History Main / ArtisticLicenseShips

1st Dec '17 3:36:35 AM jormis29
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* ''They Were Expendable'', the fictionalized story of MTB Squadron 3 in the Philipines at the start of the war. MTB Squadron 3's boats were PT-20 class 77 foot Elcos, but were portrayed in the movie by PT-103 class 80 foot Elcos. The same class boats as JFK's PT-109 mentioned above.

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* ''They Were Expendable'', ''Film/TheyWereExpendable'', the fictionalized story of MTB Squadron 3 in the Philipines at the start of the war. MTB Squadron 3's boats were PT-20 class 77 foot Elcos, but were portrayed in the movie by PT-103 class 80 foot Elcos. The same class boats as JFK's PT-109 mentioned above.
20th Sep '17 8:01:11 PM SSJMagus
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** The ''South Dakota''-class USS ''Alabama'' (BB-60, now a museum ship) has stood in for several other battleships on film, such as in the miniseries ''War and Remembrance'' and the movie ''Film/UnderSiege''.

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** The ''South Dakota''-class USS ''Alabama'' (BB-60, now a museum ship) has stood in for several other battleships on film, such as in the miniseries ''War and Remembrance'' and the movie ''Film/UnderSiege''. The limited number of battleships in the world (only 9 have been preserved) means that any film not using CGI, stock footage or stage props to replicate a battleship has very limited choices. Especially since 7 of the surviving battleships are all very similar late 1930s/early 1940s designs (the ''North Carolina'', ''South Dakota'' and ''Iowa'' classes) with identical turret layout.



* In any UsefulNotes/WorldWarII movie, if you see a carrier with an angled flight deck (the catapults launch the plane forward, the landing takes place at an angle), you are seeing something built/modified after the war, which accounts for any post-UsefulNotes/WW2 carrier afloat. Sadly, there are no straight-decked carriers left in the world, as attempts to get the USS Enterprise (CV-6), the most decorated warship in history, preserved as a museum ended in failure.
** The angled deck, invented late into the war, was so much superior (as it allows the carrier to launch and receive planes ''simultaneously'', without fearing that the landing plane would crash into the launchind one at the bow) that all straight-deck carriers were either decommissined soon after the end of hostilities, or converted into the angled deck configuraton, and the only straight-deck carriers that have been built since have been either purpose-built STOVL carriers (since STOVL aircraft land vertically, the issues that gave rise to the angled deck in the first place don't really exist for them) or amphibious assault warships with a secondary "sea control" (read: "light carrier") function.
* Averted, partly, in ''Battle of the River Plate'', where the cruisers ''Achilles'' and ''Cumberland'' were played by the actual ''Achilles'' and ''Cumberland''. Then again, ''Graf Spee'' was played by USS ''Salem'', which looked nothing like the real ''Graf Spee'', and ''Cumberland'' was minus a turret thanks to a refit. The RealLife ''Graf Spee'', having been sunk in the titular battle, was obviously unavailable for filming. Lampshaded when the German Captain says sometimes they even disguise themselves as an American cruiser and the captured British merchantman Captain accepts that as being why they have a number painted on the bow. This treads the line between TruthInTelevision and VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory because there are plenty of pictures of the real ''Admiral Graf Spee'' disguised as a US Navy cruiser.

