History Main / AngstWhatAngst

20th Oct '17 8:52:12 PM PetroleumJerry
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** Clara Oswald's tenure is, if anything, a {{deconstruction}} of the whole trope, not helped by her tendency to act as a strong-willed, DontYouDarePityMe type of person, or the fact that her friendship with the Doctor is frequently mired in half-truths and misunderstandings (especially with the colder, more detached and more alien Twelfth Doctor). Whenever she's overcome by fear, grief, or anger, she tends to explode, averting the trope in infrequent but all the more heartbreaking outbursts. By her third series, she's forever lost the man she grew to love and has visibly changed from [[FunPersonified a cheerful and cheeky lady]] into [[BrokenBird a more worldweary and reckless figure]]. Even though the Doctor is trying to be a caring friend, he realises she's become numbed to emotional trauma after plenty of tragedies and has started bordering on a {{death seeker}}. This causes him to ''explicitly worry'' in front of her, despite himself having gone through many awful and infuriating things during his entire lifetime and needing her as his LivingEmotionalCrutch, while she keeps denying that her grief is making her increasingly depressed and jaded towards everything but her adrenaline junkie desires. And ''then'' she occasionally breaks down into a sobbing mess, regardless, proving that she's still traumatised by the deaths of her loved ones. In the end, the trope is reconstructed: When she [[spoiler: condemns herself to death]] in "Face the Raven", she accepts this as the bitter fruit of her recklessness and faces it with courage, telling the Doctor that both of them must be brave now. Unfortunately, as described above he has a SanitySlippage, [[spoiler: as she learns when he pulls her out of time. In the end, helping him move on leaves her functionally immortal with her own TARDIS and companion, able to have near-infinite adventures -- so long as she eventually returns to her death -- as a sadder, wiser, more cautious woman]].

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** Clara Oswald's tenure is, if anything, a {{deconstruction}} of the whole trope, not helped by her tendency to act as a strong-willed, DontYouDarePityMe type of person, or the fact that her friendship with the Doctor is frequently mired in misunderstandings, half-truths and misunderstandings flat-out lies (especially with the colder, more detached and more alien Twelfth Doctor). Whenever she's overcome by fear, grief, or anger, she tends to explode, averting the trope in infrequent but all the more heartbreaking outbursts. By her third series, she's forever lost the man she grew to love and has visibly changed from [[FunPersonified a cheerful and cheeky lady]] into [[BrokenBird a more worldweary and reckless figure]]. Even though the Doctor is trying to be a caring friend, he realises she's become numbed to emotional trauma after plenty of tragedies and has started bordering on a {{death seeker}}. This causes him to ''explicitly worry'' in front of her, despite himself having gone through many awful and infuriating things during his entire lifetime and needing her as his LivingEmotionalCrutch, while she keeps denying that her grief is making her increasingly depressed and jaded towards everything but her adrenaline junkie desires. And ''then'' she occasionally breaks down into a sobbing mess, regardless, proving that she's still traumatised by the deaths of her loved ones. In the end, the trope is reconstructed: When she [[spoiler: condemns herself to death]] in "Face the Raven", she accepts this as the bitter fruit of her recklessness and faces it with courage, telling the Doctor that both of them must be brave now. Unfortunately, as described above he has a SanitySlippage, [[spoiler: as she learns when he pulls her out of time. In the end, helping him move on leaves her functionally immortal with her own TARDIS and companion, able to have near-infinite adventures -- so long as she eventually returns to her death -- as a sadder, wiser, more cautious woman]].
2nd Oct '17 4:02:45 AM MathsAngelicVersion
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* Enforced in-universe in ''Literature/DiaryOfAWimpyKid: Double Down''. While working on their NoBudget indie horror film ''Night of the Night Crawlers'', Rowley is so freaked out that Greg has to shoehorn in a joke to keep him from running away. This joke turns out to be an unnamed man reacting to his wife's horrifying death by saying "Well, I guess this means I'm single!" and [[AsideGlance winking at the camera]].
6th Sep '17 5:52:56 AM GnomeTitan
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** ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' tends to have this as a result of the ResetButton. In a typical episode, [[TheCaptain Picard]] experiences the planet he grew up on destroyed and everyone he loved killed via implanted memories. There's a brief shot at the end when he looks sad, but then it's like it never happened. Ronald Moore said that the episode was sort of an accident; they were just concerned with making a good hour long story (and it is considered one of the best of the series) and didn't realize until it aired just how traumatized Picard should have been afterwards. They resolved to make a few {{continuity nod}}s and then just continue.
*** Being turned into Locutus in "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS3E26S4E1TheBestOfBothWorlds The Best of Both Worlds]]" makes it seem as if Picard is just going to shrug this one off, despite looking a little haunted at the final shot. Nope, the very next episode, "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS4E2Family Family]]" (FanNickName: "The Best of Both Worlds, Part III") has Picard collapsing in tears about how the Borg essentially ''raped'' him and forced him to experience every moment. You might think it's {{Catharsis}} in that episode, but ''nope''. Fast forward to ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', and we find Jean-Luc has not gotten over it ''at all'', and it's hinted he has nightmares about it ''all the time''.

