History Main / AtlantisIsBoring

12th Aug '16 2:36:21 AM WillBGood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Tabletop Games]]

to:

[[folder:Tabletop [[AC:Tabletop Games]]
9th Aug '16 4:38:18 AM Ripburger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


(Space settings share something of the same problem, with the side-benefit that space, given FTL travel, is a route to other planets where humans might find useful environments. Humans, like other animal species, have an environmental niche which we require to exist. A race of undersea sapients would likely find land stories boring, because they can't experience land directly, just as humans can't experience undersea (or space) directly. Any being has a limited range of environments it can ever directly experience.)





See also: WaterIsAir, ThisLooksLikeAJobForAquaman, FlyingSeafoodSpecial, UnderTheSea.

to:

\n\nSpeaking which: Space settings share something of the same problem, with the side-benefit that space, given FTL travel, is a route to other planets where humans might find useful environments. Humans, like other animal species, have an environmental niche which we require to exist. A race of undersea sapients would likely find land stories boring, because they can't experience land directly, just as humans can't experience undersea (or space) directly. Any being has a limited range of environments it can ever directly experience. See also: SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale, AllPlanetsAreEarthLike, SingleBiomePlanet, RubberForeheadAliens, and PlanetOfHats.

For related underwater tropes, see:
WaterIsAir, ThisLooksLikeAJobForAquaman, FlyingSeafoodSpecial, UnderTheSea.



[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* In ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'', the smallest group of Mons is the Deep Savers - Digimon based on aquatic animals or monsters like Cthulhu and Leviathan. There are only a couple of dozen of them, while every other group has about 100 monsters each. To make things even worse, you don't have to breathe in the Digital World - in other words: there's absolutely no point to having an aquatic monster.
** Particularly, in ''Anime/DigimonAdventure02'', Iori's Mon got a transformation into a submarine. It was used exactly four times in all 50-something episodes.

to:

[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* In ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'', the smallest group of Mons
[[folder:Aversions]]

[[index]]
*[[{{AtlantisIsBoring/Aversions}} Atlantis
is the Deep Savers Boring - Digimon based on aquatic animals or monsters like Cthulhu and Leviathan. There are only a couple of dozen of them, while every other group has about 100 monsters each. To make things even worse, you don't have to breathe in the Digital World - in other words: there's absolutely no point to having an aquatic monster.
** Particularly, in ''Anime/DigimonAdventure02'', Iori's Mon got a transformation into a submarine. It was used exactly four times in all 50-something episodes.
Aversions]]
[[/index]]



[[folder:Card Games]]

to:

[[folder:Card Games]][[folder:Played Straight]]

[[AC:Anime and Manga]]

* In ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'', the smallest group of Mons is the Deep Savers - Digimon based on aquatic animals or monsters like Cthulhu and Leviathan. There are only a couple of dozen of them, while every other group has about 100 monsters each. To make things even worse, you don't have to breathe in the Digital World - in other words: there's absolutely no point to having an aquatic monster.
** Particularly, in ''Anime/DigimonAdventure02'', Iori's Mon got a transformation into a submarine. It was used exactly four times in all 50-something episodes.

[[AC:Card Games]]



[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comic Books]]

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comic Books]]

[[AC:Comic Books]]



[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fanfic]]

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fanfic]]

[[AC:Fanfic]]



[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]

[[AC:Literature]]



[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live Action TV]]

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live

[[AC:Live
Action TV]]TV]]



[[/folder]]

to:

[[/folder]]






[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]

[[AC:Video Games]]



[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]

[[AC:Western Animation]]






