History Main / ArtisticLicenseEconomics

21st Aug '16 9:07:27 AM esq263
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* In the ''Manga/LoveHina'' fanfiction [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/3611336/1/Repercussions Reprecussions]], Kitsune steals 30,000 yen from Keitaro to buy booze. When she is caught, she is told that she will be expected to pay it back ''or else'', and that she will have to work for a long time to do so. Thirty thousand yen is only about $250 (US) or £120 -- not exactly pocket change, but hardly the staggering sum the fanfic suggests. With a full-time job, Kitsune should be able to pay it off in a matter of weeks.

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* In the ''Manga/LoveHina'' fanfiction [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/3611336/1/Repercussions Reprecussions]], Repercussions]], Kitsune steals 30,000 yen from Keitaro to buy booze. When she is caught, she is told that she will be expected to pay it back ''or else'', and that she will have to work for a long time to do so. Thirty thousand yen is only about $250 (US) or £120 -- not exactly pocket change, but hardly the staggering sum the fanfic suggests. With a full-time job, Kitsune should be able to pay it off in a matter of weeks.
16th Aug '16 4:32:56 PM MartineBrooke
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** Calvin opens a lemonade stand in the dead of winter. ("It has natural refrigeration!") for a stupidly high price. When he doesn't get any customers he decides the solution is to raise the price ''even further'' so he can become profitable more quickly. [[labelnote:Note]]Calvin may be trying to use Giffen's Paradox, which says that as prices increase, demand also increases.[[/labelnote]]

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** Calvin opens a lemonade stand in the dead of winter. ("It has natural refrigeration!") for a stupidly high price. When he doesn't get any customers he decides the solution is to raise the price ''even further'' so he can become profitable more quickly. [[labelnote:Note]]Calvin may be trying to use Giffen's Paradox, which says that as prices increase, demand also increases.[[/labelnote]]
16th Aug '16 4:24:48 PM MartineBrooke
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* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'': In an episode, a group of scientists talk about harvesting rare minerals from an asteroid. One scientist remarks how this would wipe out poverty and the others agree.

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* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'': In an episode, a group of scientists talk about harvesting rare minerals from an asteroid. One scientist remarks how this would wipe out poverty and the others agree. This would only work if the minerals were useful in themselves, e.g. in eliminating certain human or animal diseases that lead to poverty.
14th Aug '16 9:35:35 PM trixus
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* Subverted in a ''ComicBook/{{Spirou}}'' comic,the BigBad fires one of his best agent after his HeelFaceTurn which scare stockholders into selling their stocks and his competitor end up buying his whole company which is an improbable domino effect. Actually the competitor has been waiting for any spark of doubt such as this and influenced the market accordingly to make it look like the BigBad was going under.

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* Subverted in a ''ComicBook/{{Spirou}}'' comic,the BigBad fires one of his best agent after his HeelFaceTurn which scare stockholders into selling their stocks and his competitor end up buying his whole company which is an improbable domino effect. Actually the competitor has been waiting for any spark of doubt such as this and influenced the market accordingly to make it look like the BigBad was going under. It's still done in a day.



** It does helps that the society is a low scale due to having survived many wars and birthrate controlled. They even mentions that they have a bunch of islands to throw unfit people there since the population is just that small.

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** It does helps that the society is a low scale due to having survived many wars and birthrate controlled. They even mentions that they have a bunch of islands to throw unfit people there since the population is just that small. And they can make it smaller if they want since they have total control over birth rates.



* While FridgeLogic dictates that the economy of the Franchise/{{Pokemon}} universe should have collapsed a long time ago, they did avert this on one occasion. The Magikarp salesman sells the useless Pokemon at high prices. He does this by convincing [[WhatanIdiot smart customers]] that the Magikarp will make them rich by having the Magikarp have children, and then the next generation will have more children, and soon one will have an infinite amount of Magikarp and an infinite amount of money. However, it is made very clear that the only one making any money off this scheme is the Magikarp salesman.

to:

