History Main / ArtisticLicenseGeology

30th Oct '17 10:50:29 AM BeerBaron
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* A number of ores that can be mined in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' have real-life names, but are actually fantastic metals that bear little resemblance to that which they were named after:
** Corundum is depicted as a greenish ore that can be melted into opaque dark gold ingots. Real Life corundum is a crystalline form of aluminum oxide best known as "sapphire" and "ruby" when it is gem-quality. If you were to melt it, it'd turn into alumina, which is white.
** Ebony is depicted as a rough black ore which can be melted into dull, malleable ingots, which can in turn be crafted into either glassy black armor or dull grey-black weapons. In the lore, it's said to be a super-durable glassy substance with mystical and holy properties. Real life ebony is a type of wood.
** Malachite in real life is a glassy greenish mineral, much closer to its appearance in ''Skyrim'' than the other examples listed here, and is actually an ore of copper. However, actual malachite armor wouldn't work at all well -- malachite is a rock, and not a very strong one at that, and as such is much more brittle than metal and would shatter under even moderate force.
** ''Skyrim'''s moonstone is in a similar situation to the malachite, it is fairly close in appearance to the real-life counterpart (a gemstone), but is noticeably more useful for making practical armor.
** Quicksilver is another name for mercury, which is a liquid at room temperature.

to:

* A number of Throughout ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series, quite a few crafting materials and ores that can be mined in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' have real-life real world names, but are actually fantastic metals that bear little resemblance to that which they were named after:
** Corundum
have vastly different properties. A recurring one is depicted as a greenish ore that can be melted into opaque dark gold ingots. Real Life corundum is a crystalline form of aluminum oxide best known as "sapphire" and "ruby" when it is gem-quality. If you were to melt it, it'd turn into alumina, which is white.
** Ebony is
Ebony, depicted as a rough black ore which can be melted into dull, malleable ingots, which can in turn be crafted into either glassy black armor or dull grey-black weapons. In the lore, it's said to be a super-durable glassy substance with mystical and holy properties. Real life ebony is a type of wood.
** Malachite in real life is a glassy greenish mineral, much closer to its appearance in ''Skyrim'' than the
wood. Numerous other examples listed here, and is actually an ore of copper. However, actual malachite armor wouldn't work at all well -- malachite is a rock, and not a very strong one at that, and as such is much more brittle than metal and would shatter are described under even moderate force.
** ''Skyrim'''s moonstone is in a similar situation to
the malachite, it is fairly close in appearance to the real-life counterpart (a gemstone), but is noticeably more useful for making practical armor.
** Quicksilver is another name for mercury, which is a liquid at room temperature.
FantasyMetals trope.
11th Oct '17 6:04:18 PM Tarlonniel
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1st Aug '17 12:22:25 PM Anddrix
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* In ''Wither'', the first book of the Chemical Garden Trilogy by Lauren De Stefano, North America is the only land mass remaining because the government destroyed the other continents with some super weapon, so a only a few small, uninhabitable islands remain. The destruction of all the other continents has no ill effect on North America or the environment in general.

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* In ''Wither'', the first book of the Chemical Garden Trilogy ''Literature/TheChemicalGardenTrilogy'' by Lauren De Stefano, North America is the only land mass remaining because the government destroyed the other continents with some super weapon, so a only a few small, uninhabitable islands remain. The destruction of all the other continents has no ill effect on North America or the environment in general.
1st Aug '17 10:47:12 AM Madrugada
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* In the miniseries ''Series/TenPointFive'', a volcano erupts without any hint of activity and a ground fissure chases a train, and the very title is not possible,[[note]]At least not through normal geological processes. A sufficiently large impact event could produce a 10.5 or higher magnitude earthquake, but then it would also do a lot of other really nasty things to the planet.[[/note]] among many other

to:

* In the miniseries ''Series/TenPointFive'', a volcano erupts without any hint of activity and a ground fissure chases a train, and the very title is not possible,[[note]]At possible, among many others.
* In one Series/SteptoeAndSon episode, the pair try to hawk a zircon to a half-blind fence as a diamond, figuring that he won't be able to see that it's fake. However, he "tests" it by smashing it with a hammer. This test wouldn't work in reality; a diamond would break at
least as easily as a zircon.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Music]]

