History Main / AscendedFridgeHorror

22nd Jul '17 10:55:31 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' has Journal 3 to provide further and often darker details about several parts of the show.

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* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' has ''[[Literature/GravityFallsJournal3 Journal 3 3]]'' to provide further and often darker details about several parts of the show.
22nd Jul '17 10:46:57 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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* After the ''ComicBook/XMen'' story arc "Fall of the Mutants" first introduced the [[GreaterScopeVillain En Sabah Nur]] (ComicBook/{{Apocalypse}}) in 1986, his introduction retroactively made the team's earliest adventures seem pretty disturbing to some fans, implying that there was a millennia-old Mutant warlord just [[ParanoiaFuel biding his time and waiting to strike]] while the X-Men were busy battling Sentinels and clashing with the Brotherhood. Then the 1995 crossover "ComicBook/AgeOfApocalypse" took that idea and ran with it. Apparently, not only was Apocalypse ''always'' lurking in the background of the Marvel Universe, the only reason he didn't reveal himself when the X-Men were teenagers is because he didn't think he could challenge Xavier and Magneto's combined forces, and was wary of [[EnemyMine giving them a common enemy to unite against]]. And in an alternate timeline where [[WhatIf Xavier died before he could form the X-Men]], Apocalypse easily ''[[BadFuture conquered most of the world]]''.

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* After the ''ComicBook/XMen'' story arc "Fall of the Mutants" first introduced the [[GreaterScopeVillain En Sabah Nur]] (ComicBook/{{Apocalypse}}) in 1986, his introduction retroactively made the team's earliest adventures seem pretty disturbing to some fans, implying that there was a millennia-old Mutant warlord just [[ParanoiaFuel biding his time and waiting to strike]] while the X-Men were busy battling Sentinels and clashing with the Brotherhood. Then the 1995 crossover "ComicBook/AgeOfApocalypse" took that idea and ran with it. Apparently, not only was Apocalypse ''always'' lurking in the background of the Marvel Universe, the only reason he didn't reveal himself when the X-Men were teenagers is because he didn't think he could challenge Xavier and Magneto's combined forces, and was wary of [[EnemyMine giving them a common enemy to unite against]]. And in an alternate timeline where [[WhatIf Xavier died before he could form the X-Men]], Apocalypse easily ''[[BadFuture conquered most of the world]]''.
22nd Jul '17 10:44:55 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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* After the ''ComicBook/XMen'' story arc "Fall of the Mutants" first introduced the [[GreaterScopeVillain En Sabah Nur]] (ComicBook/{{Apocalypse}}) in 1986, his introduction retroactively made the team's earliest adventures seem pretty disturbing to some fans, implying that there was a millennia-old Mutant warlord just [[ParanoiaFuel biding his time and waiting to strike]] while the X-Men were busy battling Sentinels and clashing with the Brotherhood. Then the 1995 crossover "ComicBook/AgeOfApocalypse" took that idea and ran with it. Apparently, not only was Apocalypse ''always'' lurking in the background of the Marvel Universe, the only reason he didn't reveal himself when the X-Men were teenagers is because he didn't think he could challenge Xavier and Magneto's combined forces, and was wary of [[EnemyMine giving them a common enemy to unite against]]. And in an alternate timeline where [[WhatIf Xavier died before he could form the X-Men]], Apocalypse easily ''[[BadFuture conquered most of the world]]''.
5th Jul '17 3:07:39 PM RedScharlach
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** The new series has Rose leave to travel with The Doctor, though she doesn't think to tell her mother about this. When she accidentally returns a year later instead of a day, her mother is very angry, having feared that she might have died. Rose's boyfriend, the last one to have seen her before her disappearance, was accused of murdering her and was even questioned by the police a few times. A similar situation had been touched upon in the last regular Classic Who story "Survival", where Ace returns to Perivale and finds she is thought dead, though her being more anti-social then Rose and having a terrible relationship with her mother makes it more plausible she would run away.

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** The new series has Rose leave to travel with The the Doctor, though she doesn't think to tell her mother about this. When she accidentally returns a year later instead of a day, her mother is very angry, having feared that she might have died. Rose's boyfriend, the last one to have seen her before her disappearance, was accused of murdering her and was even questioned by the police a few times. A similar situation had been touched upon in the last regular Classic Who story "Survival", where Ace returns to Perivale and finds she is thought dead, though her being more anti-social then Rose and having a terrible relationship with her mother makes it more plausible she would run away.



