History Main / ArcWelding

25th Mar '17 12:27:09 PM AthenaBlue
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* Literature/SherlockHolmes. It was revealed, in the first of the two stories by Creator/ArthurConanDoyle to directly feature Moriarty, that the master villain had been involved in several of Holmes' cases before, but had simply never been mentioned until then.

to:

* Literature/SherlockHolmes. It was revealed, ''Literature/AwakeInTheNightLand'', which is set in the first universe of the two stories Creator/WilliamHopeHodgson's ''Literature/TheNightLand'', linked this book to ''Literature/TheHouseOnTheBorderland'' by Creator/ArthurConanDoyle to directly feature Moriarty, stating that the master villain titular house is the entrance to the House of Silence of The Night Land, but in the past.
* ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'' series is a major ArcWelding project for the works of Creator/StephenKing, bringing together multiple previously introduced concepts and characters for a SavingTheWorld plot of epic proportions. It
had long been involved established that many of King's works took place in the same continuity (the towns of Derry and Castle Rock were recurring locations, and there were a few characters that appeared in multiple works), but their plots had generally stayed independent from one another before that point. ''The Dark Tower'' reveals that '''all''' of his works coexist with each other, even when they seem to take place in different universes--because his world is a {{multiverse}} where multiple parallel Earths exist simultaneously, and certain gifted characters can travel from one parallel world to another. To elaborate:
** The vampires from ''Literature/SalemsLot'' and the "Low Men" from [[Literature/HeartsInAtlantis "Low Men in Yellow Coats"]] are both part of a massive army commanded by the mysterious Crimson King from ''Literature/{{Insomnia}}''. Randall Flagg from ''Literature/TheStand'' and ''Literature/TheEyesOfTheDragon'' is the Crimson King's [[TheDragon Dragon]], serving as his emissary on Earth.
** The psychics Ted Brautigan (from "Low Men in Yellow Coats") and Dinky Earnshaw (from "Literature/EverythingsEventual") are two of many psychics being systematically tracked down and recruited by the Crimson King's agents so that they can harness their abilities to bring the Dark Tower crashing down. Though never stated, it's presumed that characters like Danny Torrance from ''Literature/TheShining'' and Carrie White from ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' are similar such psychics, and that their abilities could also bring down the Tower if so utilized.
** The mystical "Turtle" entity from ''Literature/{{It}}'' is "Maturin", one of
several Guardian spirits that exists to protect the Dark Tower. Each world has its own Guardian (in Roland Deschain's world, for example, it's a bear called "Shardik"), and they all oppose the Crimson King in his quest to destroy reality.
** Project Arrowhead from ''Literature/TheMist'' is one
of Holmes' cases before, but had simply never the few agencies ever to successfully discover the nature of the Multiverse, and their theory about the existence of parallel worlds was 100% true. Also, the titular mist was a "thinny", a weak spot in the barrier between parallel worlds that characteristically emits white fog and high-pitched keening noises that can drive a person insane. And the monsters from the mist were creatures from "Todash", the primordial darkness between worlds from which the Crimson King was born.
** The world of ''Literature/TheStand'', which becomes a post-apocalyptic wasteland in the wake of a disastrous plague, is one of many parallel worlds that exists in the Multiverse. Randall Flagg was trying to conquer that world in the name of the Crimson King, and he wanted to build his own new civilization atop the ashes so that his new subjects could be added to the Crimson King's army.
* ''Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse'':
** The ''Literature/DoctorWhoMissingAdventures'' novel ''Venusian Lullaby'' takes a lot of the [[RunningGag throwaway one-liners]] the Third Doctor used to make about his adventures on Venus (that the Venusians sing lullabies, play hopscotch, etc.) and makes a coherent alien race out of them (living about a billion years in the past, when Venus might have
been mentioned until then.habitable). They're radially symmetrical and move by hopping. Oddly, no mention is made of the oft-referenced "Venusian Aikido" (at least by that name), nor how he might have learned it from such odd creatures.
** The ''Literature/PastDoctorAdventures'' novel ''Divided Loyalties'' establishes that the Doctor was part of a clique in the Prydonian Academy on Gallifrey with the other renegades featured in the original series (the Master, the Monk, the War Chief, the Rani and Drax), Vansell (introduced in the [[AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho Big Finish audio drama]] [[Recap/BigFinishDoctorWho001TheSirensOfTime "The Sirens of Time"]] earlier that year), two new characters (Jelpax and Millenia), and Rallon, who is revealed to have been posessed by the Celestial Toymaker, who used his body in the First Doctor serial by that name.
** The ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'' novel ''Original Sin'' establishes that [[spoiler:Tobias Vaughn from [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E3TheInvasion "The Invasion"]]]] was responsible for various advanced technologies that plagued the Third Doctor, and also created the glitterguns from [[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E5RevengeOfTheCybermen "Revenge of the Cybermen"]].
** John Peel's Eighth Doctor novel ''War of the Daleks'' does this with the final four Dalek serials of the new series ([[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E1DestinyOfTheDaleks "Destiny"]], [[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E4ResurrectionOfTheDaleks "Resurrection"]], [[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E6RevelationOfTheDaleks "Revelation"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E1RemembranceOfTheDaleks "Remembrance of the Daleks"]]), creating a single overarching plot which was promptly ignored by every ''Who'' writer since.
* After Creator/IsaacAsimov's extensive CanonWelding of his ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'', Empire and Robots series into one, the final volume of the Second Foundation Trilogy, ''Foundation's Triumph'' by Creator/DavidBrin was a fantastic example of Arc Welding together almost every single book in the series together even better than Asimov had done.
* All 7 other of the ''Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality'' series, encompassing epic acts by Death, Time, Fate, War, Nature, God and the Devil had this trope. In the last novel in the series, ''Literature/UnderAVelvetCloak'', all of these acts are only minor compared to Nox's (the Incarnation of Night/Secrets) actions (whose actions choose which universes live or die).
* The Larry Niven ''Literature/KnownSpace'' stories develop a bad case of this later on, as the hugely successful ''Literature/{{Ringworld}}'' degenerated into increasingly complex and incomprehensible attempts to produce a Unified Field Theory Of Everything.
** Also Arthur C. Clarke's ''Rama'' and related sort-of-sequels to ''Literature/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''.



* Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse:
** The Literature/DoctorWhoMissingAdventures novel ''Venusian Lullaby'' takes a lot of the [[RunningGag throwaway one-liners]] the Third Doctor used to make about his adventures on Venus (that the Venusians sing lullabies, play hopscotch, etc.) and makes a coherent alien race out of them (living about a billion years in the past, when Venus might have been habitable). They're radially symmetrical and move by hopping. Oddly, no mention is made of the oft-referenced "Venusian Aikido" (at least by that name), nor how he might have learned it from such odd creatures.
** The Literature/PastDoctorAdventures novel ''Divided Loyalties'' establishes that the Doctor was part of a clique in the Prydonian Academy on Gallifrey with the other renegades featured in the original series (the Master, the Monk, the War Chief, the Rani and Drax), Vansell (introduced in the [[AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho Big Finish audio drama]] ''The Sirens of Time'' earlier that year), two new characters (Jelpax and Millenia), and Rallon, who is revealed to have been posessed by the Celestial Toymaker, who used his body in the First Doctor serial by that name.
** The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures novel ''Original Sin'' establishes that [[spoiler:Tobias Vaughn from "The Invasion"]] was responsible for various advanced technologies that plagued the Third Doctor, and also created the glitterguns from "Revenge of the Cybermen".
** John Peel's Eighth Doctor novel ''War of the Daleks'' does this with the final four Dalek serials of the new series (Destiny, Resurrection, Revelation and Remembrance of the Daleks), creating a single overarching plot which was promptly ignored by every Who writer since.
* Many Franchise/StarWarsLegends sources tie in many of [[BigBad Palpatine's]] and especially [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy Thrawn's]] actions as being to prepare the galaxy for [[Literature/NewJediOrder the Yuuzhan Vong invasion]]. The degree to which this is accepted by fans varies--it's pretty much considered canon for Thrawn's motivation, but most see Palpatine as just using it as an excuse.
** Jacen Solo's FaceHeelTurn in ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' is seemingly being tied to the BigBad [[EldritchAbomination Abeloth]] in ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi''.
** Another example is Cade Skywalker's unique abilities in ''ComicBook/StarWarsLegacy''. His ability to sense vulnerable fractures has been tied to Mace Windu's sense for more metaphorical "shatterpoints" from [[Literature/{{Shatterpoint}} the book of the same name]], and his ability to heal serious injuries and death using the Dark Side is uncannily close to what Palpatine claimed Darth Plagueis could do in ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith''. And considering that other sources hint that Plagueis created Anakin, it may be connected to that too... [[spoiler: though that was {{Jossed}} in the ''Literature/DarthPlagueis'' novel. Anakin was created as a backlash against Plagueis's machinations.]]
** Back to the subject of Abeloth, the final ''Fate of the Jedi'' novel reveals that she's connected to the Son, the Daughter, and the Father, the living embodiments of the Force first seen in ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars''.

to:

* Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse:
**
The Literature/DoctorWhoMissingAdventures first ''Literature/{{Noob}}'' novel ''Venusian Lullaby'' takes a lot did this to some episodes of the [[RunningGag throwaway one-liners]] the Third Doctor used to make about his adventures on Venus (that the Venusians sing lullabies, play hopscotch, etc.) and makes a coherent alien race out of them (living about a billion years in the past, when Venus might have been habitable). They're radially symmetrical and move by hopping. Oddly, no mention is made of the oft-referenced "Venusian Aikido" (at least by that name), nor how he might have learned it from such odd creatures.
** The Literature/PastDoctorAdventures novel ''Divided Loyalties'' establishes that the Doctor was part of a clique in the Prydonian Academy on Gallifrey with the other renegades featured in the
[[Series/{{Noob}} original series (the Master, the Monk, the War Chief, the Rani and Drax), Vansell (introduced in the [[AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho Big Finish audio drama]] ''The Sirens of Time'' earlier that year), two new characters (Jelpax and Millenia), and Rallon, who is revealed to have been posessed by the Celestial Toymaker, who used his body in the First Doctor serial by that name.
** The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures novel ''Original Sin'' establishes that [[spoiler:Tobias Vaughn from "The Invasion"]] was responsible for various advanced technologies that plagued the Third Doctor, and also created the glitterguns from "Revenge
webseries]], making it part of the Cybermen".
** John Peel's Eighth Doctor novel ''War
''[[FictionalVideoGame Horizon]]'' storyline. When an episode of the Daleks'' does this with the final Season 1 needed to show a character doing FetchQuest (which happened three or four Dalek serials times out of twenty often stand-alone episodes) the new series (Destiny, Resurrection, Revelation QuestGiver always happened to be InTheHood and Remembrance of the Daleks), creating a single overarching plot which was promptly ignored by every Who writer since.
* Many Franchise/StarWarsLegends sources tie
dressed in many of [[BigBad Palpatine's]] and especially [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy Thrawn's]] actions as being to prepare the galaxy for [[Literature/NewJediOrder the Yuuzhan Vong invasion]]. The degree to which this is accepted by fans varies--it's pretty much considered canon for Thrawn's motivation, but most see Palpatine as just using it as an excuse.
** Jacen Solo's FaceHeelTurn in ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' is seemingly being tied to the BigBad [[EldritchAbomination Abeloth]] in ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi''.
** Another example is Cade Skywalker's unique abilities in ''ComicBook/StarWarsLegacy''. His ability to sense vulnerable fractures has been tied to Mace Windu's sense for more metaphorical "shatterpoints" from [[Literature/{{Shatterpoint}} the book of the same name]], and his ability to heal serious injuries and death using the Dark Side is uncannily close to what Palpatine claimed Darth Plagueis
BlackCloak, something that could do in ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith''. And considering that other sources hint that Plagueis created Anakin, it may easily be connected to that too... [[spoiler: though that was {{Jossed}} in normal for the ''Literature/DarthPlagueis'' novel. Anakin was created as a backlash against Plagueis's machinations.]]
** Back
game and/or due to NoBudget. The first novel, chronologically set after the subject of Abeloth, the final ''Fate of the Jedi'' novel first season, reveals that she's connected [[spoiler: the black cloak is actually a trademark for a group that is after the DismantledMacGuffin central to the Son, the Daughter, and the Father, the living embodiments first novel; some of the Force pieces were used as decoration for random objects that they sometimes couldn't go get themselves without attracting attention, hence the fetch quests]].
* ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'': It was revealed, in the
first seen of the two stories by Creator/ArthurConanDoyle to directly feature Moriarty, that the master villain had been involved in ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars''.several of Holmes' cases before, but had simply never been mentioned until then.



* After Creator/IsaacAsimov's extensive CanonWelding of his Foundation, Empire and Robots series into one, the final volume of the Second Foundation Trilogy, ''Foundation's Triumph'' by Creator/DavidBrin was a fantastic example of Arc Welding together almost every single book in the series together even better than Asimov had done.
* All 7 other of the ''Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality'' series, encompassing epic acts by Death, Time, Fate, War, Nature, God and the Devil had this trope. In the last novel in the series, ''Literature/UnderAVelvetCloak'', all of these acts are only minor compared to Nox's (the Incarnation of Night/Secrets) actions (whose actions choose which universes live or die).

to:

* After Creator/IsaacAsimov's extensive CanonWelding Many ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' sources tie in many of [[BigBad Palpatine's]] and especially [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy Thrawn's]] actions as being to prepare the galaxy for [[Literature/NewJediOrder the Yuuzhan Vong invasion]]. The degree to which this is accepted by fans varies--it's pretty much considered canon for Thrawn's motivation, but most see Palpatine as just using it as an excuse.
** Jacen Solo's FaceHeelTurn in ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'' is seemingly being tied to the BigBad [[EldritchAbomination Abeloth]] in ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi''.
** Another example is Cade Skywalker's unique abilities in ''ComicBook/StarWarsLegacy''. His ability to sense vulnerable fractures has been tied to Mace Windu's sense for more metaphorical "shatterpoints" from [[Literature/{{Shatterpoint}} the book of the same name]], and
his Foundation, Empire ability to heal serious injuries and Robots series into one, death using the Dark Side is uncannily close to what Palpatine claimed Darth Plagueis could do in ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith''. And considering that other sources hint that Plagueis created Anakin, it may be connected to that too... [[spoiler: though that was {{Jossed}} in the ''Literature/DarthPlagueis'' novel. Anakin was created as a backlash against Plagueis's machinations.]]
** Back to the subject of Abeloth,
the final volume ''Fate of the Second Foundation Trilogy, ''Foundation's Triumph'' by Creator/DavidBrin was a fantastic example of Arc Welding together almost every single book in Jedi'' novel reveals that she's connected to the series together even better than Asimov had done.
* All 7 other of
Son, the ''Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality'' series, encompassing epic acts by Death, Time, Fate, War, Nature, God Daughter, and the Devil had this trope. In Father, the last novel in living embodiments of the series, ''Literature/UnderAVelvetCloak'', all of these acts are only minor compared to Nox's (the Incarnation of Night/Secrets) actions (whose actions choose which universes live or die).Force first seen in ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars''.



* The Larry Niven Literature/KnownSpace stories develop a bad case of this later on, as the hugely successful RingWorld degenerated into increasingly complex and incomprehensible attempts to produce a Unified Field Theory Of Everything.
** Also the Arthur C Clarke Rama and related sort-of-sequels to 2001 - A Space Odyssey.
* The first ''Literature/{{Noob}}'' novel did this to some episodes of the [[Series/{{Noob}} original webseries]], making it part of the ''[[FictionalVideoGame Horizon]]'' storyline. When an episode of Season 1 needed to show a character doing FetchQuest (which happened three or four times out of twenty often stand-alone episodes) the QuestGiver always happened to be InTheHood and dressed in BlackCloak, something that could easily be normal for the game and/or due to NoBudget. The first novel, chronologically set after the first season, reveals that [[spoiler: the black cloak is actually a trademark for a group that is after the DismantledMacGuffin central to the first novel; some of the pieces were used as decoration for random objects that they sometimes couldn't go get themselves without attracting attention, hence the fetch quests]].
* ''Literature/AwakeInTheNightLand'', which is set in the universe of Creator/WilliamHopeHodgson's ''Literature/TheNightLand'', linked this book to ''Literature/TheHouseOnTheBorderland'' by stating that the titular house is the entrance to the House of Silence of The Night Land, but in the past.
* ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'' series is a major ArcWelding project for the works of Creator/StephenKing, bringing together multiple previously introduced concepts and characters for a SavingTheWorld plot of epic proportions. It had long been established that many of King's works took place in the same continuity (the towns of Derry and Castle Rock were recurring locations, and there were a few characters that appeared in multiple works), but their plots had generally stayed independent from one another before that point. ''The Dark Tower'' reveals that '''all''' of his works coexist with each other, even when they seem to take place in different universes--because his world is a {{multiverse}} where multiple parallel Earths exist simultaneously, and certain gifted characters can travel from one parallel world to another. To elaborate:
** The vampires from ''Literature/SalemsLot'' and the "Low Men" from [[Literature/HeartsInAtlantis "Low Men in Yellow Coats"]] are both part of a massive army commanded by the mysterious Crimson King from ''Literature/{{Insomnia}}''. Randall Flagg from ''Literature/TheStand'' and ''Literature/TheEyesOfTheDragon'' is the Crimson King's [[TheDragon Dragon]], serving as his emissary on Earth.
** The psychics Ted Brautigan (from "Low Men in Yellow Coats") and Dinky Earnshaw (from "Literature/EverythingsEventual") are two of many psychics being systematically tracked down and recruited by the Crimson King's agents so that they can harness their abilities to bring the Dark Tower crashing down. Though never stated, it's presumed that characters like Danny Torrance from ''Literature/TheShining'' and Carrie White from ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' are similar such psychics, and that their abilities could also bring down the Tower if so utilized.
** The mystical "Turtle" entity from ''Literature/{{It}}'' is "Maturin", one of several Guardian spirits that exists to protect the Dark Tower. Each world has its own Guardian (in Roland Deschain's world, for example, it's a bear called "Shardik"), and they all oppose the Crimson King in his quest to destroy reality.
** Project Arrowhead from ''Literature/TheMist'' is one of the few agencies ever to successfully discover the nature of the Multiverse, and their theory about the existence of parallel worlds was 100% true. Also, the titular mist was a "thinny", a weak spot in the barrier between parallel worlds that characteristically emits white fog and high-pitched keening noises that can drive a person insane. And the monsters from the mist were creatures from "Todash", the primordial darkness between worlds from which the Crimson King was born.
** The world of ''Literature/TheStand'', which becomes a post-apocalyptic wasteland in the wake of a disastrous plague, is one of many parallel worlds that exists in the Multiverse. Randall Flagg was trying to conquer that world in the name of the Crimson King, and he wanted to build his own new civilization atop the ashes so that his new subjects could be added to the Crimson King's army.



