History Main / ArtisticLicenseHistory

29th Apr '16 1:20:45 PM hoodiecrow
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** Shakespeare has King John say, "The thunder of my cannon shall be heard" in France. The first English cannons were used at the battle of Crécy in 1346 130 years after the death of King John. Cannon are also mentioned in ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' which is set in the 11th century, well before gunpowder was invented in Europe.

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** Shakespeare has King John say, "The thunder of my cannon shall be heard" in France. The first English cannons were used at the battle of Crécy in 1346 130 years after the death of King John. Cannon are also mentioned in ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' which is set in the 11th century, well before gunpowder was invented introduced in Europe.
28th Apr '16 6:46:45 AM Fireblood
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* Bruno was not condemned for his defense of the Copernican system of astronomy, nor for his doctrine of the plurality of inhabited worlds, but for his theological heresy, among which were the following: that Christ was not God but merely an unusually skillful magician, that the Holy Ghost is the ''anima mundi'', that the Devil will be saved, ''etc''. Like all heretics, Bruno had multiple chances to repent, but refused. Supposedly, he even told off the judge who sentenced him to death with: "Perhaps you pass this sentence upon me with more fear than I receive it." In the end, he had his tongue pierced to stop him speaking while going to the execution site. As his last act, he allegedly turned away from the cross held up to him by a priest.

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* Bruno was not condemned for his defense of the Copernican system of astronomy, nor solely for his doctrine of the plurality of inhabited worlds, but for his theological heresy, among which were the following: worlds-it was just one of a list of heresy charges, including: that Christ was not God but merely an unusually skillful magician, that the Holy Ghost is the ''anima mundi'', that the Devil will be saved, ''etc''. Like all heretics, Bruno had multiple chances to repent, but refused. Supposedly, he even told off the judge who sentenced him to death with: "Perhaps you pass this sentence upon me with more fear than I receive it." In the end, he had his tongue pierced to stop him speaking while going to the execution site. As his last act, he allegedly turned away from the cross held up to him by a priest.
25th Apr '16 7:27:58 PM Fireblood
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** The term predates the Nazi ideology by thousands of years. Originally, that group of "Indo-Europeans" that swept into the Indus valley and the Iranian plateau during the 1500's BC helped in part to establish the Hindi and Iranian civilizations along with the indigenous people there. You can rest assured those people were hardly blond, since there is evidence that the Aryans and other groups of Indo-Europeans originated in what is now Turkey. Early racist ideolgies of the 19th century (Arthur de Gobineau, Houston Stewart Chamberlain et al.) built up a largely fictional mythos around the term and declared that it applied to white Northern Europeans. [[Creator/JRRTolkien Tolkien]] even wrote a letter pointing out how inaccurate Nazi conception of Aryans were, saying it was a linguistic term referring to speaker of Indo-Iranian languages.[[note]] Actually, some linguists had started using "Aryan" as a synonym for "Indo-European" during the 19th century, but that usage never was universally accepted.[[/note]]

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** The term predates the Nazi ideology by thousands of years. Originally, that group of "Indo-Europeans" that swept into the Indus valley and the Iranian plateau during the 1500's BC helped in part to establish the Hindi and Iranian civilizations along with the indigenous people there. You can rest assured those people were hardly blond, since there is evidence that the Aryans and other groups of Indo-Europeans originated in what is now Turkey. Early racist ideolgies ideologues of the 19th century (Arthur de Gobineau, Houston Stewart Chamberlain et al.) al. whom the Nazis took inspiration from) built up a largely fictional mythos around the term and declared that it applied to white Northern Europeans. [[Creator/JRRTolkien Tolkien]] even wrote a letter pointing out how inaccurate Nazi conception of Aryans were, saying it was a linguistic term referring to speaker of Indo-Iranian languages.[[note]] Actually, some linguists had started using "Aryan" as a synonym for "Indo-European" during the 19th century, but that usage never was universally accepted.[[/note]]



** Another, smaller issue is the tendency of many works set in World War II to refer to the German Army as the ''Wehrmacht''. The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wehrmacht ''Wehrmacht'']] was the more general, overarching organization (the equivalent in English would be saying "the military") composed of the Army (''Heer''), Navy (''Kriegsmarine''), and Air Force (''Luftwaffe''). These titles (except for ''Kriegsmarine''-it's simply ''Marine'' nowadays due to "Krieg" meaning "war") persist in the post-WWII ''Bundeswehr'', which is also often mistaken for the German Army.

