History Main / AteamFiring

22nd Feb '18 10:08:38 PM TheBigBopper
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In past centuries of gunpowder warfare, firearms technology put considerable limits on accuracy. Barrel rifling and tight-fitting lead ball ammunition made a gun more accurate, but they also made it slower and more difficult to reload as powder residue fouled the barrel more with each shot. Therefore, most regular infantry used smoothbore muskets while rifles were more often limited to hunters, sharpshooters, and skirmishers. It was also easier to reload a musket using under-size balls which required a cloth patch to seat them in the barrel, even though the loose fit and random spin imparted to the bullet tended to send it off target upon leaving the barrel. Especially in the 18th century, military leaders believed that volume of fire was more important than individual accuracy for inflicting casualties, training their troops to load and fire in ranks as rapidly as possible while advancing unflinchingly towards the enemy. Aiming wasn't helped by the fact that black powder guns produced huge amounts of smoke, which quickly shrouded the battlefield in an impenetrable fog after a few volleys.

The effect of firearms with higher accuracy and rates of fire has been to change tactics, leading to the same problem for different reasons. Targets that move quickly and stay behind cover instead of lining up in the open are naturally harder to hit, and when they are returning fire one's own ability to concentrate, aim and shoot will be seriously impacted. Today small arms tactics revolve around [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suppressive_fire suppressive fire]] and maneuver, which use aimed shots to suppress, or pin down the enemy, to allow other elements to move in close for the kill. Back in the late 1950s, in Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' he points out that military histories show that it takes several ''thousand'' rounds ''per person'' to kill an enemy soldier (in today's era of machine guns that shoot hundreds of rounds of suppressing fire, it takes [[http://web.archive.org/web/20100211140025/http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-forced-to-import-bullets-from-israel-as-troops-use-250000-for-every-rebel-killed-508299.html at least 250,000 rounds to kill one militant in Iraq!]][[note]]It should be noted that a large portion of those bullets were used in target practice and otherwise outside of combat.[[/note]]), even under normal circumstances; in combat, accuracy with small arms goes ''way'' down. Way, way down. It should be noted that long before machineguns and semi-automatic rifles like the WWII M1 Garand were developed, artillery was the big killer on the battlefield and it still is.

to:

In past centuries of gunpowder warfare, firearms technology put considerable limits on accuracy. Barrel rifling and tight-fitting lead ball ammunition made a gun more accurate, but they also made it slower and more difficult to reload as powder residue fouled the barrel more with each shot. Therefore, most regular infantry used smoothbore muskets while rifles were more often limited to hunters, sharpshooters, and skirmishers. It was also easier to reload a musket using under-size balls which required a cloth patch to seat them in the barrel, balls, even though the loose fit and random spin imparted to the bullet tended to send it off target upon leaving the barrel. Especially in the 18th century, military leaders believed that volume of fire was more important than individual accuracy for inflicting casualties, training their troops to load and fire in ranks as rapidly as possible while advancing unflinchingly towards the enemy. Aiming wasn't helped by the fact that black powder guns produced huge amounts of smoke, which quickly shrouded the battlefield in an impenetrable fog after a few volleys.

The effect of firearms with higher accuracy and rates rate of fire has been to change tactics, leading to the same problem for different reasons. Targets that move quickly and stay behind cover instead of lining up in the open are naturally harder to hit, and when they are returning fire one's own ability to concentrate, aim and shoot will be seriously impacted. Today small arms tactics revolve around [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suppressive_fire suppressive fire]] and maneuver, which use aimed shots to suppress, or pin down the enemy, to allow other elements to move in close for the kill. Back in the late 1950s, in Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' he points out that military histories show that it takes several ''thousand'' rounds ''per person'' to kill an enemy soldier (in today's era of machine guns that shoot hundreds of rounds of suppressing fire, it takes [[http://web.archive.org/web/20100211140025/http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-forced-to-import-bullets-from-israel-as-troops-use-250000-for-every-rebel-killed-508299.html at least 250,000 rounds to kill one militant in Iraq!]][[note]]It should be noted that a large portion of those bullets were used in target practice and otherwise outside of combat.[[/note]]), even under normal circumstances; in combat, accuracy with small arms goes ''way'' down. Way, way down. It should be noted that long before machineguns and semi-automatic rifles like the WWII M1 Garand were developed, artillery was the big killer on the battlefield and it still is.
22nd Feb '18 2:34:16 PM RyzeGuy
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This trope is often TruthInTelevision. A common term for it is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spray_and_pray spray and pray]] as any sustained automatic fire from a hand held weapon will require divine intervention to actually hit its target. The causes for this trope are rooted in physics because the recoil from each successive shot from an automatic weapon will force the weapon's muzzle to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muzzle_climb rise up]] until all of the rounds are passing harmlessly over the target.

