History Main / ArmorIsUseLess

25th Sep '16 8:43:33 PM TheInimitableECypher
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Additional protection also introduced additional risks in boxing. In the bare-knuckle days a blow to your opponent's head would damage your hands too much to be viable, but now boxing gloves protect the hands these blows have become a lot more popular, meaning both fighters are at risk of more serious head injuries. It still leads to less death than knuckle boxing but risk of commotion has skyocketed.

to:

* Additional protection also introduced additional risks in boxing. In the bare-knuckle days a blow to your opponent's head would damage your hands too much to be viable, but now boxing gloves protect the hands these blows have become a lot more popular, meaning both fighters are at risk of more serious head injuries. It still leads to less death than knuckle boxing but risk of commotion has skyocketed.skyrocketed.
14th Sep '16 2:56:26 PM Rhodes7
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Also averted and played straight in ''Fanfic/BeAllMySins''. As heroine Natalie points out, the standard guard flak armor is useless against many weapons, but will offer some protection against at least a few. Therefore, it's better than nothing.
9th Aug '16 4:07:18 AM Taskmaster123
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* An erstwhile inventor has-for the past several decades-been trying to build a bear-proof suit of armor. There are several problems with this, not the least of which is that fact that it simply may not be possible to build a suit of armor that is light enough to be worn but durable enough to withstand a bear attack. There's also no real practical application, as researchers have found the best way to study bear behavior is from a distance when the bear doesn't know it's being observed. Lastly, there's only one way to test such a suit of armor, and the best time to find out that your armor is not going to keep out a pissed-off 1500 pound Kodiak bear is not while you're wearing it.
6th Aug '16 10:04:14 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** There's a partial aversion by some higher-ranking Brute variants and ''VideoGame/HaloReach''[='s=] Grunt Ultras; you'll have to shoot off their helmets first before you can headshot them. Depending on the game, the same thing also applies to any allied human [=NPC=] wearing a helmet.

to:

** There's a partial aversion by some higher-ranking Brute variants and ''VideoGame/HaloReach''[='s=] Grunt Ultras; you'll have to shoot off their helmets first before you can headshot them. Depending on the game, the same thing also applies to any allied human [=NPC=] wearing a helmet. In general though, even helmet-wearing enemies will go down in one headshot if they don't have energy shields.
4th Aug '16 5:23:25 PM Ripburger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/XCom: UFO Defense'' is a peculiar case that caused a fair bit of Administrivia/{{Natter}}. A soldier wearing the most powerful armor in the game, hit where it's thickest, has roughly a 2/3 chance of surviving one hit from the most common alien weapon. There's no guarantee against multiple shots. What would be rejected in most games is here a crucial improvement from losing half the squad on nearly every mission. The first armor available occasionally saves from getting their faces imploded, and instead leaves them in dire need of a medic on the field and time in the infirmary when they return.[[note]]Thus doing exactly what reasonable armor can be expected to do in real life; making what would have been fatalities into living casualties.[[/note]] It's another major development.[[note]]The reasoning behind the armor in the game is somewhat complicated and involves random numbers. Basically, when a unit is hit by an attack, the attack can do between 50 and 200 percent of it's base damage. That damage value is then compared to the armor value of the unit (which varies depending on where it is hit), and an additional random value is either added or subtracted to the armor value. If the modified armor value is greater than the modified damage value, the armor holds and ''nothing happens'': no armor reduction, no damage to the unit, nothing. If the armor value is less than the damage value, then the armor is damaged and some of the damage "bleeds" through to the unit. With plasma weapons and rookie soldiers, ANY damage bleed is likely going to kill them, but the damage roulette means that it's entirely possible (though ''extremely'' unlikely) for a human rookie with no armor to survive a Heavy Plasma shot to the chest. Better armor obviously means higher armor values but they don't guarantee survival odds, just improve them.[[/note]]

to:

