History Main / AsLongAsItSoundsForeign

17th Mar '17 7:39:18 PM karstovich2
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** The source of this is that said chain was originally called "Der Wienerschnitzel", but they dropped the "Der" part in 1977 because it's a masculine article, and "Das" should be used to refer to neutral nouns (that Natalie refers to it with the "Der" makes sense since in the TV series she is played by Traylor Howard, who is in her early forties, and assuming Natalie is about the same age, she would be roughly 11 years old when this happened). Even so, "Wiener schnitzel" (as it should be written) doesn't refer to hot dogs, but rather a breaded Viennese-style veal cutlet, which the restaurant ironically doesn't sell. "Wiener" is actually short for "Wiener Würstchen", loosely translating to "little Viennese sausage".

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** The source of this is that said chain was originally called "Der Wienerschnitzel", but they dropped the "Der" part in 1977 because it's a masculine article, and "Das" should be used to refer to neutral nouns (that Natalie refers to it with the "Der" makes sense since in the TV series she is played by Traylor Howard, who is was born in her early forties, the mid-1960s (1966 to be exact), and assuming Natalie is about the same age, she would be roughly 11 years old when this happened). Even so, "Wiener schnitzel" (as it should be written) doesn't refer to hot dogs, but rather a breaded Viennese-style veal cutlet, which the restaurant ironically doesn't sell. "Wiener" is actually short for "Wiener Würstchen", loosely translating to "little Viennese sausage".
17th Mar '17 7:30:51 PM karstovich2
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* Häagen-Dazs ice cream is famous for its completely made-up "Danish-sounding" name.[[labelnote:*]]Jewish creator Reuben Mattus sought to honor Denmark for its excellent treatment of its Jews during WWII, and thought Denmark to have a good reputation in the US (especially for dairy products).[[/labelnote]] In a bizarre and funny legal case, Häagen-Dazs tried to sue another American Ice Cream brand, Frusen Glädjé (which is--aside from the accent over the "e" meant to show Americans they were supposed to pronounce it--entirely correct Swedish for "frozen joy"), because the name was intended to fool consumers into thinking the ice cream was actually made in Sweden. Häagen-Dazs lost because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unclean_hands "clean hands" doctrine]] - i.e., they were themselves equally guilty of using fake Scandinavian to sound old-timey and exotic, so couldn't blame others for using the same trick.

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* Häagen-Dazs ice cream is famous for its completely made-up "Danish-sounding" name.[[labelnote:*]]Jewish creator Reuben Mattus sought to honor Denmark for its excellent treatment of its Jews during WWII, and thought Denmark to have a good reputation in the US (especially for dairy products).products; Denmark's reputation for dairy is strong, but it tends more towards butter and cheese than ice cream).[[/labelnote]] In a bizarre and funny legal case, in 1980, Häagen-Dazs tried to sue another American Ice Cream ice cream brand, Frusen Glädjé (which is--aside from the accent over the "e" meant to show Americans they were supposed to pronounce it--entirely correct Swedish for "frozen joy"), because the name was intended to fool consumers into thinking the ice cream was actually made in Sweden. Häagen-Dazs lost because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unclean_hands "clean "unclean hands" doctrine]] - i.e., they were themselves equally guilty of using fake Scandinavian to sound old-timey and exotic, so couldn't blame others for using the same trick. Häagen-Dazs got the last laugh, though: Frusen Glädjé went out of business in 1993.
17th Mar '17 4:25:42 PM karstovich2
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* In the season six finale of ''Series/ThirtyRock'', we see Hasidic Jews speaking in their native tongue (presumably Yiddish) and complaining about the sale of pork hot dogs in a Jewish area. The actual language that they're speaking is surprisingly decent Hebrew. It's also possible that the writers thought Hasidic Jews from New York speak Hebrew (they generally do not).

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* In the season six finale of ''Series/ThirtyRock'', we see Hasidic Jews speaking in their native tongue (presumably Yiddish) and complaining about the sale of pork hot dogs in a Jewish area. The actual language that they're speaking is surprisingly decent Hebrew. It's also possible that the writers thought Hasidic Jews from New York speak Hebrew (they generally do not). Knowing the writers of ''30 Rock'', it may also be that they knew this, and [[BilingualBonus that was part of the joke]].
20th Feb '17 3:59:14 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' example: Ra's Al-Ghul's daughter, Talia, uses the "surname" Al-Ghul, despite the Arabic patronymic not working that way, but kind of makes sense as her name would thus be "Talia, of the Demon". The trouble is that she then uses the "Anglicized" variant, "Talia ''Head''", which translates the wrong word. Maybe "Talia Demon" wasn't subtle enough.

