History Main / AlternateCompanyEquivalent

4th Jul '16 6:36:37 PM Doug86
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* Believe it or not, Marvel actually has a character called Scarecrow. Though in a way Marvel's Scarecrow is more like a CompositeCharacter of [[ComicBook/{{Batman}} The Scarecrow]] from DC and [[Comicbook/TheFlash Ragdoll]], Marvel Scarecrow had an abusive mother like DC's version had an abusive aunt, but ran away to join the circus and then became a contortionist like Ragdoll is. His adrenal glands later got the ability to emit a pheromone that caused any living thing within twenty feet to have a panic attack, like DC Scarecrow's fear toxin. And when he came back from the dead he could directly cause fear in others. This is taken to its logical conclusion when the [[ComicBook/AmalgamUniverse Amalgam comics]] combined both Scarecrows into one.

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* Believe it or not, Marvel actually has a character called Scarecrow. Though in a way Marvel's Scarecrow is more like a CompositeCharacter of [[ComicBook/{{Batman}} [[Franchise/{{Batman}} The Scarecrow]] from DC and [[Comicbook/TheFlash [[Franchise/TheFlash Ragdoll]], Marvel Scarecrow had an abusive mother like DC's version had an abusive aunt, but ran away to join the circus and then became a contortionist like Ragdoll is. His adrenal glands later got the ability to emit a pheromone that caused any living thing within twenty feet to have a panic attack, like DC Scarecrow's fear toxin. And when he came back from the dead he could directly cause fear in others. This is taken to its logical conclusion when the [[ComicBook/AmalgamUniverse Amalgam comics]] combined both Scarecrows into one.
16th Jun '16 7:04:30 PM comicwriter
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** Comicbook/BlackPanther as well. A wealthy, orphaned GadgeteerGenius, who while not as strong as his teammates, makes up for it by being a world-class martial artist and a master tactician. There are even some superficial costume similarities too.
28th May '16 6:10:58 PM Sharlee
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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' and ''Series/DoctorWho'' have a similar relationship with their monsters, most notably with the Cybermen and The Borg. Star Trek fans sometimes complain that Doctor Who ripped off their ideas for an evil race of cybernetic humans. Doctor Who fans just laugh at this and then ignore them.

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' and ''Series/DoctorWho'' have a similar relationship with their monsters, most notably with the Cybermen and The Borg. Star Trek fans sometimes complain that Doctor Who ripped off their ideas for an evil race of cybernetic humans. Doctor Who fans just [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet laugh at this this]] [[OlderThanTheyThink and then ignore them.them]].
27th May '16 6:43:41 AM Tropetastic1995
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* In terms of resident [[SuperSpeed speedsters]], DC has Franchise/TheFlash and Marvel has Comicbook/{{Quicksilver}}. Although there are beings capable of super-speed in both universes, both men are ''the'' best-known speedsters for their respective sides, both are considered the fastest, and they've been paired against each other in crossovers (which of them will win depends on the story and/or [[PopularityPower reader voting]]). The major differences between them include the fact that the Flash is a LegacyCharacter (at least four different individuals in DC's comic timeline have inherited the title from the Golden Age to now) whereas Quicksilver is the only known individual whose sole power is moving really fast; Flash is unquestionably a hero, whereas Quicksilver's gone through the HeelFaceRevolvingDoor several times; and Flash gained his speed through a FreakLabAccident (Speed Force connection notwithstanding), whereas Quicksilver got his speed by virtue of being a mutant. Another key difference between them is that The Flash can run at the speed of light, whereas Wolverine's claws are unsheathed at a faster speed than Quicksilver can run.

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* In terms of resident [[SuperSpeed speedsters]], DC has Franchise/TheFlash and Marvel has Comicbook/{{Quicksilver}}. Although there are beings capable of super-speed in both universes, both men are ''the'' best-known speedsters for their respective sides, both are considered the fastest, and they've been paired against each other in crossovers (which of them will win depends on the story and/or [[PopularityPower reader voting]]). The major differences between them include the fact that the Flash is a LegacyCharacter (at least four different individuals in DC's comic timeline have inherited the title from the Golden Age to now) whereas Quicksilver is the only known individual whose sole power is moving really fast; Flash is unquestionably a hero, whereas Quicksilver's gone through the HeelFaceRevolvingDoor several times; and Flash gained his speed through a FreakLabAccident (Speed Force connection notwithstanding), whereas Quicksilver got his speed by virtue of being a mutant. Another key difference between them is that The Flash Quicksilver can run at slightly more than the speed of light, whereas Wolverine's claws are unsheathed at a faster speed than Quicksilver can run.the Flash has no real limit to his speed.