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** Another, smaller issue is the tendency of many works set in World War II to refer to the German Army as the ''Wehrmacht''. The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wehrmacht ''Wehrmacht'']] was the more general, overarching organization (the equivalent in English would be saying "the military") military"-literally it means the "defense force") composed of the Army (''Heer''), Navy (''Kriegsmarine''), and Air Force (''Luftwaffe''). These titles (except for ''Kriegsmarine''-it's simply ''Marine'' nowadays due to "Krieg" meaning "war") persist in the post-WWII ''Bundeswehr'', which is also often mistaken for the German Army.



*** The quick collapse of France is due mostly to the actions of their politicians rather than their military prowess. While most of the army was manning the Maginot Line in anticipation of a WWI trench warfare type battle, the Germans used their motorized units to strike through the Ardennes[[note]]The border between France and Belgium, which was not fortified due to expense and political considerations, mainly that if the Germans invaded Belgium en route to France, it would draw Great Britain into the fight. Which turned out not to be the deterrent they thought it would.[[/note]] and bypass the Maginot Line completely, reaching the major French cities before the army could react. At this point, the French army was completely ready to fight and drive the Germans out however the French government had already capitulated and ordered the army to stand down[[note]] The French army was so pissed off that they refused the order to surrender and instead evacuated to Britain through Dunkirk. Charles de Gaulle declared himself leader of the Free French and rallied the French colonies to his side, culminating in the invasion of southern France by mostly African and Algerian troops[[/note]]. Had they known that the reason Germany used blitzkrieg techniques was because German industry at the time could not supply a prolonged conflict, history might have turned out quite differently.

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*** The quick collapse of France is due mostly to the actions of their politicians rather than their military prowess. While most of the army was manning the Maginot Line in anticipation of a WWI trench warfare type battle, the Germans used their motorized units to strike through the Ardennes[[note]]The border between France and Belgium, which was not fortified due to expense and political considerations, mainly that if the Germans invaded Belgium en route to France, it would draw Great Britain into the fight. Which turned out not to be the deterrent they thought it would.[[/note]] and bypass the Maginot Line completely, reaching the major French cities before the army could react. At this point, the French army was completely ready to fight and drive the Germans out out, however the French government had already capitulated and ordered the army to stand down[[note]] down.[[note]] The French army was so pissed off that they refused the order to surrender and instead evacuated to Britain through Dunkirk. Charles de Gaulle declared himself leader of the Free French and rallied the French colonies to his side, culminating in the invasion of southern France by mostly African and Algerian troops[[/note]]. troops[[/note]] Had they known that the reason Germany used blitzkrieg techniques was because German industry at the time could not supply a prolonged conflict, history might have turned out quite differently.
25th Apr '16 7:20:55 PM Fireblood
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* Similarly, many supposed "acts" related to Christian martyrology are not only riddled with supposed supernatural apparitions and miracles, which are already kiiiiinda hard to believe for many, but some have ''glaring'' historical errors.[[note]]This is actually so bad that out of hundreds of supposed "martyrologies", only '''four''' (Agnes, Sebastian, Felix and Adauctus, and Marcellinus and Peter) are considered as "even remotely historical.[[/note]] A good example is the myth of Saint Philomena of Mugnano: supposed to be about a Greek RebelliousPrincess who [[ChildMarriageVeto spurns]] the offer of an ArrangedMarriage to Emperor Diocletian and gets martyred: ''there were no small kingdoms left by that time in Greece'' (it was divided in provinces, and Philomena's supposed kingdom was in the island of Corfu -- back then, a part of the Macedonia province), Diocletian was a married man and both his wife Prisca and daughter Valeria ''outlived him'' for at least four years, Diocletian reigned from ''outside of Rome'' (more exactly from Nicomedia, Mediolanum, Antioch, and ultimately Trier) while the whole "tale" happened in Rome itself, etc.

