History Main / AlienNonInterferenceClause

23rd Apr '17 7:37:02 PM katrinahood
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* Averted in ''WesternAnimation/ThreeTwoOnePenguins'', judging how the penguins just bring Jason and/or Michelle aboard their ship so nonchalantly without any regard to whatever consequences come with abducting two children from a planet that hasn't developed faster-than-light space travel.
23rd Apr '17 6:55:50 PM Timjames98
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Of course, such rules are ultimately an ObstructiveCodeOfConduct that creates as many problems as it solves. Crash landing on an inhabited world when this rule is in force brings obvious difficulties. Trying to study an alien culture without being discovered is a popular scenario. And where do you draw the line? At exactly what a point where a species is officially "mature" enough to let them in on the secrets of the universe? Does non-interference mean you're morally obliged to let a species suffer or die because it is their "natural development"? And what will happen when the "protectees" do develop advanced technology and discover that alien races have been watching them for generations… and consider themselves pretty darn righteous for their policy of non-assistance? And what should be done if the "protectees" are looking for extraterrestrial intelligence? There's also the little matter of how one defines a culture's "normal evolution" or "healthy development"; in addition to the aforementioned "letting them all die" aspect, if a society seems happy but social development has "stagnated", does that justify stepping in to nudge them in the right direction, or should you assume that they might possibly be able to do so in their own time?

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Of course, such rules are ultimately an ObstructiveCodeOfConduct that creates as many problems as it solves. Crash landing on an inhabited world when this rule is in force brings obvious difficulties. Trying to study an alien culture without being discovered is a popular scenario. And where do you draw the line? At exactly what a point where a species is officially "mature" enough to let them in on the secrets of the universe? Does non-interference mean you're morally obliged to let a species suffer or die because it is their "natural development"? And what will happen when the "protectees" do develop advanced technology and discover that alien races have been watching them for generations… and consider themselves [[AccompliceByInaction pretty darn righteous for their policy of non-assistance? non-assistance]]? And what should be done if the "protectees" are looking for extraterrestrial intelligence? There's also the little matter of how one defines a culture's "normal evolution" or "healthy development"; in addition to the aforementioned "letting them all die" aspect, if a society seems happy but social development has "stagnated", does that justify stepping in to nudge them in the right direction, or should you assume that they might possibly be able to do so in their own time?
12th Apr '17 6:42:45 AM ScorpiusOB1
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* UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} once prevented the ''Galileo'' probe, which was exploring UsefulNotes/{{Jupiter}}, from crashing into [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter the moon Europa]]. Europa has a chance of holding life, and they don't want risk "infecting" the moon with microbes from Earth, which could kill all life on Europa before it is even confirmed to exist. (They de-orbited ''Galileo'' into Jupiter instead.)[[note]]The ''Cassini'' spacecraft, currently in orbit around Saturn, is expected to be deorbited into Saturn in September 2017, to avoid contamination of [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfSaturn the moon Enceladus]], known to have a subsurface water ocean.[[/note]] For the protection of any ecosystems that might exist on possibly life-bearing worlds, there exist specific international rules governing how "clean" spacecraft must be if they are going to contact such worlds. NASA has Planetary Protection Officers charged with overseeing the compliance with these rules. (''Galileo'' itself would have been in the least strict classification, being a remote sensing platform that would not be expected to physically contact a possibly life-bearing world. The ''Huygens'' lander was in a higher category, since it was to land on a world we cannot be certain contains no life of any kind. A lander like ''Viking'' is in the most strict category, since it needs to be both clean enough to not risk contaminating the target world, but also its own life-detecting experiments. This is required because it was proven with the portions of the Surveyor 3 probe recovered by Apollo 12 that microbes can survive for years in protected spots inside spacecraft otherwise exposed to open space.)