to:

** ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' tends to have this as a result of the ResetButton. In a
*** A
typical episode, example is the episode where [[TheCaptain Picard]] experiences the planet he grew up on destroyed and everyone he loved killed via implanted memories. There's a brief shot at the end when he looks sad, but then it's like it never happened. Ronald Moore said that the episode was sort of an accident; they were just concerned with making a good hour long story (and it is considered one of the best of the series) and didn't realize until it aired just how traumatized Picard should have been afterwards. They resolved to make a few {{continuity nod}}s and then just continue.
*** Being turned into Locutus in "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS3E26S4E1TheBestOfBothWorlds The Best of Both Worlds]]" makes it seem as if Picard is just going to shrug this one off, off being assimilated and turned into Locutus, despite looking a little haunted at the final shot. Nope, the very next episode, "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS4E2Family Family]]" (FanNickName: "The Best of Both Worlds, Part III") has Picard collapsing in tears about how the Borg essentially ''raped'' him and forced him to experience every moment. You might think it's {{Catharsis}} in that episode, but ''nope''. Fast forward to ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', and we find Jean-Luc has not gotten over it ''at all'', and it's hinted he has nightmares about it ''all the time''.



** In ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' Captain Kirk was pretty bad about this. The most grating example had to be in "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E29OperationAnnihilate Operation: Annihilate!]]" where [[TheKirk Kirk's]] only brother and his sister-in-law died horribly, leaving their young son an orphan, only a week after Edith Keener's death. Not only does the episode end with [[EverybodyLaughsEnding on a bright, chipper note]] but we never even find out what happened to Kirk's nephew.

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** In ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''
***
Captain Kirk was is pretty bad about this. The most grating example had has to be in "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E29OperationAnnihilate Operation: Annihilate!]]" where [[TheKirk Kirk's]] only brother and his sister-in-law died die horribly, leaving their young son an orphan, only a week after Edith Keener's death. Not only does the episode end with [[EverybodyLaughsEnding on a bright, chipper note]] but we never even find out what happened to Kirk's nephew.



** T'Pol in ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'', after her mother's death. [[TheStoic Then again, she's a Vulcan, so she was probably repressing it.]] On the other hand, Trip still feels the death of his sister several episodes later and has nightmares about it.

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** ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise''
***
T'Pol in ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'', after her mother's death. [[TheStoic Then again, she's a Vulcan, so she was probably repressing it.]] On the other hand, Trip still feels the death of his sister several episodes later and has nightmares about it.



** ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'''s Harry Kim basically undergoes a seven-year TraumaCongaLine while lost in the Delta Quadrant -- ranging from torment by a MonsterClown to [[TheyKilledKennyAgain repeatedly getting killed]] -- and yet remains one of the most bright-eyed optimists on the ship.

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** ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'''s ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'': Harry Kim basically undergoes a seven-year TraumaCongaLine while lost in the Delta Quadrant -- ranging from torment by a MonsterClown to [[TheyKilledKennyAgain repeatedly getting killed]] -- and yet remains one of the most bright-eyed optimists on the ship.
4th Sep '17 9:28:59 PM Peteman
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** Clara Oswald's tenure is, if anything, a fairly brutal {{deconstruction}} of the whole trope, not helped by her tendency to act as a strong-willed, DontYouDarePityMe type of person, or the fact that her friendship with the Doctor is frequently mired in half-truths and misunderstandings (especially with the colder, more detached and more alien Twelfth Doctor). Whenever she's overcome by fear, grief, or anger, she tends to explode, averting the trope in infrequent but all the more heartbreaking outbursts. By her third series, she's forever lost the man she grew to love and has visibly changed from [[FunPersonified a cheerful and cheeky lady]] into [[BrokenBird a more worldweary and reckless figure]]. Even though the Doctor is trying to be a caring friend, he realises she's become numbed to emotional trauma after plenty of tragedies and has started bordering on a {{death seeker}}. This causes him to ''explicitly worry'' in front of her, despite himself having gone through many awful and infuriating things during his entire lifetime and needing her as his LivingEmotionalCrutch, while she keeps denying that her grief is making her increasingly depressed and jaded towards everything but her adrenaline junkie desires. And ''then'' she occasionally breaks down into a sobbing mess, regardless, proving that she's still traumatised by the deaths of her loved ones. In the end, the trope is reconstructed: When she [[spoiler: condemns herself to death]] in "Face the Raven", she accepts this as the bitter fruit of her recklessness and faces it with courage, telling the Doctor that both of them must be brave now. Unfortunately, as described above he has a SanitySlippage, [[spoiler: as she learns when he pulls her out of time. In the end, helping him move on leaves her functionally immortal with her own TARDIS and companion, able to have near-infinite adventures -- so long as she eventually returns to her death -- as a sadder, wiser, more cautious woman]].

