History Main / AllAbusersAreMale

11th Sep '17 5:03:02 PM Clanger00
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The most common aversion of this trope is the WickedStepmother. And even ''then'' she's usually taken more seriously when her victim is a girl. Also note that most (if not all) of the subversions and aversions listed on this page are intended to be a ShockingSwerve in the story... meaning that even when the trope's not enforced, the writers still obviously expect the audience to believe in it.

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The most common aversion of this trope is the WickedStepmother. And even ''then'' she's usually taken more seriously when her victim is a girl. Also note that most (if not all) of the subversions and aversions listed on this page are intended to be a ShockingSwerve in the story... meaning that even when the trope's not enforced, the writers still obviously expect the audience to believe in it.
11th Sep '17 5:02:04 PM Clanger00
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A somewhat more disturbing trend with this trope is when a female character who, for all intents and purposes, is a textbook example of an abuser [[KarmaHoudini is given a free pass or even some justification or excuse for her actions]]; e.g., "she was in a bad situation", "she just needed to vent", "she was just complaining", "she has mental issues", etc. [[SarcasmMode And for some reason]], these same excuses are [[DoubleStandard seen as invalid when applied to a male abuser]].
10th Sep '17 6:59:11 PM GrammarNavi
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* Despite being a {{Lifetime}} series, ''Series/StrongMedicine'' actually averted this a handful of times. A patient of Lu expresses concern because he is about to be paroled for rape. She insists that he's like this because they were both molested as children. Lu naturally assumes it was their father and is shocked when the woman reveals that it was their ''mother''.

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* Despite being a {{Lifetime}} Creator/{{Lifetime}} series, ''Series/StrongMedicine'' actually averted this a handful of times. A patient of Lu expresses concern because he is about to be paroled for rape. She insists that he's like this because they were both molested as children. Lu naturally assumes it was their father and is shocked when the woman reveals that it was their ''mother''.
8th Aug '17 4:53:02 AM ChronoLegion
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Added DiffLines:

** One notable aversion is a woman, who finds intelligent, rich men, roofies them, then uses an electric prod on their prostate to force an erection, then collects the sperm and impregnates herself. She then claims the guy raped her, and, being roofied, he can't remember either way. In the end, though, she is found guilty, and her child is given to the biological father, who is vindicated.
25th Jun '17 2:29:22 PM Fireblood
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Examples of this trope sometimes even attempt to educate the audience about serious issues like rape and abuse. They do this while upholding the idea that men are the only perpetrators of abuse. A story where a man abuses or rapes a woman is not an example. A story that addresses these issues while only acknowledging one sex as potentially abusive is. This can happen when a character becomes a lesbian to avoid evil men, or when characters are seriously anti-rape and anti-violence yet overlook the possibility that women can commit these acts. While more male abusers are reported to the police each year than female abusers, many times this is assumed to mean that only men can be abusive. The pervasiveness of tropes like this can also affect the statistics, where people are ashamed to admit they have been abused by women, or the police refuse to file reports on what they consider unimportant, or in all too many cases, consider the wife's abuse of the husband "preemptive self-defense" and arrest ''him''. In addition, most shelters ban men, and people trying to bring attention to male victims or start male shelters have been ignored, ridiculed, accused of diverting attention from women's issues, and even cases received death threats.

to:

Examples of this trope sometimes even attempt to educate the audience about serious issues like rape and abuse. They do this while upholding the idea that men are the only perpetrators of abuse. A story where a man abuses or rapes a woman is not an example. A story that addresses these issues while only acknowledging one sex as potentially abusive is. This can happen when a character becomes a lesbian to avoid evil men, or when characters are seriously anti-rape and anti-violence yet overlook the possibility that women can commit these acts. While more male abusers are reported to the police each year than female abusers, many times this is assumed to mean that only men can be abusive. The pervasiveness of tropes like this can also affect the statistics, where people are ashamed to admit they have been abused by women, or the police refuse to file reports on what they consider unimportant, or in all too many cases, consider the wife's abuse of the husband "preemptive self-defense" and arrest ''him''. In addition, most shelters ban men, and people trying to bring attention to male victims or start male shelters have been ignored, ridiculed, accused of diverting attention from women's issues, and even cases received death threats.
threats in some cases.
1st Jun '17 5:20:03 PM meanmetalmario
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* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', Peter is being sexually harassed by his female boss, and Lois refuses to take it seriously, insisting that it's "impossible" for a woman to sexually harass a man. The DoubleStandard worsens later in the episode, when the boss says she was only harassing Peter because she hasn't had sex in a long time.

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* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', Peter is being sexually harassed by his female boss, and Lois refuses to take it seriously, insisting that it's "impossible" impossible for a woman to sexually harass a man.man because [[AManIsAlwaysEager no man would ever turn down sexual advances from a woman]]. The DoubleStandard worsens later in the episode, when the boss says she was only harassing Peter because she hasn't had sex in a long time.



* DCAU ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'''s Aresia. Men caused her pain in the past, so 'all men must be evil' -even if the male captain of the destroyed ship she was on as a child saved her life. Although, she was not aware of this initially. Once she finds out, she merely switches her stance to "All men are evil except for him".