* While FridgeLogic dictates that the economy of the Franchise/{{Pokemon}} universe should have collapsed a long time ago, they did avert this on one occasion. The Magikarp salesman sells the useless Pokemon at high prices. He does this by convincing [[WhatanIdiot smart customers]] that the Magikarp will make them rich by having the Magikarp have children, and then the next generation will have more children, and soon one will have an infinite amount of Magikarp and an infinite amount of money. However, it is made very clear that the only one making any money off this scheme is the Magikarp salesman. Granted it's more of a con than economics (he sells one fish that mates and tells you it'll just multiply).
14th Aug '16 9:00:56 PM trixus
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* Subverted in a ''ComicBook/{{Spirou}}'' comic,the BigBad fires one of his best agent after his HeelFaceTurn which scare stockholders into selling their stocks and his competitor end up buying his whole company which is an improbable domino effect. Actually the competitor has been waiting for any spark of doubt such as this and influenced the market accordingly to make it look like the BigBad was going under.
25th Jul '16 9:01:17 PM PaulA
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* Creator/HilariBell's ''A Matter of Profit'' is chock full of subversions of this trope. It blatantly takes a realistic look at the nature of money and trade itself and how it can bring cultures together peacefully (you don't want to fight the people you depend on to buy your product).

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* Creator/HilariBell's ''A Matter of Profit'' ''Literature/AMatterOfProfit'' is chock full of subversions aversions of this trope. It blatantly takes a realistic look at the nature of money and trade itself and how it can bring cultures together peacefully (you don't want to fight the people you depend on to buy your product).
10th Jul '16 9:06:30 PM lavendermintrose
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* In the end of ''Anime/ToAruHikushiENoTsuioku'', the main character is given gold dust in payment for escorting the princess, who, of course, has fallen in love with him over the journey. He is told that it's more gold ''than he could spend in a lifetime''. But he can't have the princess, who, of course, is off to an arranged marriage with a prince she doesn't love. So as a romantic gesture, the pilot gets back in his plane and ''throws all the gold dust into the air'' around the ship that's taking the princess away. The value of the gold in the economy? Into the sea. The gold itself as raw material, for decorative ''or'' practical purposes? Into the sea. Economics majors will cry, but not for the reasons the writers wanted.
3rd Jul '16 12:47:14 PM Morgenthaler
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* The manga/anime ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' does pretty well when it comes to economics of the villages: the villages all get clients which pay for the services of the ninja inside, and they're ranked from easiest to most difficult and given to shinobi who fit each job. For example, babysitting, hiring a ninja for dog walking, landscaping, even trash pickup or pet finding are considered 'D-Rank' missions, while escorting people or being a bodyguard is chosen by the threats the ninja'd face (C-Rank is for the biggest threat being common bandits, B-Rank is for ninja enemies) and the most difficult jobs are A and S rank, which gives a lot of money to the people who perform them each time. [[TheObiWan Jiraiya]] is in fact the richest ninja we've seen in the manga not only due to his best selling books: he had completed ''138 S-Rank'' missions, which means he eared 138,000,000 ryo on that ALONE (each S-Rank mission earns 1,000,000 ryo each), with ''1,839 missions done total''. Also, the entire Sand / Sound invasion from Part I was sparked due to an economic depression the former Wind Daimyo had inflicted on Sunagakure by taking all of their business and giving it to Konohagakure instead of his country's own village.

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* The manga/anime ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' does pretty well when it comes to economics of the villages: the villages all get clients which pay for the services of the ninja inside, and they're ranked from easiest to most difficult and given to shinobi who fit each job. For example, babysitting, hiring a ninja for dog walking, landscaping, even trash pickup or pet finding are considered 'D-Rank' missions, while escorting people or being a bodyguard is chosen by the threats the ninja'd face (C-Rank is for the biggest threat being common bandits, B-Rank is for ninja enemies) and the most difficult jobs are A and S rank, which gives a lot of money to the people who perform them each time. [[TheObiWan Jiraiya]] Jiraiya is in fact the richest ninja we've seen in the manga not only due to his best selling books: he had completed ''138 S-Rank'' missions, which means he eared 138,000,000 ryo on that ALONE (each S-Rank mission earns 1,000,000 ryo each), with ''1,839 missions done total''. Also, the entire Sand / Sound invasion from Part I was sparked due to an economic depression the former Wind Daimyo had inflicted on Sunagakure by taking all of their business and giving it to Konohagakure instead of his country's own village.
28th Jun '16 6:19:11 PM merotoker
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* In the Manga/LoveHina fanfiction [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/3611336/1/Repercussions Reprecussions]], Kitsune steals 30,000 yen from Keitaro to buy booze. When she is caught, she is told that she will be expected to pay it back ''or else'', and that she will have to work for a long time to do so. Thirty thousand yen is only about $250 (US) or £120 -- not exactly pocket change, but hardly the staggering sum the fanfic suggests. With a full-time job, Kitsune should be able to pay it off in a matter of weeks.