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* In any UsefulNotes/WorldWarII movie, if you see a carrier with an angled flight deck (the catapults launch the plane forward, the landing takes place at an angle), you are seeing something built/modified after the war, which accounts for any post-UsefulNotes/WW2 carrier afloat. Sadly, there are no straight-decked carriers left in the world, as attempts to get the USS Enterprise ''Enterprise'' (CV-6), the most decorated warship in history, preserved as a museum ended in failure.
failure. As did attempts in the 1990s to preserve the Spanish light carrier ''Dédalo'', formerly USS ''Cabot'' (CVL-28), the last unconverted carrier (being too small for such a conversion, ''Dédalo'' was instead used for STOVL jets and helicopters) ''and'' the last of the WW2 light carriers.
** The angled deck, invented late into the war, was so much superior (as it allows the carrier to launch and receive planes ''simultaneously'', without fearing that the landing plane would crash into the launchind launching one at the bow) that all straight-deck carriers were either decommissined decommissioned soon after the end of hostilities, adapted into other (often non-combat) roles, or converted into the angled deck configuraton, configuration, and the only straight-deck carriers that have been built since have been either purpose-built STOVL carriers (since STOVL aircraft land vertically, the issues that gave rise to the angled deck in the first place don't really exist for them) or amphibious assault warships with a secondary "sea control" (read: "light carrier") function.
* Averted, partly, in ''Battle of the River Plate'', where the cruisers HMS ''Achilles'' and HMS ''Cumberland'' were played by the actual ''Achilles'' (by this point in Indian service as INS ''Delhi'') and ''Cumberland''. Then again, ''Graf Spee'' was played by USS ''Salem'', which looked nothing like the real ''Graf Spee'', and ''Cumberland'' was minus a turret thanks to a refit. The RealLife ''Graf Spee'', having been sunk in the titular battle, was obviously unavailable for filming. Lampshaded when the German Captain says sometimes they even disguise themselves as an American cruiser and the captured British merchantman Captain accepts that as being why they have a number painted on the bow. This treads the line between TruthInTelevision and VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory because there are plenty of pictures of the real ''Admiral Graf Spee'' disguised as a US Navy cruiser.cruiser, and at the Battle of the River Plate she really was sporting a fake extra turret (''Admiral Graf Spee'' had only 2 real turrets while ''Salem'' has 3).



** Oddly, HMS ''Ajax'' (sister ship of ''Achilles'') was played by the completely dissimilar HMS ''Sheffield'' instead of simply having INS ''Delhi'' portray both ships (though this would've required splicing together any scenes in which both cruisers were on screen simultaneously). And HMS ''Exeter'' was in an even bigger mismatch played by HMS ''Jamaica'', meaning that in the film "''Ajax''" was '''larger''' than "''Exeter''", when the opposite was true of the real ships. ''Cumberland'' actually would've been ideal for portraying her near-sister ''Exeter'' since removing one of her turrets (as mentioned above) actually made her look extremely similar to ''Exeter''.



** The film had USS ''Blueback'' play the ''Red October''. Notable as the ''Blueback'' is a diesel fast attack sub rather than a nuclear ballistic missile sub, for obvious security reasons regarding nuclear propulsion. The ''Blueback'', at least, was a modern design.

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** The film had USS ''Blueback'' play the ''Red October''. Notable as the ''Blueback'' is a diesel fast attack sub rather than a nuclear ballistic missile sub, for obvious security reasons regarding nuclear propulsion. And also because an American film crew during the Cold War was obviously never going to have access to Soviet submarines of any type (though [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp just a few years later]] that might not have been such a ridiculous prospect). The ''Blueback'', at least, was a modern design.



** Apparently a museum ship can be brought up to fighting condition in under a few hours, complete with fuel and ammunition. The USS Iowa took 2 years to recomission in 1980's.
** Firing [[{{BFG}} 16 inch guns]] like AK-47s in semi-automatic, at least 4 times in 10 seconds.[[note]]The best reloading time of the 16"/50 Mark 7 gun was 30 seconds. A well trained crew could do it in as little as 20 seconds at low elevation for a short period of time. The historic record for a 15"-16" naval gun was 20 seconds, the 15"/52 of the ''Bismarck''-class.[[/note]] Made even more unrealistic by the fact the ship is crewed by current Navy sailors, who would be entirely unfamiliar with a battleship's weapons, and retired sailors, who even if they remembered their training, are too few and 60+ years removed from their sailing days.
** At one point the crew needs to move a shell by hand from one turret to another and though straining, five of them are able to do so. An actual 16" shell is over 2000 lbs., even presuming they could lift and carry such a weight, there is no way they would be able to fit it through the corridors and into another turret.
** The grenades launched by the alien vessel [[OhCrap blowing up a turret]] and leaving the rest of the vessel intact. While the turrets themselves could be (And with other real-life ships such as Seydlitz, were) safely destroyed, said grenades land on the deck around the turret and thus also wreck the barbette (the circular part underneath) in the process. Not only is the barbette a major structural component of the ship, the explosion would have almost certainly cooked off any remaining ammunition, either of which would have been far more destructive than what is shown.