to:

** Clara Oswald's tenure is, if anything, a fairly brutal {{deconstruction}} of the whole trope, not helped by her tendency to act as a strong-willed, DontYouDarePityMe type of person, or the fact that her friendship with the Doctor is frequently mired in half-truths and misunderstandings (especially with the colder, more detached and more alien Twelfth Doctor). Whenever she's overcome by fear, grief, or anger, she tends to explode, averting the trope in infrequent but all the more heartbreaking outbursts. By her third series, she's forever lost the man she grew to love and has visibly changed from [[FunPersonified a cheerful and cheeky lady]] into [[BrokenBird a more worldweary and reckless figure]]. Even though the Doctor is trying to be a caring friend, he realises she's become numbed to emotional trauma after plenty of tragedies and has started bordering on a {{death seeker}}. This causes him to ''explicitly worry'' in front of her, despite himself having gone through many awful and infuriating things during his entire lifetime and needing her as his LivingEmotionalCrutch, while she keeps denying that her grief is making her increasingly depressed and jaded towards everything but her adrenaline junkie desires. And ''then'' she occasionally breaks down into a sobbing mess, regardless, proving that she's still traumatised by the deaths of her loved ones. In the end, the trope is reconstructed: When she [[spoiler: condemns herself to death]] in "Face the Raven", she accepts this as the bitter fruit of her recklessness and faces it with courage, telling the Doctor that both of them must be brave now. Unfortunately, as described above he has a SanitySlippage, [[spoiler: as she learns when he pulls her out of time. In the end, helping him move on leaves her functionally immortal with her own TARDIS and companion, able to have near-infinite adventures -- so long as she eventually returns to her death -- as a sadder, wiser, more cautious woman]].
23rd Aug '17 8:47:57 AM BackwardThgindiM
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-->'''[[spoiler:Lup:]]''' I believe that one of these times, we're gonna get it right, and we're gonna find a way to defeat [[spoiler:the hunger and save everybody inside of it.]] I have to believe that to keep doing what we do because I have to believe that I'm gonna get those fifteen dollars back from Greg ''fucking'' Grimaldis!
23rd Aug '17 8:46:49 AM BackwardThgindiM
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-->'''[[spoiler:Lup:]]''' I believe that one of these times, we're gonna get it right, and we're gonna find a way to defeat [[ spoiler:the hunger and save everybody inside of it.]] I have to believe that to keep doing what we do because I have to believe that I'm gonna get those fifteen dollars back from Greg ''fucking'' Grimaldis!

to:

-->'''[[spoiler:Lup:]]''' I believe that one of these times, we're gonna get it right, and we're gonna find a way to defeat [[ spoiler:the [[spoiler:the hunger and save everybody inside of it.]] I have to believe that to keep doing what we do because I have to believe that I'm gonna get those fifteen dollars back from Greg ''fucking'' Grimaldis!
23rd Aug '17 8:45:48 AM BackwardThgindiM
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* This trope defines Magnus, Merle, and Taako throughout first few arcs of ''Podcast/TheAdventureZone''. They [[spoilers: destroy a city, commit several murders, come close to death, are inducted into a secret organization, and lose friends]] for over 30 episodes before any one of them shows any sign of caring. As the show goes on and the stakes get higher, this is phased out somewhat (but not completely).
-->'''[[spoilers: Lup:]]''' I believe that one of these times, we're gonna get it right, and we're gonna find a way to defeat [[ spoilers:the hunger and save everybody inside of it.]] I have to believe that to keep doing what we do because I have to believe that I'm gonna get those fifteen dollars back from Greg ''fucking'' Grimaldis!

to:

* This trope defines Magnus, Merle, and Taako throughout first few arcs of ''Podcast/TheAdventureZone''. They [[spoilers: destroy [[spoiler:destroy a city, commit several murders, come close to death, are inducted into a secret organization, and lose friends]] for over 30 episodes before any one of them shows any sign of caring. As the show goes on and the stakes get higher, this is phased out somewhat (but not completely).
-->'''[[spoilers: Lup:]]''' -->'''[[spoiler:Lup:]]''' I believe that one of these times, we're gonna get it right, and we're gonna find a way to defeat [[ spoilers:the spoiler:the hunger and save everybody inside of it.]] I have to believe that to keep doing what we do because I have to believe that I'm gonna get those fifteen dollars back from Greg ''fucking'' Grimaldis!
23rd Aug '17 8:44:56 AM BackwardThgindiM
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* This trope defines Magnus, Merle, and Taako throughout first few arcs of [[TheAdventureZone]]. They [[spoilers:destroy a city, commit several murders, come close to death, are inducted into a secret organization, and lose friends]] for over 30 episodes before any one of them shows any sign of caring. As the show goes on and the stakes get higher, this is phased out somewhat (but not completely).
-->[[spoilers: '''Lup:''']] I believe that one of these times, we're gonna get it right, and we're gonna find a way to defeat [[spoilers:the hunger]] and save everyone inside of it. I have to believe that to keep doing what we do because I have to believe that I'm gonna get those fifteen dollars back from Greg ''fucking'' Grimaldis!

to:

* This trope defines Magnus, Merle, and Taako throughout first few arcs of [[TheAdventureZone]]. ''Podcast/TheAdventureZone''. They [[spoilers:destroy [[spoilers: destroy a city, commit several murders, come close to death, are inducted into a secret organization, and lose friends]] for over 30 episodes before any one of them shows any sign of caring. As the show goes on and the stakes get higher, this is phased out somewhat (but not completely).
-->[[spoilers: '''Lup:''']] -->'''[[spoilers: Lup:]]''' I believe that one of these times, we're gonna get it right, and we're gonna find a way to defeat [[spoilers:the hunger]] [[ spoilers:the hunger and save everyone everybody inside of it. it.]] I have to believe that to keep doing what we do because I have to believe that I'm gonna get those fifteen dollars back from Greg ''fucking'' Grimaldis!
23rd Aug '17 8:42:51 AM BackwardThgindiM
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Added DiffLines:

* This trope defines Magnus, Merle, and Taako throughout first few arcs of [[TheAdventureZone]]. They [[spoilers:destroy a city, commit several murders, come close to death, are inducted into a secret organization, and lose friends]] for over 30 episodes before any one of them shows any sign of caring. As the show goes on and the stakes get higher, this is phased out somewhat (but not completely).
-->[[spoilers: '''Lup:''']] I believe that one of these times, we're gonna get it right, and we're gonna find a way to defeat [[spoilers:the hunger]] and save everyone inside of it. I have to believe that to keep doing what we do because I have to believe that I'm gonna get those fifteen dollars back from Greg ''fucking'' Grimaldis!
14th Aug '17 8:17:26 AM ClintEastwood
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*** Being turned into Locutus in "The Best of Both Worlds" makes it seem as if Picard is just going to shrug this one off, despite looking a little haunted at the final shot. Nope, the very next episode, "Family" (FanNickName: "The Best of Both Worlds, Part III") has Picard collapsing in tears about how the Borg essentially ''raped'' him and forced him to experience every moment. You might think it's {{Catharsis}} in that episode, but ''nope''. Fast forward to ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', and we find Jean-Luc has not gotten over it ''at all'', and it's hinted he has nightmares about it ''all the time''.
*** The episode "The Wounded" introduced Chief O'Brien's former CO, Captain Maxwell, whose wife and children were killed DuringTheWar with the Cardassians. Picard believes Maxwell's current unauthorized attacks on Cardassian ships are [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge motivated by vengeance]], but O'Brien insists Maxwell remained [[TheStoic stoic]] and [[SadClown in good humour]] after his family's deaths and he must have a good reason for attacking the Cardassians. [[spoiler:Turns out they're both right.]]
** In ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' Captain Kirk was pretty bad about this. The most grating example had to be in "Operation: Annihilate" where [[TheKirk Kirk's]] only brother and his sister-in-law died horribly, leaving their young son an orphan, only a week after Edith Keener's death. Not only does the episode end with [[EverybodyLaughsEnding on a bright, chipper note]] but we never even find out what happened to Kirk's nephew.

to:

*** Being turned into Locutus in "The "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS3E26S4E1TheBestOfBothWorlds The Best of Both Worlds" Worlds]]" makes it seem as if Picard is just going to shrug this one off, despite looking a little haunted at the final shot. Nope, the very next episode, "Family" "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS4E2Family Family]]" (FanNickName: "The Best of Both Worlds, Part III") has Picard collapsing in tears about how the Borg essentially ''raped'' him and forced him to experience every moment. You might think it's {{Catharsis}} in that episode, but ''nope''. Fast forward to ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', and we find Jean-Luc has not gotten over it ''at all'', and it's hinted he has nightmares about it ''all the time''.
*** The episode "The Wounded" "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS4E12TheWounded}} The Wounded]]" introduced Chief O'Brien's former CO, Captain Maxwell, whose wife and children were killed DuringTheWar with the Cardassians. Picard believes Maxwell's current unauthorized attacks on Cardassian ships are [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge motivated by vengeance]], but O'Brien insists Maxwell remained [[TheStoic stoic]] and [[SadClown in good humour]] after his family's deaths and he must have a good reason for attacking the Cardassians. [[spoiler:Turns out they're both right.]]
** In ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' Captain Kirk was pretty bad about this. The most grating example had to be in "Operation: Annihilate" "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E29OperationAnnihilate Operation: Annihilate!]]" where [[TheKirk Kirk's]] only brother and his sister-in-law died horribly, leaving their young son an orphan, only a week after Edith Keener's death. Not only does the episode end with [[EverybodyLaughsEnding on a bright, chipper note]] but we never even find out what happened to Kirk's nephew.



