History Main / AsYouKnow

24th Jun '17 6:12:03 AM DarcyFoster
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* At the start of ''Film/IndependenceDay'', the SETI worker locating the source of the signal says the distance means that it's coming from the Moon. (As the initials stand for "'''S'''earch for '''E'''xtra-'''T'''errestrial '''I'''ntelligence", they would have all known how far away the Moon is from Earth.)
13th Jun '17 1:24:09 PM Gosicrystal
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** Averted in a slightly awkward way. The first case in each game requires the player to get a quick introduction to the gameplay details. This makes perfect sense in the first game, but requires some hoop-jumping to be plausible in subsequent games, considering they star the same main character who is obviously a seasoned lawyer at that point. The second game featured a convenient bout of amnesia, whereas the third one was actually a flashback to the second case of Mia Fey, Phoenix's mentor (strangely enough, when you actually get to play her first case she doesn't get any As You Know assistance). The fourth game introduced a new protagonist, Apollo Justice- but you can actually skip the tutorial here; Apollo had watched Kristoph Gavin cross-examine several witnesses, and was fully aware of the process.
** The Miles Edgeworth spin-off uses his partner, CluelessDetective Gumshoe, as TheWatson handle this. It still sometimes has some odd things, like several characters hamhandedly reminding Edgeworth how to ''use logic''. Yes, I think he's got that down pat, thanks.
** The fifth game ''Dual Destinies'' has this as an option and it was [[JustifiedTrope somewhat justified]]. If the player opts to get an introduction on the mechanics of the game, Phoenix (a seasoned lawyer at this point) would ask his rookie partner Athena Cykes to explain how the court system works in the game. However, it was done not so much for Phoenix's sake but for Athena's since she had just suffered a HeroicBSOD moments before. Phoenix believed that having Athena explain the rules to him would bring her confidence back up.
** And, again, in ''Spirit of Justice''. This time, however, the justification is that Phoenix has to explain the process of cross-examination to ''the judge'', who hasn't had to preside over a cross-examination for a witness's testimony in over twenty years, and had forgotten the protocol for the process. This happens again in 6-3, where Maya asks if Nick should be reminded of how to cross-examine Rayfa's insights for her divination seances, which ''was'' an odd new gameplay feature that had only been shown for the first time two cases ago.

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** Averted in a slightly awkward way. The first case in each game requires the player to get a quick introduction to the gameplay details. This makes perfect sense in the first game, game because Phoenix Wright has just come out of college, but requires some hoop-jumping to be plausible not so much in subsequent the next two games, considering they still star the same main character who is obviously him after a seasoned lawyer at that point. good number of trials. The second game featured features a convenient bout of amnesia, whereas the third one was is actually a flashback to the second case of Mia Fey, Phoenix's mentor (strangely enough, when (when you actually get to play her first case case, though, she doesn't get any As You Know assistance). The fourth game introduced introduces a new protagonist, Apollo Justice- Justice - but you can actually skip the tutorial here; here, as Apollo had has watched Kristoph Gavin cross-examine several witnesses, witnesses and was is fully aware of the process.
** The Miles Edgeworth spin-off uses his partner, CluelessDetective Gumshoe, as TheWatson to handle this. It still sometimes has some odd things, like this as TheWatson. Still, several characters hamhandedly keep reminding Edgeworth how to ''use logic''. Yes, I think he's got that down pat, thanks.
logic'' (a gameplay mechanic exclusive to the spinoff).
** The fifth game ''Dual Destinies'' has this as an option and it was it's [[JustifiedTrope somewhat justified]]. If the player opts to get an introduction on the mechanics of the game, Phoenix (a seasoned lawyer at this point) would ask asks his rookie partner Athena Cykes to explain how the court system works in the game. However, it was it's done not so much for Phoenix's sake but for Athena's since she had just suffered a HeroicBSOD moments before. Phoenix believed believes that having Athena explain the rules to him would will bring her confidence back up.
** And, again, in ''Spirit of Justice''. This time, however, the justification is that Phoenix has to explain the process of cross-examination to ''the judge'', who hasn't had to preside over a cross-examination for a witness's testimony in over twenty years, and had has forgotten the protocol for the process. This happens again in 6-3, the third case, where Maya asks if Nick should be reminded of how to cross-examine Rayfa's insights for her divination seances, which ''was'' an odd séances, a new gameplay feature that had was only been shown for the first time two cases ago.
13th Jun '17 1:03:26 PM Gosicrystal
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In discussions of science fiction, this is often "As You Know, Bob" (abbreviated AYKB), or occasionally, "Tell me, Professor [[ExpoSpeak [about this marvelous invention we all use every day and have no reason to be talking about except to inform the audience]"]]. Other common variations involve a newspaper reporter sent to cover events, or conversation between two supporting characters -- hence [[IHaveManyNames another name]], "maid and butler dialogue". Creator/TerryPratchett refers to the fantasy fiction version as the "As you know, your father, the king..." speech.

