History Main / AllCrimesAreEqual

10th Jul '17 5:09:27 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This is exactly why [[UsefulNotes/DynastiesFromShangToQing the Qin empire]] only lasted twenty years after UsefulNotes/QinShiHuangdi died. The laws were extremely draconian, with the death penalty being prescribed for minor crimes for reasons similar to Draco's (to terrorize the populace). However, one of these laws created a rather perverse incentive: the penalty for tardiness in arriving at one's post in the government and military was death. One company of soldiers managed to get stuck in the swamps of the southern provinces on its way to reinforce a northern fortress against barbarian attack, and realized they would not be able to report on time. It dawned on them that since the penalty for tardiness was death, and the penalty for mutiny was also death, they stood a better chance of living if they revolted (also, being killed in battle would be more honorable than summary execution). Thus they charged into a town, declared their captain Chen Sheng King of the Chu (Chu being one of the nation-states conquered by the Qin),[[note]]To this day, "Even Chen Sheng can be King" is a Chinese proverb meaning "even the lowliest man can achieve great power if he exerts himself".[[/note]] and attracted an army of xenophobes and disgruntled peasants (who had also found Qin rule distastefully foreign and oppressive), beginning [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daze_Village_Uprising a rebellion]] that ultimately led to the end of the Qin Dynasty and the establishment of the pan-Chinese Han Empire.

to:

* This is exactly why [[UsefulNotes/DynastiesFromShangToQing the Qin empire]] only lasted twenty years after UsefulNotes/QinShiHuangdi died. The laws were extremely draconian, with the death penalty being prescribed for minor crimes for reasons similar to Draco's (to terrorize the populace). However, one of these laws created a rather perverse incentive: the penalty for tardiness in arriving at one's post in the government and military was death. One company of soldiers managed to get stuck in the swamps of the southern provinces on its way to reinforce a northern fortress against barbarian attack, and realized they would not be able to report on time. It dawned on them that since the penalty for tardiness was death, and the penalty for mutiny was also death, they stood a better chance of living if they revolted (also, being killed in battle would be more honorable than summary execution). Thus they charged into a town, declared their captain Chen Sheng King of the Chu (Chu being one of the nation-states conquered by the Qin),[[note]]To this day, "Even Chen Sheng can be King" is a Chinese proverb meaning "even the lowliest man can achieve great power if he exerts himself".[[/note]] and attracted an army of xenophobes and disgruntled peasants (who had also found Qin rule distastefully foreign and oppressive), beginning [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daze_Village_Uprising a rebellion]] that ultimately led to the end of the Qin Dynasty and the establishment of the pan-Chinese Han Empire.Empire.
** The founder of the Han Dynasty, Liu Bang, had a similar story during his rise to power. Though a peasant, he had through his personal charisma made connections that ended up with him as a (low-ranking) officer in the Qin army. He was assigned to escort a number of prisoners from his province to work on Qin Shihuang's tomb. However, a number of the prisoners escaped, and guess what the punishment for letting prisoners escape was? That's right, death. So Liu decided he would desert the army, since at least as a fugitive he could try to survive. He also let the rest of the prisoners go free. A number of them joined him in hiding, where they became the nucleus of the army he eventually led to win the throne.
5th Jul '17 4:41:47 PM MCanter89
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Even better since the NCR (who controls Camp [=McCarran=]) prides itself for having a system of law and punishment (hell, one of the first factions you interact with are escaped NCR Prisoners). Although this is lampshaded in a loading screen, too - the NCR is apparently very unhappy about being the Mojave's police force, and as such have made most crimes punishable by instant execution.

to:

*** Even better since the NCR (who controls Camp [=McCarran=]) prides itself for having a system of law and punishment (hell, one of the first factions you interact with are escaped NCR Prisoners). prisoners). Although this is lampshaded in a loading screen, too - the NCR is apparently very unhappy about being the Mojave's police force, and force and, as such such, have made most crimes punishable by instant execution.



