History Main / AllCrimesAreEqual

27th Apr '17 11:03:50 AM kome360
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Webcomic/TheWaterPhoenixKing'': Tamantha, a massive deconstruction of classic karma systems. All crimes may not be equal, but all 'sinners' are judged with death and a suffocating afterlife, and all crimes are punished with a randomly generated curse on the entire world, with the severity dependent on the crime. The worst part is that the system's virtues are racism, sexism, and elitism - crime is defined as any deviation from being a self-righteous bigoted asshole, and the weakest-willed, most obedient xenophobes (who are probably indirectly responsible for much of the world's suffering, given such people under this system would usually be pretty high up on the caste system to be protected from the overflow of curses) are the only ones in heaven. Naturally, the protagonists are doing everything they can to kill karma.
20th Apr '17 4:37:55 AM CountDorku
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Protectorate of Menoth gets ''so'' close to this in ''TabletopGame/IronKingdoms''. In the Urban Adventure sourcebook for the RPG, there's a page dedicated to law and order, listing fourteen crimes - improper speech, drunkenness, assault, theft, burglary, tax evasion, smuggling, major theft, destruction of currency, counterfeiting, arson, treason, piracy and murder - and the punishments you can receive for each in the main countries in the setting. The column for the Protectorate of Menoth has the phrase "[[KillItWithFire death by burning]]" appear no fewer than ''eleven times''. The only crimes for which you ''can't'' be burned at the stake are assault, theft and drunkenness.

to:

* The Protectorate of Menoth gets ''so'' close to this in ''TabletopGame/IronKingdoms''. In the Urban Adventure sourcebook for the RPG, there's a page dedicated to law and order, listing fourteen crimes - improper speech, drunkenness, assault, theft, burglary, tax evasion, smuggling, major theft, destruction of currency, counterfeiting, arson, treason, piracy and murder - and the variety of punishments you can receive for each in the main countries in the setting. The column for the Protectorate of Menoth has the phrase "[[KillItWithFire death by burning]]" appear no fewer than ''eleven times''.times''; wracking appears nine times, and flogging seven. The only crimes for which you ''can't'' be burned at the stake are assault, theft and drunkenness.
20th Apr '17 4:35:57 AM CountDorku
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The Protectorate of Menoth gets ''so'' close to this in ''TabletopGame/IronKingdoms''. In the Urban Adventure sourcebook for the RPG, there's a page dedicated to law and order, listing fourteen crimes - improper speech, drunkenness, assault, theft, burglary, tax evasion, smuggling, major theft, destruction of currency, counterfeiting, arson, treason, piracy and murder - and the punishments you can receive for each in the main countries in the setting. The column for the Protectorate of Menoth has the phrase "[[KillItWithFire death by burning]]" appear no fewer than ''eleven times''. The only crimes for which you ''can't'' be burned at the stake are assault, theft and drunkenness.
8th Mar '17 2:32:14 PM Discar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/{{Edgedancer}}'': Nale punishes every crime with killing the criminal under the assumption that milder punishment leads to recidivism.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Edgedancer}}'': ''Literature/{{Edgedancer}}'' (a novella of ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive''): Nale punishes every crime with killing the criminal under the assumption that milder punishment leads to recidivism.
3rd Feb '17 7:00:48 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Zig-zagged in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer40000}}''. Make no mistake, you're going to run into a HangingJudge if you stick around long enough, but others actually care what you're guilty of so they don't [[PragmaticVillainy waste precious anti-magic bullets on mundane criminals, or send Chaos cultists to infiltrate valuable penal legions]]. Other sectors like Ultramar even have regular judicial systems. It really depends on the planet you're on, and the scale of the crimes everyone ''else'' is committing.

to:

* Zig-zagged in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer40000}}''.''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000''. Make no mistake, you're going to run into a HangingJudge if you stick around long enough, but others actually care what you're guilty of so they don't [[PragmaticVillainy waste precious anti-magic bullets on mundane criminals, or send Chaos cultists to infiltrate valuable penal legions]]. Other sectors like Ultramar even have regular judicial systems. It really depends on the planet you're on, and the scale of the crimes everyone ''else'' is committing.



* The city of Skullport in ''ForgottenRealms'' completely turns this trope on its head. The city is ruled by a cabal of floating skulls, who are beings of pure chaos. The only crimes in Skullport are disturbing the peace and undermining the authority of the skulls, but the skulls' punishment can be ''anything'' -- from hugging a stranger to gruesome death.

to:

* The city of Skullport in ''ForgottenRealms'' ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' completely turns this trope on its head. The city is ruled by a cabal of floating skulls, who are beings of pure chaos. The only crimes in Skullport are disturbing the peace and undermining the authority of the skulls, but the skulls' punishment can be ''anything'' -- from hugging a stranger to gruesome death.
8th Jan '17 11:22:25 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[Comicbook/ThePunisher2099 The 2099 alternate universe Punisher]] from ''Franchise/{{Marvel 2099}}'' devolves into this. At first, he's killing murderous scum in reaction to his Mom and sister being murdered by crooks who got away with it. At the end of the series, sponsored by a new regime, he's gone around the bend. Among many things, the age at which someone can be tried as an adult is now in the single digits and pretty much everything is a crime punishable by whatever the hell he wants it to be (and brain scanners are used to cover [[{{Thoughtcrime}} bad thoughts]]). At one point, he expresses the desire that [[ConsentingAdults consensual adult sex]] should be punished.

to:

* [[Comicbook/ThePunisher2099 The 2099 alternate universe Punisher]] from ''Franchise/{{Marvel 2099}}'' ''ComicBook/Marvel2099'' devolves into this. At first, he's killing murderous scum in reaction to his Mom and sister being murdered by crooks who got away with it. At the end of the series, sponsored by a new regime, he's gone around the bend. Among many things, the age at which someone can be tried as an adult is now in the single digits and pretty much everything is a crime punishable by whatever the hell he wants it to be (and brain scanners are used to cover [[{{Thoughtcrime}} bad thoughts]]). At one point, he expresses the desire that [[ConsentingAdults consensual adult sex]] should be punished.
1st Jan '17 1:47:41 PM Kakai
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/{{Edgedancer}}'': Nale punishes every crime with killing the criminal under the assumption that milder punishment leads to recidivism.
15th Dec '16 10:34:35 AM gb00393
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': All sinners are equal before the gods according to the High Sparrow. Bearing false witness is as grave a sin as any, as Margaery can attest from a penitent's cell.
27th Nov '16 10:48:52 AM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Arpaio Joe Arpaio]], Sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona (the county that contains Phoenix) 1993-2017, deliberately made it policy that a stay in his jail as horrible as he can for everybody who passes through it (prison terms that are shorter or for lesser crimes can be served in jail). The trope applies because it would not matter to him whether you're in there because you've been accused of murder or because you didn't pay a parking ticket; everybody who enters is subjected to the same [[http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/judge-calls-maricopa-county-jail-conditions-unconstitutional awful conditions]]. Though he has admitted the reason he does this is to make it so they never want to come back to jail. This has drawn particular criticism because it doesn't distinguish between inmates who have been convicted of a crime and those who have not yet been tried (or are on trial) and are merely being held because they cannot make bail (or are being held on remand). While humiliating convicted criminals might be to some degree legitimate, applying the same treatment to people who have not been convicted -- and are therefore still innocent in the eyes of the law -- is highly questionable. This, combined with his policies targeting undocumented immigrants, led to his defeat by Democrat Paul Penzone in the 2016 election; Penzone promised to reverse or revise these practices, and between those opposed to Arpaio's policies in principle and those who felt that the innumerable lawsuits and massive national opprobrium the policies were generating weren't worth whatever benefit they had, there were enough voters ready to finally kick Arpaio out.

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Arpaio Joe Arpaio]], Sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona (the county that contains Phoenix) 1993-2017, deliberately made it policy that a stay in his jail as horrible as he can for everybody who passes through it (prison terms that are shorter or for lesser crimes can be served in jail). The trope applies because it would not matter to him whether you're in there because you've been accused of murder or because you didn't pay a parking ticket; everybody who enters is subjected to the same [[http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/judge-calls-maricopa-county-jail-conditions-unconstitutional awful conditions]]. Though he has admitted the reason he does enacted this is policy was to make it so they never want to come back to jail. This has drawn particular criticism because it doesn't failed to distinguish between inmates who have been convicted of a crime and those who have not yet been tried (or are on trial) and are merely being held because they cannot make bail (or are being held on remand). While humiliating convicted criminals might be to some degree legitimate, applying the same treatment to people who have not been convicted -- and are therefore still innocent in the eyes of the law -- is highly questionable. This, combined with his policies targeting undocumented immigrants, led to his defeat by Democrat Paul Penzone in the 2016 election; Penzone promised to reverse or revise these practices, and between those opposed to Arpaio's policies in on principle and those who felt that the innumerable lawsuits and massive national opprobrium the policies were generating weren't worth whatever benefit they had, there were enough voters ready to finally kick Arpaio out.
27th Nov '16 10:46:59 AM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Maricopa County Sheriff [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Arpaio Joe Arpaio]] deliberately makes a stay in his jail as horrible as he can for everybody who passes through it (prison terms that are shorter or for lesser crimes can be served in jail). The trope applies because it doesn't matter to him whether you're in there because you've been accused of murder or because you didn't pay a parking ticket; everybody who enters is subjected to the same [[http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/judge-calls-maricopa-county-jail-conditions-unconstitutional awful conditions]]. Though he has admitted the reason he does this is to make it so they never want to come back to jail. This has drawn particular criticism because it doesn't distinguish between inmates who have been convicted of a crime and those who have not yet been tried (or are on trial) and are merely being held because they cannot make bail (or are being held on remand). While humiliating convicted criminals might be to some degree legitimate, applying the same treatment to people who have not been convicted -- and are therefore still innocent in the eyes of the law -- is highly questionable.

to:

* Maricopa County Sheriff [[http://en.*[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Arpaio Joe Arpaio]] Arpaio]], Sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona (the county that contains Phoenix) 1993-2017, deliberately makes made it policy that a stay in his jail as horrible as he can for everybody who passes through it (prison terms that are shorter or for lesser crimes can be served in jail). The trope applies because it doesn't would not matter to him whether you're in there because you've been accused of murder or because you didn't pay a parking ticket; everybody who enters is subjected to the same [[http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/judge-calls-maricopa-county-jail-conditions-unconstitutional awful conditions]]. Though he has admitted the reason he does this is to make it so they never want to come back to jail. This has drawn particular criticism because it doesn't distinguish between inmates who have been convicted of a crime and those who have not yet been tried (or are on trial) and are merely being held because they cannot make bail (or are being held on remand). While humiliating convicted criminals might be to some degree legitimate, applying the same treatment to people who have not been convicted -- and are therefore still innocent in the eyes of the law -- is highly questionable. This, combined with his policies targeting undocumented immigrants, led to his defeat by Democrat Paul Penzone in the 2016 election; Penzone promised to reverse or revise these practices, and between those opposed to Arpaio's policies in principle and those who felt that the innumerable lawsuits and massive national opprobrium the policies were generating weren't worth whatever benefit they had, there were enough voters ready to finally kick Arpaio out.
This list shows the last 10 events of 210. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AllCrimesAreEqual