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In discussions of science fiction, this is often "As You Know, Bob" (abbreviated AYKB), or occasionally, "Tell me, Professor [[ExpoSpeak [about this marvelous invention we all use every day and have no reason to be talking about except to inform the audience]"]]. Other common variations involve a newspaper reporter sent to cover events, or a conversation between two supporting characters -- hence [[IHaveManyNames another name]], "maid and butler dialogue". Creator/TerryPratchett refers to the fantasy fiction version as the "As you know, your father, the king..." speech.
6th Jun '17 3:05:58 PM shirekh34ce
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*** Similarly, Sora and company recap the events of the first game multiple times, although it's [[JustifiedTrope justified]] because they're losing their memories and they want to remind themselves why they're in Castle Oblivion.


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** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts02BirthBySleepAFragmentaryPassage'' has Yen Sid recapping the events of ''Birth by Sleep'' and Xehanort's plot from ''Dream Drop Distance'', something Riku and Mickey are aware of. However, it's [[JustifiedTrope justified]]- he's also explaining it to [[spoiler:Kairi]], who wasn't around and therefore needs to be brought up to speed.
4th Jun '17 6:47:34 PM Prinzenick
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* In the WesternAnimation/JoeOrioloFelixTheCat cartoons, the second half of each episode has a quick recap of what happened just moments ago in the first part of the episode. The reason for this is because the shows episodes were originally aired in two parts, so a quick recap was warranted since the second part of the episode wouldn't always follow up the first part right away. The [[EditedForSyndication syndicated reairings]] and DVD rerelease of the cartoons edit both parts of the episodes together into single episodes, making the recaps come off as very superfluous.
3rd Jun '17 5:04:02 AM StFan
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[[quoteright:322:[[Creator/DonRosa http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/scrooge_asyouknow.png]]]]

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[[quoteright:322:[[Creator/DonRosa [[quoteright:322:[[ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/scrooge_asyouknow.png]]]]



Although writers try to avoid this by using TheWatson (since not explaining anything sometimes results in the audience being too busy trying to figure out what's going on to enjoy the show), [[TropesAreTools using this trope is not always a bad thing.]] Also, the most common alternative is to [[EasyAmnesia give the protagonist amnesia]] so he ''doesn't'' know, which isn't really considered a better option. The IdiotHero and FishOutOfWater are also acceptable tropes to employ to make this trope more believable, though shoe-horning in such a character may be worse. A third form is to have two characters comparing information to each be sure that the other does in fact know. A fourth is to have the characters have an argument, since arguments are among the few real-life situations in which people remind each other of things they both already know.[[note]]"How could you do X? You know perfectly well that Y..."[[/note]] BreakingTheFourthWall to have the characters know they are informing the audience is OlderThanFeudalism in its own right, but obviously suitable only for broadly comic works.

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Although writers try to avoid this by using TheWatson (since not explaining anything sometimes results in the audience being too busy trying to figure out what's going on to enjoy the show), [[TropesAreTools using this trope is not always a bad thing.]] Also, the most common alternative is to [[EasyAmnesia give the protagonist amnesia]] so he ''doesn't'' know, which isn't really considered a better option. The IdiotHero and FishOutOfWater are also acceptable tropes to employ to make this trope more believable, though shoe-horning shoehorning in such a character may be worse. A third form is to have two characters comparing information to each be sure that the other does in fact know. A fourth is to have the characters have an argument, since arguments are among the few real-life situations in which people remind each other of things they both already know.[[note]]"How could you do X? You know perfectly well that Y..."[[/note]] BreakingTheFourthWall to have the characters know they are informing the audience is OlderThanFeudalism in its own right, but obviously suitable only for broadly comic works.



