History Main / ArtisticLicenseHistory

19th Aug '16 1:25:50 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''[[Film/IndianaJonesAndTheKingdomOfTheCrystalSkull Crystal Skull]]'' has a [[{{Mayincatec}} Mayan-speaking civilization]] [[LatinLand in the Amazon]] and Indy claiming that he learned Quechua (Peru) from two guys in Pancho Villa's army (Mexico). This playing loose with the facts was typical of the [[TheyJustDidntCare old adventure movies]] that serve as [[GenreThrowback inspiration to the franchise]], however.

to:

** ''[[Film/IndianaJonesAndTheKingdomOfTheCrystalSkull Crystal Skull]]'' has a [[{{Mayincatec}} Mayan-speaking civilization]] [[LatinLand in the Amazon]] and Indy claiming that he learned Quechua (Peru) from two guys in Pancho Villa's army (Mexico). This playing loose with the facts was typical of the [[TheyJustDidntCare old adventure movies]] movies that serve as [[GenreThrowback inspiration to the franchise]], however.
16th Aug '16 1:03:03 PM ArJayKay
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** York is seen using a Luger he takes from a captured German after losing his US Army Colt M1911. In truth, he never took a gun from a prisoner to use, and kept hold of his Army Colt for the entire battle. This was changed because the Luger the armorers provided was the only blank-adapted handgun available on the set.

to:

** York is seen using a Luger he takes from a captured German after losing his US Army Colt M1911. In truth, he never took a gun from a prisoner to use, and kept hold of his Army Colt for the entire battle. This was changed because the Luger the armorers provided was the only blank-adapted handgun available on the set. He is also seen using an M1903 Springfield, as opposed to the M1917 Enfield he had in real life.
11th Aug '16 5:31:47 PM dustyham
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Likewise, Hal's single combat with Hotspur at the Battle of Shrewsbury in ''Henry VI: Part 1'' is a total dramatic fabrication. Not only does Shakespeare portray them as the same age when Hotspur was really decades older, but in reality, rather than personally cross swords, both men were felled by arrows to the face (Henry barely survived; Hotspur wasn't so lucky).
11th Aug '16 11:50:22 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Wqo9IVCWV5E/SRr_T7IbTKI/AAAAAAAABgI/Vlgydog2iRs/s1600/Bizarro%2BPinata%2B11-09-08%2BWB.jpg This]] ''ComicStrip/{{Bizarro}}'' strip.



[[folder:Webcomics]]
* In ''Webcomic/{{Educomix}}'', UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was fought between Ireland and the South Pole, and one of the combatants was Jesus.

to:

[[folder:Webcomics]]
[[folder:Web Animation]]
* In ''Webcomic/{{Educomix}}'', UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was ''WebAnimation/InventionPioneersOfNote'', the episode on Alexander Graham Bell asserts, among other things, that he fought between Ireland and in World War 2. While the South Pole, and one of the combatants was Jesus.error is definitely intentional, it's not as clear if this is supposed to be a CriticalResearchFailure, or BlatantLies, or something else.



[[folder:Web Comics]]
* In ''Webcomic/{{Educomix}}'', UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was fought between Ireland and the South Pole, and one of the combatants was Jesus.
[[/folder]]



* ''Associated Space'' has the following exchange in the spirit of ''AnimalHouse'':
-->'''Fatebane''': Fixed fortifications are a monument to the stupidity of man. Admiral Patton punched right through the Western Wall and sank the Japanese fleet. And that was in the days of triremes: oar-powered ships that couldn't fire back as well as coastal fortresses.
-->'''Nazar''': And how many ships did he lose in that battle?
-->'''Fatebane''': It's the principle that matters! If she could do it, so can we!
%%* [[http://xkcd.com/771/ This]] ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}''.

to:

* ''Associated Space'' ''Literature/AssociatedSpace'' has the following exchange in the spirit of ''AnimalHouse'':
-->'''Fatebane''':
''Film/AnimalHouse'':
-->'''Fatebane:'''
Fixed fortifications are a monument to the stupidity of man. Admiral Patton punched right through the Western Wall and sank the Japanese fleet. And that was in the days of triremes: oar-powered ships that couldn't fire back as well as coastal fortresses.
-->'''Nazar''':
fortresses.\\
'''Nazar:'''
And how many ships did he lose in that battle?
-->'''Fatebane''':
battle?\\
'''Fatebane:'''
It's the principle that matters! If she could do it, so can we!
%%* [[http://xkcd.com/771/ This]] ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}''.
we!



* During WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic's review of PearlHarbor, he gives an extremely long rant about the undisciplined and unpreparedness of the American Military during the attack. What he fails to realize? It was a surprise attack, many of the people on the ships weren't only their compliment, but workers from all over the base so it makes sense that a few can't swim. And he claims that the Doolittle Raid killed many civilians... when in reality only a few died (although the targets were ''factories'' which are military targets). Note: he could have gotten this all right if he just took the time to review the OtherWiki's page on both subjects, [[CriticalResearchFailure or asked his navy father]].
* In "InventionPioneersOfNote", the episode on Alexander Graham Bell asserts, among other things, that he fought in World War 2. While the error is definitely intentional, it's not as clear if this is supposed to be a CriticalResearchFailure, or BlatantLies, or something else.

to:

* During WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic's review of PearlHarbor, ''Film/PearlHarbor'', he gives an extremely long rant about the undisciplined and unpreparedness of the American Military during the attack. What he fails to realize? It was a surprise attack, many of the people on the ships weren't only their compliment, but workers from all over the base so it makes sense that a few can't swim. And he claims that the Doolittle Raid killed many civilians... when in reality only a few died (although the targets were ''factories'' which are military targets). Note: he could have gotten this all right if he just took the time to review the OtherWiki's page on both subjects, [[CriticalResearchFailure or asked his navy father]].
* In "InventionPioneersOfNote", the episode on Alexander Graham Bell asserts, among other things, that he fought in World War 2. While the error is definitely intentional, it's not as clear if this is supposed to be a CriticalResearchFailure, or BlatantLies, or something else.
father]].



