History Main / ArtisticLicensePhysics

15th Jan '17 11:48:25 AM Xtifr
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* In ''Literature/TheStarchildTrilogy'', the authors decided to throw out the widely accepted Big Bang Theory, not because they didn't think it was true, but because the alternative "Continuous Creation" theory espoused by astronomer Fred Hoyle (and, basically, no one else) let them imagine new life spontaneously appearing in the void between the stars, to take advantage of the energy available from the new hydrogen appearing there in Hoyle's theory.
27th Dec '16 12:36:00 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Same in the movie ''SupermanReturns'', when he puts a Boeing gently down by holding its nose, and when he lifts a ship too.

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* Same in the movie ''SupermanReturns'', when ''SupermanReturns''. They [[ShownTheirWork did do enough homework]] to show him expending most of his effort trying to "brake" the plane's fall after failing to stop it by grabbing a wing --meaning Superman knew he'd rip right through the fuselage and cabin if he puts a Boeing tried to stop it cold in midair-- but none of that research transferred over to the part where he then sets the plane gently down by holding its nose, and or when he lifts half of a ship too.huge luxury yacht out of the ocean by a single piece of its framework.
28th Nov '16 4:34:16 PM RisefromYourGrave
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* Stitch in ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', who possesses super-strength, is able to pull a semi-truck to a stop. In WesternAnimation/StitchTheMovie, he actually keeps a space ship from taking off by grabbing onto it. In truth, regardless of how strong he is, a creature of Stitch's light weight could never do these things [[RequiredSecondaryPowers unless he also had super-anchoring powers]].

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* Stitch in ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', who possesses super-strength, is able to pull a semi-truck to a stop. In WesternAnimation/StitchTheMovie, ''WesternAnimation/StitchTheMovie'', he actually keeps a space ship from taking off by grabbing onto it. In truth, regardless of how strong he is, a creature of Stitch's light weight could never do these things [[RequiredSecondaryPowers unless he also had super-anchoring powers]].
26th Nov '16 9:11:59 PM Seanette
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* It's not like The Asylum is known for being on the deep end of the Moh's Hardness scale, but their 2014 film ''Asteroid vs Earth'' hinges on stupidity that may not even be quantifiable. Faced with an Earth destroying asteroid 1/4th the size and weight of the moon, one of the characters correctly informs the military that firing nukes at it won't work. He soon loses these "did his homework" points by raising another plan, that requires that nukes be set off in and around the Ring of Fire in the Pacific. By doing so, he hopes to create a magnatude ''18'' earthquake that will move the planet out of the way of the asteroid. That would be 18 on the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricter_scale Ricter Scale]]. Pothole included for reference: every step up on the scale releases 31 times more energy. A little math shows that an earthquake of magnitude 18 would release a force equivalent to 12 '''zettatons''' (zettaton = 10 ^ 21 tons) of TNT. The crater from the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs only released 100 teratons (teraton = 10 ^ 12 tons). At this point, the plot is a non issue: no matter what is done, everybody on Earth is going to die.

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* It's not like The Asylum is known for being on the deep end of the Moh's Hardness scale, but their 2014 film ''Asteroid vs Earth'' hinges on stupidity that may not even be quantifiable. Faced with an Earth destroying asteroid 1/4th the size and weight of the moon, one of the characters correctly informs the military that firing nukes at it won't work. He soon loses these "did his homework" points by raising another plan, that requires that nukes be set off in and around the Ring of Fire in the Pacific. By doing so, he hopes to create a magnatude ''18'' earthquake that will move the planet out of the way of the asteroid. That would be 18 on the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricter_scale Ricter org/wiki/Richter_scale Richter Scale]]. Pothole included for reference: every step up on the scale releases 31 times more energy. A little math shows that an earthquake of magnitude 18 would release a force equivalent to 12 '''zettatons''' (zettaton = 10 ^ 21 tons) of TNT. The crater from the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs only released 100 teratons (teraton = 10 ^ 12 tons). At this point, the plot is a non issue: no matter what is done, everybody on Earth is going to die.
13th Nov '16 10:19:04 AM Idek618
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While technically not specifically under this (possible) subtrope, gross violations of the Inverse Square Law for energy intensity are common due to this effect, as the limited ranges common for water/air combat seldom cause the writers to think about how energy intensity is effected by the vastly different distances common in space. For example, it's easy to shoot a laser beam at an opponent a couple of miles away, and not presume too much loss of effect. Shooting the same beam at a spacecraft tens of thousands of miles away, on the other hand, will cause a potential "death beam" to feel like a penlight pointer when it hits the target.