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* DCAU ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'''s Aresia. Men caused her pain in the past, so 'all all men must be evil' -even evil. Even if the male captain of the destroyed ship she was on as a child saved her life.life [[HeroicSacrifice at the cost of his own]]. Although, she was not aware of this initially. Once she finds out, she merely switches her stance to "All men are evil except for him".
8th May '17 3:23:28 PM arrgh
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Examples of this trope sometimes even attempt to educate the audience about serious issues like rape and abuse. They do this while upholding the idea that men are the only perpetrators of abuse. A story where a man abuses or rapes a woman is not an example. A story that addresses these issues while only acknowledging one sex as potentially abusive is. This can happen when a character becomes a lesbian to avoid evil men, or when characters are seriously anti-rape and anti-violence yet overlook the possibility that women can commit these acts. While more male abusers are reported to the police each year than female abusers, many times this is assumed to mean that only men can be abusive. The pervasiveness of tropes like this can also affect the statistics, where people are ashamed to admit they have been abused by women, or the police refuse to file reports on what they consider unimportant, or in all too many cases, consider the wife's abuse of the husband "preemptive self-defense" and arrest ''him''. In addition, most shelters ban men, and people trying to bring attention to male victims or start male shelters have been ignored and in some cases received death threats.

to:

Examples of this trope sometimes even attempt to educate the audience about serious issues like rape and abuse. They do this while upholding the idea that men are the only perpetrators of abuse. A story where a man abuses or rapes a woman is not an example. A story that addresses these issues while only acknowledging one sex as potentially abusive is. This can happen when a character becomes a lesbian to avoid evil men, or when characters are seriously anti-rape and anti-violence yet overlook the possibility that women can commit these acts. While more male abusers are reported to the police each year than female abusers, many times this is assumed to mean that only men can be abusive. The pervasiveness of tropes like this can also affect the statistics, where people are ashamed to admit they have been abused by women, or the police refuse to file reports on what they consider unimportant, or in all too many cases, consider the wife's abuse of the husband "preemptive self-defense" and arrest ''him''. In addition, most shelters ban men, and people trying to bring attention to male victims or start male shelters have been ignored ignored, ridiculed, accused of diverting attention from women's issues, and in some even cases received death threats.
26th Mar '17 12:53:51 AM XTC
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** Also shown in "The Murder of the Meninist". Initially slightly averted, as rotating intern Fuentes makes a remark about the masculinity of a man who allows himself to be abused, which Saroyan has a go at him about, but then played creepily straight as the founder of a men's rights organization is shown to be controlling, manipulative and oppressive to his wife. Brennan, paragon of logic and evidence, immediately jumps to the assumption that he's guilty and spends most of the episode trying to prove it. It turns out [[spoiler:that he didn't, which Brennan appears genuinely disappointed at, but not before she punches him in the face. The guilty party was the victim's ex-wife, who immediately claims it was her (clearly, easily-manipulated) boyfriend. Both are arrested.]]

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** Also shown in "The Murder of the Meninist". Initially slightly averted, as rotating intern Fuentes makes a remark about the masculinity of a man who allows himself to be abused, abused by a woman, which Saroyan has a go at him about, but about. But then played creepily disturbingly straight as the founder of a men's rights organization is shown to be controlling, manipulative and oppressive to his wife. Brennan, paragon of logic and evidence, immediately jumps to the assumption that he's guilty and spends most the majority of the episode trying to prove it. It turns out [[spoiler:that he didn't, which Brennan appears genuinely disappointed at, but not before she punches him in the face. The guilty party was the victim's ex-wife, who immediately claims it was her (clearly, easily-manipulated) boyfriend. Both are arrested.]]
26th Mar '17 12:52:37 AM XTC
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* In an episode of ''Series/TheMysteriesOfLaura'', a woman crashes her car into the river, but the body is not found. By minute 5 of the episode, and with no actual evidence, Laura has decided that the husband is abusive and killed her. [[spoiler: When the woman turns up alive, Laura's theory is now that the woman staged her own death to get away from her abusive husband. She's right, of course, however]] the show goes out of its way to break its own standard of the last-minute-twist and reinforce that if you assume the man is abusive, then he is.

to:

* In an the "The Mystery of the Watery Grave" episode of ''Series/TheMysteriesOfLaura'', a woman crashes her car into the river, but the body is not found. By minute 5 of the episode, and with no actual evidence, Laura has decided that the husband is abusive and killed her. [[spoiler: When the woman turns up alive, Laura's theory is now that the woman staged her own death to get away from her abusive husband. She's right, of course, however]] at no time does the episode seriously consider any other theory, and the show goes out of its way to break its own standard of the last-minute-twist and reinforce that if you assume the man is abusive, then he is.
26th Mar '17 12:42:23 AM XTC
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Added DiffLines:

* In an episode of ''Series/TheMysteriesOfLaura'', a woman crashes her car into the river, but the body is not found. By minute 5 of the episode, and with no actual evidence, Laura has decided that the husband is abusive and killed her. [[spoiler: When the woman turns up alive, Laura's theory is now that the woman staged her own death to get away from her abusive husband. She's right, of course, however]] the show goes out of its way to break its own standard of the last-minute-twist and reinforce that if you assume the man is abusive, then he is.


Added DiffLines:

** Also shown in "The Murder of the Meninist". Initially slightly averted, as rotating intern Fuentes makes a remark about the masculinity of a man who allows himself to be abused, which Saroyan has a go at him about, but then played creepily straight as the founder of a men's rights organization is shown to be controlling, manipulative and oppressive to his wife. Brennan, paragon of logic and evidence, immediately jumps to the assumption that he's guilty and spends most of the episode trying to prove it. It turns out [[spoiler:that he didn't, which Brennan appears genuinely disappointed at, but not before she punches him in the face. The guilty party was the victim's ex-wife, who immediately claims it was her (clearly, easily-manipulated) boyfriend. Both are arrested.]]
*** The fact that meninism is a [[http://imgur.com/a/CITHD gender-flipped parody of feminism]] is lost on the writers as well, presenting it as a real political organization.
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