* 1500-1800 Gold Coast Africa. Because slaves were so profitable, the local rulers began to make slavery a punishment to sell people to the Europeans. Of course the incentives of this system quickly became clear to the leaders. Murder? Slavery. Treason? Slavery. Theft? Slavery. Late in paying taxes? Slavery. Say something rude? Slavery. Mentioned in the book Roots.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Arpaio Joe Arpaio]], Sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona (the county that contains Phoenix) 1993-2017, deliberately made it policy that a stay in his jail as horrible as he can for everybody who passes through it (prison terms that are shorter or for lesser crimes can be served in jail). The trope applies because it would not matter to him whether you're in there because you've been accused of murder or because you didn't pay a parking ticket; everybody who enters is subjected to the same [[http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/judge-calls-maricopa-county-jail-conditions-unconstitutional awful conditions]]. Though he has admitted the reason he enacted this policy was to make it so they never want to come back to jail. This has drawn particular criticism because it failed to distinguish between inmates who have been convicted of a crime and those who have not yet been tried (or are on trial) and are merely being held because they cannot make bail (or are being held on remand). While humiliating convicted criminals might be to some degree legitimate, applying the same treatment to people who have not been convicted -- and are therefore still innocent in the eyes of the law -- is highly questionable. This, combined with his policies targeting undocumented immigrants, led to his defeat by Democrat Paul Penzone in the 2016 election; Penzone promised to reverse or revise these practices, and between those opposed to Arpaio's policies on principle and those who felt that the innumerable lawsuits and massive national opprobrium the policies were generating weren't worth whatever benefit they had, there were enough voters ready to finally kick Arpaio out.
* This is the practice behind many "Zero Tolerance" laws in schools and workplaces. In this case, the broad and severe punishments are supposed to take the "burden" of decision-making out of the hands of teachers and administrators (particularly to protect them from getting sued). This has led to the problem of otherwise outstanding students getting suspended or expelled for possessing such "dangerous substances" as Midol or mouthwash and such "dangerous weapons" as fingernail clippers. This leads to such ridiculous situations as middle-schoolers receiving suspension for fighting back against bullies who receive suspensions for the same or even lesser amounts of time.
* In 1688 in England there were 50 offences on the statute book punishable by death, but that number had almost quadrupled by 1776, and it reached 220 by the end of the century. The "Bloody Code" included some 220 crimes punishable by death, including "being in the company of [[UsefulNotes/{{Romani}} Gypsies]] for one month", "strong [[EnfanteTerrible evidence of malice]] in a child [[CreepyChild aged 714 years of age]]" and "blacking the face or [[BlatantBurglar using a disguise]] whilst committing a crime". Children were commonly executed for such minor crimes as stealing. There was no real rhyme or reason to any of this -- it just happened that a few [=MPs=] in 18th-century England were a bit bloody-minded, and whenever something happened that disgusted them, they said "why, ThereShouldBeALaw" and promptly [[ObviousRulePatch decided that whatever offended them at that moment deserved death]].

to:

* 1500-1800 15001800 Gold Coast Africa. Because slaves were so profitable, the local rulers began to make slavery a punishment to sell people to the Europeans. Of course course, the incentives of this system quickly became clear to the leaders. Murder? Slavery. Treason? Slavery. Theft? Slavery. Late in paying taxes? Slavery. Say something rude? Slavery. Mentioned in the book Roots.
''Roots''.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Arpaio Joe Arpaio]], Sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona (the county that contains Phoenix) 1993-2017, 19932017, deliberately made it policy that a stay in his jail be as horrible as he can for everybody who passes through it (prison terms that are shorter or for lesser crimes can be served in jail). The trope applies because it would not matter to him whether you're in there because you've been accused of murder or because you didn't pay a parking ticket; everybody who enters is subjected to the same [[http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/judge-calls-maricopa-county-jail-conditions-unconstitutional awful conditions]]. Though he has admitted the reason he enacted this policy was to make it so they never want to come back to jail. This has drawn particular criticism because it failed to distinguish between inmates who have been convicted of a crime and those who have not yet been tried (or are on trial) and are merely being held because they cannot make bail (or are being held on remand). While humiliating convicted criminals might be to some degree legitimate, applying the same treatment to people who have not been convicted -- and are therefore still innocent in the eyes of the law -- is highly questionable. This, combined with his policies targeting undocumented immigrants, led to his defeat by Democrat Paul Penzone in the 2016 election; Penzone promised to reverse or revise these practices, and between those opposed to Arpaio's policies on principle and those who felt that the innumerable lawsuits and massive national opprobrium the policies were generating weren't worth whatever benefit they had, there were enough voters ready to finally kick Arpaio out.
out.
* This is the practice behind many "Zero Tolerance" laws in schools and workplaces. In this case, the broad and severe punishments are supposed to take the "burden" of decision-making out of the hands of teachers and administrators (particularly to protect them from getting sued). This has led to the problem of otherwise outstanding otherwise-outstanding students getting suspended or expelled for possessing such "dangerous substances" as Midol or mouthwash and such "dangerous weapons" as fingernail clippers. This leads to such ridiculous situations as middle-schoolers receiving suspension for fighting back against bullies who receive suspensions for the same or even lesser amounts of time.
* In 1688 in England England, there were 50 offences on the statute book punishable by death, but that number had almost quadrupled by 1776, and it reached 220 by the end of the century. The "Bloody Code" included some 220 crimes punishable by death, including "being in the company of [[UsefulNotes/{{Romani}} Gypsies]] for one month", "strong [[EnfanteTerrible evidence of malice]] in a child [[CreepyChild aged 714 years of age]]" age]]", and "blacking the face or [[BlatantBurglar using a disguise]] whilst committing a crime". Children were commonly executed for such minor crimes as stealing. There was no real rhyme or reason to any of this -- it just happened that a few [=MPs=] in 18th-century England were a bit bloody-minded, and whenever something happened that disgusted them, they said "why, ThereShouldBeALaw" and promptly [[ObviousRulePatch decided that whatever offended them at that moment deserved death]].