* Daler Mehndi's ''Tunak Tunak Tun'' music video shows major depressions in the Indian Ocean when the Earth is viewed from space.
* In "Visions of Paradise", Music/TheMoodyBlues refer to "blue onyx". Onyx is a form of chalcedony and while other chalcedonies do come in blue, onyx does ''not''.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Videogames]]

* ''VideoGame/ColossalCave'':
** This game has a volcano in a limestone cave system. While here's nothing preventing a volcanic intrusion from occurring in an area with caves, which might cause magma to enter the cave system, it would
not through normal create an actual volcano. Another problem is that because of the presence of the ''hot magma'', the limestone should have recrystallized as marble, or melted to become a calcic igneous rock.
** Unlike most computer games set underground, the trope is averted in the very first version which was a fairly accurate simulation of the real Bedquilt Cave in Kentucky, with a few fantasy elements thrown in. Later versions (including the first complete version, finished by Don Woods) included more fantasy and magic, including the volcano, but the actual cave layout, being described by an experienced caver, is still quite accurate to the real place.
* The mines of the ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' games. Even discounting the one set in [[ConvectionSchmonvection a semi-active volcano]], you have mines where you can find gold, silver and copper, along with emeralds, rubies, and diamonds ''on the same level''. Older games at least tried to pay lip service to reality by having the precious gems and metals in different mines, but that was abandoned in favor of streamlining.
* Largely averted in ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' except for some minor issues with ConvectionSchmonvection and some dwarves being tough enough to drown in the lava before being burned in it.
* Lots of games have "diamond" weapons or armor, assuming that since diamond is hard, it must be very durable. In fact, diamond crystals have perfect cleavage in four directions and are therefore quite brittle: ''scratching'' a diamond is hard, but ''breaking'' it is not. (An exception is ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', where the ''Normandy'' can be upgraded with armor composed of carbon nanotube sheets interwoven with diamond [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_vapor_deposition chemical vapor deposition]], crushed into dense layers which compensate for diamond's brittleness.)
* A number of ores that can be mined in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' have real-life names, but are actually fantastic metals that bear little resemblance to that which they were named after:
** Corundum is depicted as a greenish ore that can be melted into opaque dark gold ingots. Real Life corundum is a crystalline form of aluminum oxide best known as "sapphire" and "ruby" when it is gem-quality. If you were to melt it, it'd turn into alumina, which is white.
** Ebony is depicted as a rough black ore which can be melted into dull, malleable ingots, which can in turn be crafted into either glassy black armor or dull grey-black weapons. In the lore, it's said to be a super-durable glassy substance with mystical and holy properties. Real life ebony is a type of wood.
** Malachite in real life is a glassy greenish mineral, much closer to its appearance in ''Skyrim'' than the other examples listed here, and is actually an ore of copper. However, actual malachite armor wouldn't work at all well -- malachite is a rock, and not a very strong one at that, and as such is much more brittle than metal and would shatter under even moderate force.
** ''Skyrim'''s moonstone is in a similar situation to the malachite, it is fairly close in appearance to the real-life counterpart (a gemstone), but is noticeably more useful for making practical armor.
** Quicksilver is another name for mercury, which is a liquid at room temperature.
* ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'': The world is simultaneously based on our own (during a different
geological processes. A sufficiently large impact event era) and yet [[FlatWorld is flat]] with [[WaterfallIntoTheAbyss water constantly falling over the edges]] ([[{{Literature/Discworld}} no word on giant turtles]]). Landmasses are apparently afloat on the oceans, as evidenced by a tidal wave at the beginning of the game that causes Weyard's version of India to slam into Australia in minutes, resulting in... very little damage, actually.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Webcomics]]

* InUniverse example in ''WebComic/DarthsAndDroids'' when Jim and Ben [[http://darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0035.html call the GM on this trope]] with regards to Naboo being hollow and water-filled. Later on, the GM has Jim, a geophysics Ph.D. student, [[http://darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0150.html figures out how it
could produce work]] (which requires him to {{retcon}} in that Naboo has a 10.5 or higher magnitude earthquake, but then it would also do a lot moon).
--> '''GM:''' It was there all along. I swear.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Western Animation]]