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* UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} once prevented the ''Galileo'' probe, which was exploring UsefulNotes/{{Jupiter}}, from crashing into [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter the moon Europa]]. Europa has a chance of holding life, and they don't want risk "infecting" the moon with microbes from Earth, which could kill all life on Europa before it is even confirmed to exist. (They de-orbited ''Galileo'' into Jupiter instead.)[[note]]The ''Cassini'' spacecraft, currently in orbit around Saturn, is expected to be deorbited into Saturn in September 2017, 2017 to avoid contamination of [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfSaturn the moon Enceladus]], known to have a subsurface water ocean.ocean. ''Juno'', a probe currently orbiting Jupiter, will suffer the same fate for the same reasons once its mission ends.[[/note]] For the protection of any ecosystems that might exist on possibly life-bearing worlds, there exist specific international rules governing how "clean" spacecraft must be if they are going to contact such worlds. NASA has Planetary Protection Officers charged with overseeing the compliance with these rules. (''Galileo'' itself would have been in the least strict classification, being a remote sensing platform that would not be expected to physically contact a possibly life-bearing world. The ''Huygens'' lander was in a higher category, since it was to land on a world we cannot be certain contains no life of any kind. A lander like ''Viking'' is in the most strict category, since it needs to be both clean enough to not risk contaminating the target world, but also its own life-detecting experiments. This is required because it was proven with the portions of the Surveyor 3 probe recovered by Apollo 12 that microbes can survive for years in protected spots inside spacecraft otherwise exposed to open space.)
2nd Apr '17 4:30:32 PM dbsamurai
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* The UsefulNotes/FermiParadox is the unresolved question of why we haven't had aliens visiting since before we even evolved into modern humans. After all, our sun is relatively young, and there would have been more than enough time since the beginning of the universe for a GalacticSuperpower to have formed. One answer is the "zoo hypothesis," which states that aliens are under some equivalent of the Prime Directive. Or, less benignly, that they want us to stay lab rats, or not become a potential rival. Though others have suggested that aliens aren't interfering with us because [[InsignificantLittleBluePlanet we're just not that interesting]].

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* The UsefulNotes/FermiParadox is the unresolved question of why we haven't had aliens visiting since before we even evolved into modern humans. After all, our sun is relatively young, and there would have been more than enough time since the beginning of the universe for a GalacticSuperpower to have formed. One answer is the "zoo hypothesis," which states that aliens are under some equivalent of the Prime Directive. Or, less benignly, that they want us to stay lab rats, or not become a potential rival. Though others have suggested that aliens aren't interfering with us because [[InsignificantLittleBluePlanet we're just not that interesting]].interesting]] and a third that believes it's because [[ApocalypseHow They get wiped out before reaching the technological capacity to travel interstellar distances.]]
1st Apr '17 11:34:17 AM Maplewood
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* Surtsey. A volcanic island that emerged from the Atlantic off the southern coast of Iceland in November 1963 as a result of an underwater volcano eruption. As it offered an uncomparable opportunity to study the process of biocolonization of the completely barren and dead rock, it is strictly protected from any human intervention. Only a few scientists ever set foot on Surtsey, all in heavy protective gear designed so that not a single plant seed or a piece of moss or fungi could adhere to it, to prevent accidental intrduction of a new lifeform on the island; it was mostly studied from the air, and the pilots of the planes carrying scientists were instructed not to land on the island, but ditch as far away as possible in case of potential emergency (none happened so far).
27th Mar '17 12:07:37 PM hszmv1
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** The Yeerks have a version of this. Yes, they are the antagonists. Yes, they are invading Earth, no, they will not break TheMasquerade. They may have a tech advantage over the humans, but they don't have the numbers advantage (there are more humans than the totality of the Yeerk Empire) and the advance team that found Earth is well aware of Human's instinct to fight against odds (against their own kind no less. They wrote fiction about doing this to aliens). The fear of the leadership is that should humans learn about the invasion, they would fight back. If the Yeerks win, they devastate a large amount of fairly good hosts. If the Yeerks lose, they lose a large amount of fairly good hosts. If they do it quietly, it will be slower, but more likely to succeed. And they would have gotten away with it too if it weren't for some meddling kids who turned into dogs.
20th Mar '17 12:44:59 PM CumbersomeTercel
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** Disturbingly invoked (and possibly incorrectly at that) in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS1E3TimeAndAgain Time and Again]". Janeway and Paris are stranded on a pre-warp (but still advanced) planet that is using a source of energy that will literally wipe out all life on the planet the next day. Despite Paris' wish to warn them, Janeway orders him not to, citing the Prime Directive... despite the fact that this interference would literally save everyone and doesn't seem to contradict the actual Prime Directive.