** His version of world war two is even crazier. According to him, the Nazis were actually Jews exterminating Polish; the ghettos were posh and luxurious Jew districts; there were only six million Polish and all of them were killed and made into human meat; somehow some of them survived to be later sacrificed for USA and Great Britain; the 1943 ghetto uprising is a fabrication by [[BigBad Gangster Computer God]]; and pope Pius apparently ate Polish human meat. [[FlatWhat What?]]

to:

** His version of world war two UsefulNotes/WorldWarII is even crazier. According to him, the Nazis were actually Jews exterminating Polish; the ghettos were posh and luxurious Jew districts; there were only six million Polish and all of them were killed and made into human meat; somehow some of them survived to be later sacrificed for USA and Great Britain; the 1943 ghetto uprising is a fabrication by [[BigBad Gangster Computer God]]; and pope Pius apparently ate Polish human meat. [[FlatWhat What?]]



-->I drop lyrical bombs like Hiroshima in '73
-->I write rhymes like Shakespeare when he wrote Anne Frank's Diary
-->Which is about the civil war of 1812 in Germany
-->I'm like the Spanish Inquisition when they killed {{Jesus}}
-->And Abe Lincoln's suicide was the theme for my thesis
-->Like Moses when I focus I can split the red sea
-->Like he did in 1950 with the Chinese army

to:

-->I -->''I drop lyrical bombs like Hiroshima in '73
-->I
'73\\
I
write rhymes like Shakespeare when he wrote Anne Frank's Diary
-->Which
Diary\\
hich
is about the civil war of 1812 in Germany
-->I'm
Germany\\
I'm
like the Spanish Inquisition when they killed {{Jesus}}
-->And
{{Jesus}}\\
And
Abe Lincoln's suicide was the theme for my thesis
-->Like
thesis\\
Like
Moses when I focus I can split the red sea
-->Like
sea\\
Like
he did in 1950 with the Chinese armyarmy''



** It plays MedievalMorons and TheDungAges perfectly straight and exaggerates them UpToEleven. ''No'', Ancient Greece and Rome did not have science as we know it (though they did come up with some of the important precursors). In any case, they were definitely not as advanced as the eighteenth century. No, the MiddleAges were not completely stagnant. And ''no'', the rise of Christianity most ''definitely'' did not [[CriticalResearchFailure set back all of civilization -]] [[UnfortunateImplications even the ones which had never heard of Christianity or the West at that point in time -]] [[CriticalResearchFailure back to conditions of 1000 BCE.]]

to:

** It plays MedievalMorons and TheDungAges perfectly straight and exaggerates them UpToEleven. ''No'', Ancient Greece and Rome did not have science as we know it (though they did come up with some of the important precursors). In any case, they were definitely not as advanced as the eighteenth century. No, the MiddleAges TheMiddleAges were not completely stagnant. And ''no'', the rise of Christianity most ''definitely'' did not [[CriticalResearchFailure set back all of civilization -]] civilization]] -- [[UnfortunateImplications even the ones which had never heard of Christianity or the West at that point in time -]] time]] -- [[CriticalResearchFailure back to conditions of 1000 BCE.]]



* Played for laughs in the ''WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall'' review of the Doom comic. 90s Kid actually believes the soldiers in WWII had to fight space aliens.

to:

* Played for laughs in the ''WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall'' review of the Doom ''Doom'' comic. 90s Kid actually believes the soldiers in WWII had to fight space aliens.



* [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Wqo9IVCWV5E/SRr_T7IbTKI/AAAAAAAABgI/Vlgydog2iRs/s1600/Bizarro%2BPinata%2B11-09-08%2BWB.jpg This]] ''ComicStrip/{{Bizarro}}'' strip.



[[folder: Western Animation]]

to:

[[folder: Western [[folder:Western Animation]]



* The popular notion is that Creator/WaltDisney's animated cartoon ''Ben and Me'' is what started the misconception of Creator/BenjaminFranklin's famous kite experiment, which has found its way into every adaptation of the event. Though he did come up with the idea, there's no clear evidence that Franklin ever performed it himself, and the ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' clearly showed that if Franklin attempted the experiment the way it's popularly portrayed, he would have been fried to a crisp by the lightning bolt.
* PlayedForLaughs in ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' where Beast Boy proclaims "Now I know how UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington felt when Napoleon beat him at Pearl Harbor". And at the beginning of the same episode, Beast Boy gives an account of the start of [[Main/AmericanRevolution The Revolutionary War]], thinking that it started in 1492, and was caused because the colonists getting tired of only being allowed to eat english muffins and drink tea. Raven replies by wondering if he got all of that from a cereal box (he did).

to:

* The popular notion is that Creator/WaltDisney's animated cartoon ''Ben and Me'' is what started the misconception of Creator/BenjaminFranklin's famous kite experiment, which has found its way into every adaptation of the event. Though he did come up with the idea, there's no clear evidence that Franklin ever performed it himself, and the ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' ''Series/MythBusters'' clearly showed that if Franklin attempted the experiment the way it's popularly portrayed, he would have been fried to a crisp by the lightning bolt.
* PlayedForLaughs in ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' where Beast Boy proclaims "Now I know how UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington felt when Napoleon beat him at Pearl Harbor". And at the beginning of the same episode, Beast Boy gives an account of the start of [[Main/AmericanRevolution The Revolutionary War]], UsefulNotes/TheRevolutionaryWar, thinking that it started in 1492, and was caused because the colonists getting tired of only being allowed to eat english muffins and drink tea. Raven replies by wondering if he got all of that from a cereal box (he did).