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** Apparently a museum ship can be brought up to fighting condition in under a few hours, complete with fuel and ammunition. The USS Iowa ''Iowa'' took 2 years to recomission recommission in 1980's.
** Firing [[{{BFG}} 16 inch guns]] like AK-47s in semi-automatic, at least 4 times in 10 seconds.[[note]]The best reloading time of the 16"/50 Mark 7 gun was 30 seconds. A well trained crew could do it in as little as 20 seconds at low elevation for a short period of time. The historic record for a 15"-16" naval gun was 20 seconds, the 15"/52 of the ''Bismarck''-class. The largest caliber gun to ever even come ''close'' to the rate of fire depicted in this movie was the British QF 6"/50 Mark N5 which in ideal conditions could fire a round every 3 seconds. This was of course while firing a much smaller 132 pound (60kg) round, compared to the '''2,700 pound''' (1,225kg) rounds of the 16"/50 Mark 7.[[/note]] Made even more unrealistic by the fact the ship is crewed by current Navy sailors, who would be entirely unfamiliar with a battleship's weapons, and retired sailors, who even if they remembered their training, are too few and 60+ years removed from their sailing days.
** At one point the crew needs to move a shell by hand from one turret to another and though straining, five of them are able to do so. An actual 16" shell is over 2000 lbs., weighs 2,700 pounds (1,225kg, or 1.35 tons), even presuming they could lift and carry such a weight, there is no way they would be able to fit it through the corridors and into another turret.
** The grenades launched by the alien vessel [[OhCrap blowing up a turret]] and leaving the rest of the vessel intact. While the turrets themselves could be (And (and with other real-life ships such as Seydlitz, were) safely destroyed, said grenades land on the deck around the turret and thus also wreck the barbette (the circular part underneath) in the process. Not only is the barbette a major structural component of the ship, the explosion would have almost certainly cooked off any remaining ammunition, either of which would have been far more destructive than what is shown.



*** The ''HMS Agincourt'', a WWI era Dreadnaught armed with a whopping fourteen 12" guns in seven twin turrets (no other battleship ever built had more than twelve guns of that size or larger), provides another example of what firing a broadside looks like: "the resulting sheet of flame was big enough to create the impression that a battle cruiser had blown up; it was awe inspiring."

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*** The ''HMS Agincourt'', HMS ''Agincourt'', a WWI era Dreadnaught Dreadnought armed with a whopping fourteen 12" guns in seven twin turrets (no other battleship ever built had more than twelve guns of that size or larger), provides another example of what firing a broadside looks like: "the resulting sheet of flame was big enough to create the impression that a battle cruiser had blown up; it was awe inspiring.""[[note]]At the Battle of Jutland, where this account was penned, by the time ''Agincourt'' opened fire the British sadly had three examples of exactly what it looked like when one of their battlecruisers blew up.[[/note]]



* Three aircraft carriers were used shooting ''Film/{{Godzilla 2014}}'', none of them the USS ''Saratoga'' as the movie says, because the real ''Saratoga'' was decommissioned in 1994, making it safe from bragging by current sailors. The hull number on the Saratoga is CVN-88, which isn't even being planned yet, so go with AlternateHistory again on this.

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* Three aircraft carriers were used shooting ''Film/{{Godzilla 2014}}'', none of them the USS ''Saratoga'' as the movie says, because the real ''Saratoga'' was decommissioned in 1994, making it safe from bragging by current sailors. The hull number on the Saratoga is CVN-88, which isn't even being planned yet, yet (the highest hull number assigned to any carrier as of 2017 is the not yet named CVN-81, not scheduled to enter service until 2030), so go with AlternateHistory again on this.
16th Jun '17 11:31:08 PM morane
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* In the song ''Highwayman'' by The Highwaymen, the protagonist describes being a sailor on a schooner that sailed around the Cape Horn to Mexico and how he went aloft to furl a mainsail in a storm, and he got killed when the yards broke off. This is all bogus. Schooners were coastal vessels and not well suited for rounding Cape Horn, they have fore-and-aft rig, their mainsails are reefed from the deck, and they have no yards as they do not have square sails. A fore-and-aft rigged ship whose mainsail is furled aloft on a yard is not a schooner but a brigantine or a barkentine.
16th Jun '17 11:47:15 AM SwordOfMorrigan
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* Season 3 of ''Series/PeakyBlinders'' features a [[http://i.imgur.com/qpzet2Y.jpg brief shot of a Cunard Line ship docked in Liverpool]]. Likely meant to be the [[http://www.ssmaritime.com/Mauretania-1-1906.jpg RMS Mauritania]], the CGI model appears to be the hull and superstructure of the [[http://www.maritimequest.com/liners/titanic/photos/titanic_marschall_3.jpg RMS Titanic]] with the vents, forecastle, and colors of the Mauritania added.
2nd Jun '17 11:05:41 AM CV12Hornet
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** The Taiwanese navy actually had (and has) a number of WWII-era submarines in service at the time. Unfortunately, they were heavily-modified GUPPY boats, and it's likely the filmmakers simply couldn't get permission from the Taiwanese government.
2nd Jun '17 11:02:40 AM CV12Hornet
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** The grenades launched by the alien vessel [[OhCrap blowing up a turret]] and leaving the rest of the vessel intact. Main turrets are hardest and heaviest armored parts on a capital ship, to last even as the hull is reduced to a burning hulk and each weighs 1700 tonnes. If there is a hit strong enough to rip the turret off its mount, the entire ship blows up.