** Another reason for so many capital crimes was that until the 1820s Britain didn't have a formal police force, meaning that the chances of catching a criminal were small, so the punishments for the few caught had to act as a deterrent.
** This period also gave us the sayings "in for a penny, in for a pound" and "one may as well get hanged for a sheep as a lamb". Since even crimes that had lesser punishments than death tended to have fairly disproportionate punishments, criminals, realizing that how much they stole was irrelevant to the sentence, began to shoot for larger hauls. Why bother stealing a mere penny or lamb, when one could steal a sheep or a pound and the punishment was no worse if caught? And if there were any witnesses, they might kill them too, to escape a death sentence that would come just as easily for theft as committing murder.
*** In a similar vein, in most legal systems the punishment for attempted murder is generally significantly lighter than that for actual murder. This is mostly to discourage people from going back to finish the job if they didn't manage to kill their guy the first time around.
*** The problem actually existed even earlier: in ''Utopia'' (1516), one of the characters critiques the idea of the death sentence for theft over the same possible result.
** In practice, this may have led to more crimes as well as worse crimes: many judges and juries modified the charge, ignored evidence, or outright acquitted certain offenders so as to avoid having to hang them for some of the more ridiculous statutes. Thus it led to legal corruption and disrespect for the very law they were tasked to enforce. Ironically, because of this, the period under which the Bloody Code occurred actually had fewer executions. Moreover, death sentences were commonly commuted in more "ridiculous" cases and the offenders were [[TradingBarsForStripes sent to]] the [[BritsWithBattleships Army and the Navy]] or [[SentencedToDownUnder Australia]]. [[LoopholeAbuse Nothing in the law says]] you can't sentence someone to death and then reduce the sentence for "merciful" reasons. At times this happened simply to empty out their prisons, as they couldn't even hang people fast enough. Of course this was far too often simply a slower death sentence. The mortality rates on the ships were horrible, and a huge percentage of enlisted soldiers died of diseases without ever even getting to see a battle. A lot of people died in prison from "gaol fever" as well, before ever getting hanged. Therefore even non-capital sentences could mean death functionally.
* "[[RuleOfThree Three Strikes]] Laws" are statutes enacted by state governments in the United States which require the state courts to impose a life sentence on persons who have been convicted of three or more serious criminal offenses. Some defendants have been given sentences of 25 years to life in prison for such crimes as [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking shoplifting golf clubs]] (Gary Ewing, previous strikes for burglary and armed robbery), or, along with a violent assault, stealing a slice of pepperoni pizza from a group of children (Jerry Dewayne Williams, previous convictions for robbery and attempted robbery, sentence later reduced to six years). Some managed to score themselves sentences of ''50 years to life''[[note]]He stole these videotapes in two instances and the second was his fourth strike[[/note]] for ''stealing videotapes'' (Leandro Andrade, previous strikes for petty theft, residential burglary, transportation of marijuana, and escape from prison). In ''Rummel v. Estelle'' (1980), the Supreme Court upheld life with possible parole for third-strike felony fraud in Texas, which arose from a refusal to repay $120.75 paid for air conditioning repair that was subsequently considered unsatisfactory.
** Some politicians, like [[http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1955&dat=19940404&id=0a4vAAAAIBAJ&sjid=IKIFAAAAIBAJ&pg=2369,2230088 Dennis Leh of Pennsylvania]], were even proposing to enact ''capital three strikes laws'' for habitual violent offenders.[[note]]It is particularly peculiar that he said this in Pennsylvania, since ''de facto'' PA has no death penalty: it's very hard to get a death sentence under the PA statute. The state has only executed three people since the national death penalty moratorium was lifted in 1976, all of whom had basically given up, declining to present their case on the mandatory appeal to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. And all occurred in the mid-90s, under the notoriously conservative "law-and-order" governor Tom Ridge (who later went on to become the first Secretary of Homeland Security under [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Dubya]]).[[/note]]