* In the ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1987'' episode "Turtles at the Earth's Core" the Turtles meet dinosaurs from "beneath the Earth's core". Since the core is, by definition, at the center
of the spherical Earth and thus at the point where the planet's gravity pulls ''to'', there's no such thing as ''beneath'' the core -- pass the core and you'll simply start digging ''up'' in the mantle on the other really nasty things side.
* ''WesternAnimation/Ben10'': Iron/steel, or "bicenthium alloy", is stated
to be exceptionally rare anywhere except Earth. This despite iron being the planet.[[/note]] among many other
sixth most common element in the universe. Apparently they didn't realize why Mars was red, either.

[[/folder]]
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1st Aug '17 10:43:22 AM Madrugada
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* In the miniseries ''Series/TenPointFive'', a volcano erupts without any hint of activity and a ground fissure chases a train, and the very title is not possible,[[note]]At least not through normal geological processes. A sufficiently large impact event could produce a 10.5 or higher magnitude earthquake, but then it would also do a lot of other really nasty things to the planet.[[/note]] among many other

to:

* In the miniseries ''Series/TenPointFive'', a volcano erupts without any hint of activity and a ground fissure chases a train, and the very title is not possible,[[note]]At least not through normal geological processes. A sufficiently large impact event could produce a 10.5 or higher magnitude earthquake, but then it would also do a lot of other really nasty things to the planet.[[/note]] among many otherother

[[/folder]]
1st Aug '17 10:42:06 AM Madrugada
Is there an issue? Send a Message


For earthquakes, for instance, fissures do not chase B actors or swallow entire cities whole without a trace. For volcanoes, outrunning the lava flow in RealLife can be as easy as picking up your pace to a brisk walk, but you ''can't'' outrun the pyroclastic flow -- the heat and gasses being pushed ahead of the lava -- and you might not even be able to outrun it driving a car. The primary characteristic of mudslides is that they're inexorable. They may be fast or slow, but they simply don't stop, and they are not easily diverted by such flimsy things as walls, barricades, trees, or buildings. They just pick 'em up and carry on.

to:

For earthquakes, for instance, fissures do not chase B actors or swallow entire cities whole without a trace. For volcanoes, outrunning the lava flow in RealLife can be as easy as picking up your pace to a brisk walk, but you ''can't'' outrun the pyroclastic flow -- the heat heat, ash, and gasses being pushed ahead of ejected from the lava eruption -- and you might not even be able to outrun it driving a car.car, since a pyroclastic flow can hit 700 kph. The primary characteristic of mudslides is that they're inexorable. They may be fast or slow, but they simply don't stop, and they are not easily diverted by such flimsy things as walls, barricades, trees, or buildings. They just pick 'em up and carry on.



* ''Film/DantesPeak'', a [[DuelingMovies dueling movie]] with ''Film/{{Volcano}}'', made more of an attempt to be accurate but still pick and chose things to be dramatic (the USGS has a detailed response somewhere.) For example, there is fluid lava during what is otherwise a large explosive eruption, (the two are exclusive), and there's a pyroclastic cloud chase scene where the vehicle has way too little lead time.

to:

* ''Film/DantesPeak'', a [[DuelingMovies dueling movie]] with ''Film/{{Volcano}}'', made more of an attempt to be accurate but still pick and chose things to be dramatic (the USGS has a detailed response somewhere.) For example, there is fluid lava during what is otherwise a large explosive eruption, (the two are exclusive), not absolutely exclusive, but they are highly unlikely to occur together at the scale the movie shows.), and there's a pyroclastic cloud chase scene where the vehicle has way too little lead time.



* In Peter Jackson's ReturnOfTheKing, the destruction of the ring is accompanied by Mount Doom erupting... but it has both lava flows and pyroclastic explosions, while in reality volcanoes can only have one or the other. Of course, the eruption is the death throe of a demonic sorcerer, so most likely AWizardDidIt.

to:

* In Peter Jackson's ReturnOfTheKing, the destruction of the ring is accompanied by Mount Doom erupting... but it has both lava flows and pyroclastic explosions, while in reality volcanoes can generally only have one or the other. Of course, the eruption is the death throe of a demonic sorcerer, so most likely AWizardDidIt.