----
!!Aversions:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* ''Manga/OnePiece'' averts this with Fishman Island. It's visually impressive, being several massive bubbles, partially filled with water, coral reefs, and regular buildings within the branches of a massive phosphorescent underwater tree. It's constantly visited by string of pirates (being the only way across the Red Line without going through the marines), slaver raids (fishmen are superhumanly strong, and mermaids are seen as incredibly beautiful), and a long running battle over human relations (join humans or screw humans).
* ''Anime/NagiAsuALullInTheSea'' has an extensive underwater village and a significant portion of the plot going on there. While there's some ArtisticLicensePhysics to make it more relatable for the viewers, there's plenty of wonder down there, and they usually don't forget about the additional dimension.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comic Books]]
* While it's true that comics writers often have trouble making Aquaman and Namor interesting (as mentioned at the top of the page), there have been notable aversions. (E.g., PeterDavid's run on ''Aquaman,'' in which Aquaman became a badass with an extensive supporting cast, complicated cosmology, and lengthy story arc.)
** Aquaman as 'King of the Seas' literally, makes for a potentially fascinating badass backstory character, too. Imagine if he has access to enough military power, for example, to limit or stop oceanic cargo transport, for example, or to interdict the movement of national navies.
** Rick Veitch's 2003 run on Aquaman was pretty good, too. This was partially due to the work Peter David did over the previous decade and partially Veitch's addition of a sword-and-sorcery undertone (c'mon, he's a ''king'' named ''Arthur''). Tad Williams amped the fantasy element UpToEleven in his run in 2008.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fanfic]]
* There is a scene in ''[[Fanfic/TheUrthbloodSaga The Crimson Badger]]'' where Winokur, a river otter, gets to swim in the ocean for the first time. The author does a wonderful job making the underwater world interesting and colourful.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' averts this somewhat by having several books centered around deep sea action. Gets a very notable aversion (bordering on [[InvertedTrope inversion]]) when the characters travel to the mostly aquatic planet Leera. There the scattered islands and lone continent are mostly dull, barren rock, while the sea is filled with bizarre, colorful lifeforms everywhere you look.
* Inverted in Rupert Brooke's ''Heaven'', which imagines Christianity from a fishes' point of view, ending with "And in that Heaven of all they wish / There shall be no more land say fish.".
* Creator/HPLovecraft was terrified of (among other things) the ocean, and ended up creating a mysterious, terrifying world where the seas held [[TimeAbyss ancient secrets and]] [[EldritchAbomination monsters]], providing inspiration for non-boring ocean-related stuff for years to come.
* Willard Price's ''Diving Adventure'' (part of a ValuesDissonance rife series about teenage animal trappers) has the setting of an undersea town/[[ForScience experimental community]] and does make [[ShownTheirWork full use of its setting]].
* David Brin's ''[[Literature/{{Uplift}} Startide Rising]]'' is a fast-paced exciting book which takes place primarily in an alien ocean (it helps that the protagonists' ship is one primarily manned by sentient dolphins). Of course the other half of the book is about a space battle, but still. It works.
* Slightly before Lovecraft, Creator/JulesVerne wrote ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'', which is (this being Jules Verne) hardly boring.
** Until you get to the [[NarrativeFiligree dozens of pages of the narrator describing the taxonomy of his dinner]], and [[DontLikeDontRead if you find that boring]], [[HumorMode why are you reading Jules Verne]]?
* ''[[Literature/RiftersTrilogy Starfish]]'' averts this spectacularly: its deep-sea vent setting is stunning, with every excursion by its genetically-modified protagonists a brush with death, darkness-induced telepathy, undersea robots, and giant versions of "regular" vent creatures... which aren't nearly as dangerous as their [[HumansAreTheRealMonsters land-based counterparts]]. Its sequel, while still having an [[CrapsackWorld interesting, land-based setting]], isn't nearly as astounding. Of course, ''Starfish'' couldn't help but avert this trope, what with the author being a [[ShownTheirWork marine biologist]] and all.
* Creator/LFrankBaum's children's novel ''The Sea Fairies'' deals with a young girl and her [[CoolOldGuy crusty seacaptain friend]] being temporarily transformed into the titular mermaids/mermen. They tour the queen's kingdom, meet all kinds of magical sea creatures, and end up captured by an evil sorcerer. This is actually the dominant plot of the book, so despite its scientific inaccuracy there's a lot of interesting things that happen.