* Graem Bauer and the "Bluetooth Group" in ''Series/TwentyFour''. The cabal of influential businessmen in the fifth season ordering Christopher Henderson et al. to do their dirty jobs was initially planned to be a shadowy group whose true motives were never explained (and they had no connection whatsoever to Jack or his past). In the sixth season, the previously unnamed head of this group was revealed to "Graem Bauer", and it was explained that he was responsible for most of the government's shady activities going all the way back to the fourth season (when Walt Cummings tried to have Jack killed). Graem is then revealed to be TheManBehindTheMan, as his (and Jack's) father Philip shows up and murders him in his very first appearance.
** Season 7 does it ''again'', revealing the season's BigBad, Alan Wilson, to have been behind even the Bauers' involvement, and the ultimate authority over the Season 5 conspiracy, being head of a [[TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness powerful group]] that had been manipulating events for some time and remained at large at the end of the season. Then the storyline [[AbortedArc disappeared without a trace]].
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'':
** Various, seemingly independent threats throughout Season 1, such as Project Centipede and [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Ian Quinn's]] corporation, are eventually be revealed to all be orchestrated by the same BigBad, [[HiddenVillain the Clairvoyant]] [[spoiler: who turns out to be a HYDRA agent, tying into the events of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier''.]]
** One of Season 2's initial main villains, "[[DeadlyDoctor the Doctor]]" [[spoiler: (Calvin Johnson, aka Cal Zabo, aka the comics Mr. Hyde)]] is revealed in the second half of the season to have been working on ([[LoveMakesYouEvil as he perceived it]]) the behalf of [[spoiler: his wife, Jiaying]], who eventually serves as the season's FinalBoss. She, in turn, can blame her StartOfDarkness on [[MadScientist Daniel Whitehall]], the other of the first half of the season's main villains. So, in this way, most of the season's main villains were all connected to each other.
* As part of the showrunners of ''Series/{{Alias}}''' attempts to course-correct after the debacle that was the series' third season, several elements from those episodes, such as Sloane's Omnifam enterprise and seasonal bad guy group The Covenant, were brought back and retconned into being parts of season four BigBad [[spoiler: Elena Derevko]]'s master plan.



* A similar event occurred in ''Series/{{Firefly}}'', another Creator/JossWhedon show. Although the Reapers and River's torture at the hands of the Alliance are introduced in the pilot episode, the ''Film/{{Serenity}}'' movie later ret-cons them to being linked together. Now, instead of being a group of bloodthirsty savages as a parallel to the American Indians depicted in pulp Westerns, they are analagous to the Infected from 28 days later, and the reason that River is being so strongly hunted by the Alliance is that she knows secrets like this.

to:

* A similar event occurred in ''Series/{{Firefly}}'', another Creator/JossWhedon show. Although the Reapers and River's torture at the hands ''Series/{{Arrow}}'': The first episode of the Alliance are introduced in the pilot episode, the ''Film/{{Serenity}}'' movie later ret-cons them to being linked together. Now, instead of being second season features a group of bloodthirsty savages as copycat vigilantes, who among other things kill Starling City's mayor. The midseason finale reveals that they were organized by [[DarkMessiah Brother Blood]] [[spoiler: and [[TheManBehindTheMan Slade]]]], in order to give [[VillainWithGoodPublicity Blood]] the opening he needs to run for mayor.
** Each season also finds
a parallel way to tie together its Present Day and Flashback storylines:
*** Season 1 revealed that [[BigBad Malcolm Merlyn]] was responsible for the shipwreck that stranded Oliver on the island to begin with.
*** Season 2's storylines are connected by [[PsychoSerum Mirakuru]]. It was his search for it that led [[EvilutionaryBiologist Dr. Ivo]]
to the American Indians depicted island in pulp Westerns, they the flashbacks, it's being used as part of Brother Blood's plans in the present, [[spoiler: and it's responsible for Slade's FaceHeelTurn in the flashbacks that leads to him being BigBad in the present]].
*** Season 3's storylines
are analagous to loosely connected by the Infected from 28 days later, presence of Maseo, who was Oliver's ARGUS handler in Hong Kong before his son's death by the Alpha/Omega virus led to him joining the League of Assassins, becoming TheDragon to Ra's Al Ghul in the present. The final episodes tie the storylines more tightly together, however, as [[spoiler: Ra's gets his hands on Alpha/Omega and intends to destroy Starling City with it.]]
*** Season 4's storylines also share only vague connections with each other -- the organization Oliver is sent to infiltrate in the flashbacks is Shadowspire, who serve as VillainOfTheWeek in one episode's present setting and served as part of [[spoiler: Andy Diggle]]'s StartOfDarkness. Also, the [[MacGuffin magic idol]] that flashback villain Baron Reiter is after also serves as [[BigBad Damien Darhk's]] power source in the present.
** Late in Season 3, Ra's Al Ghul reveals the existence of his rival, Damien Darhk, the leader of H.I.V.E., and that he was responsible for various episodic threats that Team Arrow had faced in Seasons 2 and 3. This on top of H.I.V.E. being responsible for Deadshot becoming a mercenary
and the reason that River is being so strongly hunted death of Diggle's brother.
* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' did this extensively in its second half, due to a bad case of Writing
by the Alliance is Seat of Your Pants which stacked up. Creator Ron D. Moore later admitted that she knows secrets despite the show's initial dependence on meticulously plotted storyarcs, he hadn't actually planned out anything for the show beyond the end of the second season (various ideas like this. "another Battlestar also survived" or "what if they find a habitable planet that isn't Earth"? had been exhausted). The result was that with a bunch of disparate plotlines that he hadn't planned out, he desperately tried to ''retroactively'' weld them all together as related. For example, he admitted he had no idea ''why'' the much-hyped Hybrid child Hera was important, let alone how it related to the rest of the main plots, until he was writing ''the series finale itself''. At the 2009 Paley Center post-finale panel (videos are on youtube of this), you can see Moore give his bizarre self-justification that he is fully capable of ''retroactively'' welding unrelated storyarcs together in a way that works. Needless to say, critics and reviewers were disenchanted as the show wore on.
* ''Series/TheBlacklist'': From the start, it was clear that [[VillainProtagonist Reddington]] only sent the FBI after people on the Blacklist as part of a larger plan, but it's not until the end of season 1, in the two-part "Berlin" episode, that we start to see what that plan is and exactly how the various Blacklisters fit into it.
** "The Director, Conclusion" finally puts together all the hints and pieces of Red's plan throughout the first half of Season 3 to undermine [[NebulousEvilOrganization the Cabal]] enough that he can [[spoiler: exonerate the framed Keen, and take down the Director]].
** "Mr. Gregory Devry" reveals the existence of Shell Island Retreat, a gathering and alliance of the leaders of the world's most powerful criminal organizations. Aside from revealing Reddington himself as a member, several past Blacklisters are mentioned as having been involved before being taken down.



* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' does excellent examples of {{Story Arc}}s and also of Arc Welding. Starting in mid-season 2 and possibly earlier, the seeds are planted in an almost offhanded manner for the coming storyline. Then, at the end of season 2, it's all revealed to be part of a big plot that isn't concluded until the final episode of the final season -- which itself is the finale of a 9-part arc within the MythArc of the show.
** Also, ExecutiveMeddling resulted in the Klingons returning to their [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Kirk-era]] level of villainy just as the Dominion was planned to take center stage. ThePowersThatBe did the best they could, and made it fit at the end by making Changeling manipulation responsible.
* ''Series/TheXFiles'' did this in later seasons, with dormant alien DNA supposedly accounting for much of the apparently Earthbound paranormal activity Mulder and Scully investigated.
* Arc Patching, if not Arc Welding, was done in ''Series/VeronicaMars'', when the season 2 bus bombing storyline wrapped up. The perpetrator was revealed to also have raped Veronica at Shelly Pomroy's party, a storyline thought to be wrapped up in season 1 as being not rape, but mutually drugged-up semi-consensual sex. This explained Veronica's chlamydia, despite her having only two (or, as TheReveal made plain, actually three) sexual partners and presumably using protection, the existence of which was used to paint Veronica as a slut and therefore untrustworthy in the trial of Aaron Echolls. The blatant illegality of delving into her medical records for some reason ''not'' resulting in a mistrial is another debate entirely.
* At the end of the first season of ''Series/TheSopranos'', Big Pussy has vanished. [[TitleDrop No one knows anything]]. The writers of the show were just going to let it go at that--people do, indeed, vanish with no explanation, though it's rare. However, when they heard how the fans were wondering what happened to him, they welded Pussy into the story of Jimmy's being TheMole, with him being a second one.

to:

* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' does excellent examples ''Series/{{Chuck}}'' welded arcs on top of {{Story Arc}}s and also of Arc Welding. Starting in mid-season 2 and possibly earlier, the seeds are planted in an almost offhanded manner for the coming storyline. Then, at the end of season 2, it's all revealed to be part of a big plot that isn't concluded until the final episode of the final season -- which itself is the finale of a 9-part arc within the MythArc of the show.
** Also, ExecutiveMeddling resulted in the Klingons returning to their [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Kirk-era]] level of villainy just as the Dominion was planned to take center stage. ThePowersThatBe did the best they could, and made it fit at the end by making Changeling manipulation responsible.
* ''Series/TheXFiles'' did this in later seasons, with dormant alien DNA supposedly accounting for much of the apparently Earthbound paranormal activity Mulder and Scully investigated.
* Arc Patching, if not Arc Welding, was done in ''Series/VeronicaMars'', when the season 2 bus bombing storyline wrapped up. The perpetrator was revealed to also have raped Veronica at Shelly Pomroy's party, a storyline thought to be wrapped up in season 1 as being not rape, but mutually drugged-up semi-consensual sex. This explained Veronica's chlamydia, despite her having only two (or, as TheReveal made plain, actually three) sexual partners and presumably using protection, the existence of which was used to paint Veronica as a slut and therefore untrustworthy in the trial of Aaron Echolls. The blatant illegality of delving into her medical records for some reason ''not'' resulting in a mistrial is another debate entirely.
* At the end of
arcs. About midway through the first season of ''Series/TheSopranos'', Big Pussy has vanished. [[TitleDrop No one knows anything]]. The writers of the show were just going to let it go at that--people do, indeed, vanish with no explanation, though it's rare. However, when they heard how the fans were wondering what everything that happened up to him, they welded Pussy into that point was revealed to largely be the story result of Jimmy's being TheMole, with him being a second one.CIA splinter group known as FULCRUM attempting to steal the Intersect. By late in Season 2, Chuck has begun to speculate that many one-shot villains earlier in the first season such as Laszlo were actually connected to the Intersect project and FULCRUM. The Season 2 finale reveals that Fulcrum was part of a larger organization called the Ring. The middle of Season 3 reveals that the Ring's direct involvement goes back much further, and that another one-shot villain from Season 2 was actually working for them. When Season 4 rolls around, you learn that yet another one-shot villain from Season 2 was actually working for new series big bad Volkoff Industries, and that the entire history of the Intersect project itself was directly connected to Volkoff himself. Finally in Season 5 you learn that rogue CIA agent Quinn was quite literally behind EVERYTHING--Fulcrum, the Ring, and Volkoff Industries--out of his desire to get revenge on Chuck for "stealing" the Intersect from him.



** There was a bit of Arc Welding near the end of its original run, when Ace's involvement with the Doctor between "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]" and "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric The Curse of Fenric]]" (eight multi-part stories over three seasons by that point) was revealed to be part of Fenric's BatmanGambit to trap the Doctor (moral of the story: don't try a BatmanGambit against a {{Chessmaster}}). It also provided a [[HilariousInHindsight bit of disappointment]] for Classic Who fans when the series returned and [[ArcWords "Bad Wolf"]] turned out not to be a returned Fenric.
** Between the Classic and revival series, the Time War, a cataclysmic war between the Daleks and the Time Lords, annihilated both races for good with the exception of the Doctor. The series eventually connects this event to the Fourth Doctor story "Genesis of the Daleks", where the Doctor attempted a genocide of the species but failed (which has no serious effects on the Classic series's overarching plot save for [[HijackedByGanon introducing Davros]]) - reimagining the event as the Time Lords firing the first shot in the war.
** In Series 5 of the new series, the startling lack of historical commentary about a big freaking Cyberking stomping around Victorian London is retconned to have been another casualty of the cracks in time.
** "The Time of the Doctor", the Eleventh Doctor's GrandFinale, concludes virtually all major ongoing plots (the cracks in time, the explosion of the TARDIS, the First Question, etc.) by tying them into the Ninth and Tenth Doctor Time War MythArc.
** In Clara's first appearance in Series 7, "The Bells of Saint John", she offhandedly mentions she got the TARDIS phone number from a woman in a shop who told her it was a help line. Flashforward to the Series 8 premiere, "Deep Breath", where a mysterious ad in a paper reunites Clara and the recently regenerated Twelfth Doctor, after which he brings up the phone incident again, pointing out that someone seems to want them together. Flashforward again to the season finale, "Death in Heaven", where it's revealed that that woman was [[BigBad Missy]], who brought Clara and the Doctor together as part of her larger overall scheme against the Doctor.
* ''Series/{{Stella|US}}'' used [[YouLookFamiliar one frequent actor]] to set up an arc for the series.
* Graem Bauer and the "Bluetooth Group" in ''Series/TwentyFour''. The cabal of influential businessmen in the fifth season ordering Christopher Henderson et al. to do their dirty jobs was initially planned to be a shadowy group whose true motives were never explained (and they had no connection whatsoever to Jack or his past). In the sixth season, the previously unnamed head of this group was revealed to "Graem Bauer", and it was explained that he was responsible for most of the government's shady activities going all the way back to the fourth season (when Walt Cummings tried to have Jack killed). Graem is then revealed to be TheManBehindTheMan, as his (and Jack's) father Philip shows up and murders him in his very first appearance.
** Season 7 does it ''again'', revealing the season's BigBad, Alan Wilson, to have been behind even the Bauers' involvement, and the ultimate authority over the Season 5 conspiracy, being head of a [[TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness powerful group]] that had been manipulating events for some time and remained at large at the end of the season. Then the storyline [[AbortedArc disappeared without a trace]].

to:

** There was a bit of Arc Welding near the end of its original run, when Ace's involvement with the Doctor between "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]" [[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire "Dragonfire"]] and "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric "The Curse of Fenric]]" Fenric"]] (eight multi-part stories over three seasons by that point) was revealed to be part of Fenric's BatmanGambit to trap the Doctor (moral of the story: don't try a BatmanGambit against a {{Chessmaster}}). It also provided a [[HilariousInHindsight bit of disappointment]] for Classic Who fans when the series returned and [[ArcWords "Bad Wolf"]] turned out not to be a returned Fenric.
** Between the Classic and revival series, the Time War, a cataclysmic war between the Daleks and the Time Lords, annihilated both races for good with the exception of the Doctor. The series eventually connects this event to the Fourth Doctor story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E4GenesisOfTheDaleks "Genesis of the Daleks", Daleks"]], where the Doctor attempted a genocide of the species but failed (which has no serious effects on the Classic series's overarching plot save for [[HijackedByGanon introducing Davros]]) - -- reimagining the event as the Time Lords firing the first shot in the war.
** In Series 5 of the new series, the startling lack of historical commentary about a big freaking Cyberking [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E14TheNextDoctor Cyberking]] stomping around Victorian London is retconned to have been another casualty of the cracks in time.
** [[Recap/DoctorWho2013CSTheTimeOfTheDoctor "The Time of the Doctor", Doctor"]], the Eleventh Doctor's GrandFinale, concludes virtually all major ongoing plots (the cracks in time, the explosion of the TARDIS, the First Question, etc.) by tying them into the Ninth and Tenth Doctor Time War MythArc.
** In Clara's first appearance in Series 7, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E6TheBellsOfSaintJohn "The Bells of Saint John", John"]], she offhandedly mentions she got the TARDIS phone number from a woman in a shop who told her it was a help line. Flashforward to the Series 8 premiere, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E1DeepBreath "Deep Breath", Breath"]], where a mysterious ad in a paper reunites Clara and the recently regenerated Twelfth Doctor, after which he brings up the phone incident again, pointing out that someone seems to want them together. Flashforward again to the season finale, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E12DeathInHeaven "Death in Heaven", Heaven"]], where it's revealed that that woman was [[BigBad Missy]], who brought Clara and the Doctor together as part of her larger overall scheme against the Doctor.
* ''Series/{{Stella|US}}'' used [[YouLookFamiliar A similar event occurred in ''Series/{{Firefly}}'', another Creator/JossWhedon show. Although the Reapers and River's torture at the hands of the Alliance are introduced in the pilot episode, the ''Film/{{Serenity}}'' movie later ret-cons them to being linked together. Now, instead of being a group of bloodthirsty savages as a parallel to the American Indians depicted in pulp Westerns, they are analagous to the Infected from 28 days later, and the reason that River is being so strongly hunted by the Alliance is that she knows secrets like this.
* ''Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'' episode 40, which not only turns the Gokaigers' EarlyBirdCameo (a BigLippedAlligatorMoment during the ''[[Series/TensouSentaiGoseiger Goseiger]]''/''[[Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger Shinkenger]]'' ReunionShow) a canon event, but also ties into the team's quest of GottaCatchThemAll.
* In the old ''Series/KamenRider'' series, many an evil organization was ruled by a guy called the "[insert this year's evil organization name] Great Leader," always voiced by veteran voice actor Creator/GoroNaya. Welding comes in with the later seasons having the new [Organization] Great Leader often say "oh, yeah, I was behind them all, and those ''other'' organizations from the last couple of series I ''wasn't'' in too!" Not only were all of Naya's "Great Leaders" made
one frequent actor]] to set up an arc character, with the final enemy of ''Black RX'' voiced by Naya as well, it's theorized that ''every pre-hiatus Kamen Rider villain ever'' is either the Great leader himself or one of his pawns.
** As
for the modern era, he appears in teamups now and again, first voiced by Naya up until his death, and then replaced by Creator/TomokazuSeki, though he doesn't take credit for seasons he wasn't in. However, the NonSerialMovie of ''Faiz'' gave the BigBad three ManBehindTheMan figures, one being played by Naya. This in a series that also has people being turned into monsters. Though far from canon, there's a real case to be made for the Great Leader being behind that series.
* Graem Bauer ** The more recent series have Foundation X playing the same part: ''Double, OOO'' and ''Fourze'' all had them involved behind the "Bluetooth Group" in ''Series/TwentyFour''. scenes. The cabal of influential businessmen "Foundation X Trilogy" culminated in a film where they're finally the fifth season ordering Christopher Henderson et al. to do their dirty jobs BigBad instead of just ''behind'' the BigBad... but the film's villain Lem Kannagi was initially planned a rogue member and his defeat was no setback to be the organization. They're perfectly capable of saying "Oh, did you think [insert your favorite new villain here] did it alone?" about any series after them (except ''[[CosmicHorrorStory Gaim]]'', perhaps.) On top of ''that,'' Kannagi's final form was a shadowy group whose true motives similarly-named homage to that of an old-school villain, and who were never explained (and they had no connection whatsoever to Jack or his past). In the sixth season, the previously unnamed head of this group was revealed to "Graem Bauer", and it was explained that he was responsible for most of the government's shady activities going all the way back to the fourth season (when Walt Cummings tried to have Jack killed). Graem is then revealed to be TheManBehindTheMan, as his (and Jack's) father Philip shows up and murders him in his very first appearance.
** Season 7 does it ''again'', revealing the season's BigBad, Alan Wilson, to have been behind even the Bauers' involvement, and the ultimate authority over the Season 5 conspiracy, being head of a [[TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness powerful group]] that had been manipulating events for some time and remained at large at the end of the season. Then the storyline [[AbortedArc disappeared without a trace]].
old-school villains created by, again?



