History Main / AlienNonInterferenceClause

12th May '16 8:34:58 PM zarpaulus
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Stellaris}}'' Empires can set their own policies on what level of observation of native species is allowed, Xenophile empires get unhappy by anything more than passive observation while fanatic Xenophobes can't passively or actively study natives but can invade them. They can also choose whether to Uplift pre-FTL species, which Xenophobes don't like.
7th May '16 7:18:10 PM katrinahood
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Of course, such rules are ultimately an ObstructiveCodeOfConduct that creates as many problems as it solves. Crash landing on an inhabited world when this rule is in force brings obvious difficulties. Trying to study an alien culture without being discovered is a popular scenario. And where do you draw the line? At exactly what a point where a species is officially "mature" enough to let them in on the secrets of the universe? Does non-interference mean you're morally obliged to let a species suffer or die because it is their "natural development"? And what will happen when the "protectees" do develop advanced technology and discover that alien races have been watching them for generations… and consider themselves pretty darn righteous for their policy of non-assistance? There's also the little matter of how one defines a culture's "normal evolution" or "healthy development"; in addition to the aforementioned "letting them all die" aspect, if a society seems happy but social development has "stagnated", does that justify stepping in to nudge them in the right direction, or should you assume that they might possibly be able to do so in their own time?

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Of course, such rules are ultimately an ObstructiveCodeOfConduct that creates as many problems as it solves. Crash landing on an inhabited world when this rule is in force brings obvious difficulties. Trying to study an alien culture without being discovered is a popular scenario. And where do you draw the line? At exactly what a point where a species is officially "mature" enough to let them in on the secrets of the universe? Does non-interference mean you're morally obliged to let a species suffer or die because it is their "natural development"? And what will happen when the "protectees" do develop advanced technology and discover that alien races have been watching them for generations… and consider themselves pretty darn righteous for their policy of non-assistance? And what should be done if the "protectees" are looking for extraterrestrial intelligence? There's also the little matter of how one defines a culture's "normal evolution" or "healthy development"; in addition to the aforementioned "letting them all die" aspect, if a society seems happy but social development has "stagnated", does that justify stepping in to nudge them in the right direction, or should you assume that they might possibly be able to do so in their own time?
7th May '16 6:51:30 AM TheKaizerreich
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Of course, the real reason the Ancients are such NeglectfulPrecursors are because the power we see on the rare occasions they cut loose means they are capable of solving the plot in ten seconds flat. The Ascended Prime Directive is how the writers got out of painting themselves into the corner with finally revealing who the Ancients are (presumably, when all we knew about them was "once upon a time, someone built awesome tech, and then the Goa'uld ganked it," the writers ''didn't'' have in mind a race that was ''nigh-omnipotent and still present.'') They could [[Series/StargateSG1 finish the Goa'uld]], [[Series/StargateAtlantis deal with the Wraith and the Asurans]], and bring the crew of the ''[[Series/StargateUniverse Destiny]]'' back to Earth with a thought -- the main problems of the three series, '''all problems they created by leaving their stuff lying around''' -- but where's the fun in that?

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Of course, the real reason the Ancients are such NeglectfulPrecursors are because the power we see on the rare occasions they cut loose means they are capable of solving the plot in ten seconds flat. The Ascended Prime Directive is how the writers got out of painting themselves into the corner with finally revealing who the Ancients are (presumably, when all we knew about them was "once upon a time, someone built awesome tech, and then the Goa'uld ganked it," the writers ''didn't'' have in mind a race that was ''nigh-omnipotent and still present.'') They could [[Series/StargateSG1 finish the Goa'uld]], [[Series/StargateAtlantis deal with the Wraith and the Asurans]], and bring the crew of the ''[[Series/StargateUniverse Destiny]]'' back to Earth with a thought -- the main problems of the three series, '''all problems they created by leaving their stuff lying around''' -- but where's the fun in that?that.\\\
Finally it should be noted that the Ancients do interfere - against ''other'' Ascended Beings. The reason their {{Evil Counterpart}}s, the Ori, don't flat-out invade the Milky Way themselves is because the Ancients keep them at bay. For Anubis, they have no right to attack him again after they pushed him back into corporeal form, which [[NiceJobBreakingItHero they totally messed up]], since Anubis got stuck between their state and ours, which means he has some measure of Ascended power but still falls under the "Ascended Beings can't attack him clause".
28th Apr '16 6:15:53 PM zarpaulus
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* The very first ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' novel involves the technologically-primitive Medusans, who the Manticorans try to keep semi-isolated from modern tech, assisted by the fact the planet really doesn't have anything anyone wants (Apart from its location on a major trade/possible invasion route, and potent psychotropic drugs that work on both Medusans and humans). When the Peeps provide advanced breechloading rifled muskets to assorted nomadic tribes, carefully designed so that they could be replicated with existing Medusan technology, the Manticoran governor sadly accepts the Manticorans will probably have to provide similar weapons to the more civilized (and friendly) Medusan city-states so they can defend themselves.