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** Disturbingly invoked (and possibly incorrectly at that) in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS1E3TimeAndAgain Time and Again]".Again]]". Janeway and Paris are stranded on a pre-warp (but still advanced) planet that is using a source of energy that will literally wipe out all life on the planet the next day. Despite Paris' wish to warn them, Janeway orders him not to, citing the Prime Directive... despite the fact that this interference would literally save everyone and doesn't seem to contradict the actual Prime Directive.
20th Mar '17 12:42:44 PM CumbersomeTercel
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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', the Time Lords adopted an official policy of neutrality and non-interference, acting only as observers save in cases of great injustice, after granting advanced technology to the Minyans who then destroyed themselves in a series of nuclear wars. Which is not to say they always adhered to it... Or in the Doctor's case, ever. He at least limits his involvement to "stop the threat of the week, then hop back in the TARDIS", and isn't keen on, say, 21st century Britain having particle guns. In "Aliens of London", he tells Rose that he can't interfere in FirstContact, because it's something humans have to do on their own. Once he realizes the aliens are a ''threat''...\\\
Captain Jack Harkness actually calls him out on this in his first appearance in "The Empty Child", saying that he "Should've known [they] weren't Time Agents [by their poor attempts at fitting in in WWII England]." Played completely for laughs by the time of the 11th Doctor, who explains his Prime-Directive-ish policy to Amy Pond in "The Beast Below" -- she turns away to digest it, and by the time she's turned back, the Doctor has zipped away to start actively interfering on board Starship UK.

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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', the Time Lords adopted an official policy of neutrality and non-interference, acting only as observers save in cases of great injustice, after granting advanced technology to the Minyans who then destroyed themselves in a series of nuclear wars. Which is not to say they always adhered to it... Or in the Doctor's case, ever. He at least limits his involvement to "stop the threat of the week, then hop back in the TARDIS", and isn't keen on, say, 21st century Britain having particle guns. In "Aliens "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E4AliensOfLondon Aliens of London", London]]", he tells Rose that he can't interfere in FirstContact, because it's something humans have to do on their own. Once he realizes the aliens are a ''threat''...\\\
''threat''...
**
Captain Jack Harkness actually calls him out on this in his first appearance in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E9TheEmptyChild The Empty Child", Child]]", saying that he "Should've known [they] weren't Time Agents [by their poor attempts at fitting in in WWII England]." Played completely for laughs by the time of the 11th Doctor, who explains his Prime-Directive-ish policy to Amy Pond in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E2TheBeastBelow The Beast Below" Below]]" -- she turns away to digest it, and by the time she's turned back, the Doctor has zipped away to start actively interfering on board Starship UK.
20th Mar '17 12:40:15 PM CumbersomeTercel
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* Creator/PatriciaMcKillip wrote a duology (''MoonFlash'' and ''TheMoonAndTheFace'') that discusses this with two dissimilar cultures on one planet.
* GregoryMcdonald wrote ''FletchToo'' about visiting Africa and the discussion arose that concerned the rightness of Africa being put under a glass shield to protect them from technology/interference/etc.

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* Creator/PatriciaMcKillip wrote a duology (''MoonFlash'' (''Literature/MoonFlash'' and ''TheMoonAndTheFace'') ''Literature/TheMoonAndTheFace'') that discusses this with two dissimilar cultures on one planet.
* GregoryMcdonald Creator//GregoryMcDonald wrote ''FletchToo'' ''Literature/FletchToo'' about visiting Africa and the discussion arose that concerned the rightness of Africa being put under a glass shield to protect them from technology/interference/etc.



** Early on in the original series the "prime directive" was actually somewhat less rigorous: in "''For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky''" it is explicitly stated that the Prime Directive does not apply to telling the people of Yonada that they are actually on a spacecraft, since while they may be "changed by the knowledge," it is better than exterminating them. Spock declares this to be logical. Later captains tended to disagree.

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** Early on in the original series the "prime directive" was actually somewhat less rigorous: in "''For "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E8ForTheWorldIsHollowAndIHaveTouchedTheSky}} For the World is Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky''" Sky]]" it is explicitly stated that the Prime Directive does not apply to telling the people of Yonada that they are actually on a spacecraft, since while they may be "changed by the knowledge," it is better than exterminating them. Spock declares this to be logical. Later captains tended to disagree.