*** Gary Mitchell, who is made out to be Kirk's good friend from years back [[AGodAmI goes mad from receiving godlike powers]] and Kirk is forced to kill him. [[ForgottenFallenFriend No mention is made of it afterwards.]]

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*** [[Recap/StarTrekS1E3WhereNoManHasGoneBefore Where No Man Has Gone Before Gary Mitchell, Mitchell]], who is made out to be Kirk's good friend from years back [[AGodAmI goes mad from receiving godlike powers]] and Kirk is forced to kill him. [[ForgottenFallenFriend No mention is made of it afterwards.]]



** In the ''second'' episode Xander and Willow's so-called [[TrueCompanions best friend]] gets turned into a vampire, and Xander is forced to slay him. Neither Xander nor Willow seem that affected by this event, especially over the long term. Said friend is never mentioned again; indeed some people (like the original writer of this entry) couldn't even remember his name (it's Jesse). Worse, this was their first exposure to the fact that [[BrokenMasquerade vampires are real]]. The situation might have been different if the [[WhatCouldHaveBeen development plans for Jesse]] had come through, since a proposed line was for him to become a recurring, unapologetic vampire opponent (like vamp!Xander and vamp!Willow in the Wishverse).

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** In [[Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS1E2TheHarvest The Harvest]] the ''second'' episode episode]] Xander and Willow's so-called [[TrueCompanions best friend]] gets turned into a vampire, and Xander is forced to slay him. Neither Xander nor Willow seem that affected by this event, especially over the long term. Said friend is never mentioned again; indeed some people (like the original writer of this entry) couldn't even remember his name (it's Jesse). Worse, this was their first exposure to the fact that [[BrokenMasquerade vampires are real]]. The situation might have been different if the [[WhatCouldHaveBeen development plans for Jesse]] had come through, since a proposed line was for him to become a recurring, unapologetic vampire opponent (like vamp!Xander and vamp!Willow in the Wishverse).