* ''Amphibian Man'' by Russian SF author Alexander Beliaev, gives a breathtaking poetic account of undersea beauty as experienced by a young man with gills, which naturally force him to spend most of his life in the ocean. Beliaev, who was paralyzed and ill for much of his life, had nothing but his imagination to take him to incredible places, and he clearly put a lot of thought into a picture of the young man's underwater environment, a cavern that he furnishes with seashells, pearls, and various plant life.
-->He placed the table in the middle of the grotto, the vases on the table, poured the earth into the vases, and planted the aquatic flowers. The earth, washed by the water, clouded for some time above the vases like smoke, but then the water cleared. Only the flowers, stirred by light ripples, swayed quietly, as if in a breeze.
* One scene in the ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfAmber Nine Princes In Amber]]'' books sees the characters going into a Castlevania-style inverse version of their own castle, which goes even further than most inverse castles by being under water. They initially go with WalkDontSwim (and they can breathe, for some reason), but eventually one of the characters gets sick of a particularly long spiral stair and swims down the bottom.
* The trope is analysed to some extent in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'', when Lucy observes some mermen on the sea floor and reflects that human concepts do not apply directly to the sea and some are inverted--for example, the safe, homely places are on the tops of 'mountains', nearest the surface, while heroes go to fight monsters in the dark, dangerous 'valleys' where the sea is deepest.
* The ''Literature/DarkLife'' series takes place entirely underwater TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture.
* ''The Deep Range'' by Creator/ArthurCClarke. You'd never expect a novel about underwater whale herding to be exctiting, but then again, Clarke specializes in putting mundane ideas into interesting seetings and making them awesome.
* ''Literature/{{Atlan}}'' boasts both a bizarre sea-girt jungle kingdom ''and'' a strange, colorful undersea path to said LostWorld.
* The ''Literature/DirkPittAdventures'' avert this. Many heart pounding action sequences happen below water as well as above. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that the characters work for the National Underwater Marine Agency and are the nations foremost civilian underwater experts.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* GerryAnderson's ''Series/{{Stingray 1964}}'' has lots of interesting underwater environments and varieties of aquatic races, many of whom want to give our heroes a hard time.
* Averted with ''SeaHunt,'' which was quite popular in the '60's. Lloyd Bridges played sea diver Mike Nelson, and he took on a new dangerous assignment of one sort or another each week, encountering seafaring crooks, Soviet spies, a sunken ship carrying nerve gas, sharks, alligators, and even a [[NotTheNessie fake sea monster.]]
* Averted in ''Series/StargateAtlantis''. The city of Atlantis is meant to be on the surface of the planet (which is mostly water) but can be submerged if necessary. The shields on the city keep it from flooding; should they fail, the city gets flooded, and everyone dies. Played straight with the ocean of the planet as it is mostly empty and boring (this is repeatedly noted by the expedition members.)
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Mythology]]
* In one version of a Greek creation myth where Zeus, Hades and Poseidon decide who gets dominion over what. Zeus goes first and chooses the sky, being so high and majestic, but Poseidon (knowing Zeus would take the empty sky) chooses the sea, which is full of life. Hades took what was left, the Underworld (that is filled with precious stones and metals and there is always room for one more).
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* ''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' tries to avert this with a number of {{Sourcebook}}s, notably "Rifts' Underseas" and "Coalition Navy". Of course, how well that is averted is up to the players...
** Also, Atlantis itself is still not a place you want to visit, But this is less because of nothing to do, and more with the fact that it's populated by [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Dragons]], AliensAndMonsters, StarfishAliens, EldritchAbomination, and other creatures who'd see you as a pet at best, and lunch at worst.
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Scion}}'', there are two major aquatic environments listed: Atlantis and the Drowned Road. The former is the ruins of a Titan-worshipping civilization (worshippers still present), is buried under Antarctica, and requires immense effort just to ''get'' there. The latter is ''the Titan of Water'', and if you're in there, it should be entertaining by sheer virtue of taking the fight to the enemy.
* ''TabletopGame/TranshumanSpace'' averts it with the sourcebook ''Under Pressure'', which details the oceans of Earth and of terraformed Mars, as well as the subsurface ocean of Europa.
* Somewhat subverted in ''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}}'' - the Elemental Plane of Water was actually one of the more hospitable planes (at least compared to most of the Inner Planes, or the Lower Planes), and was recommended as a setting for low-level adventurers.
