History Main / ArtisticLicenseStatistics

6th Jan '18 4:31:21 PM eroock
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* ''Series/{{Community}}'': While running a psychology experiment Prof. Duncan has a total breakdown when he encounters the outlier of extreme patience that is Abed, ranting that his Duncan's Principle has been completely broken. Of course any scientist can tell you a single outlier is hardly enough to totally disprove a hypothesis concerning human psychology. Possibly an intentional example, since Duncan is clearly demonstrated throughout the series to be a fairly inept psychologist.
2nd Dec '17 10:41:38 AM SparkPlugTheTroper
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[[folder:Western Animation]]
* This was parodied in ''WesternAnimation/LesShadoks''. The Shadoks' goal for Season 1 was to fail to launch their rocket 999,999 times, as they had calculated that it had a one-in-a-million chance to successfully launch. It doesn't work.
[[/folder]]
3rd Nov '17 8:31:06 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/DrexellsClass'' has one of Drexell's students reveal that he's skilled at counting cards. He demonstrates by correctly identifying the top card on the deck and then does so again with the next card. This isn't how counting cards works. The kid would only know which cards are remaining in the deck, not their exact sequence.
1st Nov '17 8:53:03 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** Similarily, German card game ''Skat'' has rules in place, that if one player in a tournament has to use a shuffling machine (e.g. due to a disability), everybody has to, because hand shuffled decks are less random and favor the player after the dealer compared to the better randomization of a machine.

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** Similarily, * German card game ''Skat'' has rules in place, that if one player in a tournament has to use a shuffling machine (e.g. due to a disability), everybody has to, because hand shuffled decks are less random and favor the player after the dealer compared to the better randomization of a machine.
1st Nov '17 8:52:39 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** That might not have helped. People are ''horrible'' at generating random numbers, so even if she picked equal (or near-equal) numbers of black and white cards, a more sophisticated analysis of her picks would reveal what she was doing, most likely by identifying a lack of runs of a single color (see fallacy #2 above). It might ''delay'' the recognition of her ability, though...and unless it were ''blatantly'' obvious what she was doing, it might leave enough doubt to prevent others from being certain.
** The ''best'' way for her to deceive the examiner would be to not even bother to ''use'' her ability during the session, but merely pretend to concentrate while drawing the cards blindly.
15th Sep '17 9:55:38 PM Doug86
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* The {{Series/Mythbusters}} have tackled several things that touched on statistical misconceptions, but probably their most direct assault on this trope was the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monty_Hall_problem Monty Hall problem]]". In a nutshell, this is when you choose one of three doors that may hold a prize. The host (who knows the truth) opens a ''different'' door, showing no prize, and asks you to keep your original choice or choose the remaining door. The hasty assumption is that this second choice is 50-50, and people will tend to stay with their first door, but the reality is that changing your choice has twice the probability of success. The Mythbusters demonstrated that much experimentally, with one hundred trials (fifty each way). When they tested the other half of the myth, the psychology of it, twenty out of twenty of their test subjects stayed with their original choice, many claiming that it was because of the supposed 50% chance.
* In OnlyFoolsAndHorses, Boycie refused to bet on a coin toss against Del because, having beaten Del in the previous few tosses, the "Laws of averages" dictated that he would likely lose this one. When Del suggested that Boycie challenged Rodney instead, he agreed!

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* The {{Series/Mythbusters}} Series/{{Mythbusters}} have tackled several things that touched on statistical misconceptions, but probably their most direct assault on this trope was the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monty_Hall_problem Monty Hall problem]]". In a nutshell, this is when you choose one of three doors that may hold a prize. The host (who knows the truth) opens a ''different'' door, showing no prize, and asks you to keep your original choice or choose the remaining door. The hasty assumption is that this second choice is 50-50, and people will tend to stay with their first door, but the reality is that changing your choice has twice the probability of success. The Mythbusters demonstrated that much experimentally, with one hundred trials (fifty each way). When they tested the other half of the myth, the psychology of it, twenty out of twenty of their test subjects stayed with their original choice, many claiming that it was because of the supposed 50% chance.
* In OnlyFoolsAndHorses, ''Series/OnlyFoolsAndHorses'', Boycie refused to bet on a coin toss against Del because, having beaten Del in the previous few tosses, the "Laws of averages" dictated that he would likely lose this one. When Del suggested that Boycie challenged Rodney instead, he agreed!
3rd Sep '17 11:59:12 AM wrpen99
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* The Creator/FoxNewsChannel's fondness for flashy graphics to engage the viewer's attention occasionally lends itself to a few mistakes. Such as [[http://pics.blameitonthevoices.com/112009/fox_news_math_fail.jpg a pie chart where the total breakdowns add up to 193%]], or [[http://www.mathfail.com/scientists-poll.jpg this poll with a breakdown that adds up to 120%]]. Either with the pressure of the rush to get on-screen information ready by showtime, those responsible have little time to double-check their work; or they care more about making a quick impression on the viewer than ensuring accurate information.[[note]]If the people polled can pick more than one option, poll results can easily add up to more than 100%. The first poll might be such a case, but a pie chart is a poor choice for showing that kind of data. The second poll suggests someone was stupid, whether the people who made the graphic, the people who calculated the numbers, or the people who voted for more than one mutually exclusive option.[[/note]]

