History Main / ArtisticLicenseEconomics

23rd Mar '17 7:32:38 AM sarysa
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An increasing amount of artistic license is also used with the inner workings of corporations, with impossible amounts of money being generated or siphoned by accounting tricks or embezzlement, minority shareholders ousting the majority (especially in {{Superhero}} fiction), dictatorial CEOs of public companies who never answer to the board, and so on.

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An increasing amount of artistic license is also used with the inner workings of corporations, with impossible amounts of money being generated or siphoned by accounting tricks or embezzlement, minority shareholders ousting the majority (especially in {{Superhero}} fiction), dictatorial CEOs [=CEOs=] of public companies who never answer to the board, and so on.
23rd Mar '17 7:30:49 AM sarysa
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An increasing amount of artistic license is also used with the inner workings of corporations, with impossible amounts of money being generated or siphoned by accounting tricks or embezzlement, minority shareholders ousting the majority (especially in {{Superhero}} fiction), dictatorial CEOs of public companies who never answer to the board, and so on.
13th Mar '17 4:38:10 PM PsychoGecko
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** The player must deal with some realistic economic situations that existed for many real islands, such as embargoes, and massive taxation on traded goods. The player is forced to find other ways to make money in these scenarios.

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** The player must deal with some realistic economic situations that existed for many real islands, such as embargoes, and massive taxation on traded goods. The player is forced to find other ways to make money in these scenarios. For example, one scenario has the prices of raw goods lose much of their value, which is detrimental to the island's starting economy due to how much easier it is to produce raw lumber, salt, metals, and foodstuffs. The lesson the scenario teaches is the value of importing materials to produce high-value refined goods such as jewelry, furniture, and cigars.
29th Jan '17 7:48:57 PM Blazer
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2Bs_nBrhbk This]] ''Website/GoAnimate'' video has a Red Lobster shutting down and a Buffalo Wild Wings on the verge of closing because of Daisy's BlatantLies and InsaneTrollLogic driving away a few customers. Keyword here being "a few": big restaurants wouldn't close up shop because of that unless they were doing ''very'' poorly.
27th Dec '16 1:22:35 AM Kazmahu
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* In ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', Dave alchemises the 'SORD.....', a weapon so shitty it actually generates [[StealthPun artifact grist]] to make it. That's not an example of this trope, as obviously videogame economies don't have to resemble real-world economies in any way. What ''is'' an example of this trope exaggerated and played for laughs is the fact that post-scratch Dave [[http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=006436 apparently managed to do this in real life]], creating products that were so crappy that he actually made money making them, and did this enough that he made himself rich. This could work in theory, if you found materials people were willing to pay you to take. However these materials tend to be incredibly labor-intensive, if they can be used at all (e-waste, recyclable scrap metal) or incredibly dangerous (nuclear waste), both reasons people are willing to pay to have it gone in the first place.

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* In ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', Dave alchemises the 'SORD.....', a weapon so shitty it actually generates [[StealthPun artifact grist]] to make it. That's not an example of this trope, as obviously videogame economies don't have to resemble real-world economies in any way. What ''is'' an example of this trope exaggerated and played for laughs is the fact that post-scratch Dave [[http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=006436 apparently managed to do this in real life]], creating products that were so crappy that he actually made money making them, and did this enough that he made himself rich. This could work in theory, if you found materials people were willing to pay you to take. However these materials tend to be incredibly labor-intensive, if they can be used at all (e-waste, recyclable scrap metal) or incredibly dangerous (nuclear waste), both reasons people are willing to pay to have it gone in the first place.
23rd Dec '16 12:49:47 PM SeanMurrayI
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* In ''Film/JohnnyMnemonic'', an evil MegaCorp intends to suppress the cure for a deadly disease which half the world's population suffers from, their logic being that "treating the disease would be more profitable than curing it." However, their treatment medicines are said to cost $2,000 per clinical unit, which would be far more than most people in the world suffering from the disease could likely ever hope to afford, especially over any lengthy, continual basis. This business strategy would likely see diminishing returns over time, as increasing numbers of people living on low and middle-class incomes struggle to pay the company's exorbitantly high prices and more sick people die off amidst the global pandemic. In this circumstance, one could expect that the working cure that they won't sell would ultimately yield a greater profit because it could be cheaper (especially if consumers only need to pay for a one-time dose or prescription), would have a greater public demand (especially if such a desired product is depicted in the movie as something people would go as far as to start riots over), and would help their global consumer base stay healthy and thrive and provide a more sustainable business platform in the long term.

