History Main / AlternativeCalendar

18th Oct '17 1:31:36 AM Arcorann
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** Based on a couple of instances where concrete dates are given in ''0080'' and ''ZZ'', which reveal that January 14th 0080 fell on a Monday and the UC years that are multiples of 4 are leap years, respectively, it's possible to narrow down the year the changeover happened somewhat. Working backwards 79 years (no official timeline ever mentions a year UC 0000), we find that the calendar changed during a common year starting on a Tuesday, meaning the earliest possible candidate for UC 0001, as of this writing, would be 2019 (unlikely to say the least). {{Fanon}} tends to put it sometime between 2047[[note]]the last official timeline Sunrise ever published that featured dates in the AD era had 2045 as the last one mentioned, but this is apparently no longer canon[[/note]] and 2081.
*** Of course, this all assumes that no dates were skipped over when they changed the calendar and that leap years are still calculated the same way.
** The ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamWing Gundam Wing]]'' sequel novel ''Frozen Teardrop'' features the first Alternate Calendar within a series: while the Earth Sphere uses the AC (After Colony) calendar, Mars uses the MC (Mars Century) calendar, with years roughly double the length of Earth's. This makes it more than a little confusing as to when exactly ''Frozen Teardrop'' takes place in relation to the main series (for the record, MC0022 corresponds to the early 220s in AC).

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** Based on a couple of instances where concrete dates are given in ''0080'' and ''ZZ'', which reveal that January 14th 0080 fell on a Monday and the UC years that are multiples of 4 are leap years, respectively, it's possible to narrow down the year the changeover happened somewhat. Working backwards 79 years (no official timeline ever mentions a year UC 0000), we find that the calendar changed during a common year starting on a Tuesday, meaning the earliest possible candidate for UC 0001, as of this writing, would be 2019 (unlikely to say the least). {{Fanon}} tends to put it sometime between 2047[[note]]the last official timeline Sunrise ever published that featured dates in the AD era had 2045 as the last one mentioned, but this is apparently no longer canon[[/note]] and 2081.
***
2081. Of course, this all assumes that no dates were skipped over when they changed the calendar and that leap years are still calculated the same way.
** The ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamWing Gundam Wing]]'' sequel novel ''Frozen Teardrop'' features the first Alternate Calendar within a series: while the Earth Sphere uses the AC (After Colony) calendar, Mars uses the MC (Mars Century) calendar, with years roughly double the length of Earth's. This makes it more than a little confusing as to when exactly ''Frozen Teardrop'' takes place in relation to the main series (for the record, MC0022 MC 0022 corresponds to the early 220s in AC).



* In Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs's ''Literature/{{Pellucidar}}'', the immobility of the central sun prevents any sort of celestial timekeeping, leading the protagonists to proclaim (unconvincingly) that there is "no such thing as time" at the Earth's core. In fact, time in Pellucidar ''passes more swiftly for you when you're exerting yourself more''. At one point, the hero and his friend were separated and the hero had several weeks worth of adventures: fighting, running, lots of hard work. His friend merely strolled back to their lodgings, so only about an hour passed for him. It's a pity the "I'm not making this up" category has been disabled, because this nonsense ''deserves'' it.
** In ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'', it gets rather more rational treatment: he believes Dejah Thoris has died in "The Gods of Mars" because it has been a year -- but he has forgotten he's on Mars.

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* Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs:
**
In Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs's ''Literature/{{Pellucidar}}'', the immobility of the central sun prevents any sort of celestial timekeeping, leading the protagonists to proclaim (unconvincingly) that there is "no such thing as time" at the Earth's core. In fact, time in Pellucidar ''passes more swiftly for you when you're exerting yourself more''. At one point, the hero and his friend were separated and the hero had several weeks worth of adventures: fighting, running, lots of hard work. His friend merely strolled back to their lodgings, so only about an hour passed for him. It's a pity the "I'm not making this up" category has been disabled, because this nonsense ''deserves'' it.
** In ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'', it gets rather more rational treatment: he believes Dejah Thoris has died in "The Gods of Mars" because it has been a year -- but he has forgotten he's on Mars. The Martians have their own methods of counting time based around the "ord" (Martian year), analysed in detail in [[www.erbzine.com/mag16/1630.html this article]].



** A year on the planet ''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}'' is 336 days long, allowing for a handy calendar of twelve 28-day months. There is no distinction between the lunar and solar calendars, as new or full moons always fall on the same dates in each year. Each country has its own names for the 12 months; the chief exception is that of the shadow elves, whose year consists of 24-day months, each named for one of their religion's 14 Verses. (Being subterranean, these elves don't need to synch their calendar with celestial events, and keep track of dates only to schedule their religious ceremonies.)
*** ''Inside'' Mystara, the Hollow World's stationary inner sun doesn't provide for conventional day/night or seasonal cycles. Rather, dates are tracked by the orbits of the major flying continents.

