History Main / ArtisticLicensePhysics

15th Apr '16 4:08:12 PM Doug86
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* In the {{DCU}} Daxamites are vulnerable to ''lead radiation''--for those not familiar with the periodic table, lead is generally considered a ''stable'' element in its most common isotopes, meaning it is not vulnerable to spontaneous radioactive decay in the same way that, say, uranium is. (This has been retconned into a severe allergy to lead, even in trace atmospheric amounts.)

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* In the {{DCU}} Franchise/TheDCU Daxamites are vulnerable to ''lead radiation''--for those not familiar with the periodic table, lead is generally considered a ''stable'' element in its most common isotopes, meaning it is not vulnerable to spontaneous radioactive decay in the same way that, say, uranium is. (This has been retconned into a severe allergy to lead, even in trace atmospheric amounts.)
7th Apr '16 9:32:11 AM Adept
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* ''Manga/CaptainTsubasa''. That aspect of the series, specially of the anime, makes for ''a lot'' of running gags in the Spanish fandom. [[http://www.lawebdefisica.com/humor/oliver/ There's even an article trying to explain why the characters seem able to bend physical laws to their will.]] So far, they've reached the conclusion that CaptainTsubasa's Japan is a little asteroid orbiting the Sun, wich would explain why you can't see the goal until you reach the penalty area or how [[InvincibleHero Tsubasa]] is able to [[InASingleBound jump twice the goal's height]] to score with his [[ThatOneAttack Scissors Kick]], due to Asteroidal Japan's smaller gravity.

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* ''Manga/CaptainTsubasa''. That aspect of the series, specially of the anime, makes for ''a lot'' of running gags in the Spanish fandom. [[http://www.lawebdefisica.com/humor/oliver/ There's even an article trying to explain why the characters seem able to bend physical laws to their will.]] So far, they've reached the conclusion that CaptainTsubasa's Captain Tsubasa's Japan is a little asteroid orbiting the Sun, wich would explain why you can't see the goal until you reach the penalty area or how [[InvincibleHero Tsubasa]] is able to [[InASingleBound jump twice the goal's height]] to score with his [[ThatOneAttack Scissors Kick]], due to Asteroidal Japan's smaller gravity.
29th Mar '16 10:03:55 PM ObsidianFire
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* It's not like The Asylum is known for being on the deep end of the Moh's Hardness scale, but their 2014 film ''Asteroid vs Earth'' hinges on stupidity that may not even be quantifiable. Faced with an Earth destroying asteroid 1/4th the size and weight of the moon, one of the characters correctly informs the military that firing nukes at it won't work. He soon loses these GenreSavvy / Did his homework points by raising another plan, that requires that nukes be set off in and around the Ring of Fire in the Pacific. By doing so, he hopes to create a magnatude ''18'' earthquake that will move the planet out of the way of the asteroid. That would be 18 on the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricter_scale Ricter Scale]]. Pothole included for reference: every step up on the scale releases 31 times more energy. A little math shows that an earthquake of magnitude 18 would release a force equivalent to 12 '''zettatons''' (zettaton = 10 ^ 21 tons) of TNT. The crater from the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs only released 100 teratons (teraton = 10 ^ 12 tons). At this point, the plot is a non issue: no matter what is done, everybody on Earth is going to die.

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* It's not like The Asylum is known for being on the deep end of the Moh's Hardness scale, but their 2014 film ''Asteroid vs Earth'' hinges on stupidity that may not even be quantifiable. Faced with an Earth destroying asteroid 1/4th the size and weight of the moon, one of the characters correctly informs the military that firing nukes at it won't work. He soon loses these GenreSavvy / Did "did his homework homework" points by raising another plan, that requires that nukes be set off in and around the Ring of Fire in the Pacific. By doing so, he hopes to create a magnatude ''18'' earthquake that will move the planet out of the way of the asteroid. That would be 18 on the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricter_scale Ricter Scale]]. Pothole included for reference: every step up on the scale releases 31 times more energy. A little math shows that an earthquake of magnitude 18 would release a force equivalent to 12 '''zettatons''' (zettaton = 10 ^ 21 tons) of TNT. The crater from the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs only released 100 teratons (teraton = 10 ^ 12 tons). At this point, the plot is a non issue: no matter what is done, everybody on Earth is going to die.
15th Mar '16 1:42:44 PM ANTMuddle
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* HollywoodGlassCut

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* HollywoodGlassCutHollywoodGlassCutter
15th Mar '16 1:42:28 PM ANTMuddle
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Added DiffLines:

* HollywoodGlassCut
11th Mar '16 1:33:08 PM Eagal
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[[AC:VideoGames]]
* ''VideoGame/GoldenSun''. Kraden, attempting to cover for Camelot's bad writing, theorizes that things suddenly became very cold after lighting Jupiter lighthouse[[note]]wind-elemental and located in a temperate region[[/note]], when lighting Mercury lighthouse[[note]]water-elemental, located very far North, in the world's equivalent to the Arctic circle[[/note]] barely made an impact on the climate, because "wind cools more efficiently than water". This is exactly the opposite of how well wind cools things; air is a terrible conductor of heat. Air is indeed a terrible conductor of heat, but that doesn't mean that it cannot transfer heat efficiently. This is because wind transfers heat via convection rather than conduction, and convection is generally a far better method of heat transfer in virtually all applications. Changing the temperature of the oceans would certainly have a stronger long-term effect on global temperatures, but the effect of changing wind speed would be far more immediate.
9th Mar '16 1:52:54 PM justanid
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* AttackOfTheFiftyFootWhatever

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* AttackOfTheFiftyFootWhateverAttackOfThe50FootWhatever
9th Mar '16 1:52:11 PM justanid
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Often [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] with "HowIsThatEvenPossible"

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Often [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] with "HowIsThatEvenPossible"
the line "HowIsThatEvenPossible".



A SisterTrope to ArtMajorBiology, CartoonPhysics (which fit RuleOfFunny more than RuleOfCool).

!!A SuperTrope to:

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A SisterTrope to ArtMajorBiology, ArtMajorBiology and CartoonPhysics (which fit RuleOfFunny more than RuleOfCool).

!!A SuperTrope to:
RuleOfCool). See also GunsDoNotWorkThatWay.

----
!!Subtropes:



[floatboxright:
See also:
+ GunsDoNotWorkThatWay
]

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[floatboxright:
See also:
+ GunsDoNotWorkThatWay
]



!!In-Universe Examples:

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!!In-Universe Examples:
Examples (that don't fit into a subtrope):



!!Other Examples:

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!!Other Examples:
Examples (that don't fit into a subtrope):
7th Mar '16 4:38:41 AM BridgeSpotter
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* In ''Film/IRobot'' the depiction of a damaged bridge crossing Lake Michigan shows a complete lack of understanding of how a suspension bridge actually works.
** This tends to be true for any film that shows a damaged or collapsed suspension bridge.[[note]]Film/TheCore, Film/StarTrek, X-Men: The Last Stand, WesternAnimation/MonstersVsAliens, to name a few.[[/note]] Generally, the central span collapses and the towers are pulled inward as if pulled down by it. However, a suspension bridge uses cables under constant tension to transfer the weight of the span to anchors or counterweights located at either end of the bridge, so the towers are normally kept in balance between the weight of the span pulling inward and the anchors pulling outward. If the span collapses, the towers would bend ''outward'' since the anchors would no longer be balanced by the span.

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* In ''Film/IRobot'' the depiction of a damaged bridge crossing Lake Michigan shows a complete lack of understanding of how a suspension bridge actually works.
** This tends to be true for any film that shows a damaged or collapsed suspension bridge.[[note]]Film/TheCore,

Any film[[note]]Film/TheCore,
Film/StarTrek, X-Men: The Last Stand, WesternAnimation/MonstersVsAliens, to name a few.[[/note]] that shows a damaged or collapsed suspension bridge tends to demonstrate a lack of understanding from the visual effects department of how such bridges would actually fail. In many cases big-budget films depicting mass destruction of a city will feature a scene showing destruction of a famous bridge, the most common victim being the Golden Gate Bridge. Generally, the central span collapses is shown as collapsing and the towers are pulled inward as if pulled down by it. However, a suspension bridge uses cables under constant tension to transfer the weight of the span to anchors or counterweights located at either end of the bridge, so the towers are normally kept in balance between the weight of the span pulling inward and the anchors pulling outward. If the span collapses, the towers would bend ''outward'' since the anchors would no longer be balanced by the span.span.
* In ''Film/IRobot'' the depiction of a damaged bridge crossing Lake Michigan.


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* In ''Film/IAmLegend'' the main spans of the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges are destroyed but the back spans remain intact with main cables in tension.
* In ''Film/XMenTheLastStand'' Magneto breaks the Golden Gate Bridge at the anchorages and tower bases and transports it to a new location in San Francisco Bay still standing.
4th Mar '16 1:21:59 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/TransformersDarkOfTheMoon'', Cybertron, which is far larger than Earth, is brought less than 1 Earth-diameter away from Earth via the space bridge. At that distance, Cybertron should have torn Earth apart.
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