History Main / AppropriatedAppellation

30th Sep '16 1:06:08 PM KJMackley
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** Subverted in ''Film/ManOfSteel''. Lois is ''about'' to suggest the name "Superman", but Supes interrupts her before she can say it.


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* ''Film/DCExtendedUniverse''
** Subverted in ''Film/ManOfSteel''. Lois is ''about'' to suggest the name "Superman", but the military party watching their conversation interrupts her. Later in the film, after Clark in costume is on good terms with the military after protecting them during an engagement with the Kryptonians, a soldier is talking to General Swanwick and using the term "Superman" to describe him. Swanwick gives him a "that's the stupidest thing I've ever heard" look. By ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', Superman is his acknowledged superhero name.
** ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'' generally avoids using "Batman" directly as a name, instead suggesting [[IHaveManyNames he has multiple names]] given by the press, from the bat, to the Gotham Bat to The Bat-Man.
** By ''Film/JusticeLeague'' most of the names of the heroes are taken from the Lex Corp metahuman files seen in BVS.
14th Sep '16 11:23:37 PM PaulA
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* In ''[[EndersGame Ender's Shadow]]'', Bean gets his name when some other street children are taunting him that he isn't worth a bean. He then immediately lampshades that the name sucks, but the mere fact that he has a name at all is enough of a sign of status that he'll take it.
** Ender himself gains his nickname because his older sister couldn't pronounce "Andrew."
*** He drops it for the sequels, though, after "Ender" becomes anathema.

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* In ''[[EndersGame Ender's Shadow]]'', ''Literature/EndersShadow'', Bean gets his name when some other street children are taunting him that he isn't worth a bean. He then immediately lampshades that the name sucks, but the mere fact that he has a name at all is enough of a sign of status that he'll take it.
** * In ''Literature/EndersGame'', Ender himself gains his nickname because his older sister couldn't pronounce "Andrew."
*** He drops it for the sequels, though, after "Ender" becomes anathema.
"Andrew".
12th Sep '16 2:23:07 PM ultimomant
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* the UrExample with the DCU was the entire, original ComicBook/DoomPatrol. The press gave them superhero handles, which they initially rejected as "freak names," but eventually embraced. (Though they never called ''each other'' by those names).

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* the The UrExample with the DCU was the entire, original ComicBook/DoomPatrol. The press gave them superhero handles, which they initially rejected as "freak names," but eventually embraced. (Though they never called ''each other'' by those names).



* In "Film/ShesOutOfMyLeague", the hero's best friend says that children taunted him with the name "stainer" after an accident, but the hero suggested he adopt it. Stainer's story is told near the end of the movie as an example of the hero's great qualities, after I'd spent 90 minutes thinking his name was Stayner.

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* In "Film/ShesOutOfMyLeague", ''Film/ShesOutOfMyLeague'', the hero's best friend says that children taunted him with the name "stainer" after an accident, but the hero suggested he adopt it. Stainer's story is told near the end of the movie as an example of the hero's great qualities, after I'd spent 90 minutes thinking his name was Stayner.




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* In ''Franchise/DevilMayCry'', Mary dislikes her own name and discards it because she hates her father and wants to distance herself from him. She takes the alias Lady after Dante goes "Whatever, Lady."
8th Sep '16 3:51:48 AM Medinoc
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* The Oathbreakers from ''Webcomic/ModestMedusa'' rebelled against their new leadership (breaking their oath doing so) and took the name for themselves.

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* The Oathbreakers from ''Webcomic/ModestMedusa'' rebelled against their new leadership (breaking their oath doing so) and took the name for themselves. They apply it to people they recruit, even when there's no oath involved.
21st Aug '16 10:34:21 AM nombretomado
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* In {{Drowtales}}, "Tainted" was originally an insult towards Drow who failed to control a summonned demon and got infected/partially possessed by it. Then some started to do this deliberately to gain immunity against full possession. They were derided and persecuted to some degree, but eventually adopted "Tainted" as their designation.

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* In {{Drowtales}}, ''Webcomic/{{Drowtales}}'', "Tainted" was originally an insult towards Drow who failed to control a summonned summoned demon and got infected/partially possessed by it. Then some started to do this deliberately to gain immunity against full possession. They were derided and persecuted to some degree, but eventually adopted "Tainted" as their designation.
11th Jul '16 8:28:54 PM Doug86
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* In ''ArtemisFowl: The Lost Colony'', the demon warlord Leon Abbott gives all the demons in his clan a name of his choosing when they metamorphose from imps into true demons, and refers to one of the imps as 'Number One' as an insult, because he is the only member of his brood who is reluctant to transform. By the end of the book, when it turns out that Number One is actually a warlock demon and will develop powerful magic and cerebral powers instead of transforming, he decides to take the name as his own.

