History Main / ArtisticLicenseEconomics

10th Feb '16 3:32:23 PM Tuckerscreator
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* ''Film/InTime'' is set InAWorld where they've "[[TheAgeless turned off the aging gene]]", and lifespan has become currency to combat overpopulation. That actually could work rather well... except that in the trailers, the Powers That Be seem more concerned with preventing overpopulation than maintaining a working economy; they've hiked the prices of goods and lowered wages so much that entire communities have less lifespan to their name than hours in the day - go to work every day or die. Added to that, there is the problem that they are using as currency something with a large intrinsic value of its own: time. The whole point of money is that it's a medium of exchange; ideally, it should have no value of its own.
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* ''Film/InTime'' is set InAWorld where they've "[[TheAgeless turned off the aging gene]]", and lifespan has become currency to combat overpopulation. That actually could work rather well... except that in the trailers, the Powers That Be elites of this society seem more concerned with preventing overpopulation than maintaining a working economy; they've hiked the prices of goods and lowered wages so much that entire communities have less lifespan to their name than hours in the day - go to work every day or die. Added to that, there is the problem that they are using as currency something with a large intrinsic value of its own: time. The whole point of money is that it's a medium of exchange; ideally, it should have no value of its own.
2nd Feb '16 9:45:35 PM vsatta
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**Furthermore, with all the looting and burning, there would be an eternal recession going on. The Detroit riots of '67 left the city in shambles and it took months, if not years for the wages to go back up for anyone around. Now, imagine a situation where there aren't any emergency services to put out fires or contain the arsonists. Property damages alone would be astronomical, not to mention the impact of having no stores(all looted), having to rebuild every year and having to spend money to get everything back on track after the yearly mayhem. Everyone would be eating horses and boiling boots in less than a year.
2nd Feb '16 9:36:59 PM vsatta
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** It should also be noted that's not how wealth works, since the Wayne family definitely has some money in a personal bank account somewhere. No billionaires keep all their money in company stock, otherwise they wouldn't even be able to buy themselves a $1 burger, much less an entire restaurant or a fancy new sports car.
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** It should also be noted that's not how that wealth works, doesn't work that way, since the Wayne family definitely has some money in a personal bank account somewhere. No billionaires keep all their money in company stock, otherwise they wouldn't even be able to buy themselves a $1 burger, much less an entire restaurant or a fancy new sports car.
2nd Feb '16 9:35:40 PM vsatta
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The movie gets so many things wrong when it comes to stock markets, it's actually kind of cute... Had to add in some mistakes
* In ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', Bruce Wayne is bankrupted after Bane and his minions break into the stock exchange, hold everyone there at gunpoint, and make fake trades in Bruce's name using his (stolen) fingerprints. In reality, the major stock exchanges have the ability to quickly cancel trades if necessary and Bruce Wayne would have been easily able to get off the hook for those fraudulent trades. This is acknowledged in the movie a couple of scenes later when Lucius Fox tells Bruce that they'll be able to prove fraud but that in the immediate short term, Bruce is bankrupted. This also assumes that the computer program wasn't somehow inserting backdated trades into the system. Though that would presumably leave a trace, it would certainly take much longer to disentangle. The whole situation is played similarly to a robbery or large-scale embezzlement. It's [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by people on the floor.
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* In ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', Bruce Wayne is bankrupted after Bane and his minions break into the stock exchange, hold everyone there at gunpoint, and make fake trades in Bruce's name using his (stolen) fingerprints. In reality, the major stock exchanges have the ability to quickly cancel trades if necessary and Bruce Wayne would have been easily able to get off the hook for those fraudulent trades. This is acknowledged in the movie a couple of scenes later when Lucius Fox tells Bruce that they'll be able to prove fraud but that in the immediate short term, Bruce is bankrupted. This also assumes that the computer program wasn't somehow inserting backdated trades into the system. Though that would presumably leave a trace, it would certainly take much longer to disentangle. The whole situation is played similarly to a robbery or large-scale embezzlement. It's [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by people on the floor. Although... considering the ridiculous speeds at which the regulating body can close down a Stock Exchange (for example the flawed shut-down system for China's stock exchange in early 2016), the Bane and his henchmen wouldn't get close to a computer before the system was shut-down.

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* In ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', ** It should also be noted that's not how wealth works, since the Wayne family definitely has some money in a personal bank account somewhere. No billionaires keep all their money in company stock, otherwise they wouldn't even be able to buy themselves a $1 burger, much less an entire restaurant or a fancy new sports car. **Also, utilities don't get shut down days after someone goes bankrupt, or gets behind on their payments, as that could endanger lives. Imagine a minor screw-up at a hospital and it coming to light the following day, when all the life support patients are dead. **To drive the point home, there are also strict regulations imposed on volume trading in basically every stock market, such as public announcements being necessary when the offering exceeds the average daily trading value, making the idea of Bruce Wayne is bankrupted after Bane and his minions break into the buying massive amounts of stock exchange, hold everyone there at gunpoint, and make fake trades in Bruce's name using or selling his (stolen) fingerprints. In reality, the major own Wayne Corp. stock exchanges have the ability to quickly cancel trades if necessary and Bruce Wayne would have been easily able to get off the hook for those fraudulent trades. This is acknowledged in the movie a couple of scenes later when Lucius Fox tells Bruce that they'll be able to prove fraud but that in the immediate short term, Bruce is bankrupted. This also assumes that the computer program wasn't somehow inserting backdated trades into the system. Though that would presumably leave a trace, it would certainly take much longer to disentangle. The whole situation is played similarly to a robbery or large-scale embezzlement. It's [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by people on the floor.ludicrous.
