History Main / AlternativeCalendar

22nd Jun '16 12:21:04 PM DaNuke
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* [[AllThereInTheManual According to Curiosities of Lotus Asia]], {{Youkai}} from ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' have their own calendar, which is adjusted to natural phenomena (such as earthquakes or the blooming of bamboo flowers) and [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld extended life spans]]. Few of the creatures actually use it, though. As a whole, Gensokyou also uses an alternate calendar based around the creation of the great barrier.

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* [[AllThereInTheManual According ''[[VideoGame/{{Touhou}} Touhou Project]]'', according to ''[[AllThereInTheManual Curiosities of Lotus Asia]], {{Youkai}} Asia]]'', has two calendars: the official Gensokyo calendar that measures years as "seasons", starting from ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' have their own 1885 when the Hakurei Barrier was created, which uses the plain ol' Gregorian calendar but with traditional Japanese names (April, May and June, for example, become "Uzuki", "Satsuki" and "Minazuki"). There is also an unspecified {{youkai}} calendar, which is adjusted to natural phenomena (such as like earthquakes or the blooming of bamboo flowers) and [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld flowers, which takes into account the youkai's extended life spans]]. Few of the creatures lifespans, but few youkai actually use it, though. As a whole, Gensokyou also uses an alternate calendar based around the creation of the great barrier.it.
2nd Jun '16 12:10:35 PM Eievie
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A common Year One, Day One in science fiction is October 4, 1957 - the date Sputnik was launched, thereby beginning the Space Age.

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A common Year One, Day One in science fiction is October 4, 1957 - the 1957--the date Sputnik was launched, thereby beginning the Space Age.



[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]
22nd May '16 1:02:58 AM morane
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Added DiffLines:

** Not only did the Hobbits and Dwarves have their own calendars, but so did Elves and Númenorean/Gondorean Men as well. The Númenorean calendar [[ShownTheirWork is based on French Republican Calendar with names of the months translated into Elvish]].
21st May '16 3:27:31 AM Morgenthaler
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*** The custom is common among Semitic languages; the Arabic days of the week (Al-Ahad, al-Ithnayn, al-Thulatha'...) mostly translate to "First, Second, Third...," but Friday is "al-Jumu`ah," or "Gathering" (because it's the day of praying together in the mosque) and Saturday is "al-Sabt". ''Al-Sabt'' comes from the same common the same root as "Shabbat," which appears to be influenced by (but not directly derived from) the common Semitic root S-B-` (realized in Arabic as ''saba`ah'' and in Hebrew as ''shev`a''), as both Hebrew and Arabic reckon Sunday as the "first day" of the week. ''Al-Sabt'' is mentioned in TheQuran as the day on which God rested after creating the world (as in TheBookOfGenesis), and the Muslim Sabbath was on Saturday (and Muslims prayed toward Jerusalem) until the Jews of Medina pissed Muhammad and the Muslim community off. At that point, they changed the direction of prayer to Makkah (an almost literal about-face--Medina is about halfway between the two) and changed the Sabbath to Friday (honoring the last day of creation, on which He created Man), which became ''al-Jumu`ah'' to reflect this change (to pagan Arabs, Friday was ''al-Suds'', "Sixth Day", while Saturday was always ''al-Sabt'', reflecting common Semitic tradition). Interestingly, this allows the days of the week to line up with the workweek in some countries; some Arabic-speaking countries (e.g. Egypt) have Friday-Saturday weekends, meaning that the workweek starts on "First Day."

