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Added DiffLines:

** "In The Cards" also had an auction where Jake and Nog tried to buy a 1951 Willie Mays baseball card for Captain Sisko. Unfortunately the card is part of a lot that another bidder wins, which sets off the ChainOfDeals plot to get it.
31st Dec '16 6:11:00 AM StFan
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* This is what is supposed to be done to properties that players do not outright purchase when they land on an unowned space in ''TabletopGame/{{Monopoly}}'' - the common HouseRule of leaving it unpurchased is a major contributor to the marathon sessions the game can be notorious for.

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* This is what is supposed to be done to properties that players do not outright purchase when they land on an unowned space in ''TabletopGame/{{Monopoly}}'' - -- the common HouseRule of leaving it unpurchased is a major contributor to the marathon sessions the game can be notorious for.
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* The Oscar-winning French film ''{{Indochine}}'' has one of these at the beginning; the main character and her LoveInterest meet at one, where he begs her not to bet any higher because he loves the painting but cannot afford any more. She bids higher.

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* The Oscar-winning French film ''{{Indochine}}'' ''Film/{{Indochine}}'' has one of these at the beginning; the main character and her LoveInterest meet at one, where he begs her not to bet any higher because he loves the painting but cannot afford any more. She bids higher.






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--->'''Auctioneer:''' Sold! To the being of inconceivable horror!
--->'''Being:''' Mwah ha ha ha! Will a money order be okay?
--->'''Auctioneer:''' Yes.
--->'''Being:''' ''BWAH HA HA HA HA HA!''

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--->'''Auctioneer:''' Sold! To the being of inconceivable horror!
--->'''Being:'''
horror!\\
'''Being:'''
Mwah ha ha ha! Will a money order be okay?
--->'''Auctioneer:''' Yes.
--->'''Being:'''
okay?\\
'''Auctioneer:''' Yes.\\
'''Being:'''
''BWAH HA HA HA HA HA!''






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22nd Dec '16 7:20:33 PM ADrago
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* ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey's'' is way of averting LostForever.

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* ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey's'' is way of averting LostForever.PermanentlyMissableContent.
29th Oct '16 9:17:38 AM nombretomado
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* Played for laughs in various episodes of ''TheGoonShow''

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\n* Played for laughs in various episodes of ''TheGoonShow''''Radio/TheGoonShow''



* Also PlayedForLaughs on an episode of ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain''; Tim Brooke-Taylor auctions off a telescope, with Graeme Garden and Bill Oddie bidding for it, and Oddie gets it for five pounds. Next item to be auctioned off is a five-pound note...

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* Also PlayedForLaughs on an episode of ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain''; Tim Brooke-Taylor auctions off a telescope, with Graeme Garden and Bill Oddie bidding for it, and Oddie gets it for five pounds. Next item to be auctioned off is a five-pound note...
note...









17th Sep '16 5:31:53 PM themisterfree
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* ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' is a whole game show built around this trope, with a twist: many games require the players to guess as close as possible to a prize's correct price without going over. The original show (1956-65) was piloted as "Auction-Aire" (having first appeared on local New York City TV as ''The Sky's The Limit'') as it took the form of a modified auction.

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* Quite a few game shows have had auctions in some form:
**
''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' is a whole game show built around this trope, with a twist: many games require the players to guess as close as possible to a prize's correct price without going over. The original show (1956-65) was piloted as "Auction-Aire" (having first appeared on local New York City TV as ''The Sky's The Limit'') as it took the form of a modified auction.auction.
** ''Series/{{Debt}}'' had the "Gambling Debt" head-to-head round: a category with five unasked questions was shown, with a dollar amount. Players bid against each other to see how many questions they could answer. Bidding ended with a player bidding five, or being told "Prove It!" before then by the opponent. The winning bidder had to answer the number of questions he bid to get that dollar amount. If the bid wasn't fulfilled, the opponent won that dollar amount.
** The Peter Tomarken version of ''[[Wipeout1988 Wipeout]]'' had the Challenge Round, where players bid against each other to see how many of eight correct answers out of twelve shown they could get right before hitting a [[{{Whammy}} Wipeout]].
** The reverse auction was used in the Kennedy and Lange versions of ''NameThatTune'', where in "Bid A Note," you had to bid to see how few if any notes you needed to guess a mystery tune after being given a clue about it.
** ''Series/TheJokersWild'' used both normal and reverse auctions:
*** "Just One More" was a category where there was a question with multiple answers, and the contestants bid on how many answers they could get right in a row. If the winning bidder couldn't get all the answers to fulfill the bid, his opponent needed ''just one more'' right answer to win the question.
*** "How Low Will You Go?" was a reverse auction where a question was given, with a list of eight clues to the right answer. Players were given one clue to start, then bid on how few extra clues were needed to answer it. The winning bidder got to hear the clues if any were needed, but a wrong answer meant the opponent got to hear ''all'' of the clues before answering.
** Sister series ''Series/TicTacDough'' also had an "Auction" category during the Martindale/Caldwell years.
** ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'' did a Dutch Auction when for an Instant Bargain there was a tie for first place.



* The game show "Debt" had the "Gambling Debt" head-to-head round: a category with five unasked questions was shown, with a dollar amount. Players bid against each other to see how many questions they could answer. Bidding ended with a player bidding five, or being told "Prove It!" before then by the opponent. The winning bidder had to answer the number of questions he bid to get that dollar amount. If the bid wasn't fulfilled, the opponent won that dollar amount.
* The Peter Tomarken version of [[Wipeout1988 "Wipeout"]] had the second round where players bid against each other to see how many of eight correct answers out of twelve shown they could get right before hitting a "wipeout" (wrong answer).
* The reverse auction was used in NameThatTune, where in "Bid A Note," you had to bid to see how few if any notes you needed to guess a mystery tune after being given a clue about it.



* ''Series/TheJokersWild'' used both normal and reverse auctions.
** "Just One More" was a category where there was a question with multiple answers, and the contestants bid on how many answers they could get right in a row. If the winning bidder couldn't get all the answers to fulfill the bid, his opponent needed ''just one more'' right answer to win the question.
** "How Low Will You Go?" was a reverse auction where a question was given, with a list of eight clues to the right answer. Players were given one clue to start, then bid on how few extra clues were needed to answer it. The winning bidder got to hear the clues if any were needed, but a wrong answer meant the opponent got to hear ''all'' of the clues before answering.
* ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'' did a Dutch Auction when for an "Instant Bargain" there was a tie for first place.
25th Aug '16 4:37:38 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/AuctionKings'' is a show on the DiscoveryChannel based around an auction house. It's a FollowTheLeader of ''Series/PawnStars'' (as the two previous examples may also be).

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* ''Series/AuctionKings'' is a show on the DiscoveryChannel Creator/DiscoveryChannel based around an auction house. It's a FollowTheLeader of ''Series/PawnStars'' (as the two previous examples may also be).
2nd Aug '16 10:10:54 AM Willbyr
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* ''LostOdyssey's'' is way of averting LostForever.

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* ''LostOdyssey's'' ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey's'' is way of averting LostForever.
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