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* Similarly, many supposed "acts" related to Christian martyrology are not only riddled with supposed supernatural apparitions and miracles, which are already kiiiiinda hard to believe for many, but some have ''glaring'' historical errors.[[note]]This is actually so bad that out of hundreds of supposed "martyrologies", only '''four''' (Agnes, Sebastian, Felix and Adauctus, and Marcellinus and Peter) are considered as "even remotely even ''remotely'' historical.[[/note]] A good example is the myth of Saint Philomena of Mugnano: supposed to be about a Greek RebelliousPrincess who [[ChildMarriageVeto spurns]] the offer of an ArrangedMarriage to Emperor Diocletian and gets martyred: ''there were no small kingdoms left by that time in Greece'' (it was divided in provinces, and Philomena's supposed kingdom was in the island of Corfu -- back then, a part of the Macedonia province), Diocletian was a married man and both his wife Prisca and daughter Valeria ''outlived him'' for at least four years, Diocletian reigned from ''outside of Rome'' (more exactly from Nicomedia, Mediolanum, Antioch, and ultimately Trier) while the whole "tale" happened in Rome itself, etc. Many of the martyrologies were only written centuries after the fact in any case and some atrocities (such as the Christians being fed to lions in the Coliseum) don't have ''any'' evidence for them (the Coliseum was not even built when these atrocities supposedly took place, for instance).



** Another cliche in the Old West is the notion that gunfighters fought in the streets with the use of the QuickDraw. Although duels did happen in the West, quick draw duels were extremely rare and unheard of. Historical gunfighters would rather have a pistol already in their hand as opposed to drawing them. It was also very rare to see two popular gunmen challenging one another to enlarge their reputation, although there were accounts of [[YoungGun young guns]] commonly challenging a more experienced gunmen to make a name for themselves.

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** Another cliche in the Old West is the notion that gunfighters fought in the streets with the use of the QuickDraw. Although duels did happen in the West, quick draw duels were extremely rare and unheard of. Historical gunfighters would rather have a pistol already in their hand as opposed to drawing them. It was also very rare to see two popular gunmen challenging one another to enlarge their reputation, although there were accounts of [[YoungGun young guns]] commonly challenging a more experienced gunmen to make a name for themselves. Revolvers were very inaccurate, so quick draws were little help anyway.



** The {{Cowboy}}s vs Indians conflicts are also heavily debated upon. Most of the battles white people did with Native Americans were military. Also, relationship between ranchers and Indians were quite mutual, and Indians would even let cowboys cross their land for a fee. However, in times of conflict, there were accounts of cowboys fighting off rogue Indians for various reasons such as war and scarcity of food. Cases like those of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Loving Oliver Loving]] and the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ute_Wars Pinhook Massacre]] are one of the most gruesome examples. Cowboys themselves weren't that chivalrous either, and they too were [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQnWv5RRPJw just as aggressive]].
** The monochrome casting of many early Westerns is also grossly wrong. You see, most of the "opening" of the West happened just after the Civil War (1861-1865). The Transconitnental Railroad was completed in 1869 (built mostly by Asian laborers) and most of the territory in question had been part of Mexico until 1848. But in 1950s Westerns all you will see in any major role are white males. Women will be shown as love interests at best and window dressing at worst and black people won't even show up at all. In reality ''many'' cowboys (you know, people who took care of cows and herded them to the next railroad station) were freedmen in search for work and fleeing discrimination in the old South.

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** The {{Cowboy}}s vs vs. Indians conflicts are also heavily debated upon. Most of the battles white people did with Native Americans were military. Also, relationship between ranchers and Indians were quite mutual, and Indians would even let cowboys cross their land for a fee. However, in times of conflict, there were accounts of cowboys fighting off rogue Indians for various reasons such as war and scarcity of food. Cases like those of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Loving Oliver Loving]] and the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ute_Wars Pinhook Massacre]] are one of the most gruesome examples. Cowboys themselves weren't that chivalrous either, and they too were [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQnWv5RRPJw just as aggressive]].
** The monochrome casting of many early Westerns is also grossly wrong. You see, most of the "opening" of the West happened just after the Civil War (1861-1865). The Transconitnental Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869 (built mostly by Asian laborers) and most of the territory in question had been part of Mexico until 1848. But in 1950s Westerns all you will see in any major role are white males. Women will be shown as love interests at best and window dressing at worst and black people won't even show up at all. In reality ''many'' cowboys (you know, people who took care of cows and herded them to the next railroad station) were freedmen in search for work and fleeing discrimination in the old South.