* ''Series/{{Chuck}}'' welded arcs on top of arcs. About midway through the first season everything that happened up to that point was revealed to largely be the result of a CIA splinter group known as FULCRUM attempting to steal the Intersect. By late in Season 2, Chuck has begun to speculate that many one-shot villains earlier in the first season such as Laszlo were actually connected to the Intersect project and FULCRUM. The Season 2 finale reveals that Fulcrum was part of a larger organization called the Ring. The middle of Season 3 reveals that the Ring's direct involvement goes back much further, and that another one-shot villain from Season 2 was actually working for them. When Season 4 rolls around, you learn that yet another one-shot villain from Season 2 was actually working for new series big bad Volkoff Industries, and that the entire history of the Intersect project itself was directly connected to Volkoff himself. Finally in Season 5 you learn that rogue CIA agent Quinn was quite literally behind EVERYTHING--Fulcrum, the Ring, and Volkoff Industries--out of his desire to get revenge on Chuck for "stealing" the Intersect from him.
* ''Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'' episode 40, which not only turns the Gokaigers' EarlyBirdCameo (a BigLippedAlligatorMoment during the ''[[Series/TensouSentaiGoseiger Goseiger]]''/''[[Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger Shinkenger]]'' ReunionShow) a canon event, but also ties into the team's quest of GottaCatchThemAll.
* In the old ''Series/KamenRider'' series, many an evil organization was ruled by a guy called the "[insert this year's evil organization name] Great Leader," always voiced by veteran voice actor Creator/GoroNaya. Welding comes in with the later seasons having the new [Organization] Great Leader often say "oh, yeah, I was behind them all, and those ''other'' organizations from the last couple of series I ''wasn't'' in too!" Not only were all of Naya's "Great Leaders" made one character, with the final enemy of ''Black RX'' voiced by Naya as well, it's theorized that ''every pre-hiatus Kamen Rider villain ever'' is either the Great leader himself or one of his pawns.
** As for the modern era, he appears in teamups now and again, first voiced by Naya up until his death, and then replaced by Creator/TomokazuSeki, though he doesn't take credit for seasons he wasn't in. However, the NonSerialMovie of ''Faiz'' gave the BigBad three ManBehindTheMan figures, one being played by Naya. This in a series that also has people being turned into monsters. Though far from canon, there's a real case to be made for the Great Leader being behind that series.
** The more recent series have Foundation X playing the same part: ''Double, OOO'' and ''Fourze'' all had them involved behind the scenes. The "Foundation X Trilogy" culminated in a film where they're finally the BigBad instead of just ''behind'' the BigBad... but the film's villain Lem Kannagi was a rogue member and his defeat was no setback to the organization. They're perfectly capable of saying "Oh, did you think [insert your favorite new villain here] did it alone?" about any series after them (except ''[[CosmicHorrorStory Gaim]]'', perhaps.) On top of ''that,'' Kannagi's final form was a similarly-named homage to that of an old-school villain, and who were all the old-school villains created by, again?

to:

* ''Series/{{Chuck}}'' welded arcs on top At the end of arcs. About midway through the first season everything that of ''Series/TheSopranos'', Big Pussy has vanished. [[TitleDrop No one knows anything]]. The writers of the show were just going to let it go at that--people do, indeed, vanish with no explanation, though it's rare. However, when they heard how the fans were wondering what happened up to him, they welded Pussy into the story of Jimmy's being TheMole, with him being a second one.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' does excellent examples of {{Story Arc}}s and also of Arc Welding. Starting in mid-season 2 and possibly earlier, the seeds are planted in an almost offhanded manner for the coming storyline. Then, at the end of season 2, it's all revealed to be part of a big plot
that point isn't concluded until the final episode of the final season -- which itself is the finale of a 9-part arc within the MythArc of the show.
** Also, ExecutiveMeddling resulted in the Klingons returning to their [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Kirk-era]] level of villainy just as the Dominion was planned to take center stage. ThePowersThatBe did the best they could, and made it fit at the end by making Changeling manipulation responsible.
* ''Series/{{Stella|US}}'' used [[YouLookFamiliar one frequent actor]] to set up an arc for the series.
* Arc Patching, if not Arc Welding, was done in ''Series/VeronicaMars'', when the season 2 bus bombing storyline wrapped up. The perpetrator
was revealed to largely also have raped Veronica at Shelly Pomroy's party, a storyline thought to be the result of a CIA splinter group known as FULCRUM attempting to steal the Intersect. By late wrapped up in Season 2, Chuck has begun to speculate that many one-shot villains earlier in the first season such 1 as Laszlo were being not rape, but mutually drugged-up semi-consensual sex. This explained Veronica's chlamydia, despite her having only two (or, as TheReveal made plain, actually connected to three) sexual partners and presumably using protection, the Intersect project existence of which was used to paint Veronica as a slut and FULCRUM. therefore untrustworthy in the trial of Aaron Echolls. The Season 2 finale reveals that Fulcrum was part blatant illegality of delving into her medical records for some reason ''not'' resulting in a larger organization called the Ring. The middle of Season 3 reveals that the Ring's direct involvement goes back much further, and that mistrial is another one-shot villain from Season 2 was actually working for them. When Season 4 rolls around, you learn that yet another one-shot villain from Season 2 was actually working for new series big bad Volkoff Industries, and that the entire history of the Intersect project itself was directly connected to Volkoff himself. Finally in Season 5 you learn that rogue CIA agent Quinn was quite literally behind EVERYTHING--Fulcrum, the Ring, and Volkoff Industries--out of his desire to get revenge on Chuck for "stealing" the Intersect from him.
* ''Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'' episode 40, which not only turns the Gokaigers' EarlyBirdCameo (a BigLippedAlligatorMoment during the ''[[Series/TensouSentaiGoseiger Goseiger]]''/''[[Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger Shinkenger]]'' ReunionShow) a canon event, but also ties into the team's quest of GottaCatchThemAll.
* In the old ''Series/KamenRider'' series, many an evil organization was ruled by a guy called the "[insert this year's evil organization name] Great Leader," always voiced by veteran voice actor Creator/GoroNaya. Welding comes in with the later seasons having the new [Organization] Great Leader often say "oh, yeah, I was behind them all, and those ''other'' organizations from the last couple of series I ''wasn't'' in too!" Not only were all of Naya's "Great Leaders" made one character, with the final enemy of ''Black RX'' voiced by Naya as well, it's theorized that ''every pre-hiatus Kamen Rider villain ever'' is either the Great leader himself or one of his pawns.
** As for the modern era, he appears in teamups now and again, first voiced by Naya up until his death, and then replaced by Creator/TomokazuSeki, though he doesn't take credit for seasons he wasn't in. However, the NonSerialMovie of ''Faiz'' gave the BigBad three ManBehindTheMan figures, one being played by Naya. This in a series that also has people being turned into monsters. Though far from canon, there's a real case to be made for the Great Leader being behind that series.
** The more recent series have Foundation X playing the same part: ''Double, OOO'' and ''Fourze'' all had them involved behind the scenes. The "Foundation X Trilogy" culminated in a film where they're finally the BigBad instead of just ''behind'' the BigBad... but the film's villain Lem Kannagi was a rogue member and his defeat was no setback to the organization. They're perfectly capable of saying "Oh, did you think [insert your favorite new villain here] did it alone?" about any series after them (except ''[[CosmicHorrorStory Gaim]]'', perhaps.) On top of ''that,'' Kannagi's final form was a similarly-named homage to that of an old-school villain, and who were all the old-school villains created by, again?
debate entirely.



* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'': The first episode of the second season features a group of copycat vigilantes, who among other things kill Starling City's mayor. The midseason finale reveals that they were organized by [[DarkMessiah Brother Blood]] [[spoiler: and [[TheManBehindTheMan Slade]]]], in order to give [[VillainWithGoodPublicity Blood]] the opening he needs to run for mayor.
** Each season also finds a way to tie together its Present Day and Flashback storylines:
*** Season 1 revealed that [[BigBad Malcolm Merlyn]] was responsible for the shipwreck that stranded Oliver on the island to begin with.
*** Season 2's storylines are connected by [[PsychoSerum Mirakuru]]. It was his search for it that led [[EvilutionaryBiologist Dr. Ivo]] to the island in the flashbacks, it's being used as part of Brother Blood's plans in the present, [[spoiler: and it's responsible for Slade's FaceHeelTurn in the flashbacks that leads to him being BigBad in the present]].
*** Season 3's storylines are loosely connected by the presence of Maseo, who was Oliver's ARGUS handler in Hong Kong before his son's death by the Alpha/Omega virus led to him joining the League of Assassins, becoming TheDragon to Ra's Al Ghul in the present. The final episodes tie the storylines more tightly together, however, as [[spoiler: Ra's gets his hands on Alpha/Omega and intends to destroy Starling City with it.]]
*** Season 4's storylines also share only vague connections with each other -- the organization Oliver is sent to infiltrate in the flashbacks is Shadowspire, who serve as VillainOfTheWeek in one episode's present setting and served as part of [[spoiler: Andy Diggle]]'s StartOfDarkness. Also, the [[MacGuffin magic idol]] that flashback villain Baron Reiter is after also serves as [[BigBad Damien Darhk's]] power source in the present.
** Late in Season 3, Ra's Al Ghul reveals the existence of his rival, Damien Darhk, the leader of H.I.V.E., and that he was responsible for various episodic threats that Team Arrow had faced in Seasons 2 and 3. This on top of H.I.V.E. being responsible for Deadshot becoming a mercenary and the death of Diggle's brother.
* ''Series/TheBlacklist'': From the start, it was clear that [[VillainProtagonist Reddington]] only sent the FBI after people on the Blacklist as part of a larger plan, but it's not until the end of season 1, in the two-part "Berlin" episode, that we start to see what that plan is and exactly how the various Blacklisters fit into it.
** "The Director, Conclusion" finally puts together all the hints and pieces of Red's plan throughout the first half of Season 3 to undermine [[NebulousEvilOrganization the Cabal]] enough that he can [[spoiler: exonerate the framed Keen, and take down the Director]].
** "Mr. Gregory Devry" reveals the existence of Shell Island Retreat, a gathering and alliance of the leaders of the world's most powerful criminal organizations. Aside from revealing Reddington himself as a member, several past Blacklisters are mentioned as having been involved before being taken down.
* As part of the showrunners of ''Series/{{Alias}}''' attempts to course-correct after the debacle that was the series' third season, several elements from those episodes, such as Sloane's Omnifam enterprise and seasonal bad guy group The Covenant, were brought back and retconned into being parts of season four BigBad [[spoiler: Elena Derevko]]'s master plan.
* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' did this extensively in its second half, due to a bad case of Writing by the Seat of Your Pants which stacked up. Creator Ron D. Moore later admitted that despite the show's initial dependence on meticulously plotted storyarcs, he hadn't actually planned out anything for the show beyond the end of the second season (various ideas like "another Battlestar also survived" or "what if they find a habitable planet that isn't Earth"? had been exhausted). The result was that with a bunch of disparate plotlines that he hadn't planned out, he desperately tried to ''retroactively'' weld them all together as related. For example, he admitted he had no idea ''why'' the much-hyped Hybrid child Hera was important, let alone how it related to the rest of the main plots, until he was writing ''the series finale itself''. At the 2009 Paley Center post-finale panel (videos are on youtube of this), you can see Moore give his bizarre self-justification that he is fully capable of ''retroactively'' welding unrelated storyarcs together in a way that works. Needless to say, critics and reviewers were disenchanted as the show wore on.
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'':
** Various, seemingly independent threats throughout Season 1, such as Project Centipede and [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Ian Quinn's]] corporation, are eventually be revealed to all be orchestrated by the same BigBad, [[HiddenVillain the Clairvoyant]] [[spoiler: who turns out to be a HYDRA agent, tying into the events of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier''.]]
** One of Season 2's initial main villains, "[[DeadlyDoctor the Doctor]]" [[spoiler: (Calvin Johnson, aka Cal Zabo, aka the comics Mr. Hyde)]] is revealed in the second half of the season to have been working on ([[LoveMakesYouEvil as he perceived it]]) the behalf of [[spoiler: his wife, Jiaying]], who eventually serves as the season's FinalBoss. She, in turn, can blame her StartOfDarkness on [[MadScientist Daniel Whitehall]], the other of the first half of the season's main villains. So, in this way, most of the season's main villains were all connected to each other.

to:

* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'': The first episode of the second season features a group of copycat vigilantes, who among other things kill Starling City's mayor. The midseason finale reveals that they were organized by [[DarkMessiah Brother Blood]] [[spoiler: and [[TheManBehindTheMan Slade]]]], in order to give [[VillainWithGoodPublicity Blood]] the opening he needs to run for mayor.
** Each season also finds a way to tie together its Present Day and Flashback storylines:
*** Season 1 revealed that [[BigBad Malcolm Merlyn]] was responsible for the shipwreck that stranded Oliver on the island to begin with.
*** Season 2's storylines are connected by [[PsychoSerum Mirakuru]]. It was his search for it that led [[EvilutionaryBiologist Dr. Ivo]] to the island in the flashbacks, it's being used as part of Brother Blood's plans in the present, [[spoiler: and it's responsible for Slade's FaceHeelTurn in the flashbacks that leads to him being BigBad in the present]].
*** Season 3's storylines are loosely connected by the presence of Maseo, who was Oliver's ARGUS handler in Hong Kong before his son's death by the Alpha/Omega virus led to him joining the League of Assassins, becoming TheDragon to Ra's Al Ghul in the present. The final episodes tie the storylines more tightly together, however, as [[spoiler: Ra's gets his hands on Alpha/Omega and intends to destroy Starling City with it.]]
*** Season 4's storylines also share only vague connections with each other -- the organization Oliver is sent to infiltrate in the flashbacks is Shadowspire, who serve as VillainOfTheWeek in one episode's present setting and served as part of [[spoiler: Andy Diggle]]'s StartOfDarkness. Also, the [[MacGuffin magic idol]] that flashback villain Baron Reiter is after also serves as [[BigBad Damien Darhk's]] power source in the present.
** Late in Season 3, Ra's Al Ghul reveals the existence of his rival, Damien Darhk, the leader of H.I.V.E., and that he was responsible for various episodic threats that Team Arrow had faced in Seasons 2 and 3. This on top of H.I.V.E. being responsible for Deadshot becoming a mercenary and the death of Diggle's brother.
* ''Series/TheBlacklist'': From the start, it was clear that [[VillainProtagonist Reddington]] only sent the FBI after people on the Blacklist as part of a larger plan, but it's not until the end of season 1, in the two-part "Berlin" episode, that we start to see what that plan is and exactly how the various Blacklisters fit into it.
** "The Director, Conclusion" finally puts together all the hints and pieces of Red's plan throughout the first half of Season 3 to undermine [[NebulousEvilOrganization the Cabal]] enough that he can [[spoiler: exonerate the framed Keen, and take down the Director]].
** "Mr. Gregory Devry" reveals the existence of Shell Island Retreat, a gathering and alliance of the leaders of the world's most powerful criminal organizations. Aside from revealing Reddington himself as a member, several past Blacklisters are mentioned as having been involved before being taken down.
* As part of the showrunners of ''Series/{{Alias}}''' attempts to course-correct after the debacle that was the series' third season, several elements from those episodes, such as Sloane's Omnifam enterprise and seasonal bad guy group The Covenant, were brought back and retconned into being parts of season four BigBad [[spoiler: Elena Derevko]]'s master plan.
* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''
''Series/TheXFiles'' did this extensively in its second half, due to a bad case of Writing by the Seat of Your Pants which stacked up. Creator Ron D. Moore later admitted that despite the show's initial dependence on meticulously plotted storyarcs, he hadn't actually planned out anything seasons, with dormant alien DNA supposedly accounting for the show beyond the end much of the second season (various ideas like "another Battlestar also survived" or "what if they find a habitable planet that isn't Earth"? had been exhausted). The result was that with a bunch of disparate plotlines that he hadn't planned out, he desperately tried to ''retroactively'' weld them all together as related. For example, he admitted he had no idea ''why'' the much-hyped Hybrid child Hera was important, let alone how it related to the rest of the main plots, until he was writing ''the series finale itself''. At the 2009 Paley Center post-finale panel (videos are on youtube of this), you can see Moore give his bizarre self-justification that he is fully capable of ''retroactively'' welding unrelated storyarcs together in a way that works. Needless to say, critics apparently Earthbound paranormal activity Mulder and reviewers were disenchanted as the show wore on.
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'':
** Various, seemingly independent threats throughout Season 1, such as Project Centipede and [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Ian Quinn's]] corporation, are eventually be revealed to all be orchestrated by the same BigBad, [[HiddenVillain the Clairvoyant]] [[spoiler: who turns out to be a HYDRA agent, tying into the events of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier''.]]
** One of Season 2's initial main villains, "[[DeadlyDoctor the Doctor]]" [[spoiler: (Calvin Johnson, aka Cal Zabo, aka the comics Mr. Hyde)]] is revealed in the second half of the season to have been working on ([[LoveMakesYouEvil as he perceived it]]) the behalf of [[spoiler: his wife, Jiaying]], who eventually serves as the season's FinalBoss. She, in turn, can blame her StartOfDarkness on [[MadScientist Daniel Whitehall]], the other of the first half of the season's main villains. So, in this way, most of the season's main villains were all connected to each other.
Scully investigated.