* ''TabletopGame/BluePlanet'' focuses on a mostly water-covered planet named Poseidon that was discovered on the other side of a stable wormhole. Part of what makes the setting exciting is all the strange alien ''things'' lurking beneath the waves, but there's plenty of loving detail beyond that and the setting makes extensive use of real oceanography.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]
* ''The Forever Blue'' / ''VideoGame/EndlessOcean'' games, while not exactly brimming with excitement, do a fantastic job of conveying the diversity of the sea's life and environments.
** However, there are a few levels that take place in sunken ruins implied to be similar to Atlantis, which are more boring than regular levels because you spend a lot of time swimming down long featureless corridors.
* The ''VideoGame/EccoTheDolphin'' series plays its setting and protagonist's species for all they're worth. The result? Lots of SceneryPorn and levels that require thinking in two or three dimensions.
* ''VideoGame/{{Aquaria}}'' shows ''extreme'' variety in its environments, coupled with a diverse array of wildlife, both natural and fictitious.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' has an added feature of three of your party being able to breathe underwater and there are several underwater places to go, complete with water-based fiends and boss battles.
* The first few ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' games include an Atlantica level based on ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid''. Fans are pretty divided on the first one and its swimming mechanic, but most prefer it to the musical mini game in ''II''. ''Chain of Memories'' simply had the characters walk around on the ocean floor unimpeded, which sort-of made sense as they were in a memory world rather than physically there.
* ''VideoGame/XComTerrorFromTheDeep'' is partly aversion, partly straight playing. It's underwater, there are various runs on the sea bottom, but underwater physics are nonexistent, and weapons not so different from land weapons. The denizens of the sea bottom are Gillmen, the first or second "alien" species you will encounter in TFTD. More precisely, they are an Earthly species and have prostrated themselves before the Aliens in exchange for their miserable hides (and a slice of the surface world, once it's conquered).
** TFTD was a cheap repainted version of ''VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense'' with the difficulty amped up. You would think that underwater, you would't be restricted to stumbling around the ocean floor ... but until you get the ultimate suit (equivalent to the original game's Flying Suit), your characters are stuck in two dimensions ... alien elevators and all. Apparently they cannot swim.
*** The last part is somewhat justified in that the soldiers are likely carrying a hundred pounds of metal in the form of armor, weapons and ammo.
* ''VideoGame/{{BioShock|1}}'' is a rather full aversion of this concept, the city of Rapture is underwater but rife with crime, murder, crazy people... Of course, its urban art deco appearance sometimes makes you forget you're under the ocean.
** In ''VideoGame/BioShock2'', there are segments where you can leave the city and travel the ocean floor to reach another part of Rapture. Big Daddies have self-contained air supplies; Splicers don't. These segments are ''deliberately'' boring in order to [[BreatherLevel give players some time to catch their breath between bouts of action]]. These levels are [[SceneryPorn spectacularly beautiful]] too.
* Ocean class planets in the ''VideoGame/MasterOfOrion'' series work exactly like planets not entirely submerged in water.
** Subverted in ''Master of Orion II'', a race with ''Aquatic'' ability gain more benefit from ocean planets or those with "wet" environments other than Gaia (Tundra, Swamp, Terran). At no time do they ever exceed the food productivity or maximum population of Gaia worlds at similar levels of development.
* PC game ''VideoGame/CivilizationCallToPower'' and its successor averts this trope in the science fiction phase of the game. Once players can build submarines the ocean is revealed to have a huge variety of features such as volcanoes, rifts and giant squid; sea colonies have access to many more resources than land-based ones, and in addition to the variety of undersea units, players can engineer underwater tunnels to move land units quickly around on the sea bed.(O'Neil's proposed habitats never did make practical sense.)
* Partly played straight, partly averted in ''VideoGame/SidMeiersAlphaCentauri''. While the sea only has a couple kinds of terrain, the same goes for the land. For most factions, the deep sea is useless; the Pirates, however, find it highly useful and productive.
* ''VideoGame/CivilizationBeyondEarth'' plays it straight then averts it in the ''Rising Tide'' expansion pack. Most factions can traverse in water, but it has little to offer, RT expands its role by making certain resources obtainable underwater, and colonies and other structures can be built on water. It also adds newer aquatic alien lifeforms.