** The Doctor himself has gone back and forth on this. Often serials would have a very BittersweetEnding with a high body count, and the Doctor mourning the senseless tragedy of it all. Next serial he'd be up for a bit more fun sightseeing, even when it's made clear that little time has past between stories. One explanation -- and justification of this trope -- running since the First Doctor days and made more explicit in the new series is that the Doctor feels the angst all too much (especially the destruction of his own people between the original show and the revival), but ''must'' keep running. To dwell on all the horror he has faced would mean a one way trip across the DespairEventHorizon. Like the First Doctor says hugging Dodo after "The Savages", he ''must never look back!''
*** For further justification, the finale three-parter of Series 9 ("Face the Raven"/"Heaven Sent"/"Hell Bent") examines '''exactly''' what happens to the Doctor if he isn't able to run. Beloved companion Clara Oswald -- whose status as a deconstruction of this trope is described below -- [[spoiler: dies in a Senseless Sacrfice]], an event inadvertently resulting from a plot hatched against him by [[spoiler: Ashildr]] and, even worse, [[spoiler: his own people]]. '''Immediately''' after this he is sent to, in his words, a "bespoke torture chamber" where the only other being is a MonsterOfTheWeek with a TouchOfDeath and the way to escape is something he has to figure out for himself. This season, he'd been criticized several times for moving on from adventure to adventure without thinking through the long-term consequences of his rasher actions on others, such as saving Ashildr's life in a way that made her immortal and leaving her to TheSlowPath. But trapped and unable to process his grief and rage, he '''''goes insane''''', ultimately suffering for [[spoiler: four-and-a-half billion years by choice]]. He emerges TheUnfettered WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds and puts a TragicDream above everything else, even ''the existence of space and time themselves''. He does come back from crossing the DespairEventHorizon, but regaining his self and sanity and moving on requires [[spoiler: a Mind Rape]] to diminish the anguish he feels over recent events. In the end, the story is a reconstruction of this trope: His choice to just accept what he has gone through -- and will go through -- instead of letting anguish control him, and to continue running and helping others, is portrayed as the best thing he can do. In the next episode, he takes the lessons he learned to hearts and by accepting [[spoiler: the inevitability of River Song's death]] manages to earn a happy ending for himself [[spoiler: and her as well, as he chooses to see through their last night together...which lasts twenty-four years]].
** The first companion to leave in the whole show is Susan, the Doctor's own granddaughter. He quietly misses her for a few moments during "The Rescue", but then he picks up Vicki, a ReplacementGoldfish granddaughter who, unlike Susan, tends to be the Doctor's chirpy sidekick instead of the ScreamingWoman. This suits the Doctor's selfishness and BlueAndOrangeMorality, but isn't exactly sympathetic to consider in any depth. Susan presents all sorts of problems in this regard as she [[TheArtifact was a companion from a very different show to what the show eventually became]] and being the only companion the Doctor has no reason never to go back for - the show did its best in the old days to deal with this by simply forgetting she ever existed. The ExpandedUniverse even suggests that the Doctor even ''forgot all about Susan'', but the revival series has both the Ninth and Tenth Doctor mention being a grandparent in a far more angsty way.
** "Doctor Who and the Silurians" is a harrowing story with a colossal body count where the Doctor is stuck mediating between the Silurians and the humans, both of whom are trying to kill each other out of racist paranoia even though the Doctor is convinced they could talk it out. At the end of the story, hundreds of humans are dead from the Silurian plague, and the Brigadier's misguided attempts to protect humanity from further warfare led him to simply murder all of the defenceless Silurians in suspended animation, metaphorically stabbing the Doctor in the back in order to do so. The final image of the story is the Doctor looking down at the explosion in horror, declaring that the Brigadier had committed murder. The following story, "The Ambassadors of Death", opens with the Doctor in a new house making the TARDIS console do TimeyWimeyBall tricks and still working for the Brigadier like nothing has happened, with the exception of one throwaway barbed comment about the Brigadier being bored because he can't find more Silurians to shoot.
** Averted as strongly as the Classic series ever really really managed in the aftermath to "Inferno" (the finale of Season 7), in which the Doctor's failure to save the MirrorUniverse Earth (and being forced by the laws of time and space to abandon the versions of his friends he met there to die) strongly affects his personality from that point on - he becomes colder and shorter-tempered and alludes to it often. His EstablishingCharacterMoment in the next season is him singing "[[Music/TheInkSpots I Don't Want to Set the World on Fire]]", and when getting a MindRape from the Keller Machine in "The Mind of Evil" he hallucinates fire and explains to Jo that it's trauma. He also experiences fire in the nightmare he has at the beginning of "The Time Monster".