* ''VideoGame/XCom: UFO Defense'' ''VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense'' is a peculiar case that caused a fair bit of Administrivia/{{Natter}}. A soldier wearing the most powerful armor in the game, hit where it's thickest, has roughly a 2/3 chance of surviving one hit from the most common alien weapon. There's no guarantee against multiple shots. What would be rejected in most games is here a crucial improvement from losing half the squad on nearly every mission. The first armor available occasionally saves from getting their faces imploded, and instead leaves them in dire need of a medic on the field and time in the infirmary when they return.[[note]]Thus doing exactly what reasonable armor can be expected to do in real life; making what would have been fatalities into living casualties.[[/note]] It's another major development.[[note]]The reasoning behind the armor in the game is somewhat complicated and involves random numbers. Basically, when a unit is hit by an attack, the attack can do between 50 and 200 percent of it's base damage. That damage value is then compared to the armor value of the unit (which varies depending on where it is hit), and an additional random value is either added or subtracted to the armor value. If the modified armor value is greater than the modified damage value, the armor holds and ''nothing happens'': no armor reduction, no damage to the unit, nothing. If the armor value is less than the damage value, then the armor is damaged and some of the damage "bleeds" through to the unit. With plasma weapons and rookie soldiers, ANY damage bleed is likely going to kill them, but the damage roulette means that it's entirely possible (though ''extremely'' unlikely) for a human rookie with no armor to survive a Heavy Plasma shot to the chest. Better armor obviously means higher armor values but they don't guarantee survival odds, just improve them.[[/note]]
3rd Aug '16 10:36:35 PM Narsil
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Manga/BlackLagoon'' subverts this in the Greenback Jane arc. One of the few hired guns to walk away from the siege (not counting the ones who had to swim) -- and the only one to do so under his own power -- is the one who wore a bulletproof vest.



* Subverted in the last episode of ''Anime/{{Noir}}'', where a Soldat {{nun|TooHoly}} charges at the titular duo with a broadsword and proves to be horribly difficult to kill because of the armored breast plate she's wearing, and while she clearly feels the impact of the shots she keeps charging at them and finally has to be taken down with a knife to her neck, which wasn't armored.



* ''Anime/{{Katanagatari}}'': Subverted in at least one case -- one of the Deviant Blades is a suit of armor that is not only impenetrable, but actually designed to defeat techniques specifically designed to penetrate armor. It's only defeated by the hero getting creative.



** Also subverted by Ulath's helmet. After taking a hit to the head during the battle of Chyrellos, Ulath is severely onfused and bed-ridden for several chapters, but it's stated that the hit would have cut his head in two if not for the helmet.



* {{Subverted|Trope}} in ''Literature/TheTraitorSonCycle'' by Miles Cameron. Armor is one of the few things that mankind has to protect them against the forces of the Wild. More than once, a man's life is saved solely due to the fact that he is wearing armor... or dies painfully because he was not. The most telling example is of a HoldTheLine situation where a single man in medium armor is forced to hold a breached gate against an incoming swarm of boglins. The armored man takes many blows during the battle, but since boglins are armed with only stone weaponry and have no strategy asides from ZergRush, which isn't very useful in an extremely narrow area, he's able to hold them off for quite some time. One unarmored man jumps in and tries to help him, and within three seconds, the man who jumped in is injured, grabbed by boglins, pulled into the onrushing mass, and is eaten alive.
* Subverted in ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' series ''Literature/NewJediOrder'': Yuuzhan Vong armor is incredibly tough; they can withstand blaster fire, and even lightsabers. However the Vong aren't always full armored and the regular {{Mooks}} don't wear helmets. Then there's the matter of the Yuuzhan Vong's [[OrganicTechnology living armor]] having ''allergies''.
3rd Aug '16 7:54:10 AM Anorgil
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' and ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' a character's protection depends more on his skill with armor class rather than the armor itself, though despite that [=NPCs=] are almost always armored appropriately. This includes the existence of "Battlemage" profession, military mages wearing heavy armor. [=NPCs=] will occasionally [[LampshadeHanging reference this trope]] if the player asks them for advice. You're warned not to judge how tough a fight will be based on the amount or quality of your opponents armor or weapons, as the really powerful characters don't need these things to kill you.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' and ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' a character's protection depends more on his skill with armor class rather than the armor itself, though despite that [=NPCs=] are almost always armored appropriately. This includes the existence of "Battlemage" "[[MagicKnight Battlemage]]" profession, military mages wearing heavy armor. [=NPCs=] will occasionally [[LampshadeHanging reference this trope]] if the player asks them for advice. You're warned not to judge how tough a fight will be based on the amount or quality of your opponents armor or weapons, as the really powerful characters don't need these things to kill you.
2nd Aug '16 1:20:34 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* While ''Franchise/{{Halo}}''[='s=] lore and ExpandedUniverse mostly avert this, its gameplay is all over the place with the trope:

to:

* While ''Franchise/{{Halo}}''[='s=] lore story and ExpandedUniverse mostly avert this, its gameplay is all over the place with the trope:
2nd Aug '16 1:19:22 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Not a very obvious example, but basically everybody in every ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' game. Energy shields are pretty much the only real defense anybody has (Elites, Spartans, Jackals) in each game, and a unit not having a personal shield, or having its shield ''down,'' is practically synonymous with "defenseless," despite all units (Covenant, Human, whatever) being heavily armored. Not even [[SuperSoldier Spartans,]] with their supposedly incredibly advanced tailored-specifically-for-Spartan painstakingly-manufactured cutting-edge-armor, can survive one single shot to the head ''from a basic pistol'' in ''any game,'' or more than just a couple shots to the body from almost any other weapon in any game. Even though most weapons in the universe are admittedly pretty advanced, it's appalling how useless armor is, when it ''should'' be equally advanced, really.

to:

* Not a very obvious example, but basically everybody in every ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' game. Energy shields are pretty much While ''Franchise/{{Halo}}''[='s=] lore and ExpandedUniverse mostly avert this, its gameplay is all over the only real defense anybody has (Elites, Spartans, Jackals) in each game, and a unit not having a place with the trope:
** Zig-zagged by anyone with [[DeflectorShields
personal shield, or having its shield ''down,'' is practically synonymous energy shields]]. While a fully-shielded [[EliteMook Elite]] Zealot can take an entire clip of assault rifle fire without even flinching, one with "defenseless," its shields drained is no more impervious to damage than a common [[CannonFodder Grunt]], despite all units (Covenant, Human, whatever) being heavily armored. Not even the fact that the former wears a lot more armor than the latter (and [[GameplayAndStorySegregation the lore stating that Elites are in general a lot tougher than Grunts]]). This discrepancy is particularly apparent with PlayerCharacter [[SuperSoldier Spartans,]] with Spartans]]; despite their supposedly incredibly advanced tailored-specifically-for-Spartan painstakingly-manufactured cutting-edge-armor, cutting-edge armor, no Spartan with its shields down can survive one single shot to the head ''from a basic pistol'' in ''any game,'' game'', or more than just a couple shots to the body from almost any other weapon in any game. Even though most weapons in game.
** In
the universe are admittedly pretty advanced, it's appalling how useless later games, Covenant mooks both wear more armor is, when it ''should'' be equally advanced, really.and have greater health the higher-ranked they are. What keeps this from being an aversion is that, with the exception of headshots, they take the same amount of damage from any given weapon regardless of whether you hit them in an armored or unarmored spot. The one exception are Hunters, who have such thick armor that you ''have to'' shoot the unarmored parts if you want to do any damage.
** There's a partial aversion by some higher-ranking Brute variants and ''VideoGame/HaloReach''[='s=] Grunt Ultras; you'll have to shoot off their helmets first before you can headshot them. Depending on the game, the same thing also applies to any allied human [=NPC=] wearing a helmet.
** Inverted with the Brutes; ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}''[='s=] and ''Reach''[='s=] unarmored versions are noticeably more durable than ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}''[='s=] armored ones (in fact, ''2''[='s=] Brutes were infamous for being insanely bullet-spongy). ''Within'' each individual game, however, they do still follow the general rule of "armored variants have more health".
1st Aug '16 5:31:08 PM MarkWilder
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Franchise/StarWars'':
** Many people make fun of the Stormtroopers' full body armor, which does not seem to protect them from hits by blasters or light sabers. However, no Stormtroopers are ever shown to go down when a laser blast hits a wall near them, while some unarmored rebels and Imperial officers do. Thus, it might be shown that Stormtrooper armor does protect against shrapnel, [[TruthInTelevision which is one of the main functions of real body armor in today's ballistic age]]. In addition, after a few battle scenes, Stormtroopers who got hit directly by blasters (at rather close range) ''do'' indeed get up; they're wounded and have to be helped by teammates, but alive. The same doesn't apply for the unarmored rebels. Stormtrooper armor also seems to resist penetration from arrows and absorb the impact of rocks on Endor [[RockBeatsLaser (though the wearers]] ''[[RockBeatsLaser still]]'' [[RockBeatsLaser went down anyway]]). [[AllThereInTheManual Other sources]] state the armour should still absorb most of the impact from a bolt if it fails to avoid penetration. Despite this, the armour is never actually shown stopping anything visible.
** Somewhat highlighted in the first film, where Han and Luke steal Stormtrooper armor so as to walk the halls of the Death Star undetected. As soon as they free Leia and escape the trash compactor, they immediately dispense with the armor. Once its use as camouflage is rendered irrelevant, so is its use as armor.
** Fighter DeflectorShields also qualify. Everywhere except the films, an X-Wing's shields can repel TIE fighter lasers for several seconds. Not so in the movies, where the X-Wing is destroyed if it's hit squarely ''once''. There would be a partial justification for this in ''A New Hope'', where they're told to switch their deflectors on "double front". As anyone who played X-Wing or its successors will point out, this dumps all your shields forward, leaving your rear uncovered. However, this was later followed by another pilot ordering "Stabilize your rear deflectors." when they anticipated a fighter attack. Further, the "double front" explanation falls utterly flat in light of the other films.