to:

* In the Manga/LoveHina ''Manga/LoveHina'' fanfiction [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/3611336/1/Repercussions Reprecussions]], Kitsune steals 30,000 yen from Keitaro to buy booze. When she is caught, she is told that she will be expected to pay it back ''or else'', and that she will have to work for a long time to do so. Thirty thousand yen is only about $250 (US) or £120 -- not exactly pocket change, but hardly the staggering sum the fanfic suggests. With a full-time job, Kitsune should be able to pay it off in a matter of weeks.



** An article in an early-90s issue of DragonMagazine discussed how to make a more realistic-looking (''looking'', mind, which even the author admitted to) economic situation by exploring real historic currencies, including making silver the dominant high-value coinage instead of gold. Platinum was thrown out of consideration entirely as it was not considered a precious metal (or even particularly well known) before the 1700s.

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** An article in an early-90s issue of DragonMagazine ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' discussed how to make a more realistic-looking (''looking'', mind, which even the author admitted to) economic situation by exploring real historic currencies, including making silver the dominant high-value coinage instead of gold. Platinum was thrown out of consideration entirely as it was not considered a precious metal (or even particularly well known) before the 1700s.



** The game hangs a {{Lampshade}} on this (and/or on real world economics) when you go to buy the ticket to Sender Station. The electronic ticket counter updates the value (based on supply and demand across the whole known Galaxy) in real time. This change occurs so quickly that the price when you start to click on the icon will have changed more than once by the time you've finished clicking on it.

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** The game hangs a {{Lampshade}} {{lampshade|Hanging}} on this (and/or on real world economics) when you go to buy the ticket to Sender Station. The electronic ticket counter updates the value (based on supply and demand across the whole known Galaxy) in real time. This change occurs so quickly that the price when you start to click on the icon will have changed more than once by the time you've finished clicking on it.



* Done by either the writers or by Peach herself in ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga''. When the eponymous brothers first arrive in the Beanbean Kingdom, they're told (by a fellow who is transparently trying to fleece them) that their 100 Mushroom Kingdom coins are currently worth 10 Beanbean coins and they'll have give him 100 Beanbean coins before he'll let them pass. Later on, Peach gets kidnapped (as she is wont to do) and the MacGuffin she was kidnapped to activate broken into a set of PlotCoupons. Prince Peasley cockily bets the brothers 99,999,999,999,999 Mushroom Coins that he'll find the coupons first. When the brothers inevitably win the bet, he makes good, but the royal advisor checks the exchange rates and reveals that their massive winnings amount to... 99 Beanbean Coins, meaning that somehow the Mushroom Kingdom currency's value relative to the Beanbean Kingdom's fell to '''a trillionth''' of it's original value. This means one of two things: either A)the Mushroom Kingdom economy collapsed entirely during the day or two that Peach was kidnapped, or B)''both'' economies were in dire straits at the beginning of the game and the value of the Beanbean Coin was artificially reset during the course of the game to prevent the Beanbean economy from crashing. Either way it doesn't speak well of Peach's ability to rule her kingdom even when she's ''not'' kidnapped. That, or Prince Peasley was lying to them to avoid paying up on a lost bet and counting on them not understanding economics.[[TakeAThirdOption Or, alternatively,]] the whole thing was a scam. Looking at the price of items in this game compared to the price of the same items in other games in the series, the exchange rate appears to be nearly 1:1. This points toward both the scam artist AND Peasley lying about it. Otherwise, the whole "exchange rate" is completely arbitrary.
* According to the description of the "Something Special for Someone Special" (an engagement ring) in ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'', it costs "approximately two months[[note]][[YouMakeMeSic sic]][[/note]] salary". It costs $100 in real-world money, which is kind of ridiculous, especially since people actually buy it and then use it to make jokes about [[RealSoonNow how long]] it's taking Valve to release ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}} 3'', but who in a first-world nation gets paid just $50 a month? On the other hand, you can buy some pretty impressive weapons for $5 and under, so maybe in the VideoGame/TeamFortress2 universe, currency is just massively deflated. (Ignoring the fact the Heavy once gave a trick-or-treater $7,000 just to make up for making the poor kid cry by being a BoomerangBigot...) Or maybe it's just an [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Acceptable Break From Reality]] because this is actually real-world money we're talking about despite the fact the Something Special's description suggests it applies in-game. [[MST3KMantra Oh, well...]]
** In all fairness, the game is set in "the middle-ish part of a century a lot like the one we just had." Specifically, the year 1968. At the time, minimum wage was approximately $1.60. This brings a month's salary to about $250, which is somewhat more reasonable. Given that VideoGame/TeamFortress2 exaggerates everything, perhaps it is making a joke about how much money is worth back then.