In past centuries of gunpowder warfare, firearms technology put considerable limits on accuracy. Barrel rifling and tight-fitting lead ball ammunition made a gun more accurate, but they also made it slower and more difficult to reload as powder residue fouled the barrel more with each shot. Therefore, most regular infantry used smootbore muskets while rifles were more often limited to hunters, sharpshooters, and skirmishers. It was also easier to reload a musket using under-size balls which required a cloth patch to seat them in the barrel, even though the loose fit and random spin imparted to the bullet tended to send it off target upon leaving the barrel. Especially in the 18th century, military leaders believed that volume of fire was more important than individual accuracy for inflicting casualties, training their troops to load and fire in ranks as rapidly as possible while advancing unflinchingly towards the enemy. Aiming wasn't helped by the fact that black powder guns produced huge amounts of smoke, which quickly shrouded the battlefield in an impenetrable fog after a few volleys.

to:

This trope is often TruthInTelevision. A common term for it is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spray_and_pray spray and pray]] as any sustained automatic fire from a hand held weapon will require divine intervention to actually hit its target. The causes for this trope are rooted in physics because the recoil from each successive shot from an automatic weapon will force the weapon's muzzle to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muzzle_climb rise up]] until all of the rounds are passing harmlessly over the target.

target. While for non-automatic weapons, handguns are known for having an effective range of ''30 feet'' for most nonprofessional users. So under most conditions, this trope could be interpreted not as "all shots have bad luck" but as "no shot gets better than average results (a miss) no matter how many shots are fired."

In past centuries of gunpowder warfare, firearms technology put considerable limits on accuracy. Barrel rifling and tight-fitting lead ball ammunition made a gun more accurate, but they also made it slower and more difficult to reload as powder residue fouled the barrel more with each shot. Therefore, most regular infantry used smootbore smoothbore muskets while rifles were more often limited to hunters, sharpshooters, and skirmishers. It was also easier to reload a musket using under-size balls which required a cloth patch to seat them in the barrel, even though the loose fit and random spin imparted to the bullet tended to send it off target upon leaving the barrel. Especially in the 18th century, military leaders believed that volume of fire was more important than individual accuracy for inflicting casualties, training their troops to load and fire in ranks as rapidly as possible while advancing unflinchingly towards the enemy. Aiming wasn't helped by the fact that black powder guns produced huge amounts of smoke, which quickly shrouded the battlefield in an impenetrable fog after a few volleys.
18th Feb '18 3:15:09 PM Kinrah
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Added DiffLines:

* The page quote comes from the Winter Olympics special of ''Series/TopGear'', where Jeremy Clarkson decides that the best weapon to use at a biathlon rifle range is [[MoreDakka an MP5 set to fully automatic]].
27th Jan '18 5:43:39 AM Willbyr
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%% Please see thread to discuss a new image.

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%% Please see start a new thread to discuss a new image.
11th Jan '18 8:10:54 PM Willbyr
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[[quoteright:299:[[Website/{{Cracked}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2581_slide_7512.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:299: [[http://www.cracked.com/photoplasty_82_if-hollywood-taught-science-class Ah,]] so ''that's'' how [[Series/TheATeam they]] do--[[FridgeLogic wait, how does it steer if the rudder is left behind in the launch bay?]][[note]][[CartridgesInFlight They fire the whole bullet.]] [[VideoGame/{{Portal 2}} That's 65% more bullet per bullet.]][[/note]]]]

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[[quoteright:299:[[Website/{{Cracked}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2581_slide_7512.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:299: [[http://www.cracked.com/photoplasty_82_if-hollywood-taught-science-class Ah,]] so ''that's'' how [[Series/TheATeam they]] do--[[FridgeLogic wait, how does it steer if the rudder is left behind in the launch bay?]][[note]][[CartridgesInFlight They fire the whole bullet.]] [[VideoGame/{{Portal 2}} That's 65% more bullet
%% Image removed per bullet.]][[/note]]]]
Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1515713328020448700
%% Please see thread to discuss a new image.
%%