* Pretty much inverted in ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', where (reflecting real life wildlife) there are more Water-types than any other type. They are also extremely diverse, as the Water-type has been paired with nearly every type in the game.
** Note that this only applies to fishing; surfing and diving are both extremely monotonous.
* Definite aversion in ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'': The Sea has more content than any other region in the game - practically a whole other game in itself.
* ''VideoGame/{{Spyro 2|Riptos Rage}}'' had an ''entire level'' set underwater - half in an underwater cavern, half in a huge ocean city!
* Averted by the ''Series/SeaQuestDSV'' GAME of all things. Now, if only the entire 2D portion wasn't ScrappyLevel after ScrappyLevel filled with mindbending button/mending puzzles. But until you're forced to do these mini-missions the game is quite fun. If only mode 7 had been implemented at the time... Then rather than deal with these you could have different 'scales' so when you use a different vehicle the scale zooms in. But anyway, the top-down 'overworld' is pretty good, and the first few non-NintendoHard 2D levels.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/EVOSearchForEden''; despite being the first area, and thus the smallest, the water level feels more 'alive' and populated than the amphibian level. Possibly due to the feeling of being the first step into a true epic, and the numerous tutorial [=NPCs=].
* ''VideoGame/ArchimedeanDynasty'' averts this by taking a heaping handful of [[SpaceIsAnOcean the nautical tropes common in the space shooter genre]] (stealth by silence, minefields, escort missions, RammingAlwaysWorks) and leveraging them for all their worth in their native UnderTheSea environment. The end result was surprisingly awesome.
* Averted by ''VideoGame/TheOceanHunter'' thanks to the twitch-inducing gameplay.
* Semi-averted in ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline''. One of the higher level zones is "Lemuria", set in an ocean trench. The waterbreathing Lemurians have suffered a political schism, and the 'bad guy' Lemurians have taken to worshipping EldritchAbomination types called the Bleak Ones, and transformed into humanoid reptile/fish things, who use both freaky sci-fi subs and shark-shaped subs for travel faster than they can swim. Meanwhile the humanoid sharks of [[spoiler: Doctor Destroyer]] have also set up shop, there's the [[spoiler: radioactive undead crew of a]] Russian sub that sank, a ghost ship with ghost pirates (and a few robot pirates down there, too), lots of sea life both hostile and not really THAT hostile, myriad forms of plant life, etcetera. A power that summons wolves on dry land summons sharks, instead, and many other pet summons are similarly altered - robot drones have artificial fins, for example. However, this is weakened considerably by the unfortunate lag suffered in that zone, which leads many to avoid it. Sad, really, there's plenty of action down there.
** Yet in a way it's played straight. Mechanically, it's just any other zone, except everything "flies".
* ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter Tri'' averts this: the ocean is full of beautiful marine life [[EverythingTryingToKillYou that wants to kill you]].
** There actually are underwater ruins in the game that you get to visit. They serve as the backdrop, armaments included, for the battle with the FinalBoss, the Ceadeus. Special note must be taken in that said FinalBoss [[spoiler:is what brought said ruins underwater in the first place, and threatens to repeat this with Moga Village above.]]
* In ''VideoGame/{{Dominions}}'', while [[TwoDSpace Two D Water]] is in effect, the oceans have special considerations and challenges; one of the bigger hurdles in the game for land-based species is developing the ability to operate in the water, and vice versa (except for Atlantis, which is truly amphibious, and a guide for the race refers to it as "[[GameBreaker a submarine]]" when it's fully geared up).
* Vashj'ir, ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'''s first fully underwater zone introduced in ''Cataclysm'', is one of the most colorful zones in the game thanks to abundant use of coral reefs. It is divided in three subzones, roughly correlating to kelp forest, tropical reef and deep-sea. Overall, Vashj'ir at least subverts the most common signs of this trope. The zone is varied, has interesting races, a story that doesn't seem like it belonged above the water and was definitely created with swimming in mind. And yet, players ''still'' complained, making it one of the least favorite zones of ''Cataclysm'' -- not because it was boring, but because 3D movement underwater was disorienting and too different from the rest of the game.