** There's the episode "Road to Germany" where Stewie and Brian travel back to 1939 to save a wayward Mort Goldman who accidentally went crap in Stewie's time machine. When learning that Nazi Germany was making a nuclear bomb, Brian attempts to pull an AuthorFilibuster when Stewie asked 'Why doesn't America go and kick their asses?' which Brian replies 'Probably because they didn't have any oil'. This joke and much of the episode falls flat for several reasons:

to:

** There's the episode "Road to Germany" where Stewie and Brian travel back to 1939 to save a wayward Mort Goldman who accidentally went crap in Stewie's time machine. When learning that Nazi Germany was making a nuclear bomb, Brian attempts to pull an AuthorFilibuster when Stewie asked 'Why "Why doesn't America go and kick their asses?' asses?" which Brian replies 'Probably "Probably because they didn't have any oil'. oil." This joke and much of the episode falls flat for several reasons:



### Nazi Germany's nuclear program... was kind of crap.[[hottip:*:The Germans planned an experiment with a highly enriched uranium core and a heavy water moderator. That design was so colossally stupid that had they actually performed the experiment, it would have gone prompt-super-critical and killed all the scientists performing it.]] They hadn't even produced enough uranium to produce a bomb at that point, and Hitler... frankly didn't care. Additionally, German physicists had messed up the math, and didn't think an atomic bomb was even possible. It didn't help (well, from the perspective of anyone not in Nazi Germany, it did help) that Germany had driven out many of their best nuclear and/or theoretical physicists (such as one UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein) due to Germany's anti-Semitic policies.

to:

### Nazi Germany's nuclear program... was kind of crap.[[hottip:*:The [[note]]The Germans planned an experiment with a highly enriched uranium core and a heavy water moderator. That design was so colossally stupid that had they actually performed the experiment, it would have gone prompt-super-critical and killed all the scientists performing it.]] [[/note]] They hadn't even produced enough uranium to produce a bomb at that point, and Hitler... frankly didn't care. Additionally, German physicists had messed up the math, and didn't think an atomic bomb was even possible. It didn't help (well, from the perspective of anyone not in Nazi Germany, it did help) that Germany had driven out many of their best nuclear and/or theoretical physicists (such as one UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein) due to Germany's anti-Semitic policies.



** Another time they had the aforementioned Lancaster Bombers...with the American Air Force insignia. The United States Army Air Force never had the Lancaster Bomber, instead used the B-17 Flying Fortress and B-24 Liberator. It might be forgivable if they just mixed up the B-24 with the Lancaster, considering their similar appearance.

to:

** Another time they had the aforementioned Lancaster Bombers... with the American Air Force insignia. The United States Army Air Force never had the Lancaster Bomber, instead used the B-17 Flying Fortress and B-24 Liberator. It might be forgivable if they just mixed up the B-24 with the Lancaster, considering their similar appearance.



-->'''Bart:''' What a piece of junk.
-->'''Grandpa:''' Junk?! That's the Wright Brothers' plane! At Kitty Hawk in 1902, Charles Lindbergh flew that on a thimble-full of corn oil. Single-handedly won us the Civil War, it did!
-->'''Bart:''' How do you know so much about history?
-->'''Grandpa:''' I pieced it together, mostly from sugar packets.

to:

-->'''Bart:''' --->'''Bart:''' What a piece of junk.
-->'''Grandpa:'''
junk.\\
'''Grandpa:'''
Junk?! That's the Wright Brothers' plane! At Kitty Hawk in 1902, Charles Lindbergh flew that on a thimble-full of corn oil. Single-handedly won us the Civil War, it did!
-->'''Bart:'''
did!\\
'''Bart:'''
How do you know so much about history?
-->'''Grandpa:'''
history?\\
'''Grandpa:'''
I pieced it together, mostly from sugar packets.



-->'''Homer:''' Are you sure you don't want to come? In a Civil War re-enactment we need lots of Indians to shoot!
-->'''Apu:''' (''{{beat}}'') I don't know what part of that sentence to correct first.

to:

-->'''Homer:''' --->'''Homer:''' Are you sure you don't want to come? In a Civil War re-enactment we need lots of Indians to shoot!
-->'''Apu:''' (''{{beat}}'')
shoot!\\
'''Apu:''' ''[{{beat}}]''
I don't know what part of that sentence to correct first.



-->'''Homer:''' Now we all know that the thirteen stripes are for good luck. But can you tell me why the American flag has exactly forty-seven stars?
-->'''Apu:''' Because that flag is ridiculously out of date. It must have been made during the brief period in 1912 after New Mexico became a State but before Arizona did.
-->'''Homer:''' Er... partial credit.
*** During his exam to become a citizen, Apu is asked a final question:
--->'''Examiner:''' What was the cause of the Civil War?
--->'''Apu:''' Actually, there were many factors. Apart from the obvious schism between abolitionists and anti-abolitionists, economic factors as well as-
--->'''Examiner:''' Slavery. Just say slavery.
--->'''Apu:''' Slavery it is, sir!

to:

-->'''Homer:''' --->'''Homer:''' Now we all know that the thirteen stripes are for good luck. But can you tell me why the American flag has exactly forty-seven stars?
-->'''Apu:'''
stars?\\
'''Apu:'''
Because that flag is ridiculously out of date. It must have been made during the brief period in 1912 after New Mexico became a State but before Arizona did.
-->'''Homer:'''
did.\\
'''Homer:'''
Er... partial credit.
*** ** During his exam to become a citizen, Apu is asked a final question:
--->'''Examiner:''' What was the cause of the Civil War?
--->'''Apu:'''
War?\\
'''Apu:'''
Actually, there were many factors. Apart from the obvious schism between abolitionists and anti-abolitionists, economic factors as well as-
--->'''Examiner:'''
as--\\
'''Examiner:'''
Slavery. Just say slavery.
--->'''Apu:'''
slavery.\\
'''Apu:'''
Slavery it is, sir!