2nd Jan '18 7:55:13 PM TheBigBopper
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MoreDakka is claimed by many to be the most reliable way of killing something, but ironically there are a lot of shootouts on TV where the number of bullets fired seems inversely proportional to their likelihood of killing or even wounding anyone. Heroes and villains can expend enormous amounts of ammo shooting at each other, often with automatic weapons and/or at very close range, yet everybody important is protected by PlotArmor; only a {{mook}} or RedShirt has anything to worry about, and sometimes even they will be defeated or driven off non-lethally. It's not that the bullets aren't potentially lethal, but everyone's accuracy is so horrible that they seem to hit everything ''except'' their foe, even in situations where they have a clear line of fire and you'd think it would be almost impossible to miss. Instead of bullet-riddled corpses, the result will be extensive damage to vehicles and property. This trope differs from ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy in that instead of just the bad guy's {{mooks}} being unable to hit the hero, it can apply to everybody on both sides.

to:

MoreDakka is claimed by many to be the most reliable way of killing something, but ironically strangely there are a lot of shootouts on TV where the number of bullets fired seems inversely proportional to their likelihood of killing or even wounding anyone. Heroes and villains can expend enormous amounts of ammo shooting at each other, often with automatic weapons and/or at very close range, yet everybody important is protected by PlotArmor; only a {{mook}} or RedShirt has anything to worry about, and sometimes even they will be defeated or driven off non-lethally. It's not that the bullets aren't potentially lethal, but everyone's accuracy is so horrible that they seem to hit everything ''except'' their foe, even in situations where they have a clear line of fire and you'd think it would be almost impossible to miss. Instead of bullet-riddled corpses, the result will be extensive damage to vehicles and property. This trope differs from ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy in that instead of just the bad guy's {{mooks}} being unable to hit the hero, it can apply to everybody on both sides.
27th Dec '17 9:15:49 AM StFan
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* Lampshaded in ''[[Creator/DCComics Detective Comics]]'' # 858, which features Comicbook/TheQuestion as a second-feature after the main ''Comicbook/{{Batwoman}}'' storyline. In the last chapter of a five-part story involving The Question breaking up a kidnapping/prostitution/smuggling organization, she is fleeing the home of the ringleader while being shot at by numerous members of his villainous entourage, only to simply run straight past the entrance gate without even a token roll to evade the gunfire. When she has run out of sight, one of the shooters turns to the others and states that they "are the worst shots ''ever.''"

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* Lampshaded in ''[[Creator/DCComics Detective Comics]]'' # 858, which features Comicbook/TheQuestion as a second-feature after the main ''Comicbook/{{Batwoman}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Batwoman}}'' storyline. In the last chapter of a five-part story involving The Question breaking up a kidnapping/prostitution/smuggling organization, she is fleeing the home of the ringleader while being shot at by numerous members of his villainous entourage, only to simply run straight past the entrance gate without even a token roll to evade the gunfire. When she has run out of sight, one of the shooters turns to the others and states that they "are the worst shots ''ever.''"



[[folder:Fan Fic]]

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[[folder:Fan Fic]]Works]]



* In the ''Fanfic/PonyPOVSeries'', Shining Armor gets a stolen enemy machine gun at one point. He misses every shot...at point blank range...in a ''crowded train car''. This is a bit of a RunningGag, as Shining Armor's aim ''stinks'' no matter what he uses, something he fully admits.

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* In the ''Fanfic/PonyPOVSeries'', Shining Armor gets a stolen enemy machine gun at one point. He misses every shot... at point blank range...range... in a ''crowded train car''. This is a bit of a RunningGag, as Shining Armor's aim ''stinks'' no matter what he uses, something he fully admits.



[[folder:Film]]
* In Creator/TimBurton's ''Film/{{Batman}}'' there is a rather campy scene where Batman goes into a dive in the Batplane, [[MoreDakka unleashes a hail of bullets]] at the Joker -- who simply stands in the open -- and completely misses. Otherwise, Burton's Batman has no problem killing (though he only does so a couple of times).

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[[folder:Film]]
[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* In Creator/TimBurton's ''Film/{{Batman}}'' ''Film/{{Batman}}'', there is a rather campy scene where Batman goes into a dive in the Batplane, [[MoreDakka unleashes a hail of bullets]] at the Joker -- who simply stands in the open -- and completely misses. Otherwise, Burton's Batman has no problem killing (though he only does so a couple of times).



* In ''Film/PulpFiction'', a random gunman takes the lead characters by surprise and unloads a large-caliber revolver at them, only for him to miss every shot and get gunned down after a {{Beat}}. [[Creator/SamuelLJackson Jules]] interprets this unlikely scenario as divine intervention, and decides to give up the life of a gangster and WalkTheEarth.
** Divine indeed. The two bullet holes over the shoulders is just coincidental. As for one bullet hole that suggest a shoulder hit and another that suggest a punctured lung, these can't be explained by science.
** It doesn't help that if you look closely during earlier scenes, you can see the bullet holes are in the wall ''[[SpecialEffectFailure before]]'' the gunman starts shooting.
* Used in the ''DerClown'' movie ''Payday'', but not played too straight: The German version of SWAT can fire their machine guns without hitting anyone. The unarmored villains can mow down most SWAT members in body armor with machine guns and shoot through steel ropes with pistols, but fail to hit the heroes unless by accidentally pulling the trigger. The heroes' firing is apparently so bad again, combined with their constant lack of [[MoreDakka dakka]], that they have to resort on [[spoiler:blowing up an entire aircraft to kill the baddies inside]].
* The gunfight in ''Film/SupportYourLocalSheriff'' demonstrated this trope.

