History Main / AsbestosFreeCereal

27th Dec '17 6:13:38 PM DarthNANAME
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*''[[VideoGame/{{Oddworld}} Oddworld: Abe's Exoddus]]'' gives us a variation, where a marquee advertisement tries to spin a flaw ''as a positive.'':
-->''[=SoulStorm=] Brew... twice the flavor... twice the bones... twice the price!''
26th Dec '17 1:57:08 PM JamieBGood
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ud1JXqGWPvU Boneless Pizza]] (warning: sensory abuse) is a strange case of someone asking for this specifically.
19th Dec '17 6:52:18 AM JackG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/TheGoodies'': On "It Might as Well Be String" (a spoof of the advertising industry), their ad campaign for Sunbeam Sliced Bread claims that "nine out of ten doctors agree that people who eat Sunbeam Sliced Bread are less likely to be trampled to death by elephants". Graeme does mention that it was a struggle to find the right nine doctors, however. And the elephants.

to:

* ''Series/TheGoodies'': On "It Might as Well Be String" (a spoof of the advertising industry), their ad campaign for Sunbeam Sliced Bread claims that "nine out of ten doctors agree that people who eat Sunbeam Sliced Bread are less likely to be trampled to death by elephants". Graeme does mention that it was a struggle to find the [[MadDoctor right nine doctors, doctors]], however. And the elephants.
5th Dec '17 5:09:39 PM thatother1dude
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[http://www.cableone.net Cable One]] advertises a speed of "50 Megs" or "50 Megs per second" in its radio commercials. They neglect to mention that it is mega''bits'', and not mega''bytes'' as the commercial implies.

to:

* [[http://www.cableone.net Cable One]] advertises a speed of "50 Megs" or "50 Megs per second" in its radio commercials. They neglect to mention that it is mega''bits'', and not mega''bytes'' as the commercial implies.implies, which lowers the speed by a factor of eight.
5th Dec '17 4:58:00 PM thatother1dude
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Inverted on ''Series/TheDailyShow'', when a pediatrics group advocated against hot dogs, Aasif Mandvi gave "threats" about eating hot dogs, like "Eating hot dogs provides none of your daily fruit intake", "People that eat hot dogs have a 100% chance of dying", and "If you lined up all of the deaths from hot dogs, they would stretch some of the distance to the Sun".

to:

* Inverted on ''Series/TheDailyShow'', when a pediatrics group advocated against hot dogs, Aasif Mandvi gave "threats" about eating hot dogs, like "Eating hot dogs provides none of your daily fruit intake", "People that eat hot dogs have a [[WeAllDieSomeDay 100% chance of dying", dying]]", and "If you lined up all of the deaths from hot dogs, they would stretch some of the distance to the Sun".
5th Dec '17 4:56:25 AM angie710
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Cable and satellite companies comparing their broadband Internet speeds to DSL. Although DSL is ''much'' slower than what they're likely offering, what they don't tell you is, ''most residential homes aren't even going to be using DSL in the first place''. (And certainly almost no businesses would use it, either.) Today's society is so Internet-dependent that DSL, while state-of-the-art in the late [[TheNineties 90's]] or at the TurnOfTheMillennium, [[TechnologyMarchesOn just doesn't cut it for most people now]]. The only people that are going to be using DSL are people who live in remote areas where cable and fiber Internet are not available, low-income households that can't afford to get anything faster (or else they would), or people (generally older) who use the Internet sparingly. (i.e. people that either can't get broadband, or have no interest in it to begin with). So they're really comparing apples and oranges.
1st Nov '17 9:39:53 PM lakingsif
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Spotted in the wild: a restaurant sign extolling passersby to "try our new gluten-free fries!" Potatoes, as you might have guessed at this point, are ''yet another'' item that normally doesn't have any gluten in the first place.

to:

** Spotted in the wild: a restaurant sign extolling passersby to "try our new gluten-free fries!" Potatoes, as you might have guessed at this point, are ''yet another'' another item that normally doesn't have any gluten in. Except, just for educational purposes, most fries are fried in the first place.same oil as gluten products, and certainly stored with them and some of the salts/miscellaneous added extras contain gluten. It's super necessary to label what you have that's fully non-contaminated, even if it seems pretty dumb to the layperson, because of life-threatening conditions like coeliac disease.
23rd Oct '17 3:55:39 PM k0r3l1k
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In UsefulNotes/TheNewTens, it became quite a common selling point to advertise a product as "gluten-free," thanks to a string of fad diets at the time that suggested reducing or eliminating it. Gluten is a protein found in grains, like wheat, rye, and oats. While there are some gluten-free products made for people sensitive to it, a lot of these products never had any gluten in them to begin with.

to:

* In UsefulNotes/TheNewTens, it became quite a common selling point to advertise a product as "gluten-free," thanks to a string of fad diets at the time that suggested reducing or eliminating it. Gluten is a protein found in grains, like wheat, rye, and oats. While there are some gluten-free products made for people sensitive to it, a lot of these products never had any gluten in them to begin with. [[note]] It can be very helpful for those who are sensitive or allergic to gluten; having otherwise logically gluten-free foods marked as gluten-free, which makes shopping much less challenging. [[/note]]
1st Oct '17 1:29:32 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''{{Wondermark}}'' [[http://wondermark.com/870/ tries this marketing scheme]], with less-than-satisfactory results.

to:

* ''{{Wondermark}}'' ''Webcomic/{{Wondermark}}'' [[http://wondermark.com/870/ tries this marketing scheme]], with less-than-satisfactory results.
10th Sep '17 7:42:24 AM KingLyger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Wegman's Cola, the generic version of Coke sold at the (rather upscale) Wegman's supermarket chain in the US Mid-Atlantic region and Northeast, is marketed on the label as "Gluten free", "Lactose free", and "Vegan". So it has no wheat, milk, or other animal product. [[note]]We're not sure if Jones Turkey Soda did in fact contain animal products in its "natural and artificial flavors." A true exception is Calpis, also known as Calpico in English-speaking regions, which is fermented, sweetened, and carbonated milk. However, it looks just like milk, so a lactose intolerant person would be careful around Calpis anyway.[[/note]]
* Similarly, there's at least one type of white cooking wine that advertises itself as "Gluten free" but FridgeLogic kicks in when you realize that wine is made out of grapes, so there is never gluten in it. Even rice wine, which is made of "glutinous rice" is gluten free, due to an odd language quirk. [[labelnote:explanation]]"glutinous" just means "sticky" and is related to the word "glue", and that happens to ''also'' be the root of the word "gluten", otherwise the two are unrelated.[[/labelnote]]
* This also goes for non-flavored liquors such that label themselves "gluten-free." Gluten is a protein that is present in most grains that liquors such as whiskey, gin and some vodkas are made from, but gluten doesn't make it through the distillation process. Rum, tequila and brandy are never distilled from any grains by definition, so a gluten-free label on any of those is pretty much a secret gullibility test for the consumer. [[labelnote:Why non-flavored?]]Many flavoring agents are made from malted ingredients, so people with an actual gluten intolerance should proceed with caution.[[/labelnote]]
* Another joiner on this particular bandwagon is Santa Cruz Organic Peanut Butter, which is 100% made from peanuts and has the label highlighting that it is "gluten free". Even brands of peanut butter that aren't 100% peanuts generally don't use gluten-containing products. While there is certainly an opportunistic advertising element to all of these examples, it's also a bit Truth In Television. To legally declare a product "gluten free" you have to do gluten testing, maintain separate production facilities, etc. Gluten contamination can occur before the product even exists -- for instance, oats growing in a field where wheat was once planted.
* A brand of cornflakes has started advertising itself as "same taste, gluten-free!" Except there's no measurable amount of gluten in ''corn'' (''Zea mais'') flakes. So if the new, improved, possibly-certified cereal tasted different, that would be a reason to worry.
* Possibly averted by a brand of circular oat cereal which applied the "gluten free" label to its boxes. The back of the box acknowledges that the oats from which the cereal is made would not have gluten, but they changed their agreement with processing facilities to ensure no cross contamination from wheat products.
* Spotted in the wild: a restaurant sign extolling passersby to "try our new gluten-free fries!" Potatoes, as you might have guessed at this point, are ''yet another'' item that normally doesn't have any gluten in the first place.