** The notion of samurais only using the katana as his only weapon (honor wise) is also false. Historical samurais are depicted using everything from bows, polearms, and even firearms. Some samurai ninjas also used other despicable weapons in the eyes of the modern viewer. Katana duels were also very rare and frequently frowned upon. In the case of Miyamoto Musashi (who by the way is the greatest Japanese samurai that ever lived), he killed one guy with the use of a homemade wooden oar.
** {{Ninja}} history is also misrepresented from time to time. They do not carry straight swords, doesn't use kunai knives and throwing stars, and never wore black jumpsuits (this misconception came in Japanese theatre and art, used to differentiate ninjas from other characters). Ninjas knowing parkour is also horrendously exaggerated. And many historical ninjas weren't peasants themselves (except of course the Iga ninjas).

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** The notion of samurais a samurai only using the katana as his only weapon (honor wise) is also false. Historical samurais are depicted using everything from bows, polearms, and polearms to even firearms. Some samurai ninjas also used other despicable weapons in the eyes of the modern viewer. Katana duels were also very rare and frequently frowned upon. In the case of Miyamoto Musashi (who by the way is the greatest Japanese samurai that ever lived), he killed one guy with the use of a homemade wooden oar.
** {{Ninja}} history is also misrepresented from time to time. They do not didn't carry straight swords, doesn't didn't use kunai knives and throwing stars, and never wore black jumpsuits (this misconception came in from Japanese theatre theater and art, used to differentiate ninjas from other characters). Ninjas knowing parkour is also horrendously exaggerated. And many historical ninjas weren't peasants themselves (except of course the Iga ninjas). Real ninjas were likely to dress as travelers, merchants, pilgrims, peasants, etc. (i.e. people who blend in).



** The Spanish Inquisition was actually highly regulated, not arbitrary as often depicted. However, since torture was an accepted way to obtain truthful confessions and denunciations were anonymous until the actual trial (which could occur as much as two years after the denunciation, during which the accused would be imprisoned without knowing who had accused them or even what the charges were), this was little comfort to its victims.
** The Spanish Inquisition was also quite methodical in gathering evidence, to the point where it ended witch burnings in Spain a full century before witch-hunts began to ''wane'' in the rest of Europe due to the lack of physical evidence for witchcraft. Again, since the main business of the Inquisition was to root out heresy, for which there was little physical evidence, this was no help to the other people accused by the Inquisition.

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** The Spanish Inquisition was actually highly regulated, not arbitrary as often depicted. However, since torture was an accepted way to obtain truthful confessions and denunciations were anonymous until the actual trial (which could occur as much as two years after the denunciation, during which the accused would be imprisoned without knowing who had accused them or even what the charges were), this was little comfort to its victims.
victims. Additionally, although torture was supposed to be used only once, and any confession obtained from it was invalid unless repeated in court, the inquisitors got around this by "recessing" torture sessions and picking them up later.
** The Spanish Inquisition was also quite methodical in gathering evidence, to the point where it ended witch burnings in Spain a full century before witch-hunts began to ''wane'' in the rest of Europe due to the lack of physical evidence for witchcraft. Again, Again though, since the main business of the Inquisition was to root out heresy, for which there was little physical evidence, this was no help to the other people accused by the Inquisition.Inquisition. It also helped that prior to the early modern witch trials, the Catholic Church officially disbelieved in witchcraft, so it didn't take much to fall back on this position.



** It's rare for anyone to note that the Papal Inquisition ("the" Inquisition) and the ''Spanish'' Inquisition were completely separate organizations. It's hardly ever mentioned that Protestants had their own persecutions of heretics (both Catholics and often Protestants of different sects) and witches. In fact they killed more witches than the Church. It's even rarer to note that the Spanish Inquisition was the state ministry, not papal organization and served the interests of the Kings of Spain, not the Church as a whole. It was founded in 1480 and was active throughout the 16th to early ''19th'' century (it was formally abolished in 1834) so its connection to the Middle Ages is rather weak.

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** It's rare for anyone to note that the Papal Inquisition ("the" Inquisition) and the ''Spanish'' Inquisition were completely separate organizations. It's hardly ever mentioned that Protestants had their own persecutions of heretics (both Catholics and often Protestants of different sects) and witches. In fact they killed more witches than the Church. It's even rarer to note that the Spanish Inquisition was the state ministry, not a papal organization and served the interests of the Kings of Spain, Spanish monarchy, not the Church as a whole. It was founded in 1480 and was active throughout the 16th to early ''19th'' century (it was formally abolished in 1834) so its connection to the Middle Ages is rather weak.