to:

** Another reason for so many capital crimes was that that, until the 1820s 1820s, Britain didn't have a formal police force, meaning that the chances of catching a criminal were small, so the punishments for the few caught had to act as a deterrent.
** This period also gave us the sayings "in for a penny, in for a pound" and "one may as well get hanged for a sheep as a lamb". Since even crimes that had lesser punishments than death tended to have fairly disproportionate punishments, criminals, realizing that how much they stole was irrelevant to the sentence, began to shoot for larger hauls. Why bother stealing a mere penny or lamb, when one could steal a sheep or a pound and the punishment was no worse if caught? And if there were any witnesses, they might kill them them, too, to escape a death sentence that would come just as easily for theft as committing murder.
murder.
*** In a similar vein, in most legal systems systems, the punishment for attempted murder is generally significantly lighter than that for actual murder. This is mostly to discourage people from going back to finish the job if they didn't manage to kill their guy the first time around.
around.
*** The problem actually existed even earlier: in ''Utopia'' (1516), one of the characters critiques the idea of the death sentence for theft over the same possible result.
result.
** In practice, this may have led to more crimes as well as worse crimes: many judges and juries modified the charge, ignored evidence, or outright acquitted certain offenders so as to avoid having to hang them for some of the more ridiculous statutes. Thus Thus, it led to legal corruption and disrespect for the very law they were tasked to enforce. Ironically, because of this, the period under which the Bloody Code occurred actually had fewer executions. Moreover, death sentences were commonly commuted in more "ridiculous" cases and the offenders were [[TradingBarsForStripes sent to]] the [[BritsWithBattleships Army and the Navy]] or [[SentencedToDownUnder Australia]]. [[LoopholeAbuse Nothing in the law says]] you can't sentence someone to death and then reduce the sentence for "merciful" reasons. At times times, this happened simply to empty out their prisons, as they couldn't even hang people fast enough. Of course course, this was far too often simply a slower death sentence. The mortality rates on the ships were horrible, and a huge percentage of enlisted soldiers died of diseases without ever even getting to see a battle. A lot of people died in prison from "gaol fever" as well, before ever getting hanged. Therefore Therefore, even non-capital sentences could mean death functionally.
* "[[RuleOfThree Three Strikes]] Laws" are statutes enacted by state governments in the United States which require the state courts to impose a life sentence on persons who have been convicted of three or more serious criminal offenses. Some defendants have been given sentences of 25 years to life in prison for such crimes as [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking shoplifting golf clubs]] (Gary Ewing, previous strikes for burglary and armed robbery), robbery) or, along with a violent assault, stealing a slice of pepperoni pizza from a group of children (Jerry Dewayne Williams, previous convictions for robbery and attempted robbery, sentence later reduced to six years). Some managed to score themselves sentences of ''50 years to life''[[note]]He stole these videotapes in two instances and the second was his fourth strike[[/note]] for ''stealing videotapes'' (Leandro Andrade, previous strikes for petty theft, residential burglary, transportation of marijuana, and escape from prison). In ''Rummel v. Estelle'' (1980), the Supreme Court upheld life with possible parole for third-strike felony fraud in Texas, which arose from a refusal to repay $120.75 paid for air conditioning repair that was subsequently considered unsatisfactory.
** Some politicians, like [[http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1955&dat=19940404&id=0a4vAAAAIBAJ&sjid=IKIFAAAAIBAJ&pg=2369,2230088 Dennis Leh of Pennsylvania]], were even proposing to enact ''capital three strikes laws'' for habitual violent offenders.[[note]]It is particularly peculiar that he said this in Pennsylvania, since ''de facto'' PA has no death penalty: it's very hard to get a death sentence under the PA statute. The state has only executed three people since the national death penalty moratorium was lifted in 1976, all of whom had basically given up, declining to present their case on the mandatory appeal to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. And all occurred in the mid-90s, mid-'90s, under the notoriously conservative "law-and-order" governor Tom Ridge (who later went on to become the first Secretary of Homeland Security under [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Dubya]]).[[/note]]