to:

* In UsefulNotes/TheNewTens, it became quite a common selling point to advertise a product as "gluten-free," thanks to a string of fad diets at the time that suggested reducing or eliminating it. Gluten is a protein found in grains, like wheat, rye, and oats. While there are some gluten-free products made for people sensitive to it, a lot of these products never had any gluten in them to begin with.
**
Wegman's Cola, the generic version of Coke sold at the (rather upscale) Wegman's supermarket chain in the US Mid-Atlantic region and Northeast, is marketed on the label as "Gluten free", "Lactose free", and "Vegan". So it has no wheat, milk, or other animal product. [[note]]We're not sure if Jones Turkey Soda did in fact contain animal products in its "natural and artificial flavors." A true exception is Calpis, also known as Calpico in English-speaking regions, which is fermented, sweetened, and carbonated milk. However, it looks just like milk, so a lactose intolerant person would be careful around Calpis anyway.[[/note]]
* Similarly, there's ** There's at least one type of white cooking wine that advertises itself as "Gluten free" but FridgeLogic kicks in when you realize that wine is made out of grapes, so there is never gluten in it. Even rice wine, which is made of "glutinous rice" is gluten free, due to an odd language quirk. [[labelnote:explanation]]"glutinous" just means "sticky" and is related to the word "glue", and that happens to ''also'' be the root of the word "gluten", otherwise the two are unrelated.[[/labelnote]]
* ** This also goes for non-flavored liquors such that label themselves "gluten-free." Gluten is a protein that is present in most grains that liquors such as whiskey, gin and some vodkas are made from, but gluten doesn't make it through the distillation process. Rum, tequila and brandy are never distilled from any grains by definition, so a gluten-free label on any of those is pretty much a secret gullibility test for the consumer. [[labelnote:Why non-flavored?]]Many flavoring agents are made from malted ingredients, so people with an actual gluten intolerance should proceed with caution.[[/labelnote]]
* ** Another joiner on this particular bandwagon is Santa Cruz Organic Peanut Butter, which is 100% made from peanuts and has the label highlighting that it is "gluten free". Even brands of peanut butter that aren't 100% peanuts generally don't use gluten-containing products. While there is certainly an opportunistic advertising element to all of these examples, it's also a bit Truth In Television. To legally declare a product "gluten free" you have to do gluten testing, maintain separate production facilities, etc. Gluten contamination can occur before the product even exists -- for instance, oats growing in a field where wheat was once planted.
* ** A brand of cornflakes has started advertising itself as "same taste, gluten-free!" Except there's no measurable amount of gluten in ''corn'' (''Zea mais'') flakes. So if the new, improved, possibly-certified cereal tasted different, that would be a reason to worry.
*
worry. This same line of logic extends to popcorn advertised as "gluten-free," which are sometimes made from the same strain of corn as corn flakes used in cereal.
**
Possibly averted by a brand of circular oat cereal which applied the "gluten free" label to its boxes. The back of the box acknowledges that the oats from which the cereal is made would not have gluten, but they changed their agreement with processing facilities to ensure no cross contamination from wheat products.
* ** Spotted in the wild: a restaurant sign extolling passersby to "try our new gluten-free fries!" Potatoes, as you might have guessed at this point, are ''yet another'' item that normally doesn't have any gluten in the first place.
This list shows the last 10 events of 366. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AsbestosFreeCereal