* Heretics are usually portrayed as peaceful if eccentric evangelists and are portrayed in a positive light. In reality, many heretical movements during the High Middle Ages, especially the millenarian sects, strove to reform not only religion but also secular life. Some of them tried to achieve it forcefully, by physical elimination of nobility and clergy, attracting simple criminals. Comparison with fascists and Bolsheviks is sometimes not too stretched. Another important detail is that many seemingly minor points of doctrine are far more important than they appear at first glance. The argument over whether the Eucharist is really the Body and Blood of Christ or merely a symbol seems like hair-splitting until you consider the fact that it is the difference between true worship and either idolatry or sacrilege (worshiping the Eucharist would be idolatry if it isn't really Jesus, and treating the Eucharist as a mere symbol is sacrilege if it is Jesus). Orthodoxy is SeriousBusiness because of FridgeHorror.
* Bruno was not condemned for his defence of the Copernican system of astronomy, nor for his doctrine of the plurality of inhabited worlds, but for his theological heresy, among which were the following: that Christ was not God but merely an unusually skillful magician, that the Holy Ghost is the ''anima mundi'', that the Devil will be saved, ''etc''. Like all heretics, Bruno had multiple chances to repent, but persisted to speak his mind. Supposedly, he even told off the judge who sentenced him to death with: "Perhaps you pass this sentence upon me with more fear than I receive it." In the end, he had his tongue pierced to stop him speaking while going to the execution site. As his last act, he allegedly turned away from the cross held up to him by a priest.
* Galileo was never tortured by the church. He ''was'' threatened with torture before confessing, but this was standard (as in, any court anywhere, secular or otherwise, had little problem with torture at the time). His sentence for heresy was house arrest at his villa for the rest of his life. There were others, such as Giordano Bruno, who ''was'' burned at the stake for his Copernican and naturalist opinions. In addition, so long as Galileo kept to his Copernican astronomy, he was quite popular with Church officials, including the Cardinal who, as Pope, would later condemn him. It was only when Galileo claimed that his astronomy overturned Church dogmas, and began reinterpreting the Bible, that he ran into trouble. It really didn't help that, at the time, differing interpretations of the Bible were grounds for war and rebellion on the part of both Catholics and Protestants, and that Galileo was practically in the Pope's backyard. Galileo claimed that the Bible is the final guide for the people, so all scientific discoveries should be included in the Scripture. It was the Pope who wanted to keep science and religion separate. Galileo didn't ''really'' get into trouble until he was asked by the Papacy to include a mention towards the Aristotelian model, which at the time was supported by the majority of astronomers at the time (people tend to forget that the first people to condemn Galileo were not priests, but secular scholars). Galileo did so, but only by introducing a very unflattering character into his writing that insulted his peers. Also, he mocked the Pope. More specifically, he made up a character called [[TakeThat Simplicio, or "Simpleton"]] for an essay he wrote denouncing Aristotelian astronomy... [[TooDumbToLive and rather obviously based him on the Pope who'd been defending him.]]
* Most people in 1492 knew the world was round (the exceptions were a few non-Pauline Christians and, as usual, proles.) ChristopherColumbus never "discovered" it: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eratosthenes Eratosthenes of Cyrene]] had experimental evidence of the roundness of the Earth and a pretty good estimate of its size a full two centuries BC. In fact, ChristopherColumbus was the one who [[ArtisticLicenseGeography failed geography forever]] - the reason no one wanted to finance his expedition was because he was working under the assumption that Earth is much smaller than it really is; if there wasn't another continent in the way, they would all be dead.