** Clara Oswald has a gigantic role in ''all'' of the Doctors' lives from Series 7 onward, having had a direct hand in everything from saving the Doctor's timeline -- and by extension the universe -- from the Great Intelligence, convincing him to [[spoiler: save Gallifrey]] in "The Day of the Doctor", keeping him from being KilledOffForReal in "The Time of the Doctor", being his ''only'' close friend when he regenerates from Eleven to Twelve, and even [[spoiler: inspiring his childhood self to heroism]]. Like all companions, she keeps his ego and alien nature in check as a LivingEmotionalCrutch and MoralityPet -- but she's also, arguably, his soulmate. Alas, he can't be together with her forever, as he's a functional immortal, and it's well-established that is he not good with dealing with loss or being alone under the usual circumstances of a companion departure. How can he move on to other companions after '''Clara''' when they'll '''all''' come up short of her barring miracles? This horror ascends in Series 9, as the biggest of the growing crises in the StoryArc is his increasingly desperate efforts to ensure he doesn't lose her. When they are separated in the worst possible way -- [[spoiler: she is killed off in a Senseless Sacrfice he had no hope of preventing]] -- AND he is promptly imprisoned in a giant torture chamber by his enemies, the result is that he goes '''''stark raving mad''''', becomes TheUnfettered, and risks all of space and time on an unattainable TragicDream: [[spoiler: bringing her back from the grave]]. In the end, he ''does'' return to his best self...but it takes the help of [[spoiler: Mind Rape, which causes him to lose his key memories of what made him love her and renders him unable to recognize her,]] to do so.

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** Clara Oswald has a gigantic role in ''all'' of the Doctors' lives from Series 7 onward, having had a direct hand in everything from saving the Doctor's timeline -- and by extension the universe -- from the Great Intelligence, convincing him to [[spoiler: save Gallifrey]] in "The Day of the Doctor", keeping him from being KilledOffForReal in "The Time of the Doctor", being his ''only'' close friend when he regenerates from Eleven to Twelve, and even [[spoiler: inspiring his childhood self to heroism]]. Like all companions, she keeps his ego and alien nature in check as a LivingEmotionalCrutch and MoralityPet -- but she's also, arguably, his soulmate. Alas, he can't be together with her forever, as he's a functional immortal, and it's well-established that is he not good with dealing with loss or being alone under the usual circumstances of a companion departure. How can he move on to other companions after '''Clara''' when they'll '''all''' come up short of her barring miracles? This horror ascends in Series 9, as the biggest of the growing crises in the StoryArc is his increasingly desperate efforts to ensure he doesn't lose her. When they are separated in the worst possible way -- [[spoiler: she is killed off in a Senseless Sacrfice SenselessSacrifice he had no hope of preventing]] -- AND he is promptly imprisoned in a giant torture chamber by his enemies, the result is that he goes '''''stark raving mad''''', becomes TheUnfettered, and risks all of space and time on an unattainable TragicDream: [[spoiler: bringing her back from the grave]]. In the end, he ''does'' return to his best self...but it takes the help of [[spoiler: Mind Rape, which causes him to lose his key memories of what made him love her and renders him unable to recognize her,]] to do so.



** It also deconstructs the small power the trolls display regarding memory manipulation. In the original, they basically wiped Anna's memories of Elsa's powers and these powers aren't brought up again. In OUAT? Memory manipulation is the one thing they major in, and everyone knows it, for good or ill. If the trolls are involved or mentioned, chances are it has to do with memories. People from across the land know stories of their powers, with one of them seeking to have them restore her memories [[spoiler:while another asked them to wipe the memories of the entire kingdom to cover up the incident mentioned above]], showing that these powers are not so easily ignored. And all while it follows the good ol' mantra of "all magic comes with a price".