* Doyle's Literature/SherlockHolmes story "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle" misuses the term "carbuncle", as it's actually a term for ''red'' garnets cut in a particular style. It is not clear whether this is a mistake by the author or if the stone in question has acquired a misleading nickname in-universe.
** One variety of garnet can, in fact, look bright blue in certain lights, but a. it only looks blue in cool light (early morning sunlight, or fluorescent light), so when Holmes was looking at it in the very warm firelight it should have been pinkish-red, and b. the fact that it changes color depending on the quality of the light would have been MUCH more noteworthy than the fact that it was sometimes blue. (Not to mention c. color-changing garnets are a fairly recent discovery and d. they come from East Africa and Madagascar, whereas the blue carbuncle was specifically said to have been found in China.)

to:

* Doyle's Literature/SherlockHolmes story "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle" misuses the term "carbuncle", as it's actually a term for ''red'' garnets cut in a particular style. It is not clear whether Given that this is Victorian England we're talking about, a mistake by the author or if the stone in question has acquired a misleading nickname in-universe.
** One variety of garnet can, in fact, look bright blue in certain lights, but a. it only looks blue in cool light (early morning sunlight, or fluorescent light), so when Holmes was looking at it in the very warm firelight it should have been pinkish-red, and b. the fact that it changes color depending on the quality of the light would have been MUCH more noteworthy than the fact that it was sometimes blue. (Not to mention c. color-changing garnets are a fairly recent discovery and d. they come from East Africa and Madagascar, whereas the blue carbuncle was specifically said
gemstone famous enough to have been found in China.)
named, and the jewelry trade, that it has an incorrect name isn't necessarily an error of research.



* In the miniseries ''Series/TenPointFive'', a volcano erupts without any hint of activity and a ground fissure chases a train, and the very title is not possible,[[note]]At least not through normal geological processes. A sufficiently large impact event could produce a 10.5 or higher magnitude earthquake, but then it would also do a lot of other really nasty things to the planet.[[/note]] among many other errors. Immediately following the original airing of ''10.5'' a local news program of the same network showed a bunch of real-life geologists watching ''10.5'' and laughing their heads off.
* In one Series/SteptoeAndSon episode, the pair try to hawk a zircon to a half-blind fence as a diamond, figuring that he won't be able to see that it's fake. However, he "tests" it by smashing it with a hammer. This test wouldn't work in reality; a diamond would break at least as easily as a zircon.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Music]]

* Daler Mehndi's ''Tunak Tunak Tun'' music video shows major depressions in the Indian Ocean when the Earth is viewed from space.
* In "Visions of Paradise", Music/TheMoodyBlues refer to "blue onyx". Onyx, a form of chalcedony, occurs in many colors, but notably, ''not'' blue.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Videogames]]