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*** The custom is common among Semitic languages; the Arabic days of the week (Al-Ahad, al-Ithnayn, al-Thulatha'...) mostly translate to "First, Second, Third...," but Friday is "al-Jumu`ah," or "Gathering" (because it's the day of praying together in the mosque) and Saturday is "al-Sabt". ''Al-Sabt'' comes from the same common the same root as "Shabbat," which appears to be influenced by (but not directly derived from) the common Semitic root S-B-` (realized in Arabic as ''saba`ah'' and in Hebrew as ''shev`a''), as both Hebrew and Arabic reckon Sunday as the "first day" of the week. ''Al-Sabt'' is mentioned in TheQuran Literature/TheQuran as the day on which God rested after creating the world (as in TheBookOfGenesis), and the Muslim Sabbath was on Saturday (and Muslims prayed toward Jerusalem) until the Jews of Medina pissed Muhammad and the Muslim community off. At that point, they changed the direction of prayer to Makkah (an almost literal about-face--Medina is about halfway between the two) and changed the Sabbath to Friday (honoring the last day of creation, on which He created Man), which became ''al-Jumu`ah'' to reflect this change (to pagan Arabs, Friday was ''al-Suds'', "Sixth Day", while Saturday was always ''al-Sabt'', reflecting common Semitic tradition). Interestingly, this allows the days of the week to line up with the workweek in some countries; some Arabic-speaking countries (e.g. Egypt) have Friday-Saturday weekends, meaning that the workweek starts on "First Day."
20th May '16 10:47:31 AM Doug86
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* In ''Literature/StarTrekDepartmentOfTemporalInvestigations'', alongside multiple human calendars including Christian, Islamic, Hindu and Mayan examples, the chapter headings include dating systems from many Star Trek cultures, including Vulcan, Andorian, Cardassian, Klingon, Deltan, Tandaran and Risian. Most of these alien calendars have been plotted out in full by the author in his annotations. Other StarTrekNovelVerse books have given dates in mostly consistant Klingon, Vulcan, Romulan and Andorian calendars, but this is probably the first time the entire calendar has been plotted for so many races.

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* In ''Literature/StarTrekDepartmentOfTemporalInvestigations'', alongside multiple human calendars including Christian, Islamic, Hindu and Mayan examples, the chapter headings include dating systems from many Star Trek cultures, including Vulcan, Andorian, Cardassian, Klingon, Deltan, Tandaran and Risian. Most of these alien calendars have been plotted out in full by the author in his annotations. Other StarTrekNovelVerse Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse books have given dates in mostly consistant Klingon, Vulcan, Romulan and Andorian calendars, but this is probably the first time the entire calendar has been plotted for so many races.
13th May '16 11:39:23 PM Doug86
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* ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' is set in the second to third century after Aegon's Landing. The seasons are random in length, but are much longer than the years, making it uncertain what a "year" actually means.

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* ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' is set in the second to third century after Aegon's Landing. The seasons are random in length, but are much longer than the years, making it uncertain what a "year" actually means.
25th Apr '16 12:16:46 AM LucaEarlgrey
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** ''VideoGame/StardewValley'', which takes inspiration from ''Harvest Moon'', uses 28-day seasons. While it does achieve the "years with identical week structures" effect that ''Rune Factory'' does, it also means that each year is 8 days shorter than in those two games.

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** ''VideoGame/StardewValley'', which takes inspiration from ''Harvest Moon'', uses 28-day seasons. While it does achieve the "years with identical week structures" effect that ''Rune Factory'' does, does without shortening the week, it also means that each year is 8 days shorter than in those two games.
17th Apr '16 10:39:58 PM LucaEarlgrey
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** ''VideoGame/StardewValley'', which takes inspiration from ''Harvest Moon'', uses 28-day seasons. While it does achieve the "years with identical week structures" effect that ''Rune Factory'' does, it also means that each year is 8 days shorter than in those two games.
6th Apr '16 7:12:52 PM Tallens
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* ''Webcomic/ChildrenOfEldair'': Eldair has 405 days in a year, and Koe mentions being familiar with several calendar systems, but is wholly unfamiliar with the date Embera, who's from Earth, gives as her birthday, March 21, 2002. She then has to give him the general idea when it is in relation to the Spring Equinox in the northern hemisphere.
28th Mar '16 10:49:01 AM arisboch
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* ''Anime/ValvraveTheLiberator'' which is basically Anime/MobileSuitGundamSeed + a little ''Anime/LegendOfGalacticHeroes'' with [[spoiler:VAMPIRES]] has the True Calendar.

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* ''Anime/ValvraveTheLiberator'' which is basically Anime/MobileSuitGundamSeed + a little ''Anime/LegendOfGalacticHeroes'' with [[spoiler:VAMPIRES]] [[spoiler:SPACE VAMPIRE ILLUMINATI]] has the True Calendar.
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