History Main / ArcadePerfectPort

2nd Feb '16 3:09:15 PM MarkLungo
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A notion that's been left behind as video game consoles have increased in power and [[VideoArcade Video Arcades]] themselves have faded into obscurity, this used to be the touchstone of any {{Arcade}} conversion to home computer or console. An ArcadePerfectPort is a port of a video game that is touted to be indistinguishable from its source.
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A notion that's been left behind as video game consoles have increased in power and [[VideoArcade Video Arcades]] {{Video Arcade}}s themselves have faded into obscurity, this used to be the touchstone of any {{Arcade}} UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame conversion to home computer or console. An ArcadePerfectPort Arcade Perfect Port is a port of a video game that is touted to be indistinguishable from its source.

* According to Steven Levy's book ''Hackers'', legendary game developer John Harris created an ArcadePerfectPort of VideoGame/PacMan for the Atari800 while working for [[{{Sierra}} On-Line Systems]] in 1981. Sierra's boss, the equally legendary Ken Williams, took one look at the results and nixed the project on the grounds that it would invite a lawsuit, and demanded that Harris change the game enough to make it viably different from the original. Harris' initial reaction? Put sunglasses and Groucho Marx moustaches on the ghosts. Despite this, the eventual game that came from this, ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jawbreaker_%28video_game%29 Jawbreaker]]'', was On-Line Systems major hit for that platform over the next year. Unfortunately, the port the Apple II was [[PortingDisaster less than successful]].
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* According to Steven Levy's book ''Hackers'', legendary game developer John Harris created an ArcadePerfectPort Arcade Perfect Port of VideoGame/PacMan for the Atari800 while working for [[{{Sierra}} On-Line Systems]] in 1981. Sierra's boss, the equally legendary Ken Williams, took one look at the results and nixed the project on the grounds that it would invite a lawsuit, and demanded that Harris change the game enough to make it viably different from the original. Harris' initial reaction? Put sunglasses and Groucho Marx moustaches on the ghosts. Despite this, the eventual game that came from this, ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jawbreaker_%28video_game%29 Jawbreaker]]'', was On-Line Systems major hit for that platform over the next year. Unfortunately, the port the Apple II was [[PortingDisaster less than successful]].
27th Jan '16 7:28:29 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''VideoGame/{{Darius}}burst Another Chronicle'' is an interesting case, especially the PC version, as that particular version supports dual monitors just like the original (while the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4 and UsefulNotes/PSVita versions are sadly stuck with letterboxed display). However, since Chronicle Mode in the arcade version relies on the participation of multiple players (due to having about 3,000 missions, which would be infeasible for a single player unless they are ''extremely'' dedicated), the consumer ports instead assign players to "virtual cabinets", with players on a given cabinet all sharing the same Chronicle Mode progress.
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* ''VideoGame/{{Darius}}burst Another Chronicle'' is an interesting case, especially the PC version, as that particular version supports dual monitors just like the original (while the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4 and UsefulNotes/PSVita versions are sadly stuck with letterboxed display). However, since Chronicle Mode in the arcade version relies on the participation of multiple players (due to having about 3,000 missions, which would be infeasible for a single player unless they are ''extremely'' dedicated), the consumer ports instead assign players to online "virtual cabinets", with players on a given cabinet all sharing the same Chronicle Mode progress.
25th Jan '16 11:13:34 PM GrammarNavi
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After the release of the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}, arcade board makers slowly began using consoles as their arcade platform over more powerful custom made boards (Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CP System III and Creator/{{Sega}}'s Model 3 were the last pure custom boards to be popular), making arcade perfect ports more common place. Now, all modern arcade boards either use a home console, such as the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} for ''VideoGame/TatsunokoVsCapcom'' or PlayStation3 for ''[[{{Tekken}} Tekken 6]]'', or use PC components (boards from Creator/{{Sega}} or {{Taito}} today follow this route).