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** A year on the planet ''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}'' is 336 days long, allowing for a handy calendar of twelve 28-day months. There is no distinction between the lunar and solar calendars, as new or full moons always fall on the same dates in each year. Each country has its own names for the 12 months; the chief exception is that of the shadow elves, whose year consists of 24-day months, each named for one of their religion's 14 Verses. (Being subterranean, these elves don't need to synch their calendar with celestial events, and keep track of dates only to schedule their religious ceremonies.)
***
) ''Inside'' Mystara, the Hollow World's stationary inner sun doesn't provide for conventional day/night or seasonal cycles. Rather, dates are tracked by the orbits of the major flying continents.



** The reason why academics tend to prefer the "Common Era"-phrasing is because its start is entirely arbitrary, and is only followed due to a cultural custom, as Jesus was certainly not actually born in 0 AD,[[note]]Going by Literature/TheBible, it was somewhere between 7 BC and 4 AD.[[/note]] and even if he was, the concept of zero wasn't known in Europe when the dating was started, so they started counting from 1 AD, automatically putting all dates off by a year.
* The [[http://www.mithrandir.com/Tranquility/tranquility.html Tranquility calendar]], first postulated in Omni magazine, is a 13-month revision of the Gregorian calendar, with the 1969 moon landing as its zero point (specifically, the exact moment Neil Armstrong said "tranquility" in "Houston, Tranquility Base here") and 28-day months named for scientists, plus days outside the months and weekday cycle, Armstrong Day (20 July Gregorian) and Aldrin Day (29 February Gregorian, only in leap years). Dates would have been either "B.T." (Before Tranquility) or "A.T." (After Tranquility). For example, 2013-05-17 corresponds to 21 Kepler, 44 A.T..

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** The reason why academics tend to prefer the "Common Era"-phrasing is because its start is entirely arbitrary, and is only followed due to a cultural custom, as Jesus was certainly not actually born in 0 AD,[[note]]Going 1 AD or 1 BC,[[note]]Going by Literature/TheBible, it was somewhere between 7 BC and 4 AD.[[/note]] and even if he was, the concept of zero wasn't known in Europe when the dating was started, so they started counting from 1 AD, automatically putting all dates off by a year.
* The [[http://www.mithrandir.com/Tranquility/tranquility.html Tranquility calendar]], first postulated in Omni magazine, is a 13-month revision of the Gregorian calendar, with the 1969 moon landing as its zero point (specifically, the exact moment Neil Armstrong said "tranquility" in "Houston, Tranquility Base here") and 28-day months named for scientists, plus days outside the months and weekday cycle, Armstrong Day (20 July Gregorian) and Aldrin Day (29 February Gregorian, only in leap years). Dates would have been are either "B.T." (Before Tranquility) or "A.T." (After Tranquility). For example, 2013-05-17 corresponds to 21 Kepler, 44 A.T..



* After her [[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution Revolution]], France tried a ''metric'' calendar, known as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Republican_Calendar Republican Calendar]] (''Calendrier républicain''). It consisted of twelve 30 day months, each divided in three ten day weeks, with five or six extra holidays at the end of the year. The years begun on the autumn equinox (1792 being year I), and were reckoned on Roman numerals. While it was very logical, it wasn't too popular, for various reasons (mostly because ten-day weeks meant weekends were a lot rarer!), and only lasted twelve years--or less, considering that many people never really used it, and that even among those who did, the seven-day week was restored after a mere nine years after the Concordat of 1801 reestablished Sunday as a weekly festival. The names of the months and days of the week were changed, one of which (Thermidor, which lasted from July to August) is still remembered in the name of the dish Lobster Thermidor; otherwise, the French Republican months are mostly remembered from the French Revolutionary events, mostly coups (the most significant things remembered by the Republican Calendar are the Law of 14 Frimaire, centralizing power in the hands of [[ReignOfTerror the Committee of Public Safety]]; the Thermidorian Reaction, essentially a coup, bringing an end to the Terror; the Coup of Fructidor; the Coup of Floréal; and the Coup of Brumaire (in which Napoleon first seized formal political power). They also had a separate name for each [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_republican_calendar#Days_of_the_year day of the year]], trying to mimic the calendar of saints with something secular -- in this case, plants, animals and tools. Which gave us day names like "pig" (Frimaire 5) or "manure" (Nivose 8) - yes, really, they had this. Now imagine all the teasing in school for kids born on these days.

