History Main / ArtisticLicenseEconomics

7th Feb '18 4:25:02 AM Piterpicher
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* Creator/StrugatskyBrothers' NoonUniverse has a classical post-scarcity society which they explicitly called communism. That gave them all kinds of trouble with the authorities, as ''their'' take on what communism should look like (decentralized, technology focused) was radically different from the party line. Similar elements were actually common with most Soviet Sci-Fi (indeed, it was actually ''required'' that writers depict the future as being communist, because the government thought it would [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp "inevitably"]] be the case) but they fleshed it out to such an extent that it unnerved censors.

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* Creator/StrugatskyBrothers' NoonUniverse Franchise/NoonUniverse has a classical post-scarcity society which they explicitly called communism. That gave them all kinds of trouble with the authorities, as ''their'' take on what communism should look like (decentralized, technology focused) was radically different from the party line. Similar elements were actually common with most Soviet Sci-Fi (indeed, it was actually ''required'' that writers depict the future as being communist, because the government thought it would [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp "inevitably"]] be the case) but they fleshed it out to such an extent that it unnerved censors.
2nd Feb '18 2:52:12 PM HeroGal2347
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* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'':

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* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'':''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'':
19th Jan '18 4:45:30 PM infernape612
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* Done by either the writers or by Peach herself in ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga''. When the eponymous brothers first arrive in the Beanbean Kingdom, they're told (by a fellow who is transparently trying to fleece them) that their 100 Mushroom Kingdom coins are currently worth 10 Beanbean coins and they'll have to give him 100 Beanbean coins before he'll let them pass. Later on, Peach gets kidnapped (as she is wont to do) and the MacGuffin she was kidnapped to activate broken into a set of PlotCoupons. Prince Peasley cockily bets the brothers 99,999,999,999,999 Mushroom Coins that he'll find the coupons first. When the brothers inevitably win the bet, he makes good, but the royal advisor checks the exchange rates and reveals that their massive winnings amount to... 99 Beanbean Coins, meaning that somehow the Mushroom Kingdom currency's value relative to the Beanbean Kingdom's fell to '''a trillionth''' of it's original value. This means one of two things: either A)the Mushroom Kingdom economy collapsed entirely during the day or two that Peach was kidnapped, or B)''both'' economies were in dire straits at the beginning of the game and the value of the Beanbean Coin was artificially reset during the course of the game to prevent the Beanbean economy from crashing. Either way it doesn't speak well of Peach's ability to rule her kingdom even when she's ''not'' kidnapped. That, or Prince Peasley was lying to them to avoid paying up on a lost bet and counting on them not understanding economics. [[TakeAThirdOption Or, alternatively,]] the whole thing was a scam. Looking at the price of items in this game compared to the price of the same items in other games in the series, the exchange rate appears to be nearly 1:1. This points toward both the scam artist AND Peasley lying about it. Otherwise, the whole "exchange rate" is completely arbitrary.

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* Done by either the writers or by Peach herself in ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga''. When the eponymous brothers first arrive in the Beanbean Kingdom, they're told (by a fellow who is transparently trying to fleece them) that their 100 Mushroom Kingdom coins are currently worth 10 Beanbean coins and they'll have to give him 100 Beanbean coins before he'll let them pass. Later on, Peach gets kidnapped (as she is wont to do) and the MacGuffin she was kidnapped to activate broken into a set of PlotCoupons. Prince Peasley cockily bets the brothers 99,999,999,999,999 Mushroom Coins that he'll find the coupons first. When the brothers inevitably win the bet, he makes good, but the royal advisor checks the exchange rates and reveals that their massive winnings amount to... 99 Beanbean Coins, meaning that somehow the Mushroom Kingdom currency's value relative to the Beanbean Kingdom's fell to '''a trillionth''' of it's its original value. This means one of two things: either A)the A) the Mushroom Kingdom economy collapsed entirely during the day or two that Peach was kidnapped, or B)''both'' B) ''both'' economies were in dire straits at the beginning of the game and the value of the Beanbean Coin was artificially reset during the course of the game to prevent the Beanbean economy from crashing. Either way it doesn't speak well of Peach's ability to rule her kingdom even when she's ''not'' kidnapped. That, or Prince Peasley was lying to them to avoid paying up on a lost bet and counting on them not understanding economics. [[TakeAThirdOption Or, alternatively,]] the whole thing was a scam. Looking at the price of items in this game compared to the price of the same items in other games in the series, the exchange rate appears to be nearly 1:1. This points toward both the scam artist AND Peasley lying about it. Otherwise, the whole "exchange rate" is completely arbitrary.