to:

* Done by either the writers or by Peach herself in ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga''. When the eponymous brothers first arrive in the Beanbean Kingdom, they're told (by a fellow who is transparently trying to fleece them) that their 100 Mushroom Kingdom coins are currently worth 10 Beanbean coins and they'll have give him 100 Beanbean coins before he'll let them pass. Later on, Peach gets kidnapped (as she is wont to do) and the MacGuffin she was kidnapped to activate broken into a set of PlotCoupons. Prince Peasley cockily bets the brothers 99,999,999,999,999 Mushroom Coins that he'll find the coupons first. When the brothers inevitably win the bet, he makes good, but the royal advisor checks the exchange rates and reveals that their massive winnings amount to... 99 Beanbean Coins, meaning that somehow the Mushroom Kingdom currency's value relative to the Beanbean Kingdom's fell to '''a trillionth''' of it's original value. This means one of two things: either A)the Mushroom Kingdom economy collapsed entirely during the day or two that Peach was kidnapped, or B)''both'' economies were in dire straits at the beginning of the game and the value of the Beanbean Coin was artificially reset during the course of the game to prevent the Beanbean economy from crashing. Either way it doesn't speak well of Peach's ability to rule her kingdom even when she's ''not'' kidnapped. That, or Prince Peasley was lying to them to avoid paying up on a lost bet and counting on them not understanding economics. [[TakeAThirdOption Or, alternatively,]] the whole thing was a scam. Looking at the price of items in this game compared to the price of the same items in other games in the series, the exchange rate appears to be nearly 1:1. This points toward both the scam artist AND Peasley lying about it. Otherwise, the whole "exchange rate" is completely arbitrary.
* According to the description of the "Something Special for Someone Special" (an engagement ring) in ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'', it costs "approximately two months[[note]][[YouMakeMeSic sic]][[/note]] salary". It costs $100 in real-world money, which is kind of ridiculous, especially since people actually buy it and then use it to make jokes about [[RealSoonNow how long]] it's taking Valve to release ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}} ''VideoGame/HalfLife 3'', but who in a first-world nation gets paid just $50 a month? On the other hand, you can buy some pretty impressive weapons for $5 and under, so maybe in the VideoGame/TeamFortress2 ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' universe, currency is just massively deflated. (Ignoring the fact the Heavy once gave a trick-or-treater $7,000 just to make up for making the poor kid cry by being a BoomerangBigot...) Or maybe it's just an [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Acceptable Break From Reality]] because this is actually real-world money we're talking about despite the fact the Something Special's description suggests it applies in-game. [[MST3KMantra Oh, well...]]
** In all fairness, the game is set in "the middle-ish part of a century a lot like the one we just had." Specifically, the year 1968. At the time, minimum wage was approximately $1.60. This brings a month's salary to about $250, which is somewhat more reasonable. Given that VideoGame/TeamFortress2 ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' exaggerates everything, perhaps it is making a joke about how much money is worth back then.



** Huey, Dewey, and Louie find a machine that lets them duplicate dollar coins en masse. Inflation promptly kicks in and loaves of bread cost $200 before they find the reverse switch. This episode was loosely based on CarlBarks' ''A Financial Fable'' and ''The Fabulous Philosopher's Stone'', which are also notable aversions.

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** Huey, Dewey, and Louie find a machine that lets them duplicate dollar coins en masse. Inflation promptly kicks in and loaves of bread cost $200 before they find the reverse switch. This episode was loosely based on CarlBarks' Creator/CarlBarks' ''A Financial Fable'' and ''The Fabulous Philosopher's Stone'', which are also notable aversions.