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* ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' example: Ra's Al-Ghul's ComicBook/RasAlGhul's daughter, Talia, uses the "surname" Al-Ghul, despite the Arabic patronymic not working that way, but kind of makes sense as her name would thus be "Talia, of the Demon". The trouble is that she then uses the "Anglicized" variant, "Talia ''Head''", which translates the wrong word. Maybe "Talia Demon" wasn't subtle enough.
5th Feb '17 7:25:12 AM __Vano
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The real reason is oftentimes that [[ViewersAreMorons if the intended audience won't be able to tell the difference]], why bother? Naturally, this paves the way for UnfortunateImplications. A somewhat more redeeming justification is that the show isn't supposed or expected to accurately portray a real-life language - though it still gives a false image.

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The real reason is oftentimes that But first and foremost, [[ViewersAreMorons if the intended audience won't be able to tell the difference]], difference anyway]], why bother? Naturally, this paves the way for UnfortunateImplications. A somewhat more redeeming justification is that the show isn't supposed or expected to accurately portray a real-life language - though it still gives a false image.
4th Feb '17 4:40:57 PM comicwriter
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* There are panels from ''Manga/UruseiYatsura'' of Lum's mom speaking in Mah-Jong tiles that combined with her Chinese-style dress (implies "As Long As It Looks Chinese") and a French lady speaking in... ''interesting'' picture combinations in ''Lupin III''. And early in the manga, where French and Chinese commentators on Ataru's game of tag with Lum spoke in, respectively, inane phrasebook style questions and Chinese food names.

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* There are panels from ''Manga/UruseiYatsura'' of Lum's mom speaking in Mah-Jong tiles that combined with her Chinese-style dress (implies "As Long As It Looks Chinese") and a French lady speaking in... ''interesting'' picture combinations in ''Lupin III''.''Franchise/{{Lupin III}}''. And early in the manga, where French and Chinese commentators on Ataru's game of tag with Lum spoke in, respectively, inane phrasebook style questions and Chinese food names.
29th Jan '17 4:44:05 AM fq
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--->Sheriff Andy: "Ik ben net in de stad gekomen. Wie zou mij willen vermoorden?
*** It's: "I've just arrived in the city. Who would want to murder me?" It's Dutch all right, although the first sentence is not 100% grammatically correct.

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--->Sheriff Andy: "Ik ben net in de stad gekomen. Wie zou mij willen vermoorden?
*** It's: "I've
vermoorden? ("I've just arrived in come into the city. Who would want to murder me?" It's me?") It'd Dutch all right, although alright, but the first sentence is awkward and not 100% entirely grammatically correct.
10th Jan '17 7:17:19 PM xXNoMoreXsXx
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Added DiffLines:

* Metalcore band Attack! Attack!’s song “Smokahontas” transitions into the techno part with a man screaming in Spanish “¡El viejo establece pollos en el este!” [[translation]]“The old man raises chickens in the east”[[/note]]
3rd Jan '17 9:29:37 PM Lloigor
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** 'Broflovski' is not a real Polish or Pole-Jewish surname, though this is probably intentional.

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** 'Broflovski' "Broflovski" is not a real Polish or Pole-Jewish surname, though this is probably intentional.



** The episode "[[Recap/SouthParkS5E9OsamaBinLadenHasFartyPants Osama Bin Laden Has Farty Pants]]" features Afghan children and Taliban who speak fluent, accurate Persian, (albeit with Iranian accents), while UsefulNotes/OsamaBinLaden speaks random Koranic words, such as "jihad," "Ramadan," "Mohammad," "fatwa," mixed with gibberish.

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** The episode "[[Recap/SouthParkS5E9OsamaBinLadenHasFartyPants Osama Bin Laden Has Farty Pants]]" features Afghan children and Taliban operatives who speak fluent, accurate Persian, Persian (albeit with Iranian accents), while UsefulNotes/OsamaBinLaden speaks random Koranic words, such as "jihad," "Ramadan," "Mohammad," "fatwa," mixed with gibberish.



** Played straight in "Tom's Rhinoplasty." The language the Iraqis speak when piling Miss Ellen into a rocket headed straight for the sun is just gibberish.

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** Played straight in "Tom's Rhinoplasty." Rhinoplasty". The language the Iraqis speak when piling Miss Ellen into a rocket headed straight for the sun is just gibberish.
3rd Jan '17 9:12:04 PM Lloigor
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*** Best of all is King's little-known short story "The Crate", where the evil crate is found on a remote island in the mid-Atlantic. The name of the island is... Paella.

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*** Best of all is King's little-known short story "The Crate", where the evil crate is found on a remote island in the mid-Atlantic.Drake Passage. The name of the island is... Paella.
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