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* In ''Film/JohnnyMnemonic'', an evil MegaCorp intends to suppress the cure for a deadly disease which half the world's population suffers from, their logic being that "treating the disease would be more profitable than curing it." However, their treatment medicines are said to cost $2,000 per clinical unit, which would be far more than most people in the world suffering from the disease could likely ever hope to afford, especially over any lengthy, continual basis. This business strategy would likely see diminishing returns over time, as increasing numbers of people living on low and middle-class incomes struggle to pay the company's exorbitantly high prices and many more sick people die off amidst the global pandemic. pandemic (Even with the best possible access to the MegaCorp's available treatments, people are still dying; Takahashi's young daughter succumbed to NAS, despite her father's ranking status at the company). In this circumstance, these circumstances, one could expect that the their working cure that they won't sell would ultimately yield a greater profit profits because it could be cheaper (especially if consumers only need to pay for a one-time dose or prescription), would have a greater public demand (especially if such a desired product is depicted in the movie as something people would go as far as to start riots ''riots'' over), and would help their the global consumer base stay healthy population remain healthy, thrive, and thrive and provide a build an even more prosperous and sustainable business platform world economy in the long term.
20th Dec '16 10:38:58 PM ClownZephyr302
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* Discussed by [[Anime/{{Pokemon}} James]] in ''[[Fanfic/CommonSense]]'' when the [[SnakeOilSalesman Magikarp salesman]] gives his pitch about how Magikarp lays one thousand eggs at a time. He instantly sees through the ruse, because if it's really such a fast multiplier, basic laws of supply and demand state that its real value would be nowhere near what the salesman claims.

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* Discussed by [[Anime/{{Pokemon}} James]] in ''[[Fanfic/CommonSense]]'' ''Fanfic/CommonSense'' when the [[SnakeOilSalesman Magikarp salesman]] gives his pitch about how Magikarp lays one thousand eggs at a time. He instantly sees through the ruse, because if it's really such a fast multiplier, basic laws of supply and demand state that its real value would be nowhere near what the salesman claims.
20th Dec '16 10:37:04 PM ClownZephyr302
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* Discussed by [[Anime/{{Pokemon}} James]] in ''[[Fanfic/CommonSense]]'' when the [[SnakeOilSalesman Magikarp salesman]] gives his pitch about how Magikarp lays one thousand eggs at a time. He instantly sees through the ruse, because if it's really such a fast multiplier, basic laws of supply and demand state that its real value would be nowhere near what the salesman claims.
20th Dec '16 9:58:08 AM Kazmahu
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* In ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', Dave alchemises the 'SORD.....', a weapon so shitty it actually generates [[StealthPun artifact grist]] to make it. That's not an example of this trope, as obviously videogame economies don't have to resemble real-world economies in any way. What ''is'' an example of this trope exaggerated and played for laughs is the fact that post-scratch Dave [[http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=006436 apparently managed to do this in real life]], creating products that were so crappy that he actually made money making them, and did this enough that he made himself rich.

to:

* In ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', Dave alchemises the 'SORD.....', a weapon so shitty it actually generates [[StealthPun artifact grist]] to make it. That's not an example of this trope, as obviously videogame economies don't have to resemble real-world economies in any way. What ''is'' an example of this trope exaggerated and played for laughs is the fact that post-scratch Dave [[http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=006436 apparently managed to do this in real life]], creating products that were so crappy that he actually made money making them, and did this enough that he made himself rich. This could work in theory, if you found materials people were willing to pay you to take. However these materials tend to be incredibly labor-intensive, if they can be used at all (e-waste, recyclable scrap metal) or incredibly dangerous (nuclear waste), both reasons people are willing to pay to have it gone in the first place.
5th Nov '16 8:27:58 PM zarpaulus
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** In another experiment, the world government set up an island entirely of "Alphas" (the highest class) which caused strife when they attempted to order each other around. So they feel it's socially necessary to have inferiors. Just why they thought that a [[FantasticCasteSystem genetically engineered caste system]] is a good idea, however, remains less clear.

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** In another experiment, the world government set up an island entirely of "Alphas" (the highest class) which caused strife when they attempted to order each other around. So they feel it's socially necessary to have inferiors. Just why they thought that a [[FantasticCasteSystem genetically engineered caste system]] is a good idea, however, remains less clear.
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