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** The grenades launched by the alien vessel [[OhCrap blowing up a turret]] and leaving the rest of the vessel intact. Main While the turrets are hardest and heaviest armored parts themselves could be (And with other real-life ships such as Seydlitz, were) safely destroyed, said grenades land on a capital ship, to last even as the hull is reduced to a burning hulk and each weighs 1700 tonnes. If there is a hit strong enough to rip deck around the turret and thus also wreck the barbette (the circular part underneath) in the process. Not only is the barbette a major structural component of the ship, the explosion would have almost certainly cooked off its mount, the entire ship blows up.any remaining ammunition, either of which would have been far more destructive than what is shown.
2nd Jun '17 10:56:24 AM CV12Hornet
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* Although much of it was filmed aboard the actual USS ''Nimitz'', with the participation of many of that carrier's crew, the scene in ''Film/TheFinalCountdown'' that showed the carrier sailing into Pearl Harbor, in the present, showed USS ''Kitty Hawk'', as at the time the movie was filmed, the ''Nimitz'' was part of the Atlantic fleet.

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* Although much of it was filmed aboard the actual USS ''Nimitz'', with the participation of many of that carrier's crew, the scene in ''Film/TheFinalCountdown'' that showed the carrier sailing into Pearl Harbor, in the present, showed USS ''Kitty Hawk'', as at the time the movie was filmed, the ''Nimitz'' was part of the Atlantic fleet. On the plus side, funnel aside the ''Kitty Hawk'' and ''Nimitz'' classes are fairly close in silhouette and flight deck layout.
19th Mar '17 10:16:40 AM CosmicFerret
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See also the UsefulNotes on NavalGazing. Not related to [[{{Shipping}} artistic ships]].

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See also the UsefulNotes on NavalGazing.UsefulNotes/NavalGazing. Not related to [[{{Shipping}} artistic ships]].
19th Jan '17 6:36:14 PM Solicitr
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* '''Film/ToraToraTora'' partly averted this trope, by constructing an accurate full-scale mockup of the main deck and superstructure of the battleship ''Nagato'', and another of the rear main deck and after turrets of the USS ''Arizona'' (doubling in some scenes as the ''Nevada''). However, the carrier ''Enterprise'' was played by the USS ''Yorktown'', a later, larger carrier which had been rebuilt in the 1950s with an angled flight deck and other modifications for operating jet aircraft. Moreover, the actual destroyer ''Ward'' was an old four-piper from 1918, nothing at all like the 1943 Edsall-class DE that portrayed her.
15th Jan '17 7:36:16 AM LentilSandEater
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** Partly averted elsewhere in the same novel, when the fires on the ship are licking at the walls of the missile magazines. The captain orders them flooded to prevent the ship from exploding, despite the fact that there are still men inside. This has been done in the World Wars, and would be done again if necessary. Whether the missiles would survive the dunking is another matter.

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** Partly averted Downplayed elsewhere in the same novel, when the fires on the ship are licking at the walls of the missile magazines. The captain orders them flooded to prevent the ship from exploding, despite the fact that there are still men inside. This has been done in the World Wars, and would be done again if necessary. Whether the missiles would survive the dunking is another matter.
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