--> "You're part of the Space Patrol that upholds Ogikubo's law and order, and hardly get any time off. Mom left home after a fight and took all the furniture with her, so now we live in this run-down apartment. [[SarcasmMode Yeah, we're super normal alright]]."

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--> "You're -->'''Luluco:''' You're part of the Space Patrol that upholds Ogikubo's law and order, and hardly get any time off. Mom left home after a fight and took all the furniture with her, so now we live in this run-down apartment. [[SarcasmMode Yeah, we're super normal alright]]."



* ''Manga/OnePiece''

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* ''Manga/OnePiece''''Manga/OnePiece'':



--->'''Usopp (to Luffy):''' This was huge news!! Where were you eh, hiding under a rock???

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--->'''Usopp (to Luffy):''' --->'''Usopp:''' ''[to Luffy]'' This was huge news!! Where were you eh, hiding under a rock???



* ''Manga/CaseClosed''

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* ''Manga/CaseClosed'' :



[[folder:Audio Plays]]
* The AudioAdaptation of ''Discworld/TheAmazingMauriceAndHisEducatedRodents'' is, for much of the time, narrated by Maurice himself. Towards the end, it becomes apparent that he's telling the story to Dangerous Beans. Who a) was right there for most of it and b) is [[spoiler: [[OnlyMostlyDead mostly dead]]]].
[[/folder]]



* The AudioAdaptation of ''Discworld/TheAmazingMauriceAndHisEducatedRodents'' is, for much of the time, narrated by Maurice himself. Towards the end, it becomes apparent that he's telling the story to Dangerous Beans. Who a) was right there for most of it and b) is [[spoiler: [[OnlyMostlyDead mostly dead]]]].



* ''[[Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook That Mitchell And Webb Sound]]'' frequently plays the trope for laughs. In later series it becomes somewhat of a RunningGag to have one character sum up things that the others already know, and when called out on it claim that [[BlatantLies "it's realistic"]] for them to do it.

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* ''[[Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook That Mitchell And and Webb Sound]]'' frequently plays the trope for laughs. In later series it becomes somewhat of a RunningGag to have one character sum up things that the others already know, and when called out on it claim that [[BlatantLies "it's realistic"]] for them to do it.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}'' has a similar DoubleSubversion:

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}'' ''WesternAnimation/Sealab2021'' has a similar DoubleSubversion:



* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime,'' when [[KidHero Finn]] and [[NonHumanSidekick Jake]] are [[MuggedForDisguise disguised as Fire Kingdom actors]]:

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* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime,'' ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'', when [[KidHero Finn]] and [[NonHumanSidekick Jake]] are [[MuggedForDisguise disguised as Fire Kingdom actors]]:



** In [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E24EquestriaGames "Equestria Games"]], Twilight mentions how [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS3E2TheCrystalEmpirePart2 Spike helped save the Crystal Empire]], something he should be fully aware of for obvious reasons. Probably justified because Spike isn't used to being treated like a national hero (he's usually a NoRespectGuy), and Twilight and Cadance had to explain to him how much the Crystal Ponies adore him.
** [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E25TwilightsKingdomPart1 "Twilight's Kingdom - Part 1"]]: "I can't believe we had to give up the Elements of Harmony."
** [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E16ItAintEasyBeingBreezies "It Ain't Easy Being Breezies"]]:

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** In [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E24EquestriaGames "Equestria Games"]], "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E24EquestriaGames Equestria Games]]", Twilight mentions how [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS3E2TheCrystalEmpirePart2 Spike helped save the Crystal Empire]], something he should be fully aware of for obvious reasons. Probably justified because Spike isn't used to being treated like a national hero (he's usually a NoRespectGuy), and Twilight and Cadance had to explain to him how much the Crystal Ponies adore him.
** [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E25TwilightsKingdomPart1 "Twilight's "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E25TwilightsKingdomPart1 Twilight's Kingdom - Part 1"]]: 1]]": "I can't believe we had to give up the Elements of Harmony."
** [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E16ItAintEasyBeingBreezies "It "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E16ItAintEasyBeingBreezies It Ain't Easy Being Breezies"]]:Breezies]]":
1st Jun '17 7:49:18 PM Goldfritha
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Although writers try to avoid this by using TheWatson (since not explaining anything sometimes results in the audience being too busy trying to figure out what's going on to enjoy the show), [[TropesAreTools using this trope is not always a bad thing.]] Also, the most common alternative is to [[EasyAmnesia give the protagonist amnesia]] so he ''doesn't'' know, which isn't really considered a better option. The IdiotHero and FishOutOfWater are also acceptable tropes to employ to make this trope more believable. A third form is to have two characters comparing information to each be sure that the other does in fact know. A fourth is to have the characters have an argument, since arguments are among the few real-life situations in which people remind each other of things they both already know.[[note]]"How could you do X? You know perfectly well that Y..."[[/note]] BreakingTheFourthWall to have the characters know they are informing the audience is OlderThanFeudalism in its own right, but obviously suitable only for broadly comic works.

to:

Although writers try to avoid this by using TheWatson (since not explaining anything sometimes results in the audience being too busy trying to figure out what's going on to enjoy the show), [[TropesAreTools using this trope is not always a bad thing.]] Also, the most common alternative is to [[EasyAmnesia give the protagonist amnesia]] so he ''doesn't'' know, which isn't really considered a better option. The IdiotHero and FishOutOfWater are also acceptable tropes to employ to make this trope more believable.believable, though shoe-horning in such a character may be worse. A third form is to have two characters comparing information to each be sure that the other does in fact know. A fourth is to have the characters have an argument, since arguments are among the few real-life situations in which people remind each other of things they both already know.[[note]]"How could you do X? You know perfectly well that Y..."[[/note]] BreakingTheFourthWall to have the characters know they are informing the audience is OlderThanFeudalism in its own right, but obviously suitable only for broadly comic works.
30th May '17 9:18:49 AM VVK
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** A different kind of example, but still a {{subversion}}: In "Years of Yarncraft" (See: ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft''), Torg is in the game fighting an NPC enemy who talks mostly in character (even though he knows he's an NPC) and tries to start talking about the backstory that brought Torg to fight him. Torg interrupts him and says he [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory doesn't care about the story, only the loot]].

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** A different kind of example, but still a {{subversion}}: In "Years of Yarncraft" (See: ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft''), Torg is in the game fighting an NPC enemy who talks mostly in character [[MediumAwareness (even though he knows he's an NPC) NPC)]] and tries to start talking about the backstory that brought Torg to fight him. Torg interrupts him and says he [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory doesn't care about the story, only the loot]].loot]].
** A fairly straight but till humorous example is found in "Chapter 21: The Hunt" when a bunch of action ([[ItMakesSenseInContext involving a demon at a Halloween costume party]]) is skipped over with such an exposition:
--> "What did I miss?"
--> "The Red Ranger got the demon by the face with the hand of his robot arm, but the demon got him in the face with a squid-on-a-stick. Then the demon grabbed the human taco by the leg which started a tug of war with the dragon-decoration that sprung to life to save him. Then, as the generic super hero tried to pry the squid tentacles off Riff's face, they all collapsed on each other and are stuck in this big knot of bodies. Oh, and the demon hunter's narrating things from the ceiling fan."
--> "Well, I sure picked the wrong time to take a leak."
30th May '17 8:38:23 AM VVK
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See also: MrExposition, TheWatson, {{Expospeak}}, CaptainObvious, ViewersAreMorons. A subtrope of ShowDontTell.

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See also: MrExposition, TheWatson, {{Expospeak}}, CaptainObvious, ExactEavesdropping, ViewersAreMorons. A subtrope of ShowDontTell.
28th May '17 12:40:54 AM Kazmahu
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* Used interestingly in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}''. The entire first half of the game is [[FramingDevice framed as]] the PlayerCharacter being interrogated. Occasionally, when the scene snaps back to the present, the interrogator will ask for more details on a person or plot point that was just met/mentioned, only for Joker to brush her off or tell her to wait until he (and the story in flashback) gets to that. Justified, as the protagonist was drugged prior to the interrogation and putting everything together in order is the only way he can get the story straight himself, to the point that [[spoiler:he doesn't even remember that his capture was a deliberate attempt to engineer this exact situation until he gets up to right before his story gets to the opening sequence]].
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