25th Dec '17 6:23:30 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In ''FinalFantasyThe4HeroesOfLight'' there's a minigame where you run a shop and sell off your inventory. Trouble is, while the customers do consider market prices to an extent, they will pay over the going rate, even for stuff you just bought from the same shop. Since both supply and demand are unlimited, you can just reap the profits until you get bored or decide you've got enough.

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* In ''FinalFantasyThe4HeroesOfLight'' ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyThe4HeroesOfLight'' there's a minigame where you run a shop and sell off your inventory. Trouble is, while the customers do consider market prices to an extent, they will pay over the going rate, even for stuff you just bought from the same shop. Since both supply and demand are unlimited, you can just reap the profits until you get bored or decide you've got enough.
28th Nov '17 8:12:59 AM KingLyger
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* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' lampshaded the "sudden influx of wealth" problem. Apparently the haul from the dungeon delve at the end of act 1 disrupted the economy for a few years during the time skip before act 2 begins.

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* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' lampshaded the "sudden influx of wealth" problem. Apparently Hawke and company delve into the haul from Deep Roads as the final dungeon delve at of Act I, coming out with a gigantic hoard of gold and treasures, making the end of act 1 disrupted the economy for a few years during Hawke family filthy rich. By the time skip before act 2 begins.the TimeSkip catches up with Act II, Hawke is now a noble in the rich part of town, but it's mentioned that this had quite a devastating effect on Kirkwall's economy when Hawke suddenly introduced a huge amount of cash into it.
22nd Nov '17 9:08:42 AM thatmadork
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Added DiffLines:

** The early capitalist AI used to do this funny thing where they'd spend thousands on building factories producing luxury clothing in countries where nobody could afford them, causing the capitalists to bankrupt themselves very quickly. [[WhatAnIdiot Derp.]] Thankfully this was patched out.
17th Nov '17 1:32:15 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/PawnStars'':
** The pawn shop owners end up dealing with a lot of people who fail Economics forever, either by assuming that an otherwise-worthless trinket they own is a lot more valuable than it is because it was owned by someone famous (as one of the hosts famously put it, "It doesn't matter if your lawnmower was owned by Bill Clinton, it's still a lawnmower"), or by doing some research, finding out the "market value", and then trying to sell it to the pawn shop at that price. The staff have to constantly remind sellers that they are salesmen, not collectors, and that the "market value" is what a ''collector'' will pay.
** Another repeat example is, "People automatically assume old plus rare automatically equals valuable", without taking any other factors into account. One of the most startling examples of overestimation includes a three-trigger shotgun, where the third trigger was used to open the breach (instead of a separate lever) while the two other triggers worked the side-by-side barrels as normal for a hammer-operated firearm. An expert was brought in to inspect it, and confirmed that yes they were very rare, but that was more because they were unpopular and not produced very long; a pristine-condition example could fetch between two and three thousand, but the one in hand had been heavily used (since it was intended as a private citizen's main hunting tool) and showed severe pitting and scoring of the barrel, splice-replacement of the stock, etc, so it was worth at most $800-$1000. This was somewhat of a shock to the seller, whose initial asking price - based solely off the fact that it was old and unusual - was ''[[WhatAnIdiot $100,000]]''.
** It doesn't matter what the seller thinks his item is worth; what matters is how much someone else is willing to pay for it. If nobody will pay what he's asking, he's priced it right out of the market, so its market value is zero.
** You simply will not get top dollar for your stuff from a pawn shop. While a collector buys something to keep it for himself, a pawnbroker buys it so he can turn around and sell it again at a profit. The advantage of selling to a pawnbroker is that you'll get cash in your hand immediately. An auction house will charge you up front to sell it on their auction block, make you wait around for months before the item goes up for bid, and if the bidding doesn't meet your expectations, you're out of luck. The same goes for selling it yourself on Ebay, minus the auctioneer's fee.
17th Nov '17 1:26:32 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** Some TruthInTelevision: 19th-century Australian folk hero Ned Kelly did exactly this. As this was [[OlderThanRadio before the computer age]], it's more likely that the banks indeed had only one copy of the records, or at least the loan notes. John Dillinger and Pretty Boy Floyd were known to do this as well. In general, many outlaws recognized the only way they would avoid capture would be to invoke Myth/RobinHood kind of banditry, so a sympathetic public would shelter them. Certainly the public had no love lost over banks for, then as now, financiers would be happy to push loans for farm expansion with high interest rates in times of boom, knowing that the increase in product supply would make repayment unlikely as prices fell accordingly. Likewise, some European peasant rebellions were actually better thought-out than most people realize, in that the rebels would destroy any documents they found in the keeping of tax agents and other local officials. Their hope was that, even if their uprisings failed, there wouldn't be any record of just how much service they owed their manor lords each year.
2nd Nov '17 8:57:38 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** Actually, it would have to go way deeper than that. First, you have to find out how much "pleasure" hooking up with the blonde or her less attractive partner would yield. Then you'd have to calculate the chances of success. If, for the sake of simplicity, the blonde is four times more "pleasure giving" and both will choose one suitor randomly, then four times as many people should hit on the blonde as on her companion. Now, everyone deviating from their strategy will suffer an expected pleasure drawback. Of course, this would not take into account differing tastes, uncertainties, preferred strategies (risk aversion and suchlike), the ability of the women to have a mind of their own and so on...
* In ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', Bruce Wayne is bankrupted after Bane and his minions break into the stock exchange, hold everyone there at gunpoint, and make fake trades in Bruce's name using his (stolen) fingerprints. In reality, the major stock exchanges have the ability to quickly cancel trades if necessary and Bruce Wayne would have been easily able to get off the hook for those fraudulent trades. This is acknowledged in the movie a couple of scenes later when Lucius Fox tells Bruce that they'll be able to prove fraud but that in the immediate short term, Bruce is bankrupted. This also assumes that the computer program wasn't somehow inserting backdated trades into the system. Though that would presumably leave a trace, it would certainly take much longer to disentangle. The whole situation is played similarly to a robbery or large-scale embezzlement. It's [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by people on the floor. Although... considering the ridiculous speeds at which the regulating body can close down a Stock Exchange (for example the flawed shut-down system for China's stock exchange in early 2016), Bane and his henchmen wouldn't get close to a computer before the system was shut-down.

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* ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'':
** Actually, it would have to go way deeper than that. First, you have to find out how much "pleasure" hooking up with the blonde or her less attractive partner would yield. Then you'd have to calculate the chances of success. If, for the sake of simplicity, the blonde is four times more "pleasure giving" and both will choose one suitor randomly, then four times as many people should hit on the blonde as on her companion. Now, everyone deviating from their strategy will suffer an expected pleasure drawback. Of course, this would not take into account differing tastes, uncertainties, preferred strategies (risk aversion and suchlike), the ability of the women to have a mind of their own and so on...
* In ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'',
Bruce Wayne is bankrupted after Bane and his minions break into the stock exchange, hold everyone there at gunpoint, and make fake trades in Bruce's name using his (stolen) fingerprints. In reality, there are strict regulations imposed on volume trading in basically every stock market, such as public announcements being necessary when the major offering exceeds the average daily trading value, making the idea of Bruce Wayne buying massive amounts of stock or selling his own Wayne Corp. stock ludicrous. Major stock exchanges also have the ability to quickly cancel trades if necessary necessary, and Bruce Wayne would have been easily able to get off the hook for those fraudulent trades. This is acknowledged in the movie a couple of scenes later when Lucius Fox tells Bruce that they'll be able to prove fraud but that in the immediate short term, Bruce is bankrupted. This also assumes that the computer program wasn't somehow inserting backdated trades into the system. Though that would presumably leave a trace, it would certainly take much longer to disentangle. The whole situation is played similarly to a robbery or large-scale embezzlement. It's [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by people on the floor. Although... considering the ridiculous speeds at which the regulating body can close down a Stock Exchange (for example the flawed shut-down system for China's stock exchange in early 2016), Bane and his henchmen wouldn't get close to a computer before the system was shut-down.