* ''VideoGame/ColossalCave'':
** This game has a volcano in a limestone cave system. While here's nothing preventing a volcanic intrusion from occurring in an area with caves, which might cause magma to enter the cave system, it would not create an actual volcano. Another problem is that because of the presence of the ''hot magma'', the limestone should have recrystallized as marble, or melted to become a calcic igneous rock.
** Unlike most computer games set underground, the trope is averted in the very first version which was a fairly accurate simulation of the real Bedquilt Cave in Kentucky, with a few fantasy elements thrown in. Later versions (including the first complete version, finished by Don Woods) included more fantasy and magic, including the volcano, but the actual cave layout, being described by an experienced caver, is still quite accurate to the real place.
* The mines of the ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' games. Even discounting the one set in [[ConvectionSchmonvection a semi-active volcano]], you have mines where you can find gold, silver and copper, along with emeralds, rubies, and diamonds ''on the same level''. Older games at least tried to pay lip service to reality by having the precious gems and metals in different mines, but that was abandoned in favor of streamlining.
* Largely averted in ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' except for some minor issues with ConvectionSchmonvection and some dwarves being tough enough to drown in the lava before being burned in it.
* Lots of games have "diamond" weapons or armor, assuming that since diamond is hard, it must be very durable. In fact, diamond crystals have perfect cleavage in four directions and are therefore quite brittle: ''scratching'' a diamond is hard, but ''breaking'' it is not. (An exception is ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', where the ''Normandy'' can be upgraded with armor composed of carbon nanotube sheets interwoven with diamond [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_vapor_deposition chemical vapor deposition]], crushed into dense layers which compensate for diamond's brittleness.)
* A number of ores that can be mined in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' have real-life names, but are actually fantastic metals that bear little resemblance to that which they were named after:
** Corundum is depicted as a greenish ore that can be melted into opaque dark gold ingots. Real Life corundum is a crystalline form of aluminum oxide best known as "sapphire" and "ruby" when it is gem-quality. If you were to melt it, it'd turn into alumina, which is white.
** Ebony is depicted as a rough black ore which can be melted into dull, malleable ingots, which can in turn be crafted into either glassy black armor or dull grey-black weapons. In the lore, it's said to be a super-durable glassy substance with mystical and holy properties. Real life ebony is a type of wood.
** Malachite in real life is a glassy greenish mineral, much closer to its appearance in ''Skyrim'' than the other examples listed here, and is actually an ore of copper. However, actual malachite armor wouldn't work at all well -- malachite is a rock, and not a very strong one at that, and as such is much more brittle than metal and would shatter under even moderate force.
** ''Skyrim'''s moonstone is in a similar situation to the malachite, it is fairly close in appearance to the real-life counterpart (a gemstone), but is noticeably more useful for making practical armor.
** Quicksilver is another name for mercury, which is a liquid at room temperature.
* ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'': The world is simultaneously based on our own (during a different geological era) and yet [[FlatWorld is flat]] with [[WaterfallIntoTheAbyss water constantly falling over the edges]] ([[{{Literature/Discworld}} no word on giant turtles]]). Landmasses are apparently afloat on the oceans, as evidenced by a tidal wave at the beginning of the game that causes Weyard's version of India to slam into Australia in minutes, resulting in... very little damage, actually.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Webcomics]]

* InUniverse example in ''WebComic/DarthsAndDroids'' when Jim and Ben [[http://darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0035.html call the GM on this trope]] with regards to Naboo being hollow and water-filled. Later on, the GM has Jim, a geophysics Ph.D. student, [[http://darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0150.html figures out how it could work]] (which requires him to {{retcon}} in that Naboo has a moon).
--> '''GM:''' It was there all along. I swear.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Western Animation]]

* In the ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1987'' episode "Turtles at the Earth's Core" the Turtles meet dinosaurs from "beneath the Earth's core". Since the core is, by definition, at the center of the spherical Earth and thus at the point where the planet's gravity pulls ''to'', there's no such thing as ''beneath'' the core -- pass the core and you'll simply start digging ''up'' in the mantle on the other side.
* ''WesternAnimation/Ben10'': Iron/steel, or "bicenthium alloy", is stated to be exceptionally rare anywhere except Earth. This despite iron being the sixth most common element in the universe. Apparently they didn't realize why Mars was red, either.

[[/folder]]
----

to:

* In the miniseries ''Series/TenPointFive'', a volcano erupts without any hint of activity and a ground fissure chases a train, and the very title is not possible,[[note]]At least not through normal geological processes. A sufficiently large impact event could produce a 10.5 or higher magnitude earthquake, but then it would also do a lot of other really nasty things to the planet.[[/note]] among many other errors. Immediately following the original airing of ''10.5'' a local news program of the same network showed a bunch of real-life geologists watching ''10.5'' and laughing their heads off.
* In one Series/SteptoeAndSon episode, the pair try to hawk a zircon to a half-blind fence as a diamond, figuring that he won't be able to see that it's fake. However, he "tests" it by smashing it with a hammer. This test wouldn't work in reality; a diamond would break at least as easily as a zircon.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Music]]

* Daler Mehndi's ''Tunak Tunak Tun'' music video shows major depressions in the Indian Ocean when the Earth is viewed from space.
* In "Visions of Paradise", Music/TheMoodyBlues refer to "blue onyx". Onyx, a form of chalcedony, occurs in many colors, but notably, ''not'' blue.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Videogames]]