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* The Creator/FoxNewsChannel's mainstream media's fondness for flashy graphics to engage the viewer's attention occasionally lends itself to a few mistakes. Such as [[http://pics.blameitonthevoices.com/112009/fox_news_math_fail.jpg a pie chart where the total breakdowns add up to 193%]], or [[http://www.mathfail.com/scientists-poll.jpg this poll with a breakdown that adds up to 120%]]. Either with the pressure of the rush to get on-screen information ready by showtime, those responsible have little time to double-check their work; or they care more about making a quick impression on the viewer than ensuring accurate information.[[note]]If the people polled can pick more than one option, poll results can easily add up to more than 100%. The first poll might be such a case, but a pie chart is a poor choice for showing that kind of data. The second poll suggests someone was stupid, whether the people who made the graphic, the people who calculated the numbers, or the people who voted for more than one mutually exclusive option.[[/note]]
30th Aug '17 7:29:09 AM komodosp
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* In OnlyFoolsAndHorses, Boycie refused to bet on a coin toss against Del because, having beaten Del in the previous few tosses, the "Laws of averages" dictated that he would likely lose this one. When Del suggested that Boycie challenged Rodney instead, he agreed!
20th Apr '17 12:05:38 AM AnotherDuck
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* Players themselves sometimes fall afoul of the gambler's fallacy.
5th Mar '17 5:08:54 AM OldBen
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* In a strange twist, ''Final Fantasy VII: Crisis Core'' had the DMW, a slot-machine of various character faces that spins during combat, creating different effects. The only way to level-up is for three "7"s to align. Isn't that awful?!? Leveling based on total randomness?!? Except...it isn't. The manual ''lies''. The DMW is actually controlled by an ''insanely complicated'' mathematical formula that, in-game, manifests itself as the strange impression that chance always ''just so happens'' to work out exactly the way natural progression should. In essence, one in a million chances succeed nine times out of ten. Furthermore, while it's not shown anywhere in the game, enemies actually do give experience when killed, increasing the odds of hitting the combination that gives Zack a level up. As can be expected, this means that getting 2 or more level-ups in a row or shortly one after another can only happen if you've been under the effects of Curse status which disables DMW for an extended perioid of time and killed a ton of enemies during that time and if you kill enough enemies, you're eventuallly guaranteed to get the combination that gives you a level up.

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* In a strange twist, ''Final Fantasy VII: Crisis Core'' ''VideoGame/CrisisCoreFinalFantasyVII'' had the DMW, a slot-machine of various character faces that spins during combat, creating different effects. The only way to level-up is for three "7"s to align. Isn't that awful?!? Leveling based on total randomness?!? Except...it isn't. The manual ''lies''. The DMW is actually controlled by an ''insanely complicated'' mathematical formula that, in-game, manifests itself as the strange impression that chance always ''just so happens'' to work out exactly the way natural progression should. In essence, one in a million chances succeed nine times out of ten. Furthermore, while it's not shown anywhere in the game, enemies actually do give experience when killed, increasing the odds of hitting the combination that gives Zack a level up. As can be expected, this means that getting 2 or more level-ups in a row or shortly one after another can only happen if you've been under the effects of Curse status which disables DMW for an extended perioid of time and killed a ton of enemies during that time and if you kill enough enemies, you're eventuallly guaranteed to get the combination that gives you a level up.
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