** One ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' episode, "First Contact" (no relation to [[Film/StarTrekFirstContact the movie]]) deals with the justified aspects of the Prime Directive. The ''Enterprise'' crew are on a secret FirstContact mission to the Malcorians, a species on the verge of discovering [[TeleportersAndTransporters Warp Drive]]. Over wine with the planetary Chancellor, Picard discusses with him the justifications of the Prime Directive and their obligation to leave the Malcorians alone if that is their wish. The Malcorians, who mirror 20th century humans in many ways, are undergoing cultural turmoil because of their rapid march of technology. Meanwhile, Riker was doing covert surveillance when he was injured and hospitalized: it becomes [[HumanOutsideAlienInside difficult to hide the fact that he's not one of them]] and he almost dies because the distrustful minister of security tries to use him to convince the Chancellor not to trust the humans. Because of this, Chancelor Durken ultimately decides that his people are not ready to learn they're not alone, though he promises to spend money and effort on education so they'll be prepared when the time comes.
** In some instances, though, there have been {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s who use a similar rule on the Federation protagonists, [[DeconstructedTrope just to point out how douchey it looks when you're on the short end of it.]] Big example being "Prime Factors" in ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'', where aliens that were entirely aware of and even sympathetic to ''Voyager's'' situation and capable of transporting most of the way across the galaxy decided that they had to be LawfulStupid about sending the ship well on its way home. Of course, part of it was that they were just unwilling to lose a potential source of entertainment that ''Voyager's'' extensive database could provide. In the end groups of low-ranking crew and citizens from both sides just trade for it, [[StatusQuoIsGod and the tech turns out to be incompatible.]]

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** One ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' episode, "First Contact" "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS4E15FirstContact}} First Contact]]" (no relation to [[Film/StarTrekFirstContact the movie]]) deals with the justified aspects of the Prime Directive. The ''Enterprise'' crew are on a secret FirstContact mission to the Malcorians, a species on the verge of discovering [[TeleportersAndTransporters Warp Drive]]. Over wine with the planetary Chancellor, Picard discusses with him the justifications of the Prime Directive and their obligation to leave the Malcorians alone if that is their wish. The Malcorians, who mirror 20th century humans in many ways, are undergoing cultural turmoil because of their rapid march of technology. Meanwhile, Riker was doing covert surveillance when he was injured and hospitalized: it becomes [[HumanOutsideAlienInside difficult to hide the fact that he's not one of them]] and he almost dies because the distrustful minister of security tries to use him to convince the Chancellor not to trust the humans. Because of this, Chancelor Durken ultimately decides that his people are not ready to learn they're not alone, though he promises to spend money and effort on education so they'll be prepared when the time comes.
** In some instances, though, there have been {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s who use a similar rule on the Federation protagonists, [[DeconstructedTrope just to point out how douchey it looks when you're on the short end of it.]] Big example being "Prime Factors" "[[{{Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS1E9PrimeFactors}} Prime Factors]]" in ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'', where aliens that were entirely aware of and even sympathetic to ''Voyager's'' situation and capable of transporting most of the way across the galaxy decided that they had to be LawfulStupid about sending the ship well on its way home. Of course, part of it was that they were just unwilling to lose a potential source of entertainment that ''Voyager's'' extensive database could provide. In the end groups of low-ranking crew and citizens from both sides just trade for it, [[StatusQuoIsGod and the tech turns out to be incompatible.]]



*** In the episode "A Piece of the Action" and some ExpandedUniverse material, it's been stated that the Prime Directive does not apply in cases where a pre-warp civilization has ''already'' been affected ("contaminated") by another outside influence. As Spock noted in the episode, the damage is done, with the civilization fully aware of aliens' existence, and the crew has to deal with it as it is.

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*** In the episode "A "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E17APieceOfTheAction}} A Piece of the Action" Action]]" and some ExpandedUniverse material, it's been stated that the Prime Directive does not apply in cases where a pre-warp civilization has ''already'' been affected ("contaminated") by another outside influence. As Spock noted in the episode, the damage is done, with the civilization fully aware of aliens' existence, and the crew has to deal with it as it is.



** Disturbingly invoked (and possibly incorrectly at that) in an episode of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. Janeway and Paris are stranded on a pre-warp (but still advanced) planet that is using a source of energy that will literally wipe out all life on the planet the next day. Despite Paris' wish to warn them, Janeway orders him not to, citing the Prime Directive... despite the fact that this interference would literally save everyone and doesn't seem to contradict the actual Prime Directive.
** Also seen in TNG "Pen Pals" and "Homeward". In those cases, [[DeconstructedTrope extinction was part of the culture's "natural development," and in the former case Picard decided that they had to intervene upon a direct plea for help from the planet.]]
** TOS' "The Paradise Syndrome" indicated that the Starfleet of the time disagreed - the ''Enterprise's'' mission is to prevent an extinction-event asteroid strike (but still without revealing themselves to the natives). Evidently, Starfleet re-interpreted the Prime Directive to no longer be a shield for less developed cultures but rather a dogma at some point between TOS and TNG.
** In the TNG episode "Symbiosis", the Ornarans are suffering from a fatal disease and are dependent on medicine provided by the Brekkians, but this has led to the Ornaran society falling apart, while the Brekkians have become so wealthy from the profits that they have centered their entire society on exploiting the Ornarans. It doesn't take long for Dr. Crusher to realize the disease was cured ages ago, and that they were suffering from the withdrawal symptoms; the "medicine" is actually a highly addictive drug. She wants to put an end to this, but Captain Picard points to the Prime Directive, saying they cannot interfere. Picard then points out they can't interfere to maintain the status quo either. The Ornaran ships were no longer able to make supply runs for the medicine, and they wanted the ''Enterprise's'' help in repairing their fleet; by refusing, the Ornarans would have to face the withdrawal and hopefully get over it on their own.