** Plus the very first spell you get takes care of the breathing issues, and after a quest you get your very own seahorse mount.
** Something about being able to swim ''over'' the entire zone if you so choose makes it feel less threatening to some players. True, you can fly over the land-based zones on your flying mount, but when you're underwater, you're always kind of flying. It seems like most humans have a tendency to think of sea level as "home", which is high above the action in the case of underwater gameplay.
** It helps that one of the lead designers for the game is a former marine biologist.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/GuildWars2''. Though underwater areas are not as common as terrestrial ones, they're just as [[SceneryPorn beautifully crafted]] as the rest of the game. Combat also changes appropriately when underwater; you use a different weapon while swimming, which has a different set of skills than what you're used to. There are Renown Heart quests and dynamic events that take place entirely underwater, and resources, scenic views and skill points can be collected just like anywhere else. You're also equipped with a breathing device right from the beginning, so you don't need to worry about the annoyance of drowning.
* ''VisualNovel/{{Ever17}}'' is about a trip to an underwater amusement park, which by the way is named after Lemuria, gone wrong.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert3'', comapred to VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert2 which barely cares about naval units, Red Alert 3 makes water travel easy, many land and air units are amphibious and naval units can travel in land. Plus certain buildings such as refinery's and power plants can be built on water.
* In ''VideoGame/JurassicParkTheGame'', the marine exhibit is where a lot of the drama unfolds, and it includes an attempt to sneak past the fearsome ''Mosasaur''.
* The first expansion of ''VideoGame/CivilizationBeyondEarth'', appropriately names ''Rising Tide'' aims for an aversion. The ocean now provides new resources and the ability to harvest existing ones, aquatic cities and an expanded roster of ocean going craft, both for the Player and the native aliens.
* ''VideoGame/TheLegendaryStarfy'' completely averts this, taking place almost entirely underwater despite the title character being from the sky.
* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' actually makes very good use of underwater settings. The first 3D outing, ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' introduced diving and later walking and breathing underwater. Every 3D game after except ''VideoGame/TheWindWaker'' would use it (the ocean is an in-universe symbol of death, and the land of Hyrule trapped beneath the waves is suspended in an air bubble), and even ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle Of Ages'' had essentially an entire other overworld under the ocean because you can transform into a merman.
* ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'' has maps where the player can travel through the coral reefs of Uranus (no, [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens we don't know how they got there]]) using their Archwing, a personal jetpack normally used for space travel. The underwater segments are strikingly detailed, and the players haven't leveled any complaints about the mode that Archwing combat didn't already have.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
* Exemplified in ''WebComic/{{XKCD}}'' [[http://xkcd.com/731/ here]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo'' does a good job of creating a diverse underwater environment with plenty of exciting action scenes.
* ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'' franchise's prequels were able to maintain a fairly interesting underwater setting. But then again, that may not be due so much to the setting as the fact that it was about a spunky princess who could talk to animals and her overprotective father. The ocean aspect at times felt a bit like an afterthought. Like the "Stormy Arc" of the animated series, in which Ariel meets a TroubledButCute underwater horse (Hippocampus, but referred to as a sea horse) she wants to tame despite it being so wild.
* ''SharkyAndGeorge'' [[ExpositoryThemeTune were the crime busters of the sea]], and they were great. This being a cartoon, they had underwater equivalents of most overland things and even an aeroplane (a whale that everyone sat inside).
* During the lesson spent as a fish in Disney's ''Disney/TheSwordInTheStone'', Merlin comments that there are all different types of underwater environments, each with their own challenges. Though we never see any of them, knowing Merlin it's probably true.
* ''Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'', even to the residents of the empire itself.
* Oddly enough, ''WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}'' has one of the best-developed "colonized ocean floor" settings you'll ever see. The show still gets [[CatchPhrase no respect! No Respect!]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
* Any oceanographer would tell you that RealLife averts this trope.
[[/folder]]
4th Aug '16 5:28:50 PM Ripburger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''/VideoGame/XComTerrorFromTheDeep'' is partly aversion, partly straight playing. It's underwater, there are various runs on the sea bottom, but underwater physics are nonexistent, and weapons not so different from land weapons. The denizens of the sea bottom are Gillmen, the first or second "alien" species you will encounter in TFTD. More precisely, they are an Earthly species and have prostrated themselves before the Aliens in exchange for their miserable hides (and a slice of the surface world, once it's conquered).