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* After her [[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution Revolution]], France tried a ''metric'' calendar, known as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Republican_Calendar Republican Calendar]] (''Calendrier républicain''). It consisted of twelve 30 day months, each divided in three ten day weeks, with five or six extra holidays at the end of the year. The years begun began on the autumn equinox (1792 being year I), and were reckoned on Roman numerals. While it was very logical, it wasn't too popular, for various reasons (mostly because ten-day weeks meant weekends were a lot rarer!), and only lasted twelve years--or less, considering that many people never really used it, and that even among those who did, the seven-day week was restored after a mere nine years after the Concordat of 1801 reestablished Sunday as a weekly festival. The names of the months and days of the week were changed, one of which (Thermidor, which lasted from July to August) is still remembered in the name of the dish Lobster Thermidor; otherwise, the French Republican months are mostly remembered from the French Revolutionary events, mostly coups (the most significant things remembered by the Republican Calendar are the Law of 14 Frimaire, centralizing power in the hands of [[ReignOfTerror the Committee of Public Safety]]; the Thermidorian Reaction, essentially a coup, bringing an end to the Terror; the Coup of Fructidor; the Coup of Floréal; and the Coup of Brumaire (in which Napoleon first seized formal political power). They also had a separate name for each [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_republican_calendar#Days_of_the_year day of the year]], trying to mimic the calendar of saints with something secular -- in this case, plants, animals and tools. Which gave us day names like "pig" (Frimaire 5) or "manure" (Nivose 8) - yes, really, they had this. Now imagine all the teasing in school for kids born on these days.



* There have also been attempts to create calendars for other planets (and moons) in the solar system in case we need to live there someday. The most developed is the Darian calendar for Mars, which has 24 months of 28 Martian days each (called ''sols'', so we [[TwoOfYourEarthMinutes don't confuse them with Earth days]][[note]]JPL and NASA use sols in tracking Mars missions: the activities of rovers are reported as, say, occurring on sol 43 since that rover landed.[[/note]]). There's ''already'' been arguments on what epoch to use (i.e. when Year Zero was); the Darian currently uses the Telescopic Epoch which is the Martian year corresponding to March 1609 - January 1610 CE, but originally used an epoch based on the landing of Viking 1 in 1976.

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* There have also been attempts to create calendars for other planets (and moons) in the solar system in case we need to live there someday. The most developed is the Darian calendar for Mars, which has 24 months of 28 Martian days each (called ''sols'', so we [[TwoOfYourEarthMinutes don't confuse them with Earth days]][[note]]JPL and NASA use sols in tracking Mars missions: the activities of rovers are reported as, say, occurring on sol 43 since that rover landed.[[/note]]). There's ''already'' been arguments on what epoch to use (i.e. when Year Zero was); the Darian currently uses the Telescopic Epoch which is the Martian year corresponding to March 1609 - January 1610 1611 CE, but originally used an epoch based on the landing of Viking 1 in 1976.
17th Oct '17 4:11:34 PM Malady
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* The freeware space exploration game ''{{Noctis}}'' puts the player in control of a cat-like alien creature called a Felysian, and employs the calendar of his civilization. For example the base unit, called ''epoc'', corresponds to about 32 human years, but the smallest unit, the ''triad dexter'' (a billionth of an ''epoc'') is "incidentally" equal to a second.

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* The freeware space exploration game ''{{Noctis}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Noctis}}'' puts the player in control of a cat-like alien creature called a Felysian, and employs the calendar of his civilization. For example the base unit, called ''epoc'', corresponds to about 32 human years, but the smallest unit, the ''triad dexter'' (a billionth of an ''epoc'') is "incidentally" equal to a second.
14th Oct '17 5:46:33 PM rosvicl
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* There have also been attempts to create calendars for other planets (and moons) in the solar system in case we need to live there someday. The most developed is the Darian calendar for Mars, which has 24 months of 28 Martian days each (called ''sols'', so we [[TwoOfYourEarthMinutes don't confuse them with Earth days]]). There's ''already'' been arguments on what epoch to use (i.e. when Year Zero was); the Darian currently uses the Telescopic Epoch which is the Martian year corresponding to March 1609 - January 1610 CE, but originally used an epoch based on the landing of Viking 1 in 1976.

to:

* There have also been attempts to create calendars for other planets (and moons) in the solar system in case we need to live there someday. The most developed is the Darian calendar for Mars, which has 24 months of 28 Martian days each (called ''sols'', so we [[TwoOfYourEarthMinutes don't confuse them with Earth days]]).days]][[note]]JPL and NASA use sols in tracking Mars missions: the activities of rovers are reported as, say, occurring on sol 43 since that rover landed.[[/note]]). There's ''already'' been arguments on what epoch to use (i.e. when Year Zero was); the Darian currently uses the Telescopic Epoch which is the Martian year corresponding to March 1609 - January 1610 CE, but originally used an epoch based on the landing of Viking 1 in 1976.
12th Oct '17 2:20:50 PM ZimFan89
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** ''[[AllThereInTheManual A World of Ice and Fire]]'' clarifies an in-universe misconception -- namely, that the Westerosi calendar doesn't actually begin at Aegon's Landing and the ''start'' of his Conquest, but the date when he was officially crowned as King of Westeros at the ''end'' of the Conquest, which was a couple of years later.
8th Oct '17 6:42:26 AM iroanxi
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* The Null Verse of ''FanFic/ADragonInShiningArmour'' has its own calendar known as the Golden Calendar, which is based off the Four Holy Beasts and their Devas.
27th Sep '17 4:42:08 AM Juicehead_Baby
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*** Of course, this all assumes that no dates were skipped over when they changed the calendar and that leap years are still calculated the same way.
29th Aug '17 1:40:32 AM PaulA
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* Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's Literature/{{Hainish}} 'verse has scores of different calendars:
** In ''Literature/TheLeftHandOfDarkness'', Gethenians count years backward and forward, with the current year always being year one. The more exact dates are determined by their relation to some historical events.
** In ''Literature/PlanetOfExile'', Werel has a 400 days' lunar cycle and a solar cycle of 60 moonphases. Year, lifetime, what difference?

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* Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's works:
** The
Literature/{{Hainish}} 'verse has scores of different calendars:
** *** In ''Literature/TheLeftHandOfDarkness'', Gethenians count years backward and forward, with the current year always being year one. The more exact dates are determined by their relation to some historical events.
** *** In ''Literature/PlanetOfExile'', Werel has a 400 days' lunar cycle and a solar cycle of 60 moonphases. Year, lifetime, what difference?difference?
*** In ''Literature/RocannonsWorld'', Rokanan has years twice the length of an earth year (or, rather, the standard year used by the League of Worlds). Some regions use two twelve-month (or however many they have) cycles to make up a full year.



** In ''Literature/RocannonsWorld'', Rokanan has years twice the length of an earth year (or, rather, the standard year used by the League of Worlds). Some regions use two twelve-month (or however many they have) cycles to make up a full year.
29th Aug '17 1:39:45 AM PaulA
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* Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin has scores of different calendars:

to:

* Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's Literature/{{Hainish}} 'verse has scores of different calendars:



** In ''Planet of Exile'', Werel has a 400 days' lunar cycle and a solar cycle of 60 moonphases. Year, lifetime, what difference?

to:

** In ''Planet of Exile'', ''Literature/PlanetOfExile'', Werel has a 400 days' lunar cycle and a solar cycle of 60 moonphases. Year, lifetime, what difference?



** In ''Rocannon's World'', Rokanan has years twice the length of an earth year (or, rather, the standard year used by the League of Worlds). Some regions use two twelve-month (or however many they have) cycles to make up a full year.

to:

** In ''Rocannon's World'', ''Literature/RocannonsWorld'', Rokanan has years twice the length of an earth year (or, rather, the standard year used by the League of Worlds). Some regions use two twelve-month (or however many they have) cycles to make up a full year.
28th Aug '17 9:04:09 PM PaulA
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** Gethenians count years backward and forward, with the current year always being year one. The more exact dates are determined by their relation to some historical events.
*** But they are kinda strange anyway.
** Werel has a 400 days' lunar cycle and a solar cycle of 60 moonphases. Year, lifetime, what difference?
** Curiously, the fantasy book ''Gifts'' uses the Gregorian month names, but this might be a TranslationConvention, and it's not clear if it's meant to take place on an alternate Earth or another planet.
** Rokanan has years twice the length of an earth year (or, rather, the standard year used by the League of Worlds). Some regions use two twelve-month (or however many they have) cycles to make up a full year.

to:

** In ''Literature/TheLeftHandOfDarkness'', Gethenians count years backward and forward, with the current year always being year one. The more exact dates are determined by their relation to some historical events.
*** But they are kinda strange anyway.
** In ''Planet of Exile'', Werel has a 400 days' lunar cycle and a solar cycle of 60 moonphases. Year, lifetime, what difference?
** Curiously, the fantasy book ''Gifts'' ''[[Literature/AnnalsOfTheWesternShore Gifts]]'' uses the Gregorian month names, but this might be a TranslationConvention, and it's not clear if it's meant to take place on an alternate Earth or another planet.
** In ''Rocannon's World'', Rokanan has years twice the length of an earth year (or, rather, the standard year used by the League of Worlds). Some regions use two twelve-month (or however many they have) cycles to make up a full year.
24th Aug '17 9:12:36 PM Arcorann
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* Numerous attempts have been made to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendar_reform replace the Gregorian calendar with something neater]], with the movement being strongest in the 1920s and 1930s.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AlternativeCalendar