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* In recent years, the Comicbook/BlueBeetle is shaping up to be DC's Spider-Man counterpart, both of them being wisecracking bug-themed (well, spiders are arachnids, but still..) superheroes who have an AffirmativeActionLegacy.
27th May '16 6:11:44 AM eliaskelham
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* Despite being years apart in their release history, and being made by companies with little-to-no tangible connection to each other, the StoryArcs of the {{Protagonist}} in Creator/{{Bioware}}'s ''VideoGame/KnightsofTheOldRepublic'' and Spike Chunsoft's ''VideoGame/SuperDanganronpa2'' have a lot of similarities. Both games star AmnesiacHeroes who appear to be average Joes at first, [[spoiler:but their backstories reveal them to have been very evil people who played a major role in driving the conflict of their own stories. The similarities are even more apparent if you play the Light-Sided route in ''KOTOR'' as Revan (the KOTOR protagonist) and Hajime (the Danganronpa 2 protagonist) turn out to be really benevolent {{NiceGuy}}s who are a far cry from their former evil personalities, and in the end they reject their former identities and decide to start with a clean slate as the heroic people they've become.]]

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* Despite being years apart in their release history, and being made by companies with little-to-no tangible connection to each other, the StoryArcs of the {{Protagonist}} in Creator/{{Bioware}}'s ''VideoGame/KnightsofTheOldRepublic'' and Spike Chunsoft's ''VideoGame/SuperDanganronpa2'' have a lot of similarities. Both games star AmnesiacHeroes {{AmnesiacHero}}es who appear to be average Joes at first, [[spoiler:but their backstories reveal them to have been very evil people who played a major role in driving the conflict of their own stories. The similarities are even more apparent if you play the Light-Sided route in ''KOTOR'' as Revan (the KOTOR protagonist) and Hajime (the Danganronpa 2 protagonist) turn out to be really benevolent {{NiceGuy}}s who are a far cry from their former evil personalities, and in the end they reject their former identities and decide to start with a clean slate as the heroic people they've become.]]
27th May '16 6:09:45 AM eliaskelham
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* Despite being years apart in their release history, and being made by companies with little-to-no tangible connection to each other, the StoryArcs of the {{Protagonist}} in Creator/{{Bioware}}'s ''VideoGame/KnightsofTheOldRepublic'' and Spike Chunsoft's ''VideoGame/SuperDanganronpa2'' have a lot of similarities. Both games star AmnesiacHeroes who appear to be average Joes at first, [[spoiler:but their backstories reveal them to have been very evil people who played a major role in driving the conflict of their own stories. The similarities are even more apparent if you play the Light-Sided route in ''KOTOR'' as Revan (the KOTOR protagonist) and Hajime (the Danganronpa 2 protagonist) turn out to be really benevolent {{NiceGuy}}s who are a far cry from their former evil personalities, and in the end they reject their former identities and decide to start with a clean slate as the heroic people they've become.]]
23rd May '16 6:09:42 PM comicwriter
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* Comicbook/TheWasp from Comicbook/TheAvengers and Bumblebee from the ''Comicbook/TeenTitans''. In fact, depending on the adaptation or continuity, Bumblebee can shrink and fire energy blasts like the Wasp does.



* Marvel and [=DC=] are stuck in a constant back-and-forth alternate equivalent arms race when it comes to the suddenly-desirable "young female" demographic. Marvel opened up the floodgates with ''ComicBook/MsMarvel2014'', a funny, light-hearted book about a nerdy teenage Muslim-American girl becoming a superhero. [=DC=] responded with the "Batgirl of Burnside" revamp of ''ComicBook/Batgirl'', updating classic Batgirl Barbara Gordon's costume to be more fashionable and practical and swapping the "All Batman-derivative characters must be unhappy grimdark antiheroes at all times" edict with bright colors and a promise of making Batgirl ''fun'' again. Marvel returned fire with the 2014 revamp of ''ComicBook/SpiderWoman'', where Jessica Drew gets a similar costume aesthetic and art style to Batgirl of Burnside, and the accidental lightning-in-a-bottle smash hit ''ComicBook/SpiderGwen'', an AlternateUniverse take on Spider-Man's [[StuffedIntoTheFridge dead girlfriend]] who shares a couple coincidental similarities to Barbara, both being fashionable daughters of cops. [=DC=] responded to Spider-Gwen with ''ComicBook/BlackCanary'', a total revamp spinning out of Batgirl of Burnside where Black Canary has (like Gwen) joined a band with a similarly electric color scheme.