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** It also deconstructs the small power the trolls display regarding memory manipulation. In the original, they basically wiped Anna's memories of Elsa's powers and these powers aren't brought up again. In OUAT? Memory OUAT, memory manipulation is the one thing they major in, and everyone knows it, for good or ill. If the trolls are involved or mentioned, chances are it has to do with memories. People from across the land know stories of their powers, with one of them seeking to have them restore her memories [[spoiler:while another asked them to wipe the memories of the entire kingdom to cover up the incident mentioned above]], showing that these powers are not so easily ignored. And all while it follows the good ol' mantra of "all magic comes with a price".



* In ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' Meg is quite dark example of a ButtMonkey, being horribly abused by her parents and is always played for BlackComedy. The episode "Seahorse Seashell Party" deconstructs the abuse as a serious issue, turning her into TheWoobie. Even Meg mentions that if people on the outside ever saw how Peter treats her, he would've been put in jail a long time ago. One would think Meg finally catches a break as her family breaks down in tears from the revelation, but Meg later realizes that the reason her family treats her like shit is because they need someone to expel all their negative energy into and without Meg for that, they would turn on each other. Meg decides to apologize for what she said and lets her family abuse her again for the sake of keeping everyone slightly sane. Some fans may see this as a cheap in-universe reason for why Meg is abused in nearly every episode, giving the FamilyUnfriendlyAesop that abused people should continue to be abused if it keeps their abusers happy.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' Meg is quite a dark example of a ButtMonkey, being horribly abused by her parents and is yet it's always played for BlackComedy. The episode "Seahorse Seashell Party" deconstructs the abuse as a serious issue, turning her into TheWoobie. Even Meg mentions that if people on the outside ever saw how Peter treats her, he would've been put in jail a long time ago. One would think Meg finally catches a break as her family breaks down in tears from the revelation, but Meg later realizes that the reason her family treats her like shit is because they need someone to expel all their negative energy into and without Meg for that, they would turn on each other. Meg decides to apologize for what she said and lets her family abuse her again for the sake of keeping everyone slightly sane. Some fans may see this as a cheap in-universe reason for why Meg is abused in nearly every episode, giving the FamilyUnfriendlyAesop that abused people should continue to be abused if it keeps their abusers happy.
22nd Jun '17 8:28:46 AM Siempie
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** It showed that Bill was planning to kill Dipper when done with him after the events of Sock Opera.

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** It showed that Bill was planning to kill Dipper by throwing his body off the water tower when done with him after the events of Sock Opera.Opera, and staging it as a suicide.
16th Jun '17 4:58:08 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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** The series is built on the premise that some people can "bend" different elements: water, fire, earth, air. To waterbend, one needs a source of water to do it. During the second season a waterbender in a swamp bends vines, so it's clearly possible to bend things partially made of water. In the episode "The Puppetmaster" Katara meets a Waterbender elder who teaches her that she can draw water from almost anywhere: the ground, plants, even from the atmosphere around her. But wait! Isn't the human body 70% water? Can't a waterbender theoretically control a person or draw the water right out of them? In this episode, the creators answer those questions to a [[DarkerAndEdgier horrifying degree.]] [[spoiler:Hama doesn't call it [[BloodyMurder Blood]][[PeoplePuppets bending]] for no reason.]]

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** The series is built on the premise that some people about 1/10th of the population can "bend" different elements: water, fire, earth, air. To waterbend, telekinetically manipulate, or "bend", one needs a source of water to do it. During the second season a waterbender in a swamp bends vines, so it's clearly possible to bend [[ElementalPowers four classical elements]]. It's also demonstrated several times that benders can affect things that are partially made of water. In the episode "The Puppetmaster" Katara meets a Waterbender elder who teaches her that she can draw water from almost anywhere: the ground, their element (for example, waterbenders bending mud or plants, even from the atmosphere around her. But wait! Isn't earthbenders bending metal, firebenders bending lightning). Well, the human body is 70% water? Can't water, isn't it? So what would happen if a waterbender theoretically control a person or draw were to bend ''that''? [[spoiler: We find out in the water right out of them? In episode ''The Puppetmaster'' that this episode, the creators answer those questions is indeed a thing. Its inventor Hama calls it bloodbending, and uses it to a [[DarkerAndEdgier horrifying degree.]] [[spoiler:Hama doesn't call it [[BloodyMurder Blood]][[PeoplePuppets bending]] for no reason.create PeoplePuppets.]]
15th Jun '17 3:04:52 AM Doug86
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* A common observation about ''Film/ManOfSteel'' is that the movie's portrayal of ComicBook/{{Superman}} seems to come off as far more of a DestructiveSavior than nearly every other incarnation of the character, to the point that he seems to cause almost as much property damage as General Zod and his soldiers, and probably racks up a sizable body count by the end of the movie. ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'' is surprisingly up-front about acknowledging this fact. It turns out that [[ComicBook/{{Batman}} Bruce Wayne]] was in Metropolis during Superman's battle with Zod, and he came to see Superman as a threat because [[BewareTheSuperman he was so terrified by the destruction that he saw]]. Among other things, we're introduced to a young girl who lost her mother when a building in Metropolis was leveled by the battle, and we meet Wallace Keefe, a man who lost both of his legs to falling debris and went on to resent Superman for the rest of his life. We also see that, from Bruce's spot on the street, it was nearly impossible to tell Zod and Superman apart while they duked it out in the sky, making it rather ambiguous which one of them was the ''real'' alien invader.