* ''VideoGame/ColossalCave'':
** This game has a volcano in a limestone cave system. While here's nothing preventing a volcanic intrusion from occurring in an area with caves, which might cause magma to enter the cave system, it would not create an actual volcano. Another problem is that because of the presence of the ''hot magma'', the limestone should have recrystallized as marble, or melted to become a calcic igneous rock.
** Unlike most computer games set underground, the trope is averted in the very first version which was a fairly accurate simulation of the real Bedquilt Cave in Kentucky, with a few fantasy elements thrown in. Later versions (including the first complete version, finished by Don Woods) included more fantasy and magic, including the volcano, but the actual cave layout, being described by an experienced caver, is still quite accurate to the real place.
* The mines of the ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' games. Even discounting the one set in [[ConvectionSchmonvection a semi-active volcano]], you have mines where you can find gold, silver and copper, along with emeralds, rubies, and diamonds ''on the same level''. Older games at least tried to pay lip service to reality by having the precious gems and metals in different mines, but that was abandoned in favor of streamlining.
* Largely averted in ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' except for some minor issues with ConvectionSchmonvection and some dwarves being tough enough to drown in the lava before being burned in it.
* Lots of games have "diamond" weapons or armor, assuming that since diamond is hard, it must be very durable. In fact, diamond crystals have perfect cleavage in four directions and are therefore quite brittle: ''scratching'' a diamond is hard, but ''breaking'' it is not. (An exception is ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', where the ''Normandy'' can be upgraded with armor composed of carbon nanotube sheets interwoven with diamond [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_vapor_deposition chemical vapor deposition]], crushed into dense layers which compensate for diamond's brittleness.)
* A number of ores that can be mined in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' have real-life names, but are actually fantastic metals that bear little resemblance to that which they were named after:
** Corundum is depicted as a greenish ore that can be melted into opaque dark gold ingots. Real Life corundum is a crystalline form of aluminum oxide best known as "sapphire" and "ruby" when it is gem-quality. If you were to melt it, it'd turn into alumina, which is white.
** Ebony is depicted as a rough black ore which can be melted into dull, malleable ingots, which can in turn be crafted into either glassy black armor or dull grey-black weapons. In the lore, it's said to be a super-durable glassy substance with mystical and holy properties. Real life ebony is a type of wood.
** Malachite in real life is a glassy greenish mineral, much closer to its appearance in ''Skyrim'' than the other examples listed here, and is actually an ore of copper. However, actual malachite armor wouldn't work at all well -- malachite is a rock, and not a very strong one at that, and as such is much more brittle than metal and would shatter under even moderate force.
** ''Skyrim'''s moonstone is in a similar situation to the malachite, it is fairly close in appearance to the real-life counterpart (a gemstone), but is noticeably more useful for making practical armor.
** Quicksilver is another name for mercury, which is a liquid at room temperature.
* ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'': The world is simultaneously based on our own (during a different geological era) and yet [[FlatWorld is flat]] with [[WaterfallIntoTheAbyss water constantly falling over the edges]] ([[{{Literature/Discworld}} no word on giant turtles]]). Landmasses are apparently afloat on the oceans, as evidenced by a tidal wave at the beginning of the game that causes Weyard's version of India to slam into Australia in minutes, resulting in... very little damage, actually.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Webcomics]]

* InUniverse example in ''WebComic/DarthsAndDroids'' when Jim and Ben [[http://darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0035.html call the GM on this trope]] with regards to Naboo being hollow and water-filled. Later on, the GM has Jim, a geophysics Ph.D. student, [[http://darthsanddroids.net/episodes/0150.html figures out how it could work]] (which requires him to {{retcon}} in that Naboo has a moon).
--> '''GM:''' It was there all along. I swear.

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Western Animation]]

* In the ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1987'' episode "Turtles at the Earth's Core" the Turtles meet dinosaurs from "beneath the Earth's core". Since the core is, by definition, at the center of the spherical Earth and thus at the point where the planet's gravity pulls ''to'', there's no such thing as ''beneath'' the core -- pass the core and you'll simply start digging ''up'' in the mantle on the other side.
* ''WesternAnimation/Ben10'': Iron/steel, or "bicenthium alloy", is stated to be exceptionally rare anywhere except Earth. This despite iron being the sixth most common element in the universe. Apparently they didn't realize why Mars was red, either.