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* Marvel and [=DC=] are stuck in a constant back-and-forth alternate equivalent arms race when it comes to the suddenly-desirable "young female" demographic. Marvel opened up the floodgates with ''ComicBook/MsMarvel2014'', a funny, light-hearted book about a nerdy teenage Muslim-American girl becoming a superhero. [=DC=] responded with the "Batgirl of Burnside" revamp of ''ComicBook/Batgirl'', ''ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2011}}'', updating classic Batgirl Barbara Gordon's costume to be more fashionable and practical and swapping the "All Batman-derivative characters must be unhappy grimdark antiheroes at all times" edict with bright colors and a promise of making Batgirl ''fun'' again. Marvel returned fire with the 2014 revamp of ''ComicBook/SpiderWoman'', where Jessica Drew gets a similar costume aesthetic and art style to Batgirl of Burnside, and the accidental lightning-in-a-bottle smash hit ''ComicBook/SpiderGwen'', an AlternateUniverse take on Spider-Man's [[StuffedIntoTheFridge dead girlfriend]] who shares a couple coincidental similarities to Barbara, both being fashionable daughters of cops. [=DC=] responded to Spider-Gwen with ''ComicBook/BlackCanary'', a total revamp spinning out of Batgirl of Burnside where Black Canary has (like Gwen) joined a band with a similarly electric color scheme.
21st May '16 11:33:44 PM Anddrix
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* [[Franchise/SpiderMan Green Goblin]], Carnage and [[ComicBook/{{Daredevil}} Bullseye]] are considered each corresponding hero's answer to SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker, not just because of their status as {{Arch Enem|y}}ies but because how they each have traits that only they truly share with the Joker, with the Goblin sharing the laugh, [[LargeHam the ham factor]], the [[ManipulativeBastard inhuman madness and intelligence]], and JokerImmunity (to a point). Bullseye shares the unknown identity, [[ImprobableWeaponUser the unusual weapons]], and rivals even Joker for the title of most insane man in comics. Nowadays though, ComicBook/NormanOsborn has a persona of a manipulative ComicBook/LexLuthor and a persona of a crazed Joker and will flip between the two at the drop of a hat.

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* [[Franchise/SpiderMan Green Goblin]], Carnage and [[ComicBook/{{Daredevil}} Bullseye]] are considered each corresponding hero's answer to SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker, ComicBook/TheJoker, not just because of their status as {{Arch Enem|y}}ies but because how they each have traits that only they truly share with the Joker, with the Goblin sharing the laugh, [[LargeHam the ham factor]], the [[ManipulativeBastard inhuman madness and intelligence]], and JokerImmunity (to a point). Bullseye shares the unknown identity, [[ImprobableWeaponUser the unusual weapons]], and rivals even Joker for the title of most insane man in comics. Nowadays though, ComicBook/NormanOsborn has a persona of a manipulative ComicBook/LexLuthor and a persona of a crazed Joker and will flip between the two at the drop of a hat.
21st May '16 3:43:50 PM TitoMosquito
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* Mongul of DC, who was created by Jim Starlin to rip off ComicBook/{{Thanos}} of Marvel, who was created by Jim Starlin to rip off {{ComicBook/Darkseid}} of DC.

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* Mongul of DC, who was created by Jim Starlin to rip off rip-off ComicBook/{{Thanos}} of Marvel, who was created by Jim Starlin to rip off rip-off {{ComicBook/Darkseid}} of DC.



* Believe it or not, Marvel actually has a character called scarecrow. Though in a way Marvels scarecrow is more like a CompositeCharacter of [[ComicBook/{{Batman}} The Scarecrow]] from DC and [[Comicbook/TheFlash Ragdoll]], Marvel scarecrow had an abusive mother like DC's version had an abusive aunt, but ran away to join the circus and then became a contortionist like Ragdoll is. His adrenal glands later got the ability to emit a pheromone that caused any living thing within twenty feet to have a panic attack, like DC scarecrows fear toxin. And when he came back from the dead he could directly cause fear in others. This is taken to its logical conclusion when the Amalgam comics combined both scarecrows into one.

to:

* Believe it or not, Marvel actually has a character called scarecrow. Scarecrow. Though in a way Marvels scarecrow Marvel's Scarecrow is more like a CompositeCharacter of [[ComicBook/{{Batman}} The Scarecrow]] from DC and [[Comicbook/TheFlash Ragdoll]], Marvel scarecrow Scarecrow had an abusive mother like DC's version had an abusive aunt, but ran away to join the circus and then became a contortionist like Ragdoll is. His adrenal glands later got the ability to emit a pheromone that caused any living thing within twenty feet to have a panic attack, like DC scarecrows Scarecrow's fear toxin. And when he came back from the dead he could directly cause fear in others. This is taken to its logical conclusion when the [[ComicBook/AmalgamUniverse Amalgam comics comics]] combined both scarecrows Scarecrows into one.
18th May '16 12:51:05 PM TICKTACKTOCK
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* Believe it or not, Marvel actually has a character called scarecrow. Though in a way Marvels scarecrow is more like a CompositeCharacter of [[ComicBook/{{Batman}} The Scarecrow]] from DC and [[Comicbook/TheFlash Ragdoll]], Marvel scarecrow had an abusive mother like DC's version had an abusive aunt, but ran away to join the circus and then became a contortionist like Ragdoll is. His adrenal glands later got the ability to emit a pheromone that caused any living thing within twenty feet to have a panic attack, like DC scarecrows fear toxin. And when he came back from the dead he could directly cause fear in others. This is taken to its logical conclusion when the Amalgam comics combined both scarecrows into one.
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