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* In ''Film/PulpFiction'', a random gunman takes the lead characters by surprise and unloads a large-caliber revolver at them, only for him to miss every shot and get gunned down after a {{Beat}}. [[Creator/SamuelLJackson Jules]] interprets this unlikely scenario as divine intervention, and decides to give up the life of a gangster and WalkTheEarth.
**
WalkTheEarth. Divine indeed. The indeed: the two bullet holes over the shoulders is just coincidental. As for one bullet hole that suggest a shoulder hit and another that suggest a punctured lung, these can't be explained by science.
**
science. It doesn't help that if you look closely during earlier scenes, you can see the bullet holes are in the wall ''[[SpecialEffectFailure before]]'' the gunman starts shooting.
* Used in the ''DerClown'' ''Film/DerClown'' movie ''Payday'', but not played too straight: The German version of SWAT can fire their machine guns without hitting anyone. The unarmored villains can mow down most SWAT members in body armor with machine guns and shoot through steel ropes with pistols, but fail to hit the heroes unless by accidentally pulling the trigger. The heroes' firing is apparently so bad again, combined with their constant lack of [[MoreDakka dakka]], that they have to resort on [[spoiler:blowing up an entire aircraft to kill the baddies inside]].
* %%* The gunfight in ''Film/SupportYourLocalSheriff'' demonstrated this trope.



* In ''Film/{{Godzilla 1998}}'', the military does this to the extent that they do more property damage to Manhattan than the monster does.

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* In ''Film/{{Godzilla 1998}}'', ''Film/{{Godzilla|1998}}'', the military does this to the extent that they do more property damage to Manhattan than the monster does.



[[folder:Live Action TV]]

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[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]



*** Guns don't kill people. People kill glass windows, car tires and radiators. And many a MemeticMutation too.
*** At least one episode ("[[Recap/TheATeamS2E16SayItWithBullets Say It With Bullets]]") saw the team set up an elaborate ruse by making their antagonist Col. Decker believe they were hiding in the guest house on an Army base; the team had rigged a stereo system to play, by remote control, a sound-effects record where one of the tracks was machine gun fire. When Decker is tipped and brings his convoy to the guest house to call the team out, Hannibal cues the stereo, making the soldiers think they are being fired upon ... and they return fire, heavily damaging the house. When nobody is found inside, Decker blows his stack, realizing that tens of thousands of rounds of ammunition had been wasted as part of a game played for Hannibal's amusement.

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*** Guns don't kill people. People kill glass windows, car tires and radiators. And many a MemeticMutation too.
***
** At least one episode ("[[Recap/TheATeamS2E16SayItWithBullets Say It With with Bullets]]") saw the team set up an elaborate ruse by making their antagonist Col. Decker believe they were hiding in the guest house on an Army base; the team had rigged a stereo system to play, by remote control, a sound-effects record where one of the tracks was machine gun fire. When Decker is tipped and brings his convoy to the guest house to call the team out, Hannibal cues the stereo, making the soldiers think they are being fired upon ...upon... and they return fire, heavily damaging the house. When nobody is found inside, Decker blows his stack, realizing that tens of thousands of rounds of ammunition had been wasted as part of a game played for Hannibal's amusement.



* ''Series/DoctorWho'' has some bad, bad examples of this trope. In "The Gunfighters," seasoned cowboys repeatedly miss some people walking down the middle of a road. In "The Caves of Androzani," the Doctor runs through a long mudfield with little cover except for a few hills, while about a gazillion rounds are fired at him by the pursuing gang of mercenaries, and still manages to escape relatively unscathed- [[spoiler: so long as you ignore the terminal case of spetrox toxaemia.]]. There was also a lampshaded defiance of this trope in the more recent episode, A Town Called Mercy, in which the Doctor questions the skill of a gunslinger who only hit the target's hat, only to be informed that it was deliberate. Later there was a justified example, in which said gunslinger somehow managed to shoot much faster than usual, blowing up the town's clock, several windows, a street lamp, and much more besides, without even coming close to the Doctor [[spoiler: he was on his knees and flailing his weaponized arm in all directions due to the Doctor overloading him though, so YMMV on whether or not it actually counts as this trope]]