to:

* ''/VideoGame/XComTerrorFromTheDeep'' ''VideoGame/XComTerrorFromTheDeep'' is partly aversion, partly straight playing. It's underwater, there are various runs on the sea bottom, but underwater physics are nonexistent, and weapons not so different from land weapons. The denizens of the sea bottom are Gillmen, the first or second "alien" species you will encounter in TFTD. More precisely, they are an Earthly species and have prostrated themselves before the Aliens in exchange for their miserable hides (and a slice of the surface world, once it's conquered).
4th Aug '16 5:28:37 PM Ripburger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/XCOMTerrorFromTheDeep'' is partly aversion, partly straight playing. It's underwater, there are various runs on the sea bottom, but underwater physics are nonexistent, and weapons not so different from land weapons. The denizens of the sea bottom are Gillmen, the first or second "alien" species you will encounter in TFTD. More precisely, they are an Earthly species and have prostrated themselves before the Aliens in exchange for their miserable hides (and a slice of the surface world, once it's conquered).
** ''X-COM 2'' was a cheap repainted version of ''XCOM: UFO Defense'' with the difficulty amped up. You would think that underwater, you would't be restricted to stumbling around the ocean floor ... but until you get the ultimate suit (equivalent to the original game's Flying Suit), your characters are stuck in two dimensions ... alien elevators and all. Apparently they cannot swim.