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While technically not specifically under this (possible) subtrope, gross violations of the Inverse Square Law for energy intensity are common due to this effect, as the limited ranges common for water/air combat seldom cause the writers to think about how energy intensity is effected affected by the vastly different distances common in space. For example, it's easy to shoot a laser beam at an opponent a couple of miles away, and not presume too much loss of effect. Shooting the same beam at a spacecraft tens of thousands of miles away, on the other hand, will cause a potential "death beam" to feel like a penlight pointer when it hits the target.
15th Oct '16 7:35:59 AM Wyldchyld
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* Only every shonen fight, ever. Look at any big super powered fight from your favorite long running shonen anime (''Manga/{{Bleach}}'' is a huge offender [[spoiler: like Ichigo vs Aizen]]) and look how many times somebody uses an attack that could break mountains. There isn't a deafening sound, a bone breaking, or insane knockback from the attack. Also, there shouldn't be any light produced by an attack, no matter how strong it is, nor should the energy from the attack be rooted to where it actually should go (a body, an arm, the mountain, or simply the ground itself. Lastly, despite thousands upon thousands of cracks appearing from these moves, no deafening, ear-splitting earth-cracking is heard!

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* Only every shonen fight, ever. Look at any big super powered fight from your favorite long running shonen anime (''Manga/{{Bleach}}'' is a huge offender [[spoiler: like Ichigo vs Aizen]]) and look how many times somebody uses an attack that could break mountains. There isn't a deafening sound, a bone breaking, or insane knockback from the attack. Also, there shouldn't be any light produced by an attack, no matter how strong it is, nor should the energy from the attack be rooted to where it actually should go (a body, an arm, the mountain, or simply the ground itself. Lastly, despite thousands upon thousands of cracks appearing from these moves, no deafening, ear-splitting earth-cracking is heard!
3rd Oct '16 3:45:53 PM nombretomado
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* EveOnline actually subverts this trope in one way while opening up physics issues in others. The region of space in which EVE takes place is described as having a fluidic nature, meaning that ships and projectiles are exposed to drag, sound can propagate through space, and ships that lose power slow and eventually stop, requiring constant thrust and having a relatively low top speed limit. However, this excuse goes out the window with ship designs. In fluidic space, ships would ideally be hydrodynamic for efficiency purposes, while many EVE ships have boxy, inefficient designs and many are ridiculously asymmetrical, which would create very imbalanced maneuverability problems.

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* EveOnline ''VideoGame/EveOnline'' actually subverts this trope in one way while opening up physics issues in others. The region of space in which EVE takes place is described as having a fluidic nature, meaning that ships and projectiles are exposed to drag, sound can propagate through space, and ships that lose power slow and eventually stop, requiring constant thrust and having a relatively low top speed limit. However, this excuse goes out the window with ship designs. In fluidic space, ships would ideally be hydrodynamic for efficiency purposes, while many EVE ships have boxy, inefficient designs and many are ridiculously asymmetrical, which would create very imbalanced maneuverability problems.
20th Sep '16 8:40:18 AM Willbyr
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* In ''HunterXHunter'', one arc has the protagonists and their allies playing [[SeriousBusiness dodgeball]] against an enemy. The game is won by one character making the ball stick to the enemy's wrists, while the enemy was trying to deflect the ball thrown by the protagonists back towards them, volleyball-style. According to the story, doing so made the antagonist be pushed back by the force of the ball until he was out of bounds, while deflecting the ball and changing the velocity of the ball to the opposite direction would have allowed him to hold his ground. [[spoiler:The Law of Conservation of Momentum weeps.]]

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* In ''HunterXHunter'', ''Manga/HunterXHunter'', one arc has the protagonists and their allies playing [[SeriousBusiness dodgeball]] against an enemy. The game is won by one character making the ball stick to the enemy's wrists, while the enemy was trying to deflect the ball thrown by the protagonists back towards them, volleyball-style. According to the story, doing so made the antagonist be pushed back by the force of the ball until he was out of bounds, while deflecting the ball and changing the velocity of the ball to the opposite direction would have allowed him to hold his ground. [[spoiler:The Law of Conservation of Momentum weeps.]]
29th Jul '16 4:34:21 AM GM_3826
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* '''VideoGame/AzureStrikerGunvolt''': Tenjian, a superhuman with [[AnIcePerson the power to manipulate ice]], has the ability to freeze things below absolute zero. If we assume that temperatures below absolute zero can exist, they would actually be warmer than any positive temperature.

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* '''VideoGame/AzureStrikerGunvolt''': ''VideoGame/AzureStrikerGunvolt'': Tenjian, a superhuman with [[AnIcePerson the power to manipulate ice]], has the ability to freeze things below absolute zero. If we assume that temperatures below absolute zero can exist, they would actually be warmer than any positive temperature.
29th Jul '16 4:33:58 AM GM_3826
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[[AC:VideoGames]]
* '''VideoGame/AzureStrikerGunvolt''': Tenjian, a superhuman with [[AnIcePerson the power to manipulate ice]], has the ability to freeze things below absolute zero. If we assume that temperatures below absolute zero can exist, they would actually be warmer than any positive temperature.
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