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* The very first ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' novel involves the technologically-primitive Medusans, who the Manticorans try to keep semi-isolated from modern tech, tech (traders can sell steel tools but nothing powered, for instance), assisted by the fact the planet really doesn't have anything anyone wants (Apart from its location on a major trade/possible invasion route, and potent psychotropic drugs that work on both Medusans and humans).route). When the Peeps provide advanced breechloading rifled muskets to assorted nomadic tribes, carefully designed so that they could be replicated with existing Medusan technology, the Manticoran governor sadly accepts the Manticorans will probably have to provide similar weapons to the more civilized (and friendly) Medusan city-states so they can defend themselves.
24th Apr '16 9:47:43 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** There's also one case in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' where Ben Sisko uses the Prime Directive as an excuse for not endorsing Kai Winn Adami as a candidate for First Minister of Bajor, stating that Starfleet regulations forbid him from becoming involved in internal political matters. Unstated is that he plain doesn't like her and wouldn't endorse her even if he ''could''.

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** There's also one case in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' where Ben Sisko uses the Prime Directive as an excuse for not endorsing Kai Winn Adami as a candidate for First Minister of Bajor, stating that Starfleet regulations forbid him from becoming involved in internal political matters. Unstated is that he plain doesn't like her and wouldn't endorse her even if he ''could''. In fact the core conflict for his character in the early seasons was that he was both forbidden to interfere in their internal affairs while ''also'' acting as the emissary for their gods at said gods' request.
24th Apr '16 9:39:30 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** There are also at least two rules which override the Prime Directive: the Temporal Prime Directive (prevent/reverse [[TimeTravel changes to the timestream]]) and the top-secret Omega Directive (prevent anyone from learning of or producing the Omega molecule, which destroys {{Subspace|OrHyperspace}}).

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** There are also at least two rules which override the Prime Directive: the Temporal Prime Directive (prevent/reverse [[TimeTravel changes to the timestream]]) and the top-secret Omega Directive (prevent anyone from learning of or producing the Omega molecule, which destroys {{Subspace|OrHyperspace}}). The Temporal Prime Directive doesn't even exist yet; time travelers from the future have mentioned it, but the "current time" of the Next Generation-Voyager era has a whole rat's nest of (almost completely unenforceable) rules instead that the main characters routinely ignore.
4th Apr '16 3:10:07 PM AnotherGuy
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* ''Film/{{Superman}}: Jor-El warns Kal-El it's forbidden to interfere with human history. That becomes a PlotPoint later in the film.

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* ''Film/{{Superman}}: ''Film/{{Superman}}'': Jor-El warns Kal-El it's forbidden to interfere with human history. That becomes a PlotPoint later in the film.
4th Apr '16 3:09:44 PM AnotherGuy
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/{{Superman}}: Jor-El warns Kal-El it's forbidden to interfere with human history. That becomes a PlotPoint later in the film.
31st Mar '16 5:50:52 PM dy031101
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* In the upcoming MMO StarCitizen, the United Empire of Earth has passed the Fair Chance Act, which prohibits hostile terraforming, mining, or most other forms of Human intervention on any planet with indigenous life of reasonable potential to develop sentience within space discovered and subsequently incoporated into the UEE, prior to the events of the game. Violators can face everything up to and including the might of UEE's military forces.

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* In the upcoming MMO StarCitizen, the United Empire of Earth has passed the Fair Chance Act, which prohibits hostile terraforming, mining, or most other forms of Human intervention on any planet with indigenous life of reasonable potential to develop sentience within space discovered and subsequently incoporated into the UEE, prior to the events of the game. Violators can face everything up to and including the might of UEE's military forces. Unfortunately, as the UEE becomes overextended over time, universal enforcement of the act proves difficult.
15th Mar '16 2:00:27 AM Tron80
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* ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''
** By the time of the trilogy, the Valar could be said to have taken up a style of this similar to the Ellimist and Crayak: They tried to fight [[BigBad Morgoth]] directly, and the results were [[Literature/TheSilmarillion not pretty for Arda]]. They (and the related Maiar) are not exactly hiding, though; there are plenty of people in Middle-Earth (Galadriel, for example) who have personally met the Valar, Gandalf ''is'' a Maia, and Elrond is descended from one.

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* ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''
Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium:
** By the time of ''[[Literature/TheLordOfTheRings the trilogy, trilogy]]'', the Valar could be said to have taken up a style of this similar to the Ellimist and Crayak: They tried to fight [[BigBad Morgoth]] directly, and the results were [[Literature/TheSilmarillion ''[[Literature/TheSilmarillion not pretty for Arda]].Arda]]''. They (and the related Maiar) are not exactly hiding, though; there are plenty of people in Middle-Earth (Galadriel, for example) who have personally met the Valar, Gandalf ''is'' a Maia, and Elrond is descended from one.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AlienNonInterferenceClause