* The ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' short ''Yankee Doodle Bugs'' has WesternAnimation/BugsBunny helping his nephew Clyde study for a test by giving him a crash course in early American history. The accuracy of Bugs' accounts can be measured by Clyde's response after he returns home from school and Bugs asks how he did: glaring angrily, pulling out a DunceCap, and placing it on his head. ("Does ''this'' answer your question?")

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' short ''Yankee "Yankee Doodle Bugs'' Bugs" has WesternAnimation/BugsBunny helping his nephew Clyde study for a test by giving him a crash course in early American history. The accuracy of Bugs' Bugs's accounts can be measured by Clyde's response after he returns home from school and Bugs asks how he did: glaring angrily, pulling out a DunceCap, and placing it on his head. ("Does ''this'' answer your question?")



** The [[RealTrailerFakeMovie trailer]] for [[http://robotchicken.wikia.com/wiki/1776 1776]]. "It ain't accurate, but it'll ''blow your fucking mind!''"

to:

** The [[RealTrailerFakeMovie trailer]] for [[http://robotchicken.''[[http://robotchicken.wikia.com/wiki/1776 1776]].1776]]''. "It ain't accurate, but it'll ''blow your fucking mind!''"



--> '''Lazlo:''' Did Napoleon give up the moon to the Swiss? Don't you think he would've planted his butt on a pinecone to keep the moon base from falling to the barbarians?!

to:

--> '''Lazlo:''' -->'''Lazlo:''' Did Napoleon give up the moon to the Swiss? Don't you think he would've planted his butt on a pinecone to keep the moon base from falling to the barbarians?!
11th Aug '16 10:44:56 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message





[[folder: Various Media]]
* Works which attempt to invoke Paris amid the dramatic changes of the 19th century and the gilded and wobbly vainglory of Napoleon III seem to gravitate toward two years: 1870 and 1871. Those dates are indeed memorable ones in civic history, but for all the wrong reasons. At that point in history, the real Paris was under siege, with battered soldiers anxiously discussing the war in the coffee shops, people eating their own pets just to remain alive, students manning the barricades, beggars dying from starvation in the streets, elephants at the zoo being found delicious, [[{{Prussia}} monocled German officers]] peering down cannons from just beyond the city limits, and later, after the city had fallen, a revolutionary Commune set up, ending in Communards being shot dead by government firing squads. All this reality would spoil the Parisian ambiance, so it's all quietly ignored. Works that make this mistake include JoelSchumacher's ''Theatre/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' adaptation and Anne Rice's ''InterviewWithTheVampire''.
** On that ''Phantom'' bit: in addition to the glaring 1871 opera house date issue, the film has Christine [[spoiler: dying in 1918 as a victim of the Spanish Influenza]]. Thing is, 1918 France was not only besieged by the Influenza; it was also crawling out of the end of this little thing called UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.
* It's often said that people in YeGoodeOldeDays in England always married young, sometimes so young that [[ValuesDissonance it seems like pedophilia]] to a modern viewer. But this is simply not true. We know from church records (which have been kept since at least the reign of Elizabeth I) that the average age at marriage for men and women has barely changed since 1600, holding steady at 26 for men, 25 for women all the way up to 1960. This affects not just how we see the past but also how we see media from the past. For instance, readers who buy into this trope might assume that [[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Elinor Dashwood's]] fears of being an "old maid" at 19 are justified for her time period, but Austen probably meant to show her as needlessly overly anxious about a possibility that might not even occur. This is especially true since most of Austen's other female characters don't marry until they're in their late teens or twenties. Belief in this trope can also take away much of the shock and horror that Shakespeare wanted his audience to feel over [[RomeoAndJuliet Juliet's]] predicament, especially since Shakespeare made her 13 when she's 16 in the source text.
** So why does the misconception exist? It turns out that some people were married off at a young age -- aristocrats, who until much later were the only people mentioned in the history books despite making up about 0.1% of the population. These marriages were usually political alliances, and (unlike Juliet above) were generally not consummated until the bride was old enough to safely deliver a child. The average man or woman, on the other hand, had to work for years in order to save up enough to marry; while men underwent apprenticeships or waited for their fathers to die so they could inherit the lease on the land they farmed, women worked as household servants, dairymaids, and general farm workers.
*** The terms "engagement" and "marriage" did not have the sharp divide that exists between them today. A promise of marriage carried as much weight as an actual marriage, and subsequent marriages could be dissolved as bigamous if a previous promise to marry existed (this is the "reason" [[UsefulNotes/RichardIII Richard III]] of England gave for deposing his nephew and ruling as king, since his nephew was supposedly illegitimate due to his father's being promised to another woman before his mother, making their marriage legally invalid. Coincidentally, it's also the reason for SpeakNowOrForeverHoldYourPeace).
*** There were exceptions to the childbearing rule, however -- Margaret Beaufort (UsefulNotes/HenryVIII's grandmother) was married at twelve and gave birth at thirteen. Most historians agree that the reason she only had one child is ''because'' giving birth at such a young age left her unable to have any more. It's useful to remember also that this particular exception was something of an emergency situation - the Lancasters to which both the Beauforts and the Tudors were satellite families were lacking in heirs at the time and facing the first rumbles of the discord with the other royal branch of York that became the Wars of the Roses. Getting a backup heir was more important than usual, which led to the very early consummation.
*** 'Marriageability' would be tied ultimately to the menarche, which is still wildly variable and mostly determined by weight rather than age. Some unscrupulous rich men in the 18th century would have their daughters over-fed in order to bring them to puberty earlier and get them off their hands faster (a practice still not unknown in some parts of the developing world...). To return to Creator/JaneAusten, this explains why the thin and sickly Fanny Price is not 'brought out' -- that is, allowed to mix with society and thus be eligible for marriage -- until her health drastically improves at age 18, when she also is noted to suddenly get taller -- whereas the highly-sexed Lydia Bennett (who the narrator notes is both tall and quite fat for her age) is 'out' at only 15.