to:

* ''Franchise/StarWars'':
** Many people make fun of the Stormtroopers' full body armor, which does not seem to protect them from hits by blasters or light sabers. However, no Stormtroopers are ever shown to go down when a laser blast hits a wall near them, while some unarmored rebels and Imperial officers do. Thus,
In ''Franchise/StarWars'' it might be shown is often lampshaded that [[https://youtu.be/Vaqq0zGPyHU?t=62 Stormtrooper armor does protect against shrapnel, [[TruthInTelevision which is one of almost completely useless for protection.]] So far, the main functions of real body only thing the armor has ever canonically stopped is a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2s0a7guIX4 very weak stun weapon.]] Even worse, the [[BlindMistake eyepieces in today's ballistic age]]. In addition, after a few battle scenes, Stormtroopers who got hit directly by blasters (at rather close range) ''do'' indeed get up; they're wounded the helmet actually ''blind'' the user,]] making it [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy difficult to shoot straight.]]
** This is seen in the first Star Wars film as well. At one point during the film, Han Solo
and have to be helped by teammates, but alive. The same doesn't apply for the unarmored rebels. Luke Skywalker stole a pair of Stormtrooper armor also seems armors to resist penetration from arrows and absorb the impact of rocks on Endor [[RockBeatsLaser (though the wearers]] ''[[RockBeatsLaser still]]'' [[RockBeatsLaser went down anyway]]). [[AllThereInTheManual Other sources]] state the armour should still absorb most of the impact from a bolt if it fails to avoid penetration. Despite this, the armour is never actually shown stopping anything visible.
** Somewhat highlighted in the first film, where Han and Luke steal Stormtrooper armor so as to walk the halls of the
hide among Death Star undetected. personnel. (Luke Skywalker quips [[LampshadeHanging I can't see a thing in this helmet!]]) As soon as they free Leia and escape the trash compactor, they immediately dispense with the armor. Once its use as camouflage is rendered irrelevant, so is its use as armor.
** Fighter DeflectorShields also qualify. Everywhere except the films, an X-Wing's shields can repel TIE fighter lasers for several seconds. Not so in the movies, where the [[OneHitPointWonder X-Wing is destroyed if it's hit squarely ''once''. ''once''.]] There would be a partial justification for this in ''A New Hope'', where they're told to switch their deflectors on "double front". As anyone who played X-Wing or its successors will point out, this dumps all your shields forward, leaving your rear uncovered. However, this was later followed by another pilot ordering "Stabilize your rear deflectors." deflectors" when they anticipated a fighter attack. attack... [[{{Jossed}} and the ships still got destroyed in one hit, regardless.]] Further, [[RocketTagGameplay the "double front" explanation falls utterly flat in light of the other films.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 303. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ArmorIsUseLess