History Main / AlternativeCalendar

22nd Mar '17 2:47:17 PM drwhom
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** To search the Japanese patent database for patent applications published before 2000, you need a letter prefix for the era (S or H), a two-digit number for the regnal year, and a publication number that restarts at 1 every year. For patent applications published in 2000 and later, you use the Gregorian year and the publication number that restarts at 1 every year.
3rd Mar '17 12:16:59 PM Xtifr
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* Historians writing about Rome (both at the time and more recently) sometimes use AUC, ''AbUrbeCondita''="from the founding of the city (of Rome)", dating years from the traditional founding of Rome in 753 BC. This system has been copied by various writers with different cities. However, Romans usually reckoned years by who was emperor. In the Republican era and early empire, years were named for the two consuls, which may be just as well, as nobody knows exactly when Rome was founded. (The bit about Republican years being named after the two consuls led to a joke that the year Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar was Consul--59 BCE--was the "Year of Julius and Caesar," since he completely overshadowed his co-consul Bibulus).

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* Historians writing about Rome (both at the time and more recently) sometimes use AUC, ''AbUrbeCondita''="from the founding of the city (of Rome)", dating years from the traditional founding of Rome in 753 BC. This system has been copied by various writers with different cities. However, Romans usually reckoned years by who was emperor. In the Republican era and early empire, years were named for the two consuls, which may be just as well, as nobody knows exactly when Rome was founded. (The bit about Republican years being named after the two consuls led to a joke that the year Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar was Consul--59 BCE--was the "Year of Julius and Caesar," since he completely overshadowed his co-consul Bibulus).
7th Feb '17 11:36:18 AM Troper1138
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* H. Beam Piper's Terro-Human future history (e.g. ''Little Fuzzy'', ''Uller Uprising'') uses Atomic Era dating, starting the year zero A.E. at 2 December 1942 by the C.E. calendar (the date of the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction). Characters occasionally speak of Nth Century Pre-Atomic dates to refer to dates before that time.

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* H. Beam Piper's HBeamPiper's Terro-Human future history (e.g. ''Little Fuzzy'', ''Literature/LittleFuzzy'', ''Uller Uprising'') uses Atomic Era dating, starting the year zero A.E. at 2 December 1942 by the C.E. calendar (the date of the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction). Characters occasionally speak of Nth Century Pre-Atomic dates to refer to dates before that time.
1st Feb '17 6:02:26 AM KrspaceT
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[[ValuesDissonance As the Japanese have a history of doing this in their own history, this trope appears a lot in anime]]. Even when depicting cultures which are not Japanese.
26th Jan '17 6:23:55 PM PaulA
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* The ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series by Creator/IsaacAsimov. The calendar begins thousands of years before the stories, with the founding date of the Galactic Empire, and later there's a new calendar that begins with the first year of the titular Foundation. However, it's averted in Asimov's book ''The End of Eternity'', even though an Alternative Calendar would make just as much sense as it does in the Foundation series. In that book, characters will refer to "the 78th Century", "the 482nd Century", or even "a Century in the 30,000s" (i.e. 3 million years after the present), and these are dates expressed in terms of our very own Gregorian calendar. The character Cooper is from the 78th century, and although he's familiar with the idea that the year he comes from is some number in the 7700s, he apparently needed an explanation to understand why there were centuries before the 1st Century. With situations like this, you can see why this trope makes sense in fiction: because if you take a long enough view, it seems very probable that it will become TruthInTelevision.

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* The Creator/IsaacAsimov:
** In the
''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series by Creator/IsaacAsimov. The series, the calendar begins thousands of years before the stories, with the founding date of the Galactic Empire, and later there's a new calendar that begins with the first year of the titular Foundation. However, it's averted Foundation.
** One of the later ''Foundation'' novels is notable for having a historian discuss calendars with a companion who's looking for EarthThatWas. The historian has determined that, based on his studies, the planet must have a yearly cycle of 365 days with each day being exactly 24 hours, based on the system that been
in Asimov's book ''The End use by humans since time immemorial. None of Eternity'', the planets in the catalog match those criteria.
** Averted in ''Literature/TheEndOfEternity'',
even though an Alternative Calendar would make just as much sense as it does in the Foundation series. In that book, characters will refer to "the 78th Century", "the 482nd Century", or even "a Century in the 30,000s" (i.e. 3 million years after the present), and these are dates expressed in terms of our very own Gregorian calendar. The character Cooper is from the 78th century, and although he's familiar with the idea that the year he comes from is some number in the 7700s, he apparently needed an explanation to understand why there were centuries before the 1st Century. With situations like this, you can see why this trope makes sense in fiction: because if you take a long enough view, it seems very probable that it will become TruthInTelevision.