[[folder:Western Animation ]]
* Interviews with the creative team behind ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'' and their remarks in various DVD audio commentaries reveal that they were several episodes into the production of ''Unlimited'' before they realized that they were working toward what became the "Cadmus Arc." The majority of the arc expanded upon and revolved around the events of "A Better World," an episode from season two of ''Justice League'' which had been written with no thought to an ongoing story. The ultimate reveal of the BigBad, Brainiac, actually connected back to an episode of ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', which had been produced eight years and two TV series before the current series was even conceived. There were also throw-away lines and references that connected to as far back as "On Leather Wings," an episode of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' that was the ''very first'' entry in the Franchise/{{DCAU}}.

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[[folder:Western Animation ]]
Animation]]
* Interviews with Various jokes and gags made in the creative team behind ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'' and their remarks purely episodic first season of ''WesterAnimation/AdventureTime'' either return in various DVD audio commentaries later seasons to help reveal that they were several episodes into the production of ''Unlimited'' before they realized that they were working toward what became the "Cadmus Arc." The majority of the arc new plot information, or are expanded upon and revolved around to bring more insight into a character. A major example includes the events of "A Better World," an episode from season two of ''Justice League'' "I Remember You", which had been written with no thought to uses an ongoing story. The ultimate reveal early throwaway gag of Marceline constantly moving all over the BigBad, Brainiac, actually connected back to an episode Land of ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', which had been produced eight years Ooo, and two TV series before explains the current series was even conceived. There were also throw-away lines and references that connected to as far back as "On Leather Wings," main reason for this being an episode of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' that was escape from [[spoiler: her now mentally-insane father figure, the ''very first'' entry in Ice King, who took care of her during the Franchise/{{DCAU}}.nuclear apocalypse]].



%%* This happens with ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' in its first season. It turns out that Father was behind a lot of the episodes.
* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' episode "The Why of Fry" reveals that Fry coming to the future was part of a wider conspiracy, as his lack of delta brain wave made him the only person who could save the Universe from the Brainspawn. Whilst at least part of this was planned from the beginning of the show, the events of "Roswell That Ends Well" (where Fry becomes his own grandfather) were used as an explanation for the lack of brain wave, which was not part of the original plan.



* Used not in ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'', but in the show's credits. At the end of each episode, there's a coded message in the credits. Despite their secretive nature, however, the messages are very simple and mostly just are cheap jokes. After Season 1 ends though, Dipper's Guide to the Unexplained comes out, and each short ends with a piece of a secret message that has to be decoded by looking through the season's credits messages. This message was obviously formed after the fact, but allows for the credits' messages to have actual significance among speculating fans.
** WordOfGod confirms that the first season's MonsterOfTheWeek approach to episodes were mostly because of Disney not knowing if the show would sit well with the audience. Aftergaining significant popularity, the show was arc-welded with a conclusive first season ending, that led to a more cohesive StoryArc in season 2.
* Interviews with the creative team behind ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'' and their remarks in various DVD audio commentaries reveal that they were several episodes into the production of ''Unlimited'' before they realized that they were working toward what became the "Cadmus Arc." The majority of the arc expanded upon and revolved around the events of "A Better World," an episode from season two of ''Justice League'' which had been written with no thought to an ongoing story. The ultimate reveal of the BigBad, Brainiac, actually connected back to an episode of ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', which had been produced eight years and two TV series before the current series was even conceived. There were also throw-away lines and references that connected to as far back as "On Leather Wings", an episode of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' that was the ''very first'' entry in the Franchise/{{DCAU}}.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'': "The Stakeout" reveals that [[spoiler:Unalaq, the BigBad of Book 2, was a member of the Red Lotus, the villains of Book 3, and he helped them kidnap Korra. However, he did betray them, and his plan to become a Dark Avatar was not the Red Lotus's plan.]]
* The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episodes "200" and "201" begin as a follow-up to "Trapped in the Closet" and then tie together the plots in "Mecha-Streisand," "Ginger Kids," "Scott Tenorman Must Die," "The Super Best Friends," "Butt Out," "Fat Butt and Pancake Head," the "Cartoon Wars" two-parter, and "Cartman's Mom Is Still a Dirty Slut," and this does not include the numerous previously one-shot characters who make another appearance in this two-parter.
* The ''WesternAnimation/StrokerAndHoop'' finale has them kidnapped along with Double Wide and put inside K.A.R.R over a canyon while being taunted by their kidnapper who gives them three guesses on who he is lest he drops them in the canyon. Through the whole episode the three call back recent episodes and go over suspects. [[spoiler: Its eventually revealed to be a no name background character whose appearance changed in each encounter with the duo save for his voice.]]



%%* This happens with ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' in its first season. It turns out that Father was behind a lot of the episodes.
* ''WesternAnimation/StrokerAndHoop'' finale has them kidnapped along with Double Wide and put inside K.A.R.R over a canyon while being taunted by their kidnapper who gives them three guesses on who he is lest he drops them in the canyon. Through the whole episode the three call back recent episodes and go over suspects. [[spoiler: Its eventually revealed to be a no name background character whose appearance changed in each encounter with the duo save for his voice.]]
* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' episode "The Why of Fry" reveals that Fry coming to the future was part of a wider conspiracy, as his lack of delta brain wave made him the only person who could save the Universe from the Brainspawn. Whilst at least part of this was planned from the beginning of the show, the events of "Roswell That Ends Well" (where Fry becomes his own grandfather) were used as an explanation for the lack of brain wave, which was not part of the original plan.
* The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episodes "200" and "201" begin as a follow-up to "Trapped in the Closet" and then tie together the plots in "Mecha-Streisand," "Ginger Kids," "Scott Tenorman Must Die," "The Super Best Friends," "Butt Out," "Fat Butt and Pancake Head," the "Cartoon Wars" two-parter, and "Cartman's Mom Is Still a Dirty Slut," and this does not include the numerous previously one-shot characters who make another appearance in this two-parter.
* Various jokes and gags made in the purely episodic first season of ''WesterAnimation/AdventureTime'' either return in later seasons to help reveal new plot information, or are expanded upon to bring more insight into a character. A major example includes the episode "I Remember You", which uses an early throwaway gag of Marceline constantly moving all over the Land of Ooo, and explains the main reason for this being an escape from [[spoiler: her now mentally-insane father figure, the Ice King, who took care of her during the nuclear apocalypse]].
* Used not in ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'', but in the show's credits. At the end of each episode, there's a coded message in the credits. Despite their secretive nature, however, the messages are very simple and mostly just are cheap jokes. After Season 1 ends though, Dipper's Guide to the Unexplained comes out, and each short ends with a piece of a secret message that has to be decoded by looking through the season's credits messages. This message was obviously formed after the fact, but allows for the credits' messages to have actual significance among speculating fans.
** WordOfGod confirms that the first season's MonsterOfTheWeek approach to episodes were mostly because of Disney not knowing if the show would sit well with the audience. Aftergaining significant popularity, the show was arc-welded with a conclusive first season ending, that led to a more cohesive StoryArc in season 2.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'': "The Stakeout" reveals that [[spoiler:Unalaq, the BigBad of Book 2, was a member of the Red Lotus, the villains of Book 3, and he helped them kidnap Korra. However, he did betray them, and his plan to become a Dark Avatar was not the Red Lotus's plan.]]
17th Mar '17 12:44:40 PM josh6243
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*** [[spoiler:[[Anime/TheBraveExpressMightGaine Black Noir]] created Embryo, the male protagonists of the anime featured in the game, and a couple other things just to enjoy as a game. When Aeolia learned of Black Noir, the former created Veda as a countermeasure.]]

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*** [[spoiler:[[Anime/TheBraveExpressMightGaine Black Noir]] created manipulated Embryo, the events involving the male protagonists of from the anime featured in the game, AD Dimension, and a couple other things just to enjoy as a game. When Aeolia learned of Black Noir, the former created Veda as a countermeasure.]]
6th Mar '17 7:38:11 PM josh6243
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*** [[Anime/Daitarn3 Banjo Haran]] was raised on Mars, meaning he's an [[Anime/MartianSuccessorNadesico A-Class Jumper and thus capable of Boson Jumping.]]
6th Mar '17 9:19:08 AM josh6243
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** ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsV'':
*** ''[[Anime/ShinMazinger Mazinger Edition Z: The Impact!]]'' never got a second season, and consequently never went into the ''Great Mazinger'' storyline despite some foreshadowing. As such, ''Shin Mazinger Zero vs The Great General of Darkness'' is brought in to give ''Great'' some proper representation.
*** The timeline of ''Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato2199'' and [[MobileSuitCrossboneGundam late UC]] is referred to as the NCC, or New Correct Century, as if it were a singular Gundam timeline, 100 years after the events of ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamCharsCounterattack Char's Counterattack]].''
*** [[Anime/CrossAnge Draconium]] is derived from the [[Anime/GetterRobo Getter Rays]] and since the Dragons are humans who evolved into Dragons to purify the land from the radiation, they can temporarily make the Shin Getter weaker.
*** [[Anime/Gundam00AWakeningOfTheTrailblazer Aeolia]] is also another member of the [[Anime/CrossAnge Ancient People]] who seeks to overthrow Embryo.
*** [[Anime/MartianSuccessorNadesico Ruri]] is another successful [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSeed Ultimate Coordinator]].
*** [[spoiler:[[Anime/TheBraveExpressMightGaine Black Noir]] created Embryo, the male protagonists of the anime featured in the game, and a couple other things just to enjoy as a game. When Aeolia learned of Black Noir, the former created Veda as a countermeasure.]]
*** Much of the plot of ''[[Manga/GetterRobo Getter Robo Armageddon]]'' is folded into the plot of ''ShinMazinger'', such as Great Mazinger and Mazin Emperor G being powered by both getter rays and photonic energy and [[spoiler: Kenzo Kabuto constructing the Shin Getter Dragon.]]
22nd Feb '17 6:57:58 PM GoldenDarkness
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* ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEgdeworth'':