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* Heretics are usually portrayed as peaceful if eccentric evangelists and are portrayed in a positive light. In reality, many heretical movements during the High Middle Ages, especially the millenarian sects, strove to reform not only religion but also secular life. Some of them tried to achieve it forcefully, by physical elimination of nobility and clergy, attracting simple criminals. Comparison Comparisons with fascists and Bolsheviks is sometimes not too stretched. Another important detail is that many seemingly minor points of doctrine are far more important than they appear at first glance. The argument over whether the Eucharist is really the Body and Blood of Christ or merely a symbol seems like hair-splitting until you consider the fact that it is the difference between true worship and either idolatry or sacrilege (worshiping the Eucharist would be idolatry if it isn't really Jesus, and treating the Eucharist as a mere symbol is sacrilege if it is Jesus). Orthodoxy is SeriousBusiness because of FridgeHorror.
FridgeHorror. This is also why heresy as a whole was treated so deadly seriously-to them it ''was''. If the wrong belief sense you to hell, heresy really is worse than murder, as some theologians like Augustine of Hippo said.
* Bruno was not condemned for his defence defense of the Copernican system of astronomy, nor for his doctrine of the plurality of inhabited worlds, but for his theological heresy, among which were the following: that Christ was not God but merely an unusually skillful magician, that the Holy Ghost is the ''anima mundi'', that the Devil will be saved, ''etc''. Like all heretics, Bruno had multiple chances to repent, but persisted to speak his mind.refused. Supposedly, he even told off the judge who sentenced him to death with: "Perhaps you pass this sentence upon me with more fear than I receive it." In the end, he had his tongue pierced to stop him speaking while going to the execution site. As his last act, he allegedly turned away from the cross held up to him by a priest.
* Galileo was never tortured by the church. He ''was'' threatened with torture before confessing, but this was standard (as in, any court anywhere, secular or otherwise, had little problem with torture at the time). His sentence for heresy was house arrest at his villa for the rest of his life. There were others, such as Giordano Bruno, who ''was'' ''were'' burned at the stake for his Copernican and naturalist opinions.as heretics. In addition, so long as Galileo kept to his Copernican astronomy, he was quite popular with Church officials, including the Cardinal who, as Pope, would later condemn him. It was only when Galileo claimed that his astronomy overturned Church dogmas, and began reinterpreting the Bible, that he ran into trouble. It really didn't help that, at the time, differing interpretations of the Bible were grounds for war and rebellion on the part of both Catholics and Protestants, and that Galileo was practically in the Pope's backyard. Galileo claimed that the Bible is the final guide for the people, so all scientific discoveries should be included in the Scripture. It was the Pope who wanted to keep science and religion separate. Galileo didn't ''really'' get into trouble until he was asked by the Papacy to include a mention towards the Aristotelian model, which at the time was supported by the majority of astronomers at the time (people tend to forget that the first people to condemn Galileo were not priests, but secular scholars). Galileo did so, but only by introducing a very unflattering character into his writing that insulted his peers. Also, he mocked the Pope. More specifically, he made up a character called [[TakeThat Simplicio, or "Simpleton"]] for an essay he wrote denouncing Aristotelian astronomy... [[TooDumbToLive and rather obviously based him on the Pope who'd been defending him.]]
* Most people in 1492 knew the world was round (the exceptions were a few non-Pauline Christians and, as usual, proles.) ChristopherColumbus never "discovered" it: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eratosthenes Eratosthenes of Cyrene]] had experimental evidence of the roundness of the Earth and a pretty good estimate of its size a full two centuries BC. In fact, ChristopherColumbus was the one who [[ArtisticLicenseGeography failed geography forever]] - the reason no one wanted to finance his expedition was because he was working under the assumption that Earth is much smaller than it really is; if there wasn't another continent in the way, they would all be dead.have died, and nearly did.
25th Apr '16 6:49:06 PM Fireblood
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* ''Film/{{U571}}'' caused some controversy in the UK as it portrays an American submarine crew capturing a German Enigma code machine from a stranded U-Boat. In reality the British Royal Navy were the ones to board a sinking U-boat and capture the device. Also the depiction of German destroyers in the Atlantic hunting US and UK submarines is inaccurate as the German navy concentrated their resources on U-Boats, their surface fleet was unable to maintain any kind of presence in the Atlantic.