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** The Doctor himself has gone back and forth on this. Often serials would have a very BittersweetEnding with a high body count, and the Doctor mourning the senseless tragedy of it all. Next serial he'd be up for a bit more fun sightseeing, even when it's made clear that little time has past between stories. One explanation -- and justification of this trope -- running since the First Doctor days and made more explicit in the new series is that the Doctor feels the angst all too much (especially the destruction of his own people between the original show and the revival), but ''must'' keep running. To dwell on all the horror he has faced would mean a one way trip across the DespairEventHorizon. Like the First Doctor says hugging Dodo after "The Savages", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E9TheSavages The Savages]]", he ''must never look back!''
*** For further justification, the finale three-parter of Series 9 ("Face ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E10FaceTheRaven Face the Raven"/"Heaven Sent"/"Hell Bent") Raven]]"[=]/[=]"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent Heaven Sent]]"[=]/[=]"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]") examines '''exactly''' what happens to the Doctor if he isn't able to run. Beloved companion Clara Oswald -- whose status as a deconstruction of this trope is described below -- [[spoiler: dies in a Senseless Sacrfice]], an event inadvertently resulting from a plot hatched against him by [[spoiler: Ashildr]] and, even worse, [[spoiler: his own people]]. '''Immediately''' after this he is sent to, in his words, a "bespoke torture chamber" where the only other being is a MonsterOfTheWeek with a TouchOfDeath and the way to escape is something he has to figure out for himself. This season, he'd been criticized several times for moving on from adventure to adventure without thinking through the long-term consequences of his rasher actions on others, such as saving Ashildr's life in a way that made her immortal and leaving her to TheSlowPath. But trapped and unable to process his grief and rage, he '''''goes insane''''', ultimately suffering for [[spoiler: four-and-a-half billion years by choice]]. He emerges TheUnfettered WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds and puts a TragicDream above everything else, even ''the existence of space and time themselves''. He does come back from crossing the DespairEventHorizon, but regaining his self and sanity and moving on requires [[spoiler: a Mind Rape]] MindRape]] to diminish the anguish he feels over recent events. In the end, the story is a reconstruction of this trope: His choice to just accept what he has gone through -- and will go through -- instead of letting anguish control him, and to continue running and helping others, is portrayed as the best thing he can do. In the next episode, he takes the lessons he learned to hearts and by accepting [[spoiler: the inevitability of River Song's death]] manages to earn a happy ending for himself [[spoiler: and her as well, as he chooses to see through their last night together...which lasts twenty-four years]].
** The first companion to leave in the whole show is Susan, the Doctor's own granddaughter. He quietly misses her for a few moments during "The Rescue", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E3TheRescue The Rescue]]", but then he picks up Vicki, a ReplacementGoldfish granddaughter who, unlike Susan, tends to be the Doctor's chirpy sidekick instead of the ScreamingWoman. This suits the Doctor's selfishness and BlueAndOrangeMorality, but isn't exactly sympathetic to consider in any depth. Susan presents all sorts of problems in this regard as she [[TheArtifact was a companion from a very different show to what the show eventually became]] and being the only companion the Doctor has no reason never to go back for - the show did its best in the old days to deal with this by simply forgetting she ever existed. The ExpandedUniverse even suggests that the Doctor even ''forgot all about Susan'', but the revival series has both the Ninth and Tenth Doctor mention being a grandparent in a far more angsty way.
** "Doctor "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E2DoctorWhoAndTheSilurians Doctor Who and the Silurians" Silurians]]" is a harrowing story with a colossal body count where the Doctor is stuck mediating between the Silurians and the humans, both of whom are trying to kill each other out of racist paranoia even though the Doctor is convinced they could talk it out. At the end of the story, hundreds of humans are dead from the Silurian plague, and the Brigadier's misguided attempts to protect humanity from further warfare led him to simply murder all of the defenceless Silurians in suspended animation, metaphorically stabbing the Doctor in the back in order to do so. The final image of the story is the Doctor looking down at the explosion in horror, declaring that the Brigadier had committed murder. The following story, "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E3TheAmbassadorsOfDeath The Ambassadors of Death", Death]]", opens with the Doctor in a new house making the TARDIS console do TimeyWimeyBall tricks and still working for the Brigadier like nothing has happened, with the exception of one throwaway barbed comment about the Brigadier being bored because he can't find more Silurians to shoot.
** Averted as strongly as the Classic series ever really really managed in the aftermath to "Inferno" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E4Inferno Inferno]]" (the finale of Season 7), in which the Doctor's failure to save the MirrorUniverse Earth (and being forced by the laws of time and space to abandon the versions of his friends he met there to die) strongly affects his personality from that point on - he becomes colder and shorter-tempered and alludes to it often. His EstablishingCharacterMoment in the next season is him singing "[[Music/TheInkSpots I Don't Want to Set the World on Fire]]", and when getting a MindRape from the Keller Machine in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E2TheMindOfEvil The Mind of Evil" Evil]]" he hallucinates fire and explains to Jo that it's trauma. He also experiences fire in the nightmare he has at the beginning of "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E5TheTimeMonster The Time Monster".Monster]]".



** Dealt with interestingly in Season 14. The Doctor in "The Face of Evil" is rather chirpy considering he's just been dumped by Sarah before having an unusually harrowing experience involving the Master and a lot of torture... but the opening of "The Robots of Death" has him give his age to Leela, and it's [[TimeSkip a year higher than it had been a couple of episodes ago]]. Presumably he did his brooding offscreen. The ExpandedUniverse plugs the gap here.

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** Dealt with interestingly in Season 14. The Doctor in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E4TheFaceOfEvil The Face of Evil" Evil]]" is rather chirpy considering he's just been dumped by Sarah before having an unusually harrowing experience involving the Master and a lot of torture... but the opening of "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E5TheRobotsOfDeath The Robots of Death" Death]]" has him give his age to Leela, and it's [[TimeSkip a year higher than it had been a couple of episodes ago]]. Presumably he did his brooding offscreen. The ExpandedUniverse plugs the gap here.



-->"If you look at the Tom Baker stuff, it's especially dark. When he leaves Leela who's a very beloved assistant he just laughs after it. There's none of the [breaking down and crying]. He just laughs, and "on to the next one," you know."

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-->"If you look at the Tom Baker Creator/TomBaker stuff, it's especially dark. When he leaves Leela who's a very beloved assistant he just laughs after it. There's none of the [breaking down and crying]. He just laughs, and "on to the next one," you know."