to:

* ''VideoGame/XCOMTerrorFromTheDeep'' ''/VideoGame/XComTerrorFromTheDeep'' is partly aversion, partly straight playing. It's underwater, there are various runs on the sea bottom, but underwater physics are nonexistent, and weapons not so different from land weapons. The denizens of the sea bottom are Gillmen, the first or second "alien" species you will encounter in TFTD. More precisely, they are an Earthly species and have prostrated themselves before the Aliens in exchange for their miserable hides (and a slice of the surface world, once it's conquered).
** ''X-COM 2'' TFTD was a cheap repainted version of ''XCOM: UFO Defense'' ''VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense'' with the difficulty amped up. You would think that underwater, you would't be restricted to stumbling around the ocean floor ... but until you get the ultimate suit (equivalent to the original game's Flying Suit), your characters are stuck in two dimensions ... alien elevators and all. Apparently they cannot swim.
4th Aug '16 5:26:59 PM Ripburger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''[[VideoGame/XCom X-COM 2: Terror From The Deep]]'' is partly aversion, partly straight playing. It's underwater, there are various environments on the sea bottom, but the underwater physics is goofy and not so different from land physics.

to:

* ''[[VideoGame/XCom X-COM 2: Terror From The Deep]]'' ''VideoGame/XCOMTerrorFromTheDeep'' is partly aversion, partly straight playing. It's underwater, there are various environments runs on the sea bottom, but the underwater physics is goofy are nonexistent, and weapons not so different from land physics.weapons. The denizens of the sea bottom are Gillmen, the first or second "alien" species you will encounter in TFTD. More precisely, they are an Earthly species and have prostrated themselves before the Aliens in exchange for their miserable hides (and a slice of the surface world, once it's conquered).
24th Jul '16 1:44:24 PM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The first few ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' games include an Atlantica level is based on ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid''. Fans are pretty divided on the first one and its swimming mechanic, but most prefer it to the musical mini game in ''II''. ''Chain of Memories'' simply had the characters walk around on the ocean floor unimpeded, which sort-of made sense as they were in a memory world rather than physically there.

to:

* The first few ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' games include an Atlantica level is based on ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid''. Fans are pretty divided on the first one and its swimming mechanic, but most prefer it to the musical mini game in ''II''. ''Chain of Memories'' simply had the characters walk around on the ocean floor unimpeded, which sort-of made sense as they were in a memory world rather than physically there.
24th Jul '16 1:44:04 PM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the first two ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' games, the Atlantica level is based on ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid''. Fans are pretty divided on it but most prefer it to the musical mini game in the second game.

to:

* In the The first two ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' games, the few ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' games include an Atlantica level is based on ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid''. Fans are pretty divided on it the first one and its swimming mechanic, but most prefer it to the musical mini game in ''II''. ''Chain of Memories'' simply had the second game.characters walk around on the ocean floor unimpeded, which sort-of made sense as they were in a memory world rather than physically there.
10th Jul '16 3:33:08 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/StreetSharks''. Granted, the show had other obvious problems, but the big one was that the boys turned into shark-hybrids that swam ''through the streets.'' They could have tried to make the shark-hybrid thing work by actually having them fight underwater, but, [[TheyJustDidntCare well...]]
** Made even worse by the fact that they seemed to live in ''California''.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/StreetSharks''. Granted, the show had other obvious problems, but the big one was that the boys turned into shark-hybrids that swam ''through the streets.'' They could have tried to make the shark-hybrid thing work by actually having them fight underwater, but, [[TheyJustDidntCare well...]]
** Made even worse by the fact that they seemed to live in ''California''.
''
29th Jun '16 4:15:01 PM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'' has maps where the player can travel through the coral reefs of Uranus (no, [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens we don't know how they got there]]) using their Archwing, a personal jetpack normally used for space travel. The underwater segments are strikingly detailed, and the players haven't leveled any complaints about the mode that [[BaseBreaker Archwing combat didn't already have]].

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'' has maps where the player can travel through the coral reefs of Uranus (no, [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens we don't know how they got there]]) using their Archwing, a personal jetpack normally used for space travel. The underwater segments are strikingly detailed, and the players haven't leveled any complaints about the mode that [[BaseBreaker Archwing combat didn't already have]].have.
22nd Jun '16 1:06:14 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** And ''TheSnorks'' did this to a lesser extent (at least the characters SWAM).
* ''TigerSharks'', which was ''WesternAnimation/{{Thundercats}}'' [[AC:[[RecycledInSPACE UNDERWATER]]]] only lasted one season. Their main enemy was a hydrophobic crime boss. On a world covered in nothing but water. What part of this seemed like a good idea?

to:

** And ''TheSnorks'' ''WesternAnimation/TheSnorks'' did this to a lesser extent (at least the characters SWAM).
* ''TigerSharks'', ''WesternAnimation/TigerSharks'', which was ''WesternAnimation/{{Thundercats}}'' [[AC:[[RecycledInSPACE UNDERWATER]]]] only lasted one season. Their main enemy was a hydrophobic crime boss. On a world covered in nothing but water. What part of this seemed like a good idea?
This list shows the last 10 events of 247. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AtlantisIsBoring