to:

[[folder: Various [[folder:Various Media]]
* Works which attempt to invoke Paris amid the dramatic changes of the 19th century and the gilded and wobbly vainglory of Napoleon III seem to gravitate toward two years: 1870 and 1871. Those dates are indeed memorable ones in civic history, but for all the wrong reasons. At that point in history, the real Paris was under siege, with battered soldiers anxiously discussing the war in the coffee shops, people eating their own pets just to remain alive, students manning the barricades, beggars dying from starvation in the streets, elephants at the zoo being found delicious, [[{{Prussia}} monocled German officers]] peering down cannons from just beyond the city limits, and later, after the city had fallen, a revolutionary Commune set up, ending in Communards being shot dead by government firing squads. All this reality would spoil the Parisian ambiance, so it's all quietly ignored. Works that make this mistake include JoelSchumacher's Creator/JoelSchumacher's ''Theatre/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' adaptation and Anne Rice's ''InterviewWithTheVampire''.
**
''Literature/InterviewWithTheVampire''. On that ''Phantom'' bit: in addition to the glaring 1871 opera house date issue, the film has Christine [[spoiler: dying [[spoiler:dying in 1918 as a victim of the Spanish Influenza]]. Thing is, 1918 France was not only besieged by the Influenza; it was also crawling out of the end of this little thing called UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.
* It's often said that people in YeGoodeOldeDays in England always married young, sometimes so young that [[ValuesDissonance it seems like pedophilia]] to a modern viewer. But this is simply not true. We know from church records (which have been kept since at least the reign of Elizabeth I) that the average age at marriage for men and women has barely changed since 1600, holding steady at 26 for men, 25 for women all the way up to 1960. This affects not just how we see the past but also how we see media from the past. For instance, readers who buy into this trope might assume that [[Literature/SenseAndSensibility Elinor Dashwood's]] fears of being an "old maid" at 19 are justified for her time period, but Austen probably meant to show her as needlessly overly anxious overanxious about a possibility that might not even occur. This is especially true since most of Austen's other female characters don't marry until they're in their late teens or twenties. Belief in this trope can also take away much of the shock and horror that Shakespeare wanted his audience to feel over [[RomeoAndJuliet Juliet's]] predicament, especially since Shakespeare made her 13 when she's 16 in the source text.
**
text.\\\
So why does the misconception exist? It turns out that some people were married off at a young age -- aristocrats, who until much later were the only people mentioned in the history books despite making up about 0.1% of the population. These marriages were usually political alliances, and (unlike Juliet above) were generally not consummated until the bride was old enough to safely deliver a child. The average man or woman, on the other hand, had to work for years in order to save up enough to marry; while men underwent apprenticeships or waited for their fathers to die so they could inherit the lease on the land they farmed, women worked as household servants, dairymaids, and general farm workers.
***
workers.\\\
The terms "engagement" and "marriage" did not have the sharp divide that exists between them today. A promise of marriage carried as much weight as an actual marriage, and subsequent marriages could be dissolved as bigamous if a previous promise to marry existed (this is the "reason" [[UsefulNotes/RichardIII Richard III]] of England gave for deposing his nephew and ruling as king, since his nephew was supposedly illegitimate due to his father's being promised to another woman before his mother, making their marriage legally invalid. Coincidentally, it's also the reason for SpeakNowOrForeverHoldYourPeace).
***
SpeakNowOrForeverHoldYourPeace).\\\
There were exceptions to the childbearing rule, however -- Margaret Beaufort (UsefulNotes/HenryVIII's grandmother) was married at twelve and gave birth at thirteen. Most historians agree that the reason she only had one child is ''because'' giving birth at such a young age left her unable to have any more. It's useful to remember also that this particular exception was something of an emergency situation - -- the Lancasters to which both the Beauforts and the Tudors were satellite families were lacking in heirs at the time and facing the first rumbles of the discord with the other royal branch of York that became the Wars of the Roses. Getting a backup heir was more important than usual, which led to the very early consummation.
*** 'Marriageability'
consummation.\\\
"Marriageability"
would be tied ultimately to the menarche, which is still wildly variable and mostly determined by weight rather than age. Some unscrupulous rich men in the 18th century would have their daughters over-fed in order to bring them to puberty earlier and get them off their hands faster (a practice still not unknown in some parts of the developing world...). To return to Creator/JaneAusten, this explains why the thin and sickly Fanny Price is not 'brought out' "brought out" -- that is, allowed to mix with society and thus be eligible for marriage -- until her health drastically improves at age 18, when she also is noted to suddenly get taller -- whereas the highly-sexed Lydia Bennett (who the narrator notes is both tall and quite fat for her age) is 'out' "out" at only 15.



