History Main / ArtisticLicenseHistory

5th Feb '17 7:34:23 AM Doug86
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** ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' generally gets the Renaissance background and history right, doing as much as possible as to avoid anachronistic architecture, especially compared to later games. It also shows UsefulNotes/LeonardoDaVinci as a young handsome man (rather than the older man based on a drawing never attributed to Leonardo), Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli as a republican statesman and a more nuanced portrayal of Caterina Sforza then elsewhere. However it's depiction of the Medici and the Borgia falls within conventional parameters of HistoricalHeroUpgrade[=/=]HistoricalVillainUpgrade common to HollywoodHistory rather than the GrayAndGreyMorality in realiy.

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** ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' generally gets the Renaissance background and history right, doing as much as possible as to avoid anachronistic architecture, especially compared to later games. It also shows UsefulNotes/LeonardoDaVinci Creator/LeonardoDaVinci as a young handsome man (rather than the older man based on a drawing never attributed to Leonardo), Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli as a republican statesman and a more nuanced portrayal of Caterina Sforza then elsewhere. However it's depiction of the Medici and the Borgia falls within conventional parameters of HistoricalHeroUpgrade[=/=]HistoricalVillainUpgrade common to HollywoodHistory rather than the GrayAndGreyMorality in realiy.
4th Feb '17 10:17:14 AM FrustratedFox
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*** The South's interactions with states' rights were odd. The Confederate central government was weak, but in a way that was all downside and no upside; this could be called support for states' rights. (Alabama, for example, successfully insisted for years that its soldiers could only be used to defend the borders of Alabama -- where no battles were fought for the duration of the war.) The Confederate constitution, meanwhile, was almost identical to the US constitution (even including the Interstate Commerce Clause, [[LoopholeAbuse a loophole large enough to drive a centralized government through]]), except that it was more restrictive on slavery. (The Confederate constitution forbade banning slavery, but also forbade importing slaves.) This was absolutely ''not'' support for states' rights. In short, states' rights weren't much of a concern for the Confederacy one way or the other. The South actually was ''hostile'' to states' rights when it went against them. For instance, many free states passed laws saying slaves brought into their territory were automatically freed. This naturally pissed off visiting Southerners who wanted to bring their cook or driver along. Also, the free states obstructed the return of fugitive slaves to their owners by measures like requiring that a jury find they were indeed fugitive slaves before returning them (some slave-catchers were known to misidentify free blacks). Juries often refused to do this. Because of such things, the issue became federalized by the Fugitive Slave Act, with federal marshals hunting down escaped slaves-hardly what a states' rights supporter would want. Of course the free states loudly protested this, and it helped move civil war closer.

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*** The South's interactions with states' rights were odd. The Confederate central government was weak, but in a way that was all downside and no upside; this could be called support for states' rights. (Alabama, for example, successfully insisted for years that its soldiers could only be used to defend the borders of Alabama -- where no battles were fought for the duration of the war.) Alabama) The Confederate constitution, meanwhile, was almost identical to the US constitution (even including the Interstate Commerce Clause, [[LoopholeAbuse a loophole large enough to drive a centralized government through]]), except that it was more restrictive on slavery. (The Confederate constitution forbade banning slavery, but also forbade importing slaves.) This was absolutely ''not'' support for states' rights. In short, states' rights weren't much of a concern for the Confederacy one way or the other. The South actually was ''hostile'' to states' rights when it went against them. For instance, many free states passed laws saying slaves brought into their territory were automatically freed. This naturally pissed off visiting Southerners who wanted to bring their cook or driver along. Also, the free states obstructed the return of fugitive slaves to their owners by measures like requiring that a jury find they were indeed fugitive slaves before returning them (some slave-catchers were known to misidentify free blacks). Juries often refused to do this. Because of such things, the issue became federalized by the Fugitive Slave Act, with federal marshals hunting down escaped slaves-hardly what a states' rights supporter would want. Of course the free states loudly protested this, and it helped move civil war closer.
3rd Feb '17 12:14:57 PM Snarf
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* Invoked and PlayedForLaughs by {{Music/TheB52s The B-52's}} in "Mesopotamia". The band consulted an encyclopedia when writing the song just to make sure they got everything ''wrong''.

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* Invoked and PlayedForLaughs by {{Music/TheB52s [[Music/TheB52s The B-52's}} B-52's]] in "Mesopotamia". The band consulted an encyclopedia when writing the song just to make sure they got everything ''wrong''.
3rd Feb '17 12:09:39 PM Snarf
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* Invoked and played for laughs by {{Music/TheB52s}} in "Mesopotamia". The band consulted an encyclopedia when writing the song just to make sure they got everything ''wrong''.

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* Invoked and played for laughs PlayedForLaughs by {{Music/TheB52s}} {{Music/TheB52s The B-52's}} in "Mesopotamia". The band consulted an encyclopedia when writing the song just to make sure they got everything ''wrong''.
3rd Feb '17 12:05:20 PM Snarf
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* Invoked and played for laughs by {{Music/TheB52s}} in "Mesopotamia". The band consulted an encyclopedia when writing the song just to make sure they got everything ''wrong''.
1st Feb '17 6:22:53 AM RappaR
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** The reason, why Bruno was turned down to authority, was because he was fraid and he cheated some nobles, that he is is wizard and offered them his "service".
30th Jan '17 2:56:51 PM VirgYetAgain
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** More weight is given to the alternate reality theory by the existence of the nation of Qumar and its pivotal role in many episodes. No such real nation exists.
29th Jan '17 7:02:39 AM skidoo23
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** Actually, this is disputed as numerous histories of Victoria dating back decades do suggest that there was some romantic inclination, with Elizabeth Longford's ''Victoria R.I." describing them as "one of the romances of history" and others referring to them as "half-lovers". There is no indication that Victoria [[spoiler: considered proposing marriage to Lord M]] as depicted in the series, and the series depicts Lord M as more robust and attractive than the real-life counterpart, but on the topic of whether the two actually fell for each other in some way, there is no agreement in the history books. Victoria's own WordOfGod (her published diaries), offer no help given they were heavily censored by her heirs after her death, but even then Lord M dominates her memoirs.
27th Jan '17 10:58:27 PM laserviking42
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** Almost everything in the BookOfExodus. There is no evidence that the Israelites (or even a minority) lived in Egypt. The biblical account of forty years in the Sinai has no archealogical or contemporary historical evidence, in fact there is no evidence of any significant habitation in the Sinai for the entire 2nd millenium BCE. Exodus states that there were around 600,000 fighting men, combined with women, children and the elderly, this would put the number at 1.5-2 million, estimates of the entire population of Egypt are about 3-3.5 million.
27th Jan '17 10:34:22 PM laserviking42
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*** In Virginia in 1860, it was illegal to teach slaves to read and write. Stonewall Jackson defied this law -- and the Lost Cause celebrates him for doing so -- but most masters didn't. Recall how Christianization of the slaves was an argument in favor of slavery, that the South was overwhelmingly Protestant, and that being a faithful Protestant more or less requires reading the Bible.

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*** In Virginia in 1860, it was illegal to teach slaves to read and write.write, thanks to the Nat Turner rebellion in 1830 (Turner was a slave preacher who used services to agitate for rebellion). Stonewall Jackson defied this law -- and the Lost Cause celebrates him for doing so -- but most masters didn't. Recall how Christianization of the slaves was an argument in favor of slavery, that the South was overwhelmingly Protestant, and that being a faithful Protestant more or less requires reading the Bible.
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