[[/folder]]
----
other
1st Aug '17 10:08:21 AM Madrugada
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For earthquakes, fissures do not chase B actors or swallow entire cities whole without a trace. For volcanoes, outrunning the lava flow in RealLife is as easy as picking up your pace to a brisk walk, and you're more likely to be overcome by fumes than caught by the molten rock -- so maybe you ''should'' run. Speaking of which, it's not the lava that kills you, it's the [[ConvectionSchmonvection tremendous and far-reaching heat]] that would overwhelm you. It's molten rock, and if you're that close, you'll spontaneously combust from the heat before the lava catches you.

In addition to quakes and volcanoes, this trope also covers any abuses of the field of geology including getting rocks, minerals, or whole processes wrong.

to:

For earthquakes, for instance, fissures do not chase B actors or swallow entire cities whole without a trace. For volcanoes, outrunning the lava flow in RealLife is can be as easy as picking up your pace to a brisk walk, but you ''can't'' outrun the pyroclastic flow -- the heat and you're more likely to be overcome by fumes than caught by the molten rock -- so maybe you ''should'' run. Speaking gasses being pushed ahead of which, it's not the lava -- and you might not even be able to outrun it driving a car. The primary characteristic of mudslides is that kills you, it's the [[ConvectionSchmonvection tremendous they're inexorable. They may be fast or slow, but they simply don't stop, and far-reaching heat]] that would overwhelm you. It's molten rock, they are not easily diverted by such flimsy things as walls, barricades, trees, or buildings. They just pick 'em up and if you're that close, you'll spontaneously combust from the heat before the lava catches you.

carry on.

In addition to quakes and quakes, volcanoes, and mudslides, this trope also covers any abuses of the field of geology including getting rocks, minerals, or whole processes wrong.
4th Jul '17 6:44:22 AM Vanshira
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** One variety of garnet can, in fact, look bright blue in certain lights, but a. it only looks blue in cool light (early morning sunlight, or fluorescent light), so when Holmes was looking at it in the very warm firelight it should have been pinkish-red, and b. the fact that it changes color depending on the quality of the light would have been MUCH more noteworthy than the fact that it was sometimes blue. (Not to mention c. color-changing garnets are a fairly recent discovery and d. they come from East Africa and Madagascar, whereas the blue carbuncle was specifically said to have been found in China.)
19th Apr '17 9:06:32 PM Madrugada
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* In "Visions of Paradise", Music/TheMoodyBlues refer to ''blue'' onyx.

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* In "Visions of Paradise", Music/TheMoodyBlues refer to ''blue'' onyx.
"blue onyx". Onyx, a form of chalcedony, occurs in many colors, but notably, ''not'' blue.
28th Mar '17 8:31:30 PM Theriocephalus
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[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]

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[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]
Manga]]



[[folder: Comic Books ]]

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[[folder: Comic Books ]]
Books]]



[[folder: Film ]]

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[[folder: Film ]]
Film]]



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[[folder: Literature ]]
Literature]]



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[[folder: Live-Action TV ]]
TV]]



[[folder: Music ]]

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[[folder: Music ]]
Music]]



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[[folder: Video Games ]]
Videogames]]



** Malachite in real life is a glassy greenish mineral, much closer to its appearance in ''Skyrim'' than the other examples listed here, and is actually an ore of copper. However, actual malachite armor wouldn't work at all well -- malachite is a rock, and not a very strong one at that, and such is much more brittle than metal and would shatter under even moderate force.

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** Malachite in real life is a glassy greenish mineral, much closer to its appearance in ''Skyrim'' than the other examples listed here, and is actually an ore of copper. However, actual malachite armor wouldn't work at all well -- malachite is a rock, and not a very strong one at that, and as such is much more brittle than metal and would shatter under even moderate force.



[[folder: Web Comics ]]

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[[folder: Web Comics ]]
Webcomics]]



[[folder: Western Animation ]]

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[[folder: Western Animation ]]
Animation]]
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