History Main / AllFirstPersonNarratorsWriteLikeNovelists

9th May '18 2:28:01 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Literature/AsILayDying'' by Creator/WilliamFaulkner is a good example of an aversion. All of the narrators talk like normal people, even if that makes the story really hard to follow.

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* ''Literature/AsILayDying'' by Creator/WilliamFaulkner is a good example of an aversion. All of the narrators talk like normal people, even if features stream-of-consciousness narration from people that makes include children, the story really hard to follow.dying and the insane.
9th May '18 2:25:19 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Future!Ted from ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' often displayed a rather haphazard narrative style (especially in the first three seasons), occasionally dropping random spoilers and explanations into the story instead of working them into the plot properly (e.g., pausing the action in "Okay Awesome" to say "Oh I forgot! This is important: your Uncle Marshall just had a temporary filling put in that afternoon" right before said filling plays a part in the story.) He also tends to meander around at random: for example, in "Showdown", in the middle of Past Ted's best man speech at Marshall and Lily's wedding, Future!Ted suddenly interjects with "Oh wait! [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse I forgot to tell you guys what happened to Uncle Barney!]]" and spends the rest of the episode showing a completely unrelated scene from a different storyline, and doesn't come around to telling the wedding story until the next episode.

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* Future!Ted from ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'': Fred's narration often displayed displays a rather haphazard narrative style (especially in the first three seasons), occasionally dropping random spoilers and explanations into the story instead of working them into the plot properly (e.g., pausing the action in "Okay Awesome" to say "Oh I forgot! This is important: your Uncle Marshall just had a temporary filling put in that afternoon" right before said filling it plays a part in the story.) He also tends to meander around at random: for example, in "Showdown", in the middle of Past Ted's best man speech at Marshall and Lily's wedding, Future!Ted suddenly interjects with "Oh wait! [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse I forgot to tell you guys what happened to Uncle Barney!]]" and spends the rest of the episode showing a completely unrelated scene from a different storyline, and doesn't come around to telling the wedding story until the next episode.
15th Mar '18 12:59:47 AM yisfidri
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-->-- '''Mrs Bantry''', ''[[Literature/MissMarple The Thirteen Problems]]''

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-->-- '''Mrs Bantry''', ''[[Literature/MissMarple The Thirteen Problems]]''
''Literature/TheThirteenProblems''



* Most of the stories in ''The Thirteen Problems'' by Creator/AgathaChristie, which are supposedly being told by different members of Literature/MissMarple's circle. The [[AvertedTrope exceptions]] are the last three: one is narrated by Mrs Bantry (see page quote), and mostly consists of the others asking questions in order to get any detail at all; one is narrated by a BrainlessBeauty who needs a lot of help to get the story straight; and the last simply doesn't maintain the framing device.

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* Most of the stories in ''The Thirteen Problems'' ''Literature/TheThirteenProblems'' by Creator/AgathaChristie, which are supposedly being told by different members of Literature/MissMarple's circle. The [[AvertedTrope exceptions]] are the last three: one is narrated by Mrs Bantry (see page quote), and mostly consists of the others asking questions in order to get any detail at all; one is narrated by a BrainlessBeauty who needs a lot of help to get the story straight; and the last simply doesn't maintain the framing device.
24th Jan '18 5:32:54 PM nombretomado
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* ''Literature/FifthBusiness'' by Robertson Davies is a particularly {{egregious}} case. Elaborate writing aside, the first person narration comes off as a bit odd because the entire story is framed as a letter from the main character to the headmaster of the school that he works at. Said "letter" happens to be around 300 pages long, and it describes around forty years of the protagonist's life in intimate detail, including gratuitously long passages describing [[AuthorAppeal his thoughts about obscure Catholic saints]]. When was the last time someone wrote their autobiography as a letter to a friend? Hell, how many envelopes can fit a 300-page letter?

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* ''Literature/FifthBusiness'' by Robertson Davies is a particularly {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} case. Elaborate writing aside, the first person narration comes off as a bit odd because the entire story is framed as a letter from the main character to the headmaster of the school that he works at. Said "letter" happens to be around 300 pages long, and it describes around forty years of the protagonist's life in intimate detail, including gratuitously long passages describing [[AuthorAppeal his thoughts about obscure Catholic saints]]. When was the last time someone wrote their autobiography as a letter to a friend? Hell, how many envelopes can fit a 300-page letter?
28th Oct '17 5:34:11 PM ProfessorThascales
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Added DiffLines:

** J.M. Coetzee's ''Age of Iron'' is also supposedly a single letter from a dying woman to her daughter.
21st Apr '17 9:17:54 PM TristanJeremiah
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!Owing to the ubiquity of this trope, only unusual variants or subversions will be listed:

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!Owing ![[OmnipresentTropes Owing to the ubiquity of this trope, trope]], only unusual variants or subversions will be listed:
30th Jan '17 12:25:38 PM Evighet
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* ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' is for the most part a subversion. Lots of jokes have been made about how it's written largely in sentence fragments due to its BeigeProse style. The story is told in first person present narration through the eyes of a sixteen year old girl being put through all kinds of trauma.
7th Oct '16 11:24:02 AM erforce
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* Creator/DanSimmons has a fondness of writing parts of his books as journal entries from people who are going insane or dying. It happens part way through ''Literature/{{Hyperion}}'' and near the end of ''TheTerror''.

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* Creator/DanSimmons has a fondness of writing parts of his books as journal entries from people who are going insane or dying. It happens part way through ''Literature/{{Hyperion}}'' and near the end of ''TheTerror''.''Literature/TheTerror''.
26th May '16 6:25:13 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''Literature/AsILayDying'' by WilliamFaulkner is a good example of an aversion. All of the narrators talk like normal people, even if that makes the story really hard to follow.

to:

* ''Literature/AsILayDying'' by WilliamFaulkner Creator/WilliamFaulkner is a good example of an aversion. All of the narrators talk like normal people, even if that makes the story really hard to follow.
6th Mar '16 2:20:57 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Literature/PaleFire'' by VladimirNabokov is a first-person narrative disguised as a critical edition of a poem: the narrator is the editor, not the poet, who is dead. The "editor" slips his narrative into the preface and annotations, and it becomes increasingly clear that he resents the poet for not including his narrative into the poem itself. Then it becomes clear that the editor's an UnreliableNarrator and that the "true" narrative is lurking on an even deeper level...except that there might be an even more "true" narrative lurking beneath that one. And so on.

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* ''Literature/PaleFire'' by VladimirNabokov Creator/VladimirNabokov is a first-person narrative disguised as a critical edition of a poem: the narrator is the editor, not the poet, who is dead. The "editor" slips his narrative into the preface and annotations, and it becomes increasingly clear that he resents the poet for not including his narrative into the poem itself. Then it becomes clear that the editor's an UnreliableNarrator and that the "true" narrative is lurking on an even deeper level...except that there might be an even more "true" narrative lurking beneath that one. And so on.



* DanSimmons has a fondness of writing parts of his books as journal entries from people who are going insane or dying. It happens part way through ''{{Hyperion}}'' and near the end of ''TheTerror''.

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* DanSimmons Creator/DanSimmons has a fondness of writing parts of his books as journal entries from people who are going insane or dying. It happens part way through ''{{Hyperion}}'' ''Literature/{{Hyperion}}'' and near the end of ''TheTerror''.
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