** One of the later ''Foundation'' novels is notable for having a historian discuss calendars with a companion who's looking for EarthThatWas. The historian has determined that, based on his studies, the planet must have a yearly cycle of 365 days with each day being exactly 24 hours, based on the system that been in use by humans since time immemorial. None of the planets in the catalog match those criteria.
26th Jan '17 3:30:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* In the ''StarCraft'' expansion, the United Earth Directorate uses a different calendar, and the present year, 2501 AD (The original game used the Gregorian calendar), is marked as 872 GD. It's not explained what significance the year 1629 AD has to be year 0 on the UED calendar.

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* In the ''StarCraft'' ''VideoGame/StarCraft'' expansion, the United Earth Directorate uses a different calendar, and the present year, 2501 AD (The original game used the Gregorian calendar), is marked as 872 GD. It's not explained what significance the year 1629 AD has to be year 0 on the UED calendar.
25th Jan '17 1:42:04 AM Xtifr
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* The "Common Era" in AlexeiPanshin's AnthonyVilliers novels apparently is reckoned from the launching of Sputnik I in 1957.

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* The "Common Era" in AlexeiPanshin's AnthonyVilliers Creator/AlexeiPanshin's Anthony Villiers novels apparently is reckoned from the launching of Sputnik I in 1957.
21st Jan '17 10:49:35 PM Arcorann
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** One of the later ''Foundation'' novels is notable for having a historian discuss calendars with a companion who's looking for EarthThatWas. The historian has determined that, based on his studies, the planet must have a yearly cycle of 365 days with each day being 24 hours, based on the system that been in use by humans since time immemorial. None of the planets in the catalog match those criteria. Even ''Earth'' doesn't quite meet those criteria ... the year is a bit longer than 365 days.

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** One of the later ''Foundation'' novels is notable for having a historian discuss calendars with a companion who's looking for EarthThatWas. The historian has determined that, based on his studies, the planet must have a yearly cycle of 365 days with each day being exactly 24 hours, based on the system that been in use by humans since time immemorial. None of the planets in the catalog match those criteria. Even ''Earth'' doesn't quite meet those criteria ... the year is a bit longer than 365 days.
19th Jan '17 11:24:23 PM Arcorann
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* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' counts dates as "BBY" and "ABY", Before and After the Battle of Yavin, where the first Death Star was destroyed. Mention is occasionally made of the old Imperial Calendar that was used by the Empire. At one point Luke, doing some historical research, expresses exasperation at each new regime feeling the need to implement a new calendar, which makes pinning down dates more difficult.

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* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' counts dates as "BBY" and "ABY", Before and After the Battle of Yavin, where the first Death Star was destroyed. Mention is occasionally made of the old Imperial Calendar that was used by the Empire. At one point Luke, doing some historical research, expresses exasperation at each new regime feeling the need to implement a new calendar, which makes pinning down dates more difficult. As for the months, originally the setting used a 10-month calendar where each month had 35 days, with three 5-day festival weeks and three other holidays added to give 368 days. However, in a few later works a 12-month system was retconned in.
19th Jan '17 8:55:53 PM PaulA
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* The nations of Euterpe in Teresa Edgerton's ''Goblin Moon'' use a calendar of nine forty-day "seasons", rather than months. The actual solar year is a bit longer than that, so celebratory "intercalary days" round it out every three seasons.

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* The nations of Euterpe in Teresa Edgerton's Creator/TeresaEdgerton's ''Goblin Moon'' use a calendar of nine forty-day "seasons", rather than months. The actual solar year is a bit longer than that, so celebratory "intercalary days" round it out every three seasons.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AlternativeCalendar