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* In ''ArtemisFowl: ''Literature/ArtemisFowl: The Lost Colony'', the demon warlord Leon Abbott gives all the demons in his clan a name of his choosing when they metamorphose from imps into true demons, and refers to one of the imps as 'Number One' as an insult, because he is the only member of his brood who is reluctant to transform. By the end of the book, when it turns out that Number One is actually a warlock demon and will develop powerful magic and cerebral powers instead of transforming, he decides to take the name as his own.
10th Jul '16 4:19:50 PM ThenWhyNot
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* Brazilian [[UsefulNotes.AssociationFootball football]] player Paulo Henrique "Ganso" takes his nickname from how some employees in Santos F.C. called him when he was a teenager. In brazilian football slang, "Ganso" (goose) was used to describe young players who wouldn't become professionals because they lacked skill.
5th Jul '16 5:02:16 PM nombretomado
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* During TheGildedAge, [[PoliticalCartoon political cartoonist]] Thomas Nast started to caricature the Republican Party as an elephant -- for being bloated but unstoppable (in Nast's day, the GOP ran everything that wasn't the South or New York City) -- and popularized the use of the donkey to represent the Democratic Party (AndrewJackson had been called a "jackass" in the 1830s, and as the Democrats were seen as being rather obstinate in the late 19th century, the symbol was extremely fitting). The Republicans and Democrats adopted the animals as mascots, and use them to this day.

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* During TheGildedAge, [[PoliticalCartoon political cartoonist]] Thomas Nast started to caricature the Republican Party as an elephant -- for being bloated but unstoppable (in Nast's day, the GOP ran everything that wasn't the South or New York City) -- and popularized the use of the donkey to represent the Democratic Party (AndrewJackson (UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson had been called a "jackass" in the 1830s, and as the Democrats were seen as being rather obstinate in the late 19th century, the symbol was extremely fitting). The Republicans and Democrats adopted the animals as mascots, and use them to this day.
21st Jun '16 7:50:32 PM gewunomox
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* When the Yardbirds collapsed, leaving Jimmy Page as sole remaining member, he recruited three unknown musicians (they knew each other through session work) and carried on. Legal uncertainties caused them to become the New Yardbirds. Then TheWho's Keith Moon and John Entwistle made a remark about them going down "like a lead zeppelin". They adopted this name, changing the spelling to the familiar Music/LedZeppelin at the suggestion of their US distributor, who thought people might mispronounce (and misconstrue) "Lead" as if it were "'''lead''' a horse to water".

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* When the Yardbirds collapsed, leaving Jimmy Page as sole remaining member, he recruited three unknown musicians (they knew each other through session work) and carried on. Legal uncertainties caused them to become the New Yardbirds. Then TheWho's Music/TheWho's Keith Moon and John Entwistle made a remark about them going down "like a lead zeppelin". They adopted this name, changing the spelling to the familiar Music/LedZeppelin at the suggestion of their US distributor, who thought people might mispronounce (and misconstrue) "Lead" as if it were "'''lead''' a horse to water".
18th Jun '16 4:19:30 PM Lopiny
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* The online term "Social Justice Warrior", or "SJW", was created as a ironic pejorative term for people who often spoke negatively about sexism, racism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, or anything of that ilk to a tiresome extent. It was initially used to describe [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad overly-PC]] Website/{{Tumblr}}ites who had just found out what "cultural appropriation" meant and applied the term rather broadly, before expanding to become a general invective that could be yelled at anyone. Eventually, it was adopted as a self-descriptive term by geeky online folks with strong opinions about inclusivity and social equality, leading to a fad for replacing "warrior" with other ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' classes, and eventually [[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BzSuMiUIIAIclHG.jpg:large these buttons]] being sold at conventions. Its use as a pejorative does seem to have seen a resurgence as of late.
** Inversely, "Shitlord" was used as an insult to the kind of person against [=SJWs=] and meant sexist, homophobic, racist, etc; in just one word. The term became so overused and parodied, almost no one uses it anymore and the ones that do only call each other that as a friendly term to make fun of its lack of hurtful meaning.

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* The online term "Social Justice Warrior", or "SJW", was created as a ironic pejorative term for people who often spoke negatively about sexism, racism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, or anything of that ilk to a tiresome extent. It was initially used to describe [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad overly-PC]] Website/{{Tumblr}}ites who had just found out what "cultural appropriation" meant and applied the term rather broadly, before expanding to become a general invective that could be yelled at anyone. Eventually, it was adopted as a self-descriptive term by geeky online folks with strong opinions about inclusivity and social equality, leading to a fad for replacing "warrior" with other ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' classes, and eventually [[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BzSuMiUIIAIclHG.jpg:large these buttons]] being sold at conventions. Its use as a pejorative does seem to have seen a resurgence as of late.
late, as some of the aforementioned people took it increasingly far.
** Inversely, "Shitlord" was used as an insult to the kind of person against [=SJWs=] and meant sexist, homophobic, racist, etc; in just one word. The term became so overused and parodied, almost no one uses it anymore and the ones that do only call each other that as a friendly term to make fun of its lack of hurtful meaning.meaning, or (occasionally) as a sort of praise for someone who'd rather stand their ground when attacked by the aforementioned [=SJWs=].
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