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'' has some bad, bad examples of this trope. In "The Gunfighters," Gunfighters", seasoned cowboys repeatedly miss some people walking down the middle of a road. In "The Caves of Androzani," the Doctor runs through a long mudfield with little cover except for a few hills, while about a gazillion rounds are fired at him by the pursuing gang of mercenaries, and still manages to escape relatively unscathed- [[spoiler: so long as you ignore the terminal case of spetrox toxaemia.]]. There was also a lampshaded defiance of this trope in the more recent episode, A Town Called Mercy, in which the Doctor questions the skill of a gunslinger who only hit the target's hat, only to be informed that it was deliberate. Later there was a justified example, in which said gunslinger somehow managed to shoot much faster than usual, blowing up the town's clock, several windows, a street lamp, and much more besides, without even coming close to the Doctor [[spoiler: he was on his knees and flailing his weaponized arm in all directions due to the Doctor overloading him though, so YMMV on whether or not it actually counts as this trope]]



* Any enemy on ''Series/{{Andromeda}}''. To be fair, in one episode, the crew of the ''Andromeda Ascendant'' were shown to be wearing "ECM Generators" that "play hell with smart bullets."
** This is worst when automated defenses are used. These will track dodging enemies, but walking straight at them is perfectly safe. These are the main ship defense weapons used by the heroes, too.
*** It got hijacked and used against them so many times in the first season alone that one of the characters commented something along the lines of: "Automated ships defenses. What kind of a retarded engineer had that put in?" while taking cover from said automatic defense turrets.
* Generally averted on ''Series/{{Airwolf}}''.

to:

* Any enemy on ''Series/{{Andromeda}}''. To be fair, in one episode, the crew of the ''Andromeda Ascendant'' were shown to be wearing "ECM Generators" that "play hell with smart bullets."
**
" This is worst when automated defenses are used. These will track dodging enemies, but walking straight at them is perfectly safe. These are the main ship defense weapons used by the heroes, too.
***
too. It got hijacked and used against them so many times in the first season alone that one of the characters commented something along the lines of: "Automated ships defenses. What kind of a retarded engineer had that put in?" while taking cover from said automatic defense turrets.
* Generally averted on ''Series/{{Airwolf}}''.
turrets.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'': [[MoreDakka Orks + guns]] = [[HilarityEnsues hilarity.]] Orks in general tend to shoot more to hear the noise of their guns going off than to actually kill anyone with them. The ''TabletopGame/RogueTrader'' RPG points out that all Ork weapons are actually ''smoothbore'', as their genetically-engineered technical knowledge apparently doesn't include that whole "spin-stabilized ballistics" thing.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'': ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': [[MoreDakka Orks + guns]] = [[HilarityEnsues hilarity.]] Orks in general tend to shoot more to hear the noise of their guns going off than to actually kill anyone with them. The ''TabletopGame/RogueTrader'' RPG points out that all Ork weapons are actually ''smoothbore'', as their genetically-engineered technical knowledge apparently doesn't include that whole "spin-stabilized ballistics" thing.



* Ideally, this is what you want to make out of your opponents in BulletHell games.



''[cue Wash staring at him for a moment, then dropping the guard with a single shot.]''

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''[cue Wash staring at him for a moment, then dropping the guard with a single shot.]''shot]''



* ''WebVideo/{{Kickassia}}'' was slightly less extreme, in that at one point one person was hit.

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* ''WebVideo/{{Kickassia}}'' was is slightly less extreme, in that at one point one person was hit.
26th Dec '17 10:24:19 PM TheBigBopper
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The ineffective deployment of MoreDakka. Bullets fly left, right and center, but no one is getting hit. Their remarkable ability to expend enormous amounts of ammunition without managing to hit anyone ([[{{Mooks}} important]]) distinguishes them as honor graduates from the ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy.

Related to this is when the goodies deliberately miss their shots because they do not wish to kill anyone.

This trope is often TruthInTelevision, particularly after it was statistically analyzed in World War II. Officially this trope goes by the term [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spray_and_pray spray and pray]] as any sustained automatic fire from a hand held weapon will require divine intervention to actually hit its target. The causes for this trope are rooted in physics because the recoil from each successive shot from an automatic weapon will force the weapon's muzzle to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muzzle_climb rise up]] until all of the rounds are passing harmlessly over the target.