12th Jan '16 5:59:41 PM Kazmahu
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* Invoked in-universe in the HGame ''Bunny Black''. Rakia took a Devil's Pact that granted her a modest boost in power, in exchange for any human being able to literally buy her for the right price, and said price being a king's ransom. That was many, many years and a lot of inflation ago. These days [[AlmightyJanitor she runs a shop despite having the firepower to take the position of Dungeon Master]], since now any adventurer could purchase her loyalty with pocket change, something she quietly laments.
3rd Jan '16 5:10:07 PM Darksilverhawk
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* ''Webcomic/{{Nodwick}}'' averts this when the party meets up with a [[http://comic.nodwick.com/?p=130 kobold accountant]], who gets them to spare his life in exchange for advice on how to make the most of their treasure. He introduces them to the idea of inflation, for a start, and suggests they pay more attention to gathering treasures other than gold coins. Later, after they've slain a dragon, they were subsequently asked to "[[http://comic.nodwick.com/?p=379 STOP DESTABILISING OUR ECONOMY!]]"
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* ''Webcomic/{{Nodwick}}'' ''ComicStrip/{{Nodwick}}'' averts this when the party meets up with a [[http://comic.nodwick.com/?p=130 kobold accountant]], who gets them to spare his life in exchange for advice on how to make the most of their treasure. He introduces them to the idea of inflation, for a start, and suggests they pay more attention to gathering treasures other than gold coins. Later, after they've slain a dragon, they were subsequently asked to "[[http://comic.nodwick.com/?p=379 STOP DESTABILISING OUR ECONOMY!]]"
30th Dec '15 11:09:34 PM jormis29
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* In a Creator/DonRosa [[ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse Scrooge McDuck]] story, ''The Quest for Kalevala'', Scrooge briefly gets his hand on the Sampo, a mythic handmill that can produce infinite amounts of gold. Normally business-savvy Scrooge gets struck by a severe case of gold fever, and starts rolling out tons of gold. In a boat. In the middle of a storming sea. The economic implications were left unstudied, since immediate survival quickly becomes a more important matter. Knowing Scrooge -- he probably wanted more gold ''just'' to swim in.
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* In a Creator/DonRosa [[ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse Scrooge McDuck]] story, ''The Quest for Kalevala'', Scrooge briefly gets his hand on the Sampo, TheSampo, a mythic handmill that can produce infinite amounts of gold. Normally business-savvy Scrooge gets struck by a severe case of gold fever, and starts rolling out tons of gold. In a boat. In the middle of a storming sea. The economic implications were left unstudied, since immediate survival quickly becomes a more important matter. Knowing Scrooge -- he probably wanted more gold ''just'' to swim in.
15th Dec '15 8:33:27 PM Yalsaris63
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* The [[VideoGame/{{X}} X-Universe]] takes the trope UpToEleven in that the economy doesn't work InUniverse either ([[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard without cheating a bit, that is]]). Special mention goes to the Terrans in ''X3: Terran Conflict'', who are guaranteed to essentially go bankrupt without a player-owned trade network propping them up.
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* The [[VideoGame/{{X}} X-Universe]] ''[[VideoGame/{{X}} X-Universe]]'' takes the trope UpToEleven in that the economy doesn't work InUniverse either ([[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard without cheating a bit, that is]]). Special mention goes to the Terrans in ''X3: Terran Conflict'', who are guaranteed to essentially go bankrupt without a player-owned trade network propping them up.
16th Nov '15 11:04:25 PM TARINunit9
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** Calvin opens a lemonade stand in the dead of winter. ("It has natural refrigeration!") When he doesn't get any customers he decides the solution is to raise the price so he can become profitable more quickly. ** Another case was when he started taking selling lemonade too seriously and began enforcing various policies on it, such as charging $20 per cup and justifying just throwing a lemon in some sludge water as "I'd have to charge more if I followed health codes". This is all PlayedForLaughs and, sure enough, nobody buys from him.
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** Calvin opens a lemonade stand in the dead of winter. ("It has natural refrigeration!") for a stupidly high price. When he doesn't get any customers he decides the solution is to raise the price ''even further'' so he can become profitable more quickly. ** Another case was when he started taking selling lemonade too seriously seriously. His price is, again, stupidly high (fifteen bucks), which he justifies by having to appease his "stockholders" (himself) and began enforcing various policies on it, such as charging $20 per cup and justifying just throwing pay "employee benefits" (for himself). When Susie points out that he's not even selling lemonade, but rather a pitcher of "sludge water" with a lemon in some sludge water as it, his response is [[InsaneTrollLogic "I'd have to charge more if I followed health codes".regulations" and "I have to cut expenses SOMEwhere if I want to stay competitive"]]. This is all PlayedForLaughs and, sure enough, nobody buys from him.
8th Nov '15 8:17:51 AM zarpaulus
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*** Diamonds already can be created that easily. The reason diamonds are priced so high is due to De Beers monopoly. It's relatively easy to synthesize chemically and physically identical diamonds cheaply. *** Synethetic diamonds can be detected under a microscope, and the conspiracy prevents these from being accepted as "real" or even tolerable as a novelty, more in line with "counterfeit" than anything else; as such, synthetic diamonds mostly see use as an industrial abrasive.
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*** Diamonds already can be created synthesized fairly easily, but the [=DeBeers=] cartel has spent considerable money on claims that easily. The reason diamonds are priced so high is due to De Beers monopoly. It's relatively easy to synthesize chemically and physically identical diamonds cheaply. *** Synethetic diamonds can be detected under a microscope, and the conspiracy prevents these from being accepted as "real" or even tolerable as a novelty, more in line with "counterfeit" than anything else; as such, synthetic diamonds mostly see use as an are inferior to their overpriced natural ones. However synthetic diamonds are widely used in industrial abrasive.tools because they're not only cheaper but easily proven to be harder than natural diamonds with impurities.
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