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** Disturbingly invoked (and possibly incorrectly at that) in an the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''."[[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS1E3TimeAndAgain Time and Again]". Janeway and Paris are stranded on a pre-warp (but still advanced) planet that is using a source of energy that will literally wipe out all life on the planet the next day. Despite Paris' wish to warn them, Janeway orders him not to, citing the Prime Directive... despite the fact that this interference would literally save everyone and doesn't seem to contradict the actual Prime Directive.
** Also seen in TNG "Pen Pals" " [[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E15PenPals}} Pen Pals]]" and "Homeward"."[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS7E12Homeward}} Homeward]]". In those cases, [[DeconstructedTrope extinction was part of the culture's "natural development," and in the former case Picard decided that they had to intervene upon a direct plea for help from the planet.]]
** TOS' "The "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E3TheParadiseSyndrome}} The Paradise Syndrome" Syndrome]]" indicated that the Starfleet of the time disagreed - the ''Enterprise's'' mission is to prevent an extinction-event asteroid strike (but still without revealing themselves to the natives). Evidently, Starfleet re-interpreted the Prime Directive to no longer be a shield for less developed cultures but rather a dogma at some point between TOS and TNG.
** In the TNG episode "Symbiosis", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS1E21Symbiosis}} Symbiosis]]", the Ornarans are suffering from a fatal disease and are dependent on medicine provided by the Brekkians, but this has led to the Ornaran society falling apart, while the Brekkians have become so wealthy from the profits that they have centered their entire society on exploiting the Ornarans. It doesn't take long for Dr. Crusher to realize the disease was cured ages ago, and that they were suffering from the withdrawal symptoms; the "medicine" is actually a highly addictive drug. She wants to put an end to this, but Captain Picard points to the Prime Directive, saying they cannot interfere. Picard then points out they can't interfere to maintain the status quo either. The Ornaran ships were no longer able to make supply runs for the medicine, and they wanted the ''Enterprise's'' help in repairing their fleet; by refusing, the Ornarans would have to face the withdrawal and hopefully get over it on their own.



** Londo actually tells the Earth government in ''In The Beginning'' that the Centauri as a matter of policy do not sell advanced weapons systems to developing worlds. [[spoiler: This does not stop their enemies, the Narns, from selling Earth pirated Centauri weapons technology at a sizeable profit.]]
** In the episode, "Deathwalker", a renegade Dilgar scientist named Jha'dur is captured but bargains her freedom with a breakthrough medication that grants immortality. Before her medication can be mass-produced, she is killed by the Vorlons. Ambassador Kosh tells an assembled audience, "You are not ready for immortality." It's made complicated in that, unknown to most of the cast, the medicine was a trap; it requires the murder of a sentient being to use, and Jha'dur had planned for it to cause the other races to fall on each other like rabid animals to fuel their own immortality.

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** Londo actually tells the Earth government in ''In The Beginning'' ''[[{{Recap/BabylonFiveFilm01InTheBeginning}} In the Beginning]]'' that the Centauri as a matter of policy do not sell advanced weapons systems to developing worlds. [[spoiler: This does not stop their enemies, the Narns, from selling Earth pirated Centauri weapons technology at a sizeable profit.]]
** In the episode, "Deathwalker", "[[{{Recap/BabylonFiveS01E09Deathwalker}} Deathwalker]]", a renegade Dilgar scientist named Jha'dur is captured but bargains her freedom with a breakthrough medication that grants immortality. Before her medication can be mass-produced, she is killed by the Vorlons. Ambassador Kosh tells an assembled audience, "You are not ready for immortality." It's made complicated in that, unknown to most of the cast, the medicine was a trap; it requires the murder of a sentient being to use, and Jha'dur had planned for it to cause the other races to fall on each other like rabid animals to fuel their own immortality.