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* ''Film/{{U571}}'' caused some controversy in the UK as it portrays an American submarine crew capturing a German Enigma code machine from a stranded U-Boat. In reality the British Royal Navy were the ones to board a sinking U-boat and capture the device. Also the depiction of German destroyers in the Atlantic hunting US and UK submarines is inaccurate as the German navy concentrated their resources on U-Boats, their surface fleet was unable to maintain any kind of presence in the Atlantic. The fact the British captured the Enigma code machines rather than the US is acknowledged just prior to the credits.
8th Apr '16 5:27:56 PM MyFinalEdits
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** That is to say, those Carls actually ''existed'', they just were not part of the numerical order.
8th Apr '16 4:59:38 PM jormis29
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** Music/{{Poison}} performing at Kodiak Valley is seen as a big deal and April is covering the band for Spin Magazine, but in 1986 Poison had nkot yet achieved mainstream fame (that wouldn't happen until 1987).

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** Music/{{Poison}} performing at Kodiak Valley is seen as a big deal and April is covering the band for Spin Magazine, but in 1986 Poison had nkot not yet achieved mainstream fame (that wouldn't happen until 1987).
8th Apr '16 7:34:49 AM Adept
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** Music/{{Poison}} performing at Kodiak Valley is seen as a big deal and April is covering the band for Spin Magazine, but in 1986 Poison had not yet achieved mainstream fame (that wouldn't happen until 1987).

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** Music/{{Poison}} performing at Kodiak Valley is seen as a big deal and April is covering the band for Spin Magazine, but in 1986 Poison had not nkot yet achieved mainstream fame (that wouldn't happen until 1987).



* [[http://www.sff.net/people/lucy-snyder/brain/2005/12/playing-poker-with-tarot-cards.html This]] article on a Tarot {{poker}} game in a fantasy novel claims that the Tarot deck is the ancestor of the modern playing card deck. Modern European playing cards only appeared sometime around 1370, and the earliest Tarot decks appeared circa 1440.

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* [[http://www.sff.net/people/lucy-snyder/brain/2005/12/playing-poker-with-tarot-cards.html This]] article on a Tarot {{poker}} TabletopGame/{{poker}} game in a fantasy novel claims that the Tarot deck is the ancestor of the modern playing card deck. Modern European playing cards only appeared sometime around 1370, and the earliest Tarot decks appeared circa 1440.
30th Mar '16 2:38:35 AM mrnickname
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Added DiffLines:

** That is to say, those Carls actually ''existed'', they just were not part of the numerical order.
24th Mar '16 8:31:02 PM MsChibi
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* ''Literature/TheRedTent'', which takes place in BibleTimes mentions a RiteOfPassage for girls in Padan-Aram called the "Ritual of Opening." When a girl has her first period, she is dressed in simple garments but elaborately made up and decorated with jewelry, then given large amounts of fortified wine as part of the celebration. Then, after dark, she is taken outside, stripped naked and placed supine on the ground, and [[SexAsRiteOfPassage masturbated with a fertility idol until she orgasms]], in order to [[ArtisticLicenseBiology break her hymen]] and offer the resultant blood to [[MesopotamianMythology Inanna]], as well as to encourage her to dream about what her destiny holds and find her "personal goddess." The ritual's purpose is simultaneously to prepare the girl for marriage and to keep her worth under the control of Inanna, not under the control of men vis a vis her virginity. There is no record of such a ritual existing there, or ''anywhere'' in the Fertile Crescent. And considering that Mesopotamian society was very patriarchal, with women's chastity held as a reflection of their fathers' and husbands' honor, it's not likely that such a ritual did or would have existed there.

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* ''Literature/TheRedTent'', which takes place in BibleTimes mentions a RiteOfPassage for girls in Padan-Aram called the "Ritual of Opening." When a girl has her first period, she is dressed in simple garments but elaborately made up and decorated with jewelry, then given large amounts of fortified wine as part of the celebration. Then, after dark, she is taken outside, stripped naked and placed supine in a prone position on the ground, and [[SexAsRiteOfPassage masturbated with a fertility idol until she orgasms]], in order to [[ArtisticLicenseBiology break her hymen]] and offer the resultant blood to [[MesopotamianMythology Inanna]], as well as to encourage her to dream about what her destiny holds and find her "personal goddess." The ritual's purpose is simultaneously to prepare the girl for marriage and to keep her worth under the control of Inanna, not under the control of men vis a vis her virginity. There is no record of such a ritual existing there, or ''anywhere'' in the Fertile Crescent. And considering that Mesopotamian society was very patriarchal, with women's chastity held as a reflection of their fathers' and husbands' honor, it's not likely that such a ritual did or would have existed there.
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