-->'''Miller''': Nobody questions why after Pearl Harbor we attacked the Nazi Germany. It's because we're taking on a form of global fascism. We're doing the same thing now.
-->'''Conan''': They did declare war on us.
-->'''Miller''': Yeah, what I mean is, [[CriticalResearchFailure so did Iraq]].
::Especially amusing, given that a "fight against global fascism" is not really the reason - in fact, had Germany not declared war on the USA, it is highly possible that the USA would not have intervened in Europe at all, though the USA did give tons of supplies to both England and Russia in their fight against Hitler. FDR wanted war very badly with Germany, he just needed the American people to want war too. Use Miller's analogy backwards?

to:

-->'''Miller''': -->'''Miller:''' Nobody questions why after Pearl Harbor we attacked the Nazi Germany. It's because we're taking on a form of global fascism. We're doing the same thing now.
-->'''Conan''':
now.\\
'''Conan:'''
They did declare war on us.
-->'''Miller''':
us.\\
'''Miller:'''
Yeah, what I mean is, [[CriticalResearchFailure so did Iraq]].
::Especially amusing, given that a "fight against global fascism" is not really the reason - -- in fact, had Germany not declared war on the USA, it is highly possible that the USA would not have intervened in Europe at all, though the USA did give tons of supplies to both England and Russia in their fight against Hitler. FDR wanted war very badly with Germany, he just needed the American people to want war too. Use Miller's analogy backwards?



** This is so omnipresent that it doesn't really deserve breaking down further, but it's interesting to see historical accuracy flop back and forth depending on how seriously we are supposed to take a part. For instance, most of the times we see writing in the series, the characters carve it into tablets, even for disposable things like memos or personal letters or teaching to children - mostly because it's really funny imagining a Roman bureaucrat having to carve twelve huge slabs of rock just to induct a new legionnaire. However, in one scene where Asterix is planning a bank robbery and makes a diagram of their plan of attack, he does it on a diptych wax tablet, which is what someone in his time period would actually have used for making notes that would have to be quickly disposed of later.
** Historical inaccuracy in ''Asterix'' comes in a few flavours -- PurelyAestheticEra anachronism for humour, deliberate HollywoodHistory, fudging dates for the plot to work and occasionally just total mistakes. It was extensively researched by the creators, who both visited museums to speak with expert historians and read primary sources, and then all of the research was ignored so they could do something they found funny instead.

to:

** This is so omnipresent that it doesn't really deserve breaking down further, but it's interesting to see historical accuracy flop back and forth depending on how seriously we are supposed to take a part. For instance, most of the times we see writing in the series, the characters carve it into tablets, even for disposable things like memos or personal letters or teaching to children - -- mostly because it's really funny imagining a Roman bureaucrat having to carve twelve huge slabs of rock just to induct a new legionnaire. However, in one scene where Asterix is planning a bank robbery and makes a diagram of their plan of attack, he does it on a diptych wax tablet, which is what someone in his time period would actually have used for making notes that would have to be quickly disposed of later.
** Historical inaccuracy in ''Asterix'' comes in a few flavours flavors -- PurelyAestheticEra anachronism for humour, deliberate HollywoodHistory, fudging dates for the plot to work and occasionally just total mistakes. It was extensively researched by the creators, who both visited museums to speak with expert historians and read primary sources, and then all of the research was ignored so they could do something they found funny instead.



* {{Tintin}} was guilty of this in its first few issues -- and then became famous for averting it.

to:

* {{Tintin}} ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'' was guilty of this in its first few issues -- and then became famous for averting it.



[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* In September 2009, a character in ''Tank [=McNamara=]'' was said to have researched the Vandals (the name of a college sports team) and found that they were part of Norse mythology. The Vandals have nothing to do with Norse mythology; they were a historic Germanic tribe, or perhaps Slavs, who invaded the Roman Empire. This misinterpretation comes from the old Swedish kings' style as "Suecorum, Gothorum et Vandalorum Rex" Vandalorum being the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wends Wends]] (or the Vends), not the Vandals. This is however somewhat of a Real Life example, since the "Vandalorum" was ''meant'' to be (mis)interpreted as "Vandals", which were remembered as exercising impressive military force not unlike the impression one in the 20th century could have derived from "King of the Vikings"[[note]]which actually would have carried some historical accuracy, but probably also been highly politically incorrect before the 19th century[[/note]]. That the ''Swedes'' started using this particular title (in 1540, a good 300 years after the Wends disappeared from history) is mostly as part of a pissing contest with the king of Denmark and Norway, who similarly claimed to be the king of the Wends and {{Goth}}s.
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]

to:

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
Animation]]



* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfTheTitanic'' has a mouse who sneaked aboard the Titanic named Top Connors tells his grandchildren the "real" story of the Titanic where a giant octopus named Tentacles saves the ship and actually threw the iceberg at the Titanic.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfTheTitanic'' has a mouse who sneaked aboard the Titanic ''Titanic'' named Top Connors tells his grandchildren the "real" story of the Titanic ''Titanic'' where a giant octopus named Tentacles saves the ship and actually threw the iceberg at the Titanic.''Titanic''.



-->Bruce Wayne: "It's Japanese."
-->Knox: "How do you know?"
-->Bruce Wayne: "Because I bought it in Japan."
:::This may be true if the suits come from an independent modern artist, otherwise they are not even close to traditional armor.

to:

-->Bruce Wayne: "It's -->'''Bruce Wayne:''' It's Japanese."
-->Knox: "How
\\
'''Knox:''' How
do you know?"
-->Bruce Wayne: "Because
know?\\
'''Bruce Wayne:''' Because
I bought it in Japan."
:::This
Japan.
::This
may be true if the suits come from an independent modern artist, otherwise they are not even close to traditional armor.