** On the other hand, in the ''Series/{{Crusade}}'' spin-off series, Captain Matthew Gideon would launch a full spread of modified probes (uploaded with considerable information about Earth and the Interstellar alliance) at a pre-hyperspace planet at the end of ''Visitors From Down the Street'', which abounds in ''[[Series/TheXFiles X-Files]]'' [[ShoutOut references]]. The ''Excalibur'' picked up two agents from an alien world who are looking for proof of a government cover-up. They show pictures of Mount Rushmore and old Earth blimps. They also dress in Earth fashions from 200 years go (ie: from the time period at the time of the show's shoot). One of them can ''[[AliensSpeakingEnglish speak English]]'' because of information stolen from the conspirators. TheReveal: Years before, the government had found itself in a time of social unrest similar to TheSixties. Upon discovering Earth broadcasts, they used them as part of a truly [[MagnificentBastard Magnificent]] conspiracy; manufacture appropriate "evidence", then dispatch TheMenInBlack to suppress it. The resultant subculture of {{Conspiracy Theorist}}s absorbed the government's critics and kept them wasting their time [[AgentMulder chasing "aliens"]] rather than [[LaResistance engaging in civil disobedience]]. ''[[NoDelaysForTheWicked Every crime the government committed afterward was thus blamed on "Outsiders" who secretly manipulated their civilization, permitting them to do as they pleased.]]'' Gideon's reasoning for launching the probes to expose the real conspiracy: the government already knew about alien life, and was using humans as scapegoats for unpopular domestic decisions. If that went on unimpeded, they would be a hostile power once they ''did'' discover starflight. Gideon's interference was motivated as a rebuttal to the accusations being made against Earth. He was questioned about whether this violated any non-interference principles and replied "[[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight Screw 'em]]."

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** On the other hand, in the ''Series/{{Crusade}}'' spin-off series, Captain Matthew Gideon would launch a full spread of modified probes (uploaded with considerable information about Earth and the Interstellar alliance) at a pre-hyperspace planet at the end of ''Visitors From "[[{{Recap/CrusadeS01E12VisitorsFromDownTheStreet}} Visitors from Down the Street'', Street]]", which abounds in ''[[Series/TheXFiles X-Files]]'' [[ShoutOut references]]. The ''Excalibur'' picked up two agents from an alien world who are looking for proof of a government cover-up. They show pictures of Mount Rushmore and old Earth blimps. They also dress in Earth fashions from 200 years go (ie: from the time period at the time of the show's shoot). One of them can ''[[AliensSpeakingEnglish speak English]]'' because of information stolen from the conspirators. TheReveal: Years before, the government had found itself in a time of social unrest similar to TheSixties. Upon discovering Earth broadcasts, they used them as part of a truly [[MagnificentBastard Magnificent]] conspiracy; manufacture appropriate "evidence", then dispatch TheMenInBlack to suppress it. The resultant subculture of {{Conspiracy Theorist}}s absorbed the government's critics and kept them wasting their time [[AgentMulder chasing "aliens"]] rather than [[LaResistance engaging in civil disobedience]]. ''[[NoDelaysForTheWicked Every crime the government committed afterward was thus blamed on "Outsiders" who secretly manipulated their civilization, permitting them to do as they pleased.]]'' Gideon's reasoning for launching the probes to expose the real conspiracy: the government already knew about alien life, and was using humans as scapegoats for unpopular domestic decisions. If that went on unimpeded, they would be a hostile power once they ''did'' discover starflight. Gideon's interference was motivated as a rebuttal to the accusations being made against Earth. He was questioned about whether this violated any non-interference principles and replied "[[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight Screw 'em]]."
27th Feb '17 9:19:35 PM Arctimon
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Compare HelpingWouldBeKillstealing and EarthMustStandOnItsOwn. Contrast TechnologyUplift, when the aliens don't have this clause. See also LowCultureHighTech, which is what the violation of this rule can sometimes lead to. Protagonists who tend to say ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight usually treat this as a FrequentlyBrokenUnbreakableVow.

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Compare HelpingWouldBeKillstealing and EarthMustStandOnItsOwn.HelpingWouldBeKillstealing. Contrast TechnologyUplift, when the aliens don't have this clause. See also LowCultureHighTech, which is what the violation of this rule can sometimes lead to. Protagonists who tend to say ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight usually treat this as a FrequentlyBrokenUnbreakableVow.
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