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* A common observation about ''Film/ManOfSteel'' is that the movie's portrayal of ComicBook/{{Superman}} Franchise/{{Superman}} seems to come off as far more of a DestructiveSavior than nearly every other incarnation of the character, to the point that he seems to cause almost as much property damage as General Zod and his soldiers, and probably racks up a sizable body count by the end of the movie. ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'' is surprisingly up-front about acknowledging this fact. It turns out that [[ComicBook/{{Batman}} [[Franchise/{{Batman}} Bruce Wayne]] was in Metropolis during Superman's battle with Zod, and he came to see Superman as a threat because [[BewareTheSuperman he was so terrified by the destruction that he saw]]. Among other things, we're introduced to a young girl who lost her mother when a building in Metropolis was leveled by the battle, and we meet Wallace Keefe, a man who lost both of his legs to falling debris and went on to resent Superman for the rest of his life. We also see that, from Bruce's spot on the street, it was nearly impossible to tell Zod and Superman apart while they duked it out in the sky, making it rather ambiguous which one of them was the ''real'' alien invader.



** It also confirmed fan theories that McGucket had had multiple bad experiences working with Ford even before the portal incident.

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** It also confirmed fan theories that McGucket [=McGucket=] had had multiple bad experiences working with Ford even before the portal incident.
5th Jun '17 4:44:41 PM Julia1984
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* A promotional booklet for the 2015 ''Film/{{Goosebumps}}'' film adopts the popular if not universal {{fanon}} interpretation of a line from the [[Series/{{Goosebumps}} tv series']] episode "Night of the Living Dummy II" that the incantation that brings a DemonicDummy to life (who, keep in mind, proceeds blackmail and threaten prepubescent-to-teenage girls into being his "slaves") translates to "You and I are one now." Only fans could come up with a translation ''that'' creepy.
1st Jun '17 10:34:45 AM Allronix
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* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' had a couple bits at the end. Okay, so Peter is a HalfHumanHybrid, and that explains how he was able to handle the Power Stone and not die instantly. And Yondu, a notorious career pirate and criminal refers to Peter's father as a "[[EvenEvilHasStandards jackass.]]" Okay, so what kind of being was both ''that'' powerful and so bad that someone who spent a lifetime plundering ships and killing people would call a "jackass?" We find out in the sequel. [[spoiler: This universe's version of Ego the Living Planet, a Celestial who sired - and murdered - untold numbers of his own offspring trying find one that had enough power to help him destroy the entire universe. Yondu was hired to deliver Peter to Ego, but backed out of the deal and raised Peter as his own when he realized what Ego was doing to the ''other'' kids he help bring to the planet.]]
7th May '17 5:28:24 PM cybertoy0
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* In the backstory of ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfTheGummiBears'', there used to be hundreds of Gummis living in Gummi Glen, whose numbers have dwindled to seven. There's always been the subtle implication that Cubbi might end up alone someday, and this was addressed in the episode, where we meet another Gummi by the name of Chummi. Chummi was the youngest of his clan, and now the last, and it's outright stated that if something isn't done, all Cubbi has to look forward to is eventually being alone.
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