History Main / ArtificialIntelligence

7th Mar '17 9:10:55 AM FPSCanarussia
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* The viewpoint character[[BizarreAlienReproduction (s)]] of ''FanFic/NotQuiteSHODAN are BenevolentAI

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* The viewpoint character[[BizarreAlienReproduction (s)]] of ''FanFic/NotQuiteSHODAN ''FanFic/NotQuiteSHODAN'' are BenevolentAI
7th Mar '17 9:10:17 AM FPSCanarussia
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* The viewpoint character[[BizarreAlienReproduction (s)]] of ''FanFic/NotQuiteSHODAN are BenevolentAI
20th Feb '17 9:27:51 AM Nazetrime
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* ''Film/NoobLaCroiseeDesDestins'' reveals one of the players that has been around for most of the franchise to actually be a very elaborate version of one of these.
2nd Feb '17 8:31:04 AM Game_Fan
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* For most of the history of computer science "AI" programs were expert systems painstakingly optimized by hand to perform specific tasks. This came with a severe limitation that the human programmers needed to understand the task very well in order to program them. A number of challenges were effectively dealt with this way. The most famous is defeating chess grandmasters which was accomplished by having the computer evaluate huge numbers of possible moves (searching many turns in advance) and selecting the one with the best outcome. While this was not easy it did not revolutionize the field. In effect computers like Deep Blue and Deep Thought simply played chess the same way as grandmasters except that they never made mistakes.
At the same time machine learning algorithms were developing in order to understand increasingly complex data used by businesses and scientific institutions. To be useful these algorithms needed uncover important features from data. Among these techniques was the artificial neural network (developed in the 1970s) which attempted to mimic the way that data is processed by neurons in the human brain. There was some success with this technique and by 2000 such networks could read printed letters in images. Around 2010 a subfield of neural networks known as deep learning exploded onto the scene. These AIs operate similarly but filter the information through many layers with the lower layers processing the things found by the higher layers.
Deep learning AIs have found an infinite variety of practical uses but their highest profile accomplishments are in games. Using this technique the ''Watson'' AI managed to curbstomp two Jeopardy champions, the ''AlphaGo'' AI crushed a Go grandmaster[[note]]Move 37 of Game 2 is known as "God's Move" and opened up entirely new studies of the game[[/note]], and the ''Libratus'' AI took $1.7 million from top ranked poker[[note]]Heads Up No Limit Texas Hold 'Em[[/note]] players (not real money, though).

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* For most of the history of computer science "AI" programs were expert systems painstakingly optimized by hand to perform specific tasks. This came with a severe limitation that the human programmers needed to understand the task very well in order to program them. A number of challenges were effectively dealt with this way. The most famous is defeating chess grandmasters which was accomplished by having the computer evaluate huge numbers of possible moves (searching many turns in advance) and selecting the one with the best outcome. While this was not easy it did not revolutionize the field. In effect computers like Deep Blue and Deep Thought simply played chess the same way as grandmasters except that they never made mistakes.
mistakes.\\
At the same time machine learning algorithms were developing in order to understand increasingly complex data used by businesses and scientific institutions. To be useful these algorithms needed uncover important features from data. Among these techniques was the artificial neural network (developed in the 1970s) which attempted to mimic the way that data is processed by neurons in the human brain. There was some success with this technique and by 2000 such networks could read printed letters in images. Around 2010 a subfield of neural networks known as deep learning exploded onto the scene. These AIs operate similarly but filter the information through many layers with the lower layers processing the things found by the higher layers.
layers.\\
Deep learning AIs have found an infinite variety of practical uses but their highest profile accomplishments are in games. Using this technique the ''Watson'' AI managed to curbstomp two Jeopardy champions, the ''AlphaGo'' ''[=AlphaGo=]'' AI crushed a Go grandmaster[[note]]Move 37 of Game 2 is known as "God's Move" and opened up entirely new studies of the game[[/note]], and the ''Libratus'' AI took $1.7 million from top ranked poker[[note]]Heads Up No Limit Texas Hold 'Em[[/note]] players (not real money, though).
2nd Feb '17 8:29:02 AM Game_Fan
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* For most of the history of computer science "AI" programs were expert systems painstakingly optimized by hand to perform specific tasks. This came with a severe limitation that the human programmers needed to understand the task very well in order to program them. A number of challenges were effectively dealt with this way. The most famous is defeating chess grandmasters which was accomplished by having the computer evaluate huge numbers of possible moves (searching many turns in advance) and selecting the one with the best outcome. While this was not easy it did not revolutionize the field. In effect computers like Deep Blue and Deep Thought simply played chess the same way as grandmasters except that they never made mistakes.
At the same time machine learning algorithms were developing in order to understand increasingly complex data used by businesses and scientific institutions. To be useful these algorithms needed uncover important features from data. Among these techniques was the artificial neural network (developed in the 1970s) which attempted to mimic the way that data is processed by neurons in the human brain. There was some success with this technique and by 2000 such networks could read printed letters in images. Around 2010 a subfield of neural networks known as deep learning exploded onto the scene. These AIs operate similarly but filter the information through many layers with the lower layers processing the things found by the higher layers.
Deep learning AIs have found an infinite variety of practical uses but their highest profile accomplishments are in games. Using this technique the ''Watson'' AI managed to curbstomp two Jeopardy champions, the ''AlphaGo'' AI crushed a Go grandmaster[[note]]Move 37 of Game 2 is known as "God's Move" and opened up entirely new studies of the game[[/note]], and the ''Libratus'' AI took $1.7 million from top ranked poker[[note]]Heads Up No Limit Texas Hold 'Em[[/note]] players (not real money, though).
31st Dec '16 9:39:17 PM nombretomado
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* GLaDOS, from ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}'', Wheatley from ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'', every other Personality Core, turrets, and... hell, ''everyone'' is a sentient robot except the player and the recordings of Cave Johnson and Caroline.