** Furthermore, Wayne's company treats this assault as a reason to kick him off the board of directors when it is obviously not his fault.



** Also, utilities don't get shut down days after someone goes bankrupt, or gets behind on their payments, as that could endanger lives. Imagine a minor screw-up at a hospital and it coming to light the following day, when all the life support patients are dead.
** To drive the point home, there are also strict regulations imposed on volume trading in basically every stock market, such as public announcements being necessary when the offering exceeds the average daily trading value, making the idea of Bruce Wayne buying massive amounts of stock or selling his own Wayne Corp. stock ludicrous.
* In Creator/JamesCameron's ''Film/{{Avatar}}'' doesn't give enough information. By all accounts the operating costs of mining and shipping something from one solar system to another at less than the speed of light should prevent the RDA from making even close to a profit. {{Unobtainium}} would need to be both absolutely vital to technology on earth and un-synthesizable for their operations to be profitable. And since it forms on its own, on a planet humans can walk around on with only breath-masks, it's almost certainly easier to synthesize than to schlepp light-years by ([[AwesomeButImpractical antimatter catalyzed]]) rocket to mine it. Averted in the [[AllThereInTheManual supplementary material]], where it's stated that Unobtanium is not only vital to the construction of faster-than-light ships, but it ''can't'' be synthesized, otherwise they would have. The reason they bother with the [[DeathWorld harshness of Pandora]] is because of the abundance of the stuff, which otherwise is so scarcely scattered across the reachable galaxy that it's not worth even trying to obtain except as a byproduct of other operations.

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** Also, utilities Utilities don't get shut down days after someone goes bankrupt, or gets behind on their payments, as that could endanger lives. Imagine a minor screw-up at a hospital and it coming to light the following day, when all the life support patients are dead.
** To drive the point home, there are also strict regulations imposed on volume trading in basically every stock market, such as public announcements being necessary when the offering exceeds the average daily trading value, making the idea of Bruce Wayne buying massive amounts of stock or selling his own Wayne Corp. stock ludicrous.
* In Creator/JamesCameron's ''Film/{{Avatar}}'' doesn't give enough information. By all accounts the operating costs of mining and shipping something from one solar system to another at less than the speed of light should prevent the RDA from making even close to a profit. {{Unobtainium}} would need to be both absolutely vital to technology on earth and un-synthesizable for their operations to be profitable. And since it forms on its own, on a planet humans can walk around on with only breath-masks, it's almost certainly easier to synthesize than to schlepp light-years by ([[AwesomeButImpractical antimatter catalyzed]]) rocket to mine it. Averted in the [[AllThereInTheManual supplementary material]], where it's stated that Unobtanium is not only vital to the construction of faster-than-light ships, but it ''can't'' be synthesized, otherwise they would have. The reason they bother with the [[DeathWorld harshness of Pandora]] is because of the abundance of the stuff, which otherwise is so scarcely scattered across the reachable galaxy that it's not worth even trying to obtain except as a byproduct of other operations.
dead.
26th Oct '17 6:17:54 PM CheeseDogX
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* In ''Film/TheFifthElement'', Zorg espouses the "Destruction Equals Employment" mentality, and demonstrates it by destroying a glass and explaining how the machines that clean the glass shards away employ so many people manufacturing them. However, Zorg doesn't mention that only companies like his, which profits off of war, stand to benefit, rather than society as a whole.

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* In ''Film/TheFifthElement'', Zorg espouses the "Destruction Equals Employment" mentality, and demonstrates it by destroying a glass and explaining how the machines that clean the glass shards away employ so many people manufacturing them. However, Zorg doesn't mention that only companies like his, which profits off of war, stand to benefit, rather than society as a whole. It's a version of the Parable of the Broken Window, which is explained in more detail at TheOtherWiki.
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