* ''MemoirsOfAGeisha'': Though set in 1930's-40's Japan, the Geisha's traditional attention to detail given to kimonos is not present, some scenes are clearly CaliforniaDoubling, and the "Snow Dance" performed is not accurate to any Japanese traditional dance.

to:

* ''MemoirsOfAGeisha'': ''Film/MemoirsOfAGeisha'': Though set in 1930's-40's Japan, the Geisha's traditional attention to detail given to kimonos is not present, some scenes are clearly CaliforniaDoubling, and the "Snow Dance" performed is not accurate to any Japanese traditional dance.



* This hilarious exchange from ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' during the Benjamin Franklin myths episode:
-->'''Tory''': "We just killed a dead president!"
-->'''Grant''': "Ben Franklin was never president..."

to:

* This hilarious exchange from ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' ''Series/MythBusters'' during the Benjamin Franklin myths episode:
-->'''Tory''': "We -->'''Tory:''' We just killed a dead president!"
-->'''Grant''': "Ben
president!\\
'''Grant:''' Ben
Franklin was never president..."



** In the Victorian-era set stories "Ghost Light" (from 1989) and "Tooth and Claw" (from 2006) different villains plot to overthrow Queen Victoria and seize the throne for themselves thereby, it's explained, becoming rulers of the most powerful country in the world. The only problem with this plan is that Victoria was a powerless symbolic figurehead and the villains' plots make about as much sense as a modern day villain planning to control Britain by replacing Elizabeth II (which, incidentally, ''is'' used as the basis for the villain's plot in ''Film/JohnnyEnglish''). The British monarch has not attempted to veto a Bill of Parliament since Queen Anne and has not appointed a government that did not have the confidence of Parliament since King William IV. The first example may be justified by the villain in "Ghost Light" being very stupid and over-confident, although that doesn't excuse the second.

to:

** In the Victorian-era set stories "Ghost Light" (from 1989) and "Tooth and Claw" (from 2006) different villains plot to overthrow Queen Victoria and seize the throne for themselves thereby, it's explained, becoming rulers of the most powerful country in the world. The only problem with this plan is that Victoria was a powerless symbolic figurehead and the villains' plots make about as much sense as a modern day modern-day villain planning to control Britain by replacing Elizabeth II (which, incidentally, ''is'' used as the basis for the villain's plot in ''Film/JohnnyEnglish''). The British monarch has not attempted to veto a Bill of Parliament since Queen Anne and has not appointed a government that did not have the confidence of Parliament since King William IV. The first example may be justified by the villain in "Ghost Light" being very stupid and over-confident, although that doesn't excuse the second.



[[folder: Newspaper Comics]]
* In September 2009, a character in ''Tank [=McNamara=]'' was said to have researched the Vandals (the name of a college sports team) and found that they were part of Norse mythology. The Vandals have nothing to do with Norse mythology; they were a historic Germanic tribe, or perhaps Slavs, who invaded the Roman Empire. This misinterpretation comes from the old Swedish kings' style as "Suecorum, Gothorum et Vandalorum Rex" Vandalorum being the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wends Wends]] (or the Vends), not the Vandals. This is however somewhat of a Real Life example, since the "Vandalorum" was ''meant'' to be (mis)interpreted as "Vandals", which were remembered as exercising impressive military force not unlike the impression one in the 20th century could have derived from "King of the Vikings"[[note]]which actually would have carried some historical accuracy, but probably also been highly politically incorrect before the 19th century[[/note]]. That the ''Swedes'' started using this particular title (in 1540, a good 300 years after the Wends disappeared from history) is mostly as part of a pissing contest with the king of Denmark and Norway, who similarly claimed to be the king of the Wends and {{Goth}}s.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Tabletop Games]]

to:

[[folder: Newspaper Comics]]
* In September 2009, a character in ''Tank [=McNamara=]'' was said to have researched the Vandals (the name of a college sports team) and found that they were part of Norse mythology. The Vandals have nothing to do with Norse mythology; they were a historic Germanic tribe, or perhaps Slavs, who invaded the Roman Empire. This misinterpretation comes from the old Swedish kings' style as "Suecorum, Gothorum et Vandalorum Rex" Vandalorum being the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wends Wends]] (or the Vends), not the Vandals. This is however somewhat of a Real Life example, since the "Vandalorum" was ''meant'' to be (mis)interpreted as "Vandals", which were remembered as exercising impressive military force not unlike the impression one in the 20th century could have derived from "King of the Vikings"[[note]]which actually would have carried some historical accuracy, but probably also been highly politically incorrect before the 19th century[[/note]]. That the ''Swedes'' started using this particular title (in 1540, a good 300 years after the Wends disappeared from history) is mostly as part of a pissing contest with the king of Denmark and Norway, who similarly claimed to be the king of the Wends and {{Goth}}s.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Tabletop
[[folder:Tabletop Games]]



[[folder: Web Original]]

to:

[[folder: Web [[folder:Web Original]]
9th Aug '16 8:43:48 AM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the Victorian-era set stories "Ghost Light" (from 1989) and "Tooth and Claw" (from 2006) different villains plot to overthrow Queen Victoria and seize the throne for themselves thereby, it's explained, becoming rulers of the most powerful country in the world. The only problem with this plan is that Victoria was a powerless symbolic figurehead and the villains' plots make about as much sense as a modern day villain planning to control Britain by replacing Elizabeth II (which, incidentally, ''is'' used as the basis for the villain's plot in ''Film/JohnnyEnglish''). The British monarch has not attempted to veto a Bill of Parliament since Queen Anne and has not appointed a government that did not have the confidence of Parliament since King William IV.