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After the release of the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}, arcade board makers slowly began using consoles as their arcade platform over more powerful custom made boards (Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CP System III and Creator/{{Sega}}'s Model 3 were the last pure custom boards to be popular), making arcade perfect ports more common place. Now, all modern arcade boards either use a home console, such as the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} for ''VideoGame/TatsunokoVsCapcom'' or PlayStation3 for ''[[{{Tekken}} ''[[{{VideoGame/Tekken}} Tekken 6]]'', or use PC components (boards from Creator/{{Sega}} or {{Taito}} today follow this route).
22nd Jan '16 9:29:57 AM Morgenthaler
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** The Dreamcast port of ''MarvelVsCapcom2'' was considered the definitive home port for a long time after (until the PS3 and 360 port), with aftermarket prices for the game climbing into hundreds of dollars. Compare this to the PS2 and Xbox ports, considered [[PortingDisaster Porting Disasters]] due to blurry graphics, muffled audio and fixing [[GoodBadBug Good Bad Bugs]] essential for TournamentPlay.
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** The Dreamcast port of ''MarvelVsCapcom2'' ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'' was considered the definitive home port for a long time after (until the PS3 and 360 port), with aftermarket prices for the game climbing into hundreds of dollars. Compare this to the PS2 and Xbox ports, considered [[PortingDisaster Porting Disasters]] due to blurry graphics, muffled audio and fixing [[GoodBadBug Good Bad Bugs]] essential for TournamentPlay.
20th Jan '16 1:18:56 PM LucaEarlgrey
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Added DiffLines:
* ''VideoGame/{{Darius}}burst Another Chronicle'' is an interesting case, especially the PC version, as that particular version supports dual monitors just like the original (while the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4 and UsefulNotes/PSVita versions are sadly stuck with letterboxed display). However, since Chronicle Mode in the arcade version relies on the participation of multiple players (due to having about 3,000 missions, which would be infeasible for a single player unless they are ''extremely'' dedicated), the consumer ports instead assign players to "virtual cabinets", with players on a given cabinet all sharing the same Chronicle Mode progress.
19th Jan '16 8:43:36 PM Saurubiker
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* Being arcade perfect is a point of contention for the re-release of ''Vampire Savior'' included in ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} Resurrection''. Purists are happy that the game is supposed to be an arcade perfect port. However, fans who grew up with the PSX version are disappointed since it lacks the extra characters added to that version.
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* Being arcade perfect is a point of contention for the re-release of ''Vampire Savior'' included in ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} Resurrection''. Purists are happy that the game is supposed to be an arcade perfect port. However, fans who grew up with the PSX PS version are disappointed since it lacks the extra characters and gameplay features added to that version.
19th Dec '15 5:13:49 PM nombretomado
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* Lots of SharpX68000 conversions: ''VideoGame/{{Parodius}}, VideoGame/FinalFight, VideoGame/StreetFighterII, VideoGame/GhostsNGoblins''.
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* Lots of SharpX68000 UsefulNotes/SharpX68000 conversions: ''VideoGame/{{Parodius}}, VideoGame/FinalFight, VideoGame/StreetFighterII, VideoGame/GhostsNGoblins''.
17th Dec '15 6:52:13 PM nombretomado
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* All the games released for the NeoGeo (released 1990) are arcade-perfect ports, being as the home console has identical hardware to the Neo Geo arcade system. However, this being the 90's, back when console hardware was not on par with then-current arcade hardware, you were lucky to be able to even ''rent'' a Neo Geo console.
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* All the games released for the NeoGeo UsefulNotes/NeoGeo (released 1990) are arcade-perfect ports, being as the home console has identical hardware to the Neo Geo arcade system. However, this being the 90's, back when console hardware was not on par with then-current arcade hardware, you were lucky to be able to even ''rent'' a Neo Geo console.

* Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CPS Changer, like the NeoGeo, was a luxury system designed to run games from actual arcade boards. The only game that had to be downgraded was ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Street Fighter Zero]]'', whose arcade version is run on the somewhat more powerful CPS-2 hardware.
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* Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CPS Changer, like the NeoGeo, UsefulNotes/NeoGeo, was a luxury system designed to run games from actual arcade boards. The only game that had to be downgraded was ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Street Fighter Zero]]'', whose arcade version is run on the somewhat more powerful CPS-2 hardware.
3rd Dec '15 4:50:59 PM nombretomado
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After the release of the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}, arcade board makers slowly began using consoles as their arcade platform over more powerful custom made boards (Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CP System III and {{Sega}}'s Model 3 were the last pure custom boards to be popular), making arcade perfect ports more common place. Now, all modern arcade boards either use a home console, such as the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} for ''VideoGame/TatsunokoVsCapcom'' or PlayStation3 for ''[[{{Tekken}} Tekken 6]]'', or use PC components (boards from Creator/{{Sega}} or {{Taito}} today follow this route).
to:
After the release of the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}, arcade board makers slowly began using consoles as their arcade platform over more powerful custom made boards (Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CP System III and {{Sega}}'s Creator/{{Sega}}'s Model 3 were the last pure custom boards to be popular), making arcade perfect ports more common place. Now, all modern arcade boards either use a home console, such as the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} for ''VideoGame/TatsunokoVsCapcom'' or PlayStation3 for ''[[{{Tekken}} Tekken 6]]'', or use PC components (boards from Creator/{{Sega}} or {{Taito}} today follow this route).

* For the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis's 32X add-on, {{Sega}} released perfect versions of its arcade games ''VideoGame/AfterBurner II'', ''VideoGame/SpaceHarrier'' and ''StarWarsArcade''.
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* For the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis's 32X add-on, {{Sega}} Creator/{{Sega}} released perfect versions of its arcade games ''VideoGame/AfterBurner II'', ''VideoGame/SpaceHarrier'' and ''StarWarsArcade''.

* The SegaSaturn had a cartridge slot mainly used for the Backup Memory device. While it didn't get much use in the overseas market (outside the [=NetLink=] modem adapter), Sega released a couple of RAM expansion cartridges exclusively in Japan that turned it into a complete [=2D=] powerhouse capable of rendering ports of Neo-Geo and CP System II titles to near perfection. Namely a [=1 Megabit=] cartridge designed for SNK ports (such as the ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' series and ''VideoGame/MetalSlug'') and a [=4 Megabit=] model designed for Capcom ports (such as ''X-Men vs. Street Fighter'' and ''Vampire Savior''). Contrast with the versions of those same games released for the original [=PlayStation=] (and the Neo-Geo CD for that matter), which were constrained by their platforms' lack of upgradability and suffered from long loading times and -- in the case of ''X-Men vs. Street Fighter'' -- gimped gameplay features.
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* The SegaSaturn UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn had a cartridge slot mainly used for the Backup Memory device. While it didn't get much use in the overseas market (outside the [=NetLink=] modem adapter), Sega released a couple of RAM expansion cartridges exclusively in Japan that turned it into a complete [=2D=] powerhouse capable of rendering ports of Neo-Geo and CP System II titles to near perfection. Namely a [=1 Megabit=] cartridge designed for SNK ports (such as the ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' series and ''VideoGame/MetalSlug'') and a [=4 Megabit=] model designed for Capcom ports (such as ''X-Men vs. Street Fighter'' and ''Vampire Savior''). Contrast with the versions of those same games released for the original [=PlayStation=] (and the Neo-Geo CD for that matter), which were constrained by their platforms' lack of upgradability and suffered from long loading times and -- in the case of ''X-Men vs. Street Fighter'' -- gimped gameplay features.
29th Nov '15 12:00:31 AM nombretomado
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* MegaDrive ''VideoGame/{{Strider}}, [[VideoGame/GhostsNGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]''
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* MegaDrive UsefulNotes/MegaDrive ''VideoGame/{{Strider}}, [[VideoGame/GhostsNGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]''
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