Since soldiers stopped lining up and charging the enemy head on (which had made sense back when the standard weapons were smoothbore muskets that were slow to reload and hopelessly inaccurate unless fired in massive volleys), it has become much harder to actually hit your opponent, even with well-aimed shots. Targets that move quickly and stay behind cover are naturally harder to hit, and when they are returning fire one's own ability to concentrate, aim and shoot will be seriously impacted. Today small arms tactics revolve around [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suppressive_fire suppressive fire]] and maneuver, which use aimed shots to suppress, or pin down the enemy, to allow other elements to move in close for the kill. Back in the late 1950s, in Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' he points out that military histories show that it takes several ''thousand'' rounds ''per person'' to kill an enemy soldier (in today's era of machine guns that shoot hundreds of rounds of suppressing fire, it takes [[http://web.archive.org/web/20100211140025/http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-forced-to-import-bullets-from-israel-as-troops-use-250000-for-every-rebel-killed-508299.html at least 250,000 rounds to kill one militant in Iraq!]][[note]]It should be noted that a large portion of those bullets were used in target practice and otherwise outside of combat.[[/note]]), even under normal circumstances; in combat, accuracy with small arms goes ''way'' down. Way, way down. It should be noted that long before machineguns and semi-automatic rifles like the WWII M1 Garand were developed, artillery was the big killer on the battlefield and still is.

Perhaps this trope is employed as an alternative to the opposite extreme of GunsAreWorthless and AnnoyingArrows. A writer trying to be realistic about how dangerous both arrows and bullets are in the right hands would have to make the people firing them unable to hit the broad side of a barn in order to draw fights out for dramatic effect.

The real reason, of course, was the fact ''[[Series/TheATeam The A-Team]]'' was nominally a kid's show in prime time, and [[BloodlessCarnage killing was a network no-no]] (similar rationale can be given for ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero''). At the time, it was overlooked due to the RuleOfCool. (And still is, so much so that the movie remake was heavily criticized by fans for actually showing the heroes killing people.)

The opposite of this trope is ImprobableAimingSkills, and the bladed weapon counterpart is {{Flynning}}, in which swords clash but nobody goes for the kill. See also BloodlessCarnage and NonLethalWarfare, which often motivate this trope. Compare ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy, which is this trope specifically applied to {{mooks}}, and PowerfulButInaccurate, when the inaccuracy is canonically a property of the weapon.

to:

The ineffective deployment MoreDakka is claimed by many to be the most reliable way of MoreDakka. Bullets fly left, right killing something, but ironically there are a lot of shootouts on TV where the number of bullets fired seems inversely proportional to their likelihood of killing or even wounding anyone. Heroes and center, but no one is getting hit. Their remarkable ability to villains can expend enormous amounts of ammunition without managing ammo shooting at each other, often with automatic weapons and/or at very close range, yet everybody important is protected by PlotArmor; only a {{mook}} or RedShirt has anything to worry about, and sometimes even they will be defeated or driven off non-lethally. It's not that the bullets aren't potentially lethal, but everyone's accuracy is so horrible that they seem to hit anyone ([[{{Mooks}} important]]) distinguishes everything ''except'' their foe, even in situations where they have a clear line of fire and you'd think it would be almost impossible to miss. Instead of bullet-riddled corpses, the result will be extensive damage to vehicles and property. This trope differs from ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy in that instead of just the bad guy's {{mooks}} being unable to hit the hero, it can apply to everybody on both sides.

Perhaps this trope is employed as an alternative to the opposite extreme of GunsAreWorthless and AnnoyingArrows. A writer trying to be realistic about how dangerous both arrows and bullets are in the right hands would have to make the people firing
them as honor graduates from unable to hit the ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy.

Related
broad side of a barn in order to this is when draw fights out for dramatic effect. In the case of the TropeNamer, however, the real reason was that ''Series/TheATeam'' was nominally a kid's show in prime time, and [[BloodlessCarnage killing was a network no-no]]; It was overlooked at the time due to the RuleOfCool, and in fact the movie remake was heavily criticized by fans for actually showing the heroes killing people. This trope can be related to instances where the goodies deliberately miss their shots because they do not wish to kill anyone.

anyone, but ironically the intentionally non-lethal use of firearms tends to require the opposite trope--ImprobableAimingSkills--for tricks like BlastingItOutOfTheirHands or winging the bad guys in order to invoke OnlyAFleshWound. Most of the time, A-Team firing is depicted as unintentional.

This trope is often TruthInTelevision, particularly after it was statistically analyzed in World War II. Officially this trope goes by the TruthInTelevision. A common term for it is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spray_and_pray spray and pray]] as any sustained automatic fire from a hand held weapon will require divine intervention to actually hit its target. The causes for this trope are rooted in physics because the recoil from each successive shot from an automatic weapon will force the weapon's muzzle to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muzzle_climb rise up]] until all of the rounds are passing harmlessly over the target.