to:

** In the Victorian-era set stories "Ghost Light" (from 1989) and "Tooth and Claw" (from 2006) different villains plot to overthrow Queen Victoria and seize the throne for themselves thereby, it's explained, becoming rulers of the most powerful country in the world. The only problem with this plan is that Victoria was a powerless symbolic figurehead and the villains' plots make about as much sense as a modern day villain planning to control Britain by replacing Elizabeth II (which, incidentally, ''is'' used as the basis for the villain's plot in ''Film/JohnnyEnglish''). The British monarch has not attempted to veto a Bill of Parliament since Queen Anne and has not appointed a government that did not have the confidence of Parliament since King William IV. The first example may be justified by the villain in "Ghost Light" being very stupid and over-confident, although that doesn't excuse the second.
8th Aug '16 3:21:01 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The current King of {{Sweden}}, Carl 16. Gustaf, is actually only the tenth King of Sweden named Carl. 16th century Swedish historian Johannes Magnus (1488-1544) invented six extra Carls as part of a pissing contest with Danish historians about whose country was the oldest, and this fake chronology was later adopted by the Swedish kings.

to:

* The current King of {{Sweden}}, UsefulNotes/{{Sweden}}, Carl 16. Gustaf, is actually only the tenth King of Sweden named Carl. 16th century Swedish historian Johannes Magnus (1488-1544) invented six extra Carls as part of a pissing contest with Danish historians about whose country was the oldest, and this fake chronology was later adopted by the Swedish kings.
7th Aug '16 5:49:22 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' generally gets the Renaissance background and history right, doing as much as possible as to avoid anachronistic architecture, especially compared to later games. It also shows UsefulNotes/LeonardoDaVinci as a young handsome man (rather than the older man based on a drawing never attributed to Leonardo), UsefulNotes/NiccoloMachiavelli as a republican statesman and a more nuanced portrayal of Caterina Sforza then elsewhere. However it's depiction of the Medici and the Borgia falls within conventional parameters of HistoricalHeroUpgrade[=/=]HistoricalVillainUpgrade common to HollywoodHistory rather than the GrayAndGreyMorality in realiy.

to:

** ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' generally gets the Renaissance background and history right, doing as much as possible as to avoid anachronistic architecture, especially compared to later games. It also shows UsefulNotes/LeonardoDaVinci as a young handsome man (rather than the older man based on a drawing never attributed to Leonardo), UsefulNotes/NiccoloMachiavelli Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli as a republican statesman and a more nuanced portrayal of Caterina Sforza then elsewhere. However it's depiction of the Medici and the Borgia falls within conventional parameters of HistoricalHeroUpgrade[=/=]HistoricalVillainUpgrade common to HollywoodHistory rather than the GrayAndGreyMorality in realiy.
1st Aug '16 7:31:21 AM thatmadork
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Comes up a lot in the ''Franchise/TotalWar'' series:
** In ''VideoGame/RomeTotalWar'', Egypt fields a number of units that look straight from the New Kingdom, i.e, several centuries before the game is set. The developers acknowledged that the faction's appearance and unit selection were anachronistic but said it was a deliberate choice to avoid them being too similar to other factions. One popular conversion mod, [[http://www.europabarbarorum.com/index.html Europa Barbarorum]], converts the Egyptian faction to be more authentic, as a Macedonian/Greek inspired faction. Also, we're pretty sure the ancient Britons didn't throw severed heads at their enemies.
** ''VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar'':
*** While Scotland historically was relatively poor and isolated, it was a feudal nation which fielded men-at-arms and knights just like any other European nation at the time - most of the fighting men were recruited from the lowlands and borders. Of course, this is ''not'' the case in ''Medieval 2'', where Scotland is Film/{{Braveheart}} Land and every soldier is a highlander is wrapped in a kilt (which wasn't around back then) and has blue woad all over his face.
*** Helsinki is portrayed as a castle and the capital of Finland. Not only did Finland not exist as an entity at the time, but Helsinki was just a simple fishing village.
*** England's generals, princesses and ruling family members all have Anglo-Saxon names and speak English with a familiar English accent. The real-life Plantagenet dynasty would never have used Anglo-Saxon names, and every single monarch in England from 1066 to 1399 spoke French as their first language.
** In ''VideoGame/EmpireTotalWar'', Moscow is the capital of Russia. Historically, St. Petersburg was the capital from 1713 to 1918. The Winter Palace and the Kunstkamera museum, both in St. Petersburg in real life, can only be built in Moscow in the game.
** In ''VideoGame/TotalWarShogun2'', the Boshin War of 1868 can be a titanic conflict which can last years, rack up a death toll similar to that of the American Civil War (600,000 lives lost through various causes) and involve troops from the United States and the British Empire. In reality, it was just a small-scale conflict which ended with 3,500 deaths.
** In ''VideoGame/TotalWarAttila'', it's possible to meet a Germanic tribe which worships Tengriism decades before the Huns ever really arrived in Europe in real life. And the Visigoths were Christians, not pagan.
30th Jul '16 11:47:22 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Shakespeare was patronized by the British monarchy (in spite of ''possibly'' not being a good Protestant). He knew exactly what side his bread was buttered on. DanBrown is offended at being compared to Shakespeare because -- as he points out -- he gets things like geography and clothing accurate. [[DanBrowned Usually.]]

to:

** Shakespeare was patronized by the British monarchy (in spite of ''possibly'' not being a good Protestant). He knew exactly what side his bread was buttered on. DanBrown Creator/DanBrown is offended at being compared to Shakespeare because -- as he points out -- he gets things like geography and clothing accurate. [[DanBrowned Usually.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 730. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ArtisticLicenseHistory