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* ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEgdeworth'':''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEdgeworth'':
8th Feb '17 6:58:27 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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* ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'' series is a major ArcWelding project for the works of Creator/StephenKing, bringing together multiple previously introduced concepts and characters for a SavingTheWorld plot of epic proportions. It had long been established that many of King's works took place in the same continuity (the towns of Derry and Castle Rock were recurring locations, and there were a few characters that appeared in multiple works), but their plots had generally stayed independent from one another before that point. ''The Dark Tower'' reveals that '''all''' of his works coexist with each other, even when they seem to take place in different universes--because his world is a {{multiverse}} where multiple parallel Earths exist simultaneously, and certain gifted characters can travel from one parallel world to another. To elaborate:
** The vampires from ''Literature/SalemsLot'' and the "Low Men" from [[Literature/HeartsInAtlantis "Low Men in Yellow Coats"]] are both part of a massive army commanded by the mysterious Crimson King from ''Literature/{{Insomnia}}''. Randall Flagg from ''Literature/TheStand'' and ''Literature/TheEyesOfTheDragon'' is the Crimson King's [[TheDragon Dragon]], serving as his emissary on Earth.
** The psychics Ted Brautigan (from "Low Men in Yellow Coats") and Dinky Earnshaw (from "Literature/EverythingsEventual") are two of many psychics being systematically tracked down and recruited by the Crimson King's agents so that they can harness their abilities to bring the Dark Tower crashing down. Though never stated, it's presumed that characters like Danny Torrance from ''Literature/TheShining'' and Carrie White from ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' are similar such psychics, and that their abilities could also bring down the Tower if so utilized.
** The mystical "Turtle" entity from ''Literature/{{It}}'' is "Maturin", one of several Guardian spirits that exists to protect the Dark Tower. Each world has its own Guardian (in Roland Deschain's world, for example, it's a bear called "Shardik"), and they all oppose the Crimson King in his quest to destroy reality.
** Project Arrowhead from ''Literature/TheMist'' is one of the few agencies ever to successfully discover the nature of the Multiverse, and their theory about the existence of parallel worlds was 100% true. Also, the titular mist was a "thinny", a weak spot in the barrier between parallel worlds that characteristically emits white fog and high-pitched keening noises that can drive a person insane. And the monsters from the mist were creatures from "Todash", the primordial darkness between worlds from which the Crimson King was born.
** The world of ''Literature/TheStand'', which becomes a post-apocalyptic wasteland in the wake of a disastrous plague, is one of many parallel worlds that exists in the Multiverse. Randall Flagg was trying to conquer that world in the name of the Crimson King, and he wanted to build his own new civilization atop the ashes so that his new subjects could be added to the Crimson King's army.
31st Jan '17 1:34:59 PM Anicomicgeek
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** Additionally, as noted before, Onslaught has his roots in the events of ''ComicBook/FatalAttractions'', has Xavier mindwiping Magneto following his ripping out Wolverine's Adamantium is what led to Onslaught's existence.

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** Additionally, as noted before, Onslaught has his roots in the events of ''ComicBook/FatalAttractions'', has as Xavier mindwiping Magneto following his ripping out Wolverine's Adamantium is what led to Onslaught's existence.
31st Jan '17 1:34:09 PM Anicomicgeek
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* ''ComicBook/{{Onslaught}}'' does this with two different elements:
** When Bishop first appeared in the Franchise/XMen comics, a key part of his backstory was finding a garbled tape of Jean Grey talking about a traitor in the X-Men's ranks who'd killed everyone, seemingly starting with Professor Xavier and that they shouldn't have trusted and something or someone. Furthermore, an older man known as the Witness is seemingly an older Gambit, being the only survivor, which led Bishop to suspect that Gambit was the traitor. When ''Onslaught'' finally kicked off, the one-shot ''Onslaught: X-Men'' tied the tape into its plot, showing it in its entirety: Professor Xavier himself was the traitor (this ''is'' ''Onslaught'' after all), Jean believed Juggernaut was the first to die, and that the X-Men should have suspected that Xavier's mindwipe of Magneto in ''Fatal Attractions'' could (and would) backfire (as it's what led into Onslaught).

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* ''ComicBook/{{Onslaught}}'' does this with two different three elements:
** When Bishop first appeared in the Franchise/XMen comics, a key part of his backstory was finding a garbled tape of Jean Grey talking about a traitor in the X-Men's ranks who'd killed everyone, seemingly starting with Professor Xavier and that they shouldn't have trusted and something or someone. Furthermore, an older man known as the Witness is seemingly an older Gambit, being the only survivor, which led Bishop to suspect that Gambit was the traitor. When ''Onslaught'' finally kicked off, the one-shot ''Onslaught: X-Men'' tied the tape into its plot, showing it in its entirety: Professor Xavier himself was the traitor (this ''is'' ''Onslaught'' after all), Jean believed Juggernaut was the first to die, and that the X-Men should have suspected that Xavier's mindwipe of Magneto in ''Fatal Attractions'' ''ComicBook/FatalAttractions'' could (and would) backfire (as it's what led into Onslaught).


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** Additionally, as noted before, Onslaught has his roots in the events of ''ComicBook/FatalAttractions'', has Xavier mindwiping Magneto following his ripping out Wolverine's Adamantium is what led to Onslaught's existence.
25th Jan '17 10:17:20 AM Gosicrystal
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* ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigations 1 and 2'': [[spoiler: The first four seemingly unrelated cases turn out to have all been part of the BigBad's BatmanGambit. In fact, the main point of the final case is for the player to figure it out. It is, however, subtly foreshadowed from the beginning, and the hints are there if you look for them.]]
** ''2'' alone has a couple even more surprising examples. [[spoiler:The Berry Big Circus, focal point of ''the'' most [[BrokenBase base breaking]] case in the series, [[ThatOneLevel Turnabout Big Top]], winds up being the place of employment and unwitting facilitator of several plans of that game's BigBad.]] Considering most of the references to non-Investigations games being little more than TheCameo, this one stands out. Meanwhile, ''2'' also ties in the main arc of the first game to an even ''greater'' scale, [[spoiler:due to the Inherited Turnabout prominently featuring playable segments as ''the'' [[PosthumousCharacter Gregory]] [[CrusadingLawyer Edgeworth]] during his ultimately-fatal last case. Due to tying it in with the ''Investigations'' games' MythArc, the events behind his final case against [[AmoralAttorney Manfred von Karma]] are given even ''more'' significance in the grand scheme of things.]]


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* ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEgdeworth'':
** In both games, [[spoiler:the first four seemingly unrelated cases turn out to have all been part of the BigBad's BatmanGambit. In fact, the main point of the final case is for the player to figure it out. It is, however, subtly foreshadowed from the beginning, and the hints are there if you look for them.]]
** In the second game, [[spoiler:the Berry Big Circus (focal point of ''the'' most base-breaking case in the series, "Turnabout Big Top") winds up being the place of employment and unwitting facilitator of several plans of that game's BigBad]]. Considering most of the references to non-Investigations games being little more than TheCameo, this one stands out. Meanwhile, ''2'' also ties in the main arc of the first game to an even ''greater'' scale, [[spoiler:due to the Inherited Turnabout prominently featuring playable segments as ''the'' [[PosthumousCharacter Gregory]] [[CrusadingLawyer Edgeworth]] during his ultimately-fatal last case. Due to tying it in with the ''Investigations'' games' MythArc, the events behind his final case against [[AmoralAttorney Manfred von Karma]] are given even ''more'' significance in the grand scheme of things.]]
22nd Jan '17 1:29:37 AM AtmosBlitzer
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* ''Anime/YuGiOh5DS'', the villains of the first major story arc are Roman Godwin and [[spoiler:his brother Rex]], who are revealed to be responsible for the Zero Reverse incident that severed Domino City in two. The next season revealed Roman's turn to evil was engineered by the AncientConspiracy Yliaster as a plot to destroy Domino City with Zero Reverse. After the three leaders of Yliaster were defeated, the founder of the organization, Z-one, appeared as the final antagonist of the series, picking up the trio's plans to destroy Domino. The final arc also revealed that Paradox, the antagonist of the Tenth Anniversary Movie, was also an agent of Yliaster working on a secondary plan in that film.

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* ''Anime/YuGiOh5DS'', the villains of the first major story arc are Roman Godwin and [[spoiler:his brother Rex]], who are revealed to be responsible for the Zero Reverse incident that severed Domino City in two. The next season revealed Roman's turn to evil was engineered by the AncientConspiracy Yliaster as a plot to destroy Domino City with Zero Reverse. After the three leaders of Yliaster were defeated, the founder of the organization, Z-one, appeared as the final antagonist of the series, picking up the trio's plans to destroy Domino. The final arc also revealed that Paradox, the antagonist of the Tenth Anniversary Movie, ''Anime/YuGiOhBondsBeyondTime'', was also an agent of Yliaster working on a secondary plan in that film.
This list shows the last 10 events of 392. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ArcWelding