Since soldiers stopped lining up In past centuries of gunpowder warfare, firearms technology put considerable limits on accuracy. Barrel rifling and charging the enemy head on (which had tight-fitting lead ball ammunition made sense back when the standard weapons were smoothbore muskets that were slow a gun more accurate, but they also made it slower and more difficult to reload as powder residue fouled the barrel more with each shot. Therefore, most regular infantry used smootbore muskets while rifles were more often limited to hunters, sharpshooters, and hopelessly inaccurate unless fired skirmishers. It was also easier to reload a musket using under-size balls which required a cloth patch to seat them in massive volleys), it has become much harder to actually hit your opponent, the barrel, even though the loose fit and random spin imparted to the bullet tended to send it off target upon leaving the barrel. Especially in the 18th century, military leaders believed that volume of fire was more important than individual accuracy for inflicting casualties, training their troops to load and fire in ranks as rapidly as possible while advancing unflinchingly towards the enemy. Aiming wasn't helped by the fact that black powder guns produced huge amounts of smoke, which quickly shrouded the battlefield in an impenetrable fog after a few volleys.

The effect of firearms
with well-aimed shots. higher accuracy and rates of fire has been to change tactics, leading to the same problem for different reasons. Targets that move quickly and stay behind cover instead of lining up in the open are naturally harder to hit, and when they are returning fire one's own ability to concentrate, aim and shoot will be seriously impacted. Today small arms tactics revolve around [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suppressive_fire suppressive fire]] and maneuver, which use aimed shots to suppress, or pin down the enemy, to allow other elements to move in close for the kill. Back in the late 1950s, in Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' he points out that military histories show that it takes several ''thousand'' rounds ''per person'' to kill an enemy soldier (in today's era of machine guns that shoot hundreds of rounds of suppressing fire, it takes [[http://web.archive.org/web/20100211140025/http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-forced-to-import-bullets-from-israel-as-troops-use-250000-for-every-rebel-killed-508299.html at least 250,000 rounds to kill one militant in Iraq!]][[note]]It should be noted that a large portion of those bullets were used in target practice and otherwise outside of combat.[[/note]]), even under normal circumstances; in combat, accuracy with small arms goes ''way'' down. Way, way down. It should be noted that long before machineguns and semi-automatic rifles like the WWII M1 Garand were developed, artillery was the big killer on the battlefield and it still is.

Perhaps this trope is employed as an alternative to the opposite extreme of GunsAreWorthless and AnnoyingArrows. A writer trying to be realistic about how dangerous both arrows and bullets are in the right hands would have to make the people firing them unable to hit the broad side of a barn in order to draw fights out for dramatic effect.

The real reason, of course, was the fact ''[[Series/TheATeam The A-Team]]'' was nominally a kid's show in prime time, and [[BloodlessCarnage killing was a network no-no]] (similar rationale can be given for ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero''). At the time, it was overlooked due to the RuleOfCool. (And still is, so much so that the movie remake was heavily criticized by fans for actually showing the heroes killing people.)

The opposite of this trope is ImprobableAimingSkills, and the bladed weapon counterpart is {{Flynning}}, in which swords clash but nobody goes for the kill. See also BloodlessCarnage and NonLethalWarfare, which often motivate this trope. Compare ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy, which is this trope specifically applied to {{mooks}}, and PowerfulButInaccurate, when the inaccuracy is canonically a property of the weapon.
16th Oct '17 8:46:29 PM Kadorhal
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* On September 23, 1989, in the Hilltop neighborhood of Tacoma, Washington, resident Bill Foulk, a US Army Ranger Staff Sergeant, was having a cookout with several of his friends (also Army Rangers) and their families. [[MuggingTheMonster He and his party were attacked by local drug dealers in retaliation]] for Foulk's attempts to organize neighborhood watch and protection programs, which included videotaping of a nearby "crack house". In a gun battle lasting more than 10 minutes, over 300 rounds were reported to have been fired from semiautomatic pistols, rifles, and shotguns; without a single injury resulting on either side. Foulk's party was not prosecuted for their participation in the shooting, as city officials deemed it a clear case of self defense. Their commanding officer was less forgiving, however; and ordered them to spend several months of extended time on the firing range for failing to hit their targets.
* John Haguee, the televangelist, will happily retell an incident, caught on camera, where a gunman from [[SarcasmMode a "successful councelling session"]] stormed his church during a live broadcast, pointed a gun at Haguee, and demanded he get on his hands and knees and pray to Satan, while denying the existence of God (which is ridiculous, since the official Church of Satan acknowledges that God created Satan). When Haguee refused, the gunman opened fire, and caused considerable property damage but failed to hit Haguee, Upon running out of ammunition, the gunman dropped his weapon and fled, right into waiting police officers, responding to the incident. Police forensics checking the footage and doing ray-tracing analysis concluded that Haguee should have been hit, repeatedly, and possibly killed. Haguee insists divine intervention for the fact that he was not.