* The [[AncientGreece Athenian]] law code of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draco_(lawgiver) Draco]]. Much like the Bloody Code, while not ''all'' crimes had the same punishment, his constitution did set death as the punishment for numerous minor offenses. Unlike the Bloody Code, however, he justified his...erm...liberality with the death penalty by saying that it was the only fitting punishment he could think of for certain minor crimes, and as for worse offenses, there really isn't any worse punishment than death, is there? (bear in mind that the Greeks weren't particularly fond of torture at this point). From this, we get the term "Draconian" to describe harsh laws; the fact that his name means "dragon" is merely a poetic coincidence.

to:

* The [[AncientGreece Athenian]] law code of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draco_(lawgiver) Draco]]. Much like the Bloody Code, while not ''all'' crimes had the same punishment, his constitution did set death as the punishment for numerous minor offenses. Unlike the Bloody Code, however, he justified his...erm... erm... liberality with the death penalty by saying that it was the only fitting punishment he could think of for certain minor crimes, and as for worse offenses, there really isn't any worse punishment than death, is there? (bear in mind that the Greeks weren't particularly fond of torture at this point). From this, we get the term "Draconian" to describe harsh laws; the fact that his name means "dragon" is merely a poetic coincidence.



* Several Western countries are under pressure to crack down heavily on antisemitic comments and actions here. The problem, as critics have pointed out, is that the interpretation of antisemitic speech is so broad that it would also place legitimate criticism of actions undertaken by the state of Israel on the same level as Holocaust denial, or random acts of violence against Jewish people. It has been pointed out that it would not only serve some vested interests if criticism of Israeli government actions was stifled, it would actually encourage [[ConspiracyTheorist people]] who believe the AncientConspiracy exists and a certain ethnicity is behind it - and make them even more strident in the perceived defense of their right to free speech. The venerable American Anti-Defamation League has been accused of doing this commonly, and seems to view ''all'' efforts at pressuring Israel into changing policy as an antisemitic campaign. In fairness, we must note that antisemites typically do not look fondly on Israel, as you would expect, and legitimate criticisms can get mistakes for bigotry. On the other hand, this seems to be conflated deliberately too at times as a means of tarring critics as being antisemites (even ''Jewish'' ones-they're supposedly "[[InternalizedCategorism self-hating]]") and thus discredit them. In the US, hate speech isn't illegal. However elsewhere there have been serious legal issues (including punishment) regarding this.

to:

* Several Western countries are under pressure to crack down heavily on antisemitic comments and actions here. The problem, as critics have pointed out, is that the interpretation of antisemitic speech is so broad that it would also place legitimate criticism of actions undertaken by the state of Israel on the same level as Holocaust denial, or random acts of violence against Jewish people. It has been pointed out that it would not only serve some vested interests if criticism of Israeli government actions was stifled, it would actually encourage [[ConspiracyTheorist people]] who believe the AncientConspiracy exists and a certain ethnicity is behind it - and make them even more strident in the perceived defense of their right to free speech. The venerable American Anti-Defamation League has been accused of doing this commonly, commonly and seems to view ''all'' efforts at pressuring Israel into changing policy as an antisemitic campaign. In fairness, we must note that antisemites typically do not look fondly on Israel, as you would expect, and legitimate criticisms can get mistakes mistaken for bigotry. On the other hand, this seems to be conflated deliberately too deliberately, too, at times as a means of tarring critics as being antisemites (even ''Jewish'' ones-they're ones--they're supposedly "[[InternalizedCategorism self-hating]]") and thus discredit them. In the US, hate speech isn't illegal. However However, elsewhere there have been serious legal issues (including punishment) regarding this. this.
30th Jun '17 1:54:13 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Mechanismo was a program for new robotic Judges implemented after severe manpower shortages. They [[AIIsACrapshoot quickly started to malfunction]] during live field tests, handing out Isocube sentences that exceed even the disproportionate standards of the regular Judges, and later going on murderous rampages to kill "criminals".