* A Paul Murry-drawn ''[[ComicBook/MickeyMouseComicUniverse Mickey Mouse]]'' comic has a villain that has discovered a literal mountain made of diamond. This makes him incredibly rich, as long as no one else knows it exists, since he can control the amount he sells. Hence, his villainousness consists of seeing to it that no one who has seen his property ever gets away alive. Disturbingly, this sort of artificial scarcity is TruthInTelevision for how the diamond industry actually works (and it was worse under the infamous [=DeBeers=] monopoly).

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* A Paul Murry-drawn ''[[ComicBook/MickeyMouseComicUniverse Mickey Mouse]]'' comic has a villain that has discovered a literal mountain made of diamond. This makes him incredibly rich, as long as no one else knows it exists, since he can control the amount he sells. Hence, his villainousness villainy consists of seeing to it that no one who has seen his property ever gets away alive. Disturbingly, this sort of artificial scarcity is TruthInTelevision for how the diamond industry actually works (and it was worse under the infamous [=DeBeers=] monopoly).



** Critics of the book's premise are quick to point out that the protagonists' "fuck you, got mine" system [[NotSoDifferent is no more feasible,]] and only works because they have a ''perpetual motion machine'' and cloaking device to hide Galt's Gulch from outsiders. BobTheAngryFlower parodied this by showing Galt & co. stuck doing backbreaking farm labor just to survive (which, at least, they would prefer in-context to working for "the looters" back in civilization).

to:

** Critics of the book's premise are quick to point out that the protagonists' "fuck you, got mine" system [[NotSoDifferent is no more feasible,]] and only works because they have a ''perpetual motion machine'' and cloaking device to hide Galt's Gulch from outsiders. BobTheAngryFlower ''WebComic/BobTheAngryFlower'' parodied this by showing Galt & co. stuck doing backbreaking farm labor just to survive (which, at least, they would prefer in-context to working for "the looters" back in civilization).



* While FridgeLogic dictates that the economy of the Franchise/{{Pokemon}} universe should have collapsed a long time ago, they did avert this on one occasion. The Magikarp salesman sells the useless pokemon at high prices. He does this by convincing [[WhatanIdiot smart customers]] that the Magikarp will make them rich by having the Magikarp have children, and then the next generation will have more children, and soon one will have an infinite amount of Magikarp and an infinite amount of money. However, it is made very clear that the only one making any money off this scheme is the Magikarp salesman.

to:

* While FridgeLogic dictates that the economy of the Franchise/{{Pokemon}} universe should have collapsed a long time ago, they did avert this on one occasion. The Magikarp salesman sells the useless pokemon Pokemon at high prices. He does this by convincing [[WhatanIdiot smart customers]] that the Magikarp will make them rich by having the Magikarp have children, and then the next generation will have more children, and soon one will have an infinite amount of Magikarp and an infinite amount of money. However, it is made very clear that the only one making any money off this scheme is the Magikarp salesman.



* ''VideoGame/OffworldTradingCompany'', being a game about economic warfare, simplifies the economy but avoids any many discrepancies. If you corner the market on a particularly scare resource, you'll make money hand over fist. On the other hand, if your monopoly is disrupted by someone mining another source, the price will fall to a more equitable equilibrium. In addition, the larger the surplus, the less a commmodity is worth because of the glut. An early example is power: at the beginning of the game, you don't have the resources to build power generators, resulting in rising debt as you have to pay someone else for it. Once you're able to build power generators, the price you get for your surplus is very high as it's still limited. Building lots of additional power generators will result in the crash of the power market as you end up with too much supply for not enough demand.

to:

* ''VideoGame/OffworldTradingCompany'', being a game about economic warfare, simplifies the economy but avoids any many discrepancies. If you corner the market on a particularly scare resource, you'll make money hand over fist. On the other hand, if your monopoly is disrupted by someone mining another source, the price will fall to a more equitable equilibrium. In addition, the larger the surplus, the less a commmodity commodity is worth because of the glut. An early example is power: at the beginning of the game, you don't have the resources to build power generators, resulting in rising debt as you have to pay someone else for it. Once you're able to build power generators, the price you get for your surplus is very high as it's still limited. Building lots of additional power generators will result in the crash of the power market as you end up with too much supply for not enough demand.
26th Jun '16 7:52:18 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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* PlayedForLaughs with the Paradise Group's scheme in ''Webcomic/OnePunchMan''. They want to make a world wherein people only have to work if they want to, and those who don't work are fully financially supported. They don't seem to know that this is not at all how economics work, but then again they really aren't all that smart.
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