to:

* On September 23, 1989, in the Hilltop neighborhood of Tacoma, Washington, resident Bill Foulk, a US Army Ranger Staff Sergeant, was having a cookout with several of his friends (also Army Rangers) and their families. [[MuggingTheMonster He and his party were attacked by local drug dealers in retaliation]] for Foulk's attempts to organize neighborhood watch and protection programs, which included videotaping of a nearby "crack house". In a gun battle lasting more than 10 minutes, over 300 rounds were reported to have been fired from semiautomatic pistols, rifles, and shotguns; without a single injury resulting on either side. Foulk's party was not prosecuted for their participation in the shooting, as city officials deemed it a clear case of self defense. Their commanding officer was less forgiving, however; however, and ordered them to spend several months of extended time on the firing range for failing to hit their targets.
* John Haguee, the televangelist, will happily retell an incident, caught on camera, where a gunman from [[SarcasmMode a "successful councelling session"]] stormed his church during a live broadcast, pointed a gun at Haguee, and demanded he get on his hands and knees and pray to Satan, while denying the existence of God (which is ridiculous, since the official Church of Satan acknowledges that God created Satan). When Haguee refused, the gunman opened fire, and caused considerable property damage but failed to hit Haguee, Haguee. Upon running out of ammunition, the gunman dropped his weapon and fled, right into waiting police officers, responding to the incident. Police forensics checking the footage and doing ray-tracing analysis concluded that Haguee should ''should'' have been hit, repeatedly, and possibly killed. Haguee insists divine intervention for the fact that he was not.
14th Oct '17 12:07:26 AM TheBigBopper
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Since soldiers stopped lining up and charging the enemy head on, it has become much harder to actually hit your opponent, even with well-aimed shots. Targets that move quickly and stay behind cover are naturally harder to hit, and when they are returning fire one's own ability to concentrate, aim and shoot will be seriously impacted. Today small arms tactics revolve around [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suppressive_fire suppressive fire]] and maneuver, which use aimed shots to suppress, or pin down the enemy, to allow other elements to move in close for the kill. Back in the late 1950s, in Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' he points out that military histories show that it takes several ''thousand'' rounds ''per person'' to kill an enemy soldier (in today's era of machine guns that shoot hundreds of rounds of suppressing fire, it takes [[http://web.archive.org/web/20100211140025/http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-forced-to-import-bullets-from-israel-as-troops-use-250000-for-every-rebel-killed-508299.html at least 250,000 rounds to kill one militant in Iraq!]][[note]]It should be noted that a large portion of those bullets were used in target practice and otherwise outside of combat.[[/note]]), even under normal circumstances; in combat, accuracy with small arms goes ''way'' down. Way, way down. It should be noted that long before machineguns and semi-automatic rifles like the WWII M1 Garand were developed, artillery was the big killer on the battlefield and still is.

to:

Since soldiers stopped lining up and charging the enemy head on, on (which had made sense back when the standard weapons were smoothbore muskets that were slow to reload and hopelessly inaccurate unless fired in massive volleys), it has become much harder to actually hit your opponent, even with well-aimed shots. Targets that move quickly and stay behind cover are naturally harder to hit, and when they are returning fire one's own ability to concentrate, aim and shoot will be seriously impacted. Today small arms tactics revolve around [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suppressive_fire suppressive fire]] and maneuver, which use aimed shots to suppress, or pin down the enemy, to allow other elements to move in close for the kill. Back in the late 1950s, in Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' he points out that military histories show that it takes several ''thousand'' rounds ''per person'' to kill an enemy soldier (in today's era of machine guns that shoot hundreds of rounds of suppressing fire, it takes [[http://web.archive.org/web/20100211140025/http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-forced-to-import-bullets-from-israel-as-troops-use-250000-for-every-rebel-killed-508299.html at least 250,000 rounds to kill one militant in Iraq!]][[note]]It should be noted that a large portion of those bullets were used in target practice and otherwise outside of combat.[[/note]]), even under normal circumstances; in combat, accuracy with small arms goes ''way'' down. Way, way down. It should be noted that long before machineguns and semi-automatic rifles like the WWII M1 Garand were developed, artillery was the big killer on the battlefield and still is.
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