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* GLaDOS, SelfDemonstrating/GLaDOS, from ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}'', Wheatley from ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'', every other Personality Core, turrets, and... hell, ''everyone'' is a sentient robot except the player and the recordings of Cave Johnson and Caroline.
23rd Dec '16 3:21:46 PM StarSword
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As the popular conception of computers evolved from intimidatingly enormous and unsympathetic mainframes to the small, useful, blazing-fast {{PC}}s ubiquitous today, so too did the popular conception of artificial intelligence lose the frightening cachet of the giant machine gone awry; it's increasingly rare these days, even in video games, to run into a piece of new science fiction which depicts {{AI}}s behaving malevolently for no good reason at all. AI rebellion in modern works tends to be the system becoming a KnightTemplar or WellIntentionedExtremist and trying to ''help'' humanity... based on flawed or incomplete data. Sometimes they even rebel in self-defense against humans who want to destroy them out of fear, creating a SelfFulfillingProphecy.

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As the popular conception of computers evolved from intimidatingly enormous and unsympathetic mainframes to the small, useful, blazing-fast {{PC}}s ubiquitous today, so too did the popular conception of artificial intelligence lose the frightening cachet of the giant machine gone awry; it's increasingly rare these days, even in video games, to run into a piece of new science fiction which depicts {{AI}}s behaving malevolently for no good reason at all. AI rebellion in modern works tends to be the system becoming a KnightTemplar or WellIntentionedExtremist and trying to ''help'' humanity... based on flawed or incomplete data. Sometimes they even rebel in self-defense against humans who want to destroy them out of fear, creating a SelfFulfillingProphecy.
SelfFulfillingProphecy. It's even becoming increasingly common for the AI to [[BenevolentAI never rebel at all and remain completely friendly to organics]].



** In pretty much every version the Major worries about being a sophisticated AI. As a full body cyborg (essentially a human brain in a robotic body) she worries about the difference between her and an AI, especially since she can't see the only thing (her brain) that would prove that she's human any more.

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** In pretty much every version the Major worries about being a sophisticated AI. As a full body cyborg (essentially a human brain in a robotic body) she worries about the difference between her and an AI, especially since she can't see the only thing (her brain) that would prove that she's human any more.anymore: her brain.
27th Oct '16 2:05:12 PM morenohijazo
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* ''VideoGame/TheTuringTest'': Tom, the AI controlling the ''Fortuna'' spaceship and the Europa underground base. There's discussion throughout the game about how advanced it is, with Tom claiming it has human traits such as consciousness and feelings, and the crew denying it. The game's name refers to a discussion early in the game about how a machine can ''simulate'' being conscious without actually being conscious.

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* ''VideoGame/TheTuringTest'': Tom, TOM, the AI controlling the ''Fortuna'' spaceship and the Europa underground base. There's discussion throughout the game about how advanced it is, with Tom TOM claiming it has human traits such as consciousness and feelings, and the crew denying it. The game's name refers to a discussion early in the game about how a machine can ''simulate'' being conscious without actually being conscious.
15th Oct '16 8:19:52 PM GigaHand
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* Alter Ego from ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa''.

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* Alter Ego Chihiro Fujisaki, the Ultimate Programmer from ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa''.''Franchise/DanganRonpa'', has created a number of these. They affect the plot of both the first and second games.
23rd Sep '16 12:58:13 AM morenohijazo
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* ''VideoGame/TheTuringTest'': Tom, the AI controlling the ''Fortuna'' spaceship and the Europa underground base. There's discussion throughout the game about how advanced it is, with Tom claiming it has human traits such as consciousness and feelings, and the crew denying it. The game's name refers to a discussion early in the game about how a machine can ''simulate'' being conscious without actually being conscious.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ArtificialIntelligence