to:

** Mechanismo was a program for new robotic Judges implemented after severe manpower shortages. They [[AIIsACrapshoot quickly started to malfunction]] during live field tests, handing out Isocube sentences that exceed even the disproportionate standards of the regular Judges, Judges (25 years for littering?), and later going on murderous rampages to kill "criminals".
3rd Jun '17 1:45:13 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


%% Image replaced per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1437587954062290600

to:

%% Image replaced selected per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1437587954062290600
28th May '17 11:02:11 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


See also JaywalkingWillRuinYourLife.

to:

See also JaywalkingWillRuinYourLife. \n Also a common form of the DystopianEdict.
10th May '17 6:04:30 AM GigaHand
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' has the school rules set so that breaking any of them at all is punishable by death. This goes from lending other students your ID card to murder.

to:

* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' has the school rules set so that breaking any of them at all is punishable by death. This goes from lending other students your ID card to murder. This is probably a poor example however, as murder ''technically'' isn't against the rules - unless the other students catch you.
4th May '17 8:15:18 AM ChronoLegion
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Audio Plays]]
* In the [[AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho Big Finish]] audioplay ''Night of the Whisper'', the titular vigilante initially only goes after killers, but then starts to attack minor offenders, such as spray painters, with deadly force. [[spoiler:It turns out to be a side effect of the Whisper's creation, a melding of a murdered girl and a robotic Star Marshal]].
[[/folder]]
27th Apr '17 11:03:50 AM kome360
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Webcomic/TheWaterPhoenixKing'': Tamantha, a massive deconstruction of classic karma systems. All crimes may not be equal, but all 'sinners' are judged with death and a suffocating afterlife, and all crimes are punished with a randomly generated curse on the entire world, with the severity dependent on the crime. The worst part is that the system's virtues are racism, sexism, and elitism - crime is defined as any deviation from being a self-righteous bigoted asshole, and the weakest-willed, most obedient xenophobes (who are probably indirectly responsible for much of the world's suffering, given such people under this system would usually be pretty high up on the caste system to be protected from the overflow of curses) are the only ones in heaven. Naturally, the protagonists are doing everything they can to kill karma.
20th Apr '17 4:37:55 AM CountDorku
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Protectorate of Menoth gets ''so'' close to this in ''TabletopGame/IronKingdoms''. In the Urban Adventure sourcebook for the RPG, there's a page dedicated to law and order, listing fourteen crimes - improper speech, drunkenness, assault, theft, burglary, tax evasion, smuggling, major theft, destruction of currency, counterfeiting, arson, treason, piracy and murder - and the punishments you can receive for each in the main countries in the setting. The column for the Protectorate of Menoth has the phrase "[[KillItWithFire death by burning]]" appear no fewer than ''eleven times''. The only crimes for which you ''can't'' be burned at the stake are assault, theft and drunkenness.

to:

* The Protectorate of Menoth gets ''so'' close to this in ''TabletopGame/IronKingdoms''. In the Urban Adventure sourcebook for the RPG, there's a page dedicated to law and order, listing fourteen crimes - improper speech, drunkenness, assault, theft, burglary, tax evasion, smuggling, major theft, destruction of currency, counterfeiting, arson, treason, piracy and murder - and the variety of punishments you can receive for each in the main countries in the setting. The column for the Protectorate of Menoth has the phrase "[[KillItWithFire death by burning]]" appear no fewer than ''eleven times''.times''; wracking appears nine times, and flogging seven. The only crimes for which you ''can't'' be burned at the stake are assault, theft and drunkenness.
20th Apr '17 4:35:57 AM CountDorku
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The Protectorate of Menoth gets ''so'' close to this in ''TabletopGame/IronKingdoms''. In the Urban Adventure sourcebook for the RPG, there's a page dedicated to law and order, listing fourteen crimes - improper speech, drunkenness, assault, theft, burglary, tax evasion, smuggling, major theft, destruction of currency, counterfeiting, arson, treason, piracy and murder - and the punishments you can receive for each in the main countries in the setting. The column for the Protectorate of Menoth has the phrase "[[KillItWithFire death by burning]]" appear no fewer than ''eleven times''. The only crimes for which you ''can't'' be burned at the stake are assault, theft and drunkenness.
This list shows the last 10 events of 217. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AllCrimesAreEqual