** Matthew Waterhouse (Adric) thinks this was the reason the show treated much of the universe as a ThrowAwayCountry after its destruction in "Logopolis" - there was no way to deal with the implications of what had happened, and the characters' participation (however unwitting) in it, without derailing the show. (The [[TakeAThirdOption third option]] would have been not to have such a huge catastrophe in the first place, but anyway.) Nyssa, who was ''from'' that part of the universe, is visibly choked up, her voice breaking (or shaking with suppressed rage, its hard to tell which) when watching Traken's destruction. After that, events moved with enough speed and desperation that she wouldn't have had a ''chance'' to emotionally break down until the end of the story arc, at which point she presumably did her mourning offstage in the time gap between episodes. It's also entirely in-character for Nyssa to ''not'' go around emotionally freaking out; unlike some of the more higher-strung Companions, Nyssa's hat was being the calm and intelligent one.
** Ended up being something of a signature trope of the Peter Davison era, as an unfortunate result of (not entirely unsuccessful) attempts to ramp up the drama and conflict, presided over by a bunch of sci-fi and light entertainment writers and producers who didn't really understand how to pull this off. Nyssa's father's corpse is being worn by a mad Time Lord constantly trying to kill her!... and she never mentions it at all or even reacts. Tegan's aunt is killed by the Master!... "...and what's worse, I'm late for work!". Adric dies in a brilliant and painful sequence!... and in the next episode the Doctor says Adric wouldn't want everyone to mourn and everything is forgotten! The Doctor is introduced to his granddaughter who he abandoned centuries ago in a war zone and vowed through suppressed tears that he would come back for her!... and says "Yes, I know".

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** Matthew Waterhouse Creator/MatthewWaterhouse (Adric) thinks this was the reason the show treated much of the universe as a ThrowAwayCountry after its destruction in "Logopolis" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E7Logopolis Logopolis]]" - there was no way to deal with the implications of what had happened, and the characters' participation (however unwitting) in it, without derailing the show. (The [[TakeAThirdOption third option]] would have been not to have such a huge catastrophe in the first place, but anyway.) Nyssa, who was ''from'' that part of the universe, is visibly choked up, her voice breaking (or shaking with suppressed rage, its hard to tell which) when watching Traken's destruction. After that, events moved with enough speed and desperation that she wouldn't have had a ''chance'' to emotionally break down until the end of the story arc, at which point she presumably did her mourning offstage in the time gap between episodes. It's also entirely in-character for Nyssa to ''not'' go around emotionally freaking out; unlike some of the more higher-strung Companions, Nyssa's hat was being the calm and intelligent one.
** Ended up being something of a signature trope of the Peter Davison Creator/PeterDavison era, as an unfortunate result of (not entirely unsuccessful) attempts to ramp up the drama and conflict, presided over by a bunch of sci-fi and light entertainment writers and producers who didn't really understand how to pull this off. Nyssa's father's corpse is being worn by a mad Time Lord constantly trying to kill her!... and she never mentions it at all or even reacts. Tegan's aunt is killed by the Master!... "...and what's worse, I'm late for work!". Adric dies in a brilliant and painful sequence!... and in the next episode the Doctor says Adric wouldn't want everyone to mourn and everything is forgotten! The Doctor is introduced to his granddaughter who he abandoned centuries ago in a war zone and vowed through suppressed tears that he would come back for her!... and says "Yes, I know".



* ''Series/FawltyTowers'' lost a good joke because of John Cleese's unwillingness to do this. In an episode where a guest dies and Basil and Manuel have to carry the body around without anyone noticing, the original ending was that the guest's twin brother arrived, greatly upsetting Basil who thought he was the guest and had been pranking him. Cleese realized that at some point the man would have to catch on that his brother was dead, which would ruin any comedy.

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* ''Series/FawltyTowers'' lost a good joke because of John Cleese's Creator/JohnCleese's unwillingness to do this. In an episode where a guest dies and Basil and Manuel have to carry the body around without anyone noticing, the original ending was that the guest's twin brother arrived, greatly upsetting Basil who thought he was the guest and had been pranking him. Cleese realized that at some point the man would have to catch on that his brother was dead, which would ruin any comedy.



** The kids never show any emotion, besides their trademark line, when [[TheyKilledKennyAgain Kenny is killed]]. One episode reveals that [[TheChewToy Kenny]] is the only one aware he ever died. Everyone else forgets it ever happened the next morning. {{Deconstructed|Trope}} in "Kenny Dies," which has Kenny diagnosed with a terminal disease and [[PlayingWithATrope plays it straight]]. As an added twist, this death actually stuck; the creators intended to have him KilledOffForReal, but did eventually resurrect him by the end of the next season.

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** The kids never show any emotion, besides their trademark line, when [[TheyKilledKennyAgain Kenny is killed]]. One episode reveals that [[TheChewToy Kenny]] is the only one aware he ever died. Everyone else forgets it ever happened the next morning. {{Deconstructed|Trope}} in "Kenny Dies," "[[Recap/SouthParkS5E13KennyDies Kenny Dies]]," which has Kenny diagnosed with a terminal disease and [[PlayingWithATrope plays it straight]]. As an added twist, this death actually stuck; the creators intended to have him KilledOffForReal, but did eventually resurrect him by the end of the next season.
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