History Main / AlienNonInterferenceClause

23rd Dec '16 9:37:32 AM Gosicrystal
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* In the ''World of Literature/LoneWolf'', the Shianti are a race of demigods that settled on Magnamund thousands of years ago. On request from the goddess Ishir, they are now forbidden from interfering in human affairs, even though [[spoiler:Wytch-King Shasarak, [[BlackSheep one of their number]], is doing just that]]. Of course, when a human baby accidentally lands on their island, there AintNoRule about teaching him to use magic and "allowing" him to go into the world to deal with the threat.

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* In the ''World of Literature/LoneWolf'', the Shianti are a race of demigods that settled on Magnamund thousands of years ago. On request from the goddess Ishir, they are now forbidden from interfering in human affairs, even though [[spoiler:Wytch-King Shasarak, [[BlackSheep one of their number]], is doing just that]]. Of course, when a human baby accidentally lands on their island, there AintNoRule [[LoopholeAbuse ain't no rule]] about teaching him to use magic and "allowing" him to go into the world to deal with the threat.
10th Dec '16 2:47:50 PM DarkHunter
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Finally it should be noted that the Ancients do interfere - against ''other'' Ascended Beings. The reason their {{Evil Counterpart}}s, the Ori, don't flat-out invade the Milky Way themselves is because the Ancients keep them at bay. For Anubis, they have no right to attack him again after they pushed him back into corporeal form, which [[NiceJobBreakingItHero they totally messed up]], since Anubis got stuck between their state and ours, which means he has some measure of Ascended power but still falls under the "Ascended Beings can't attack him clause".

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Finally it should be noted that the Ancients do interfere - against ''other'' Ascended Beings. The reason their {{Evil Counterpart}}s, the Ori, don't flat-out invade the Milky Way themselves is because the Ancients keep them at bay. For Anubis, they have no right to attack him again after they pushed him back into corporeal form, which [[NiceJobBreakingItHero they totally messed up]], since Anubis got stuck between their state and ours, which means is in a bit of a grey area here: he has some measure was forcibly "de-Ascended" halfway, so while he doesn't have all the power of an Ascended, he's still orders of magnitude more powerful than any other creature, not to mention immortal. Anubis basically is restricted to never using his Ascended power powers... but ''knowledge'' is still falls under fair game (because, conceivably, a non-Ascended ''could'' obtain some Ascended knowledge). The Ancients let him run wild with that as Oma Desala's punishment for Ascending him in the "Ascended Beings can't attack him clause".first place, basically saying "All this death, slavery, and horror he causes now? That's your fault."
26th Nov '16 10:07:22 PM Fireblood
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* ''Literature/GuardiansOfTheFlame'': Utterly averted-at least in the first four books, none of the main band even stops to think if it's ethically or morally justified to introduce huge changes into the sociopolitical culture of another world[[note]] Of course considering that this is ''slavery'', it would likely be practiced for many more centuries on absent intervention and they did make an effort to establish a better system...[[/note]]. For example by them introducing guns, which triggers an arms race and trying to end slavery by violent attacks on slaver caravans rather than waiting to see if it comes about naturally as society evolves past the need for or permitting slavery. Not to mention setting up their own ''kingdom'', forever changing the geopolitical makeup of the world. Possibly {{justified}} by the fact that Arthur Deighton/Arta Myrdhyn had already seriously interfered (including fighting a massive magical duel that laid waste to an entire valley) though it's not made clear whether he's an earth or local native.
11th Nov '16 2:57:24 AM MCanter89
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* [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] has a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncontacted_peoples list of peoples]] who have kept culturally isolated or were until fairly recently. Most of them have an estimated three hundred or fewer people (which is not a sustainable population without massive problems due to inbreeding). In general unconnected people are left alone to protect them from disease, or because they are actively hostile.

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* [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] has a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncontacted_peoples list of peoples]] who have kept culturally isolated or were until fairly recently. Most of them have an estimated three hundred 300 or fewer people (which is not a sustainable population without massive problems due to inbreeding). In general unconnected general, uncontacted people are left alone to protect them from disease, or because they are actively hostile.



* UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} once prevented the ''Galileo'' probe, which was exploring UsefulNotes/{{Jupiter}}, from crashing into [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter the moon Europa]]. Europa has a chance of holding life, and they don't want risk "infecting" the moon with microbes from Earth, which could kill all life on Europa before it is even confirmed to exist. (They de-orbited ''Galileo'' into Jupiter instead.)[[note]]The ''Cassini'' spacecraft, currently in orbit around Saturn, it's expected to be deorbited into Saturn in September 2017, to avoid contamination of [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfSaturn the moon Enceladus]], known to have a subsurface water ocean[[/note]] For the protection of any ecosystems that might exist on possibly life-bearing worlds, there exist specific international rules governing how "clean" spacecraft must be if they are going to contact such worlds. NASA has Planetary Protection Officers charged with overseeing the compliance with these rules. (''Galileo'' itself would have been in the least strict classification, being a remote sensing platform that would not be expected to physically contact a possibly life-bearing world. The ''Huygens'' lander was in a higher category, since it was to land on a world we cannot be certain contains no life of any kind. A lander like ''Viking'' is in the most strict category, since it needs to be both clean enough to not risk contaminating the target world, but also its own life-detecting experiments. This is required because it was proven with the portions of the Surveyor 3 probe recovered by Apollo 12 that microbes can survive for years in protected spots inside spacecraft otherwise exposed to open space.)
* Laws established for the protection of endangered species often require that they be left entirely undisturbed by humans, even when taking action might preserve individual members of that species (e.g. letting baby sea turtles crawl into the sea without help). Like the prime directive, this can have bizarrely inconsistent effects. Areas are made inaccessible to development because they are an edge territory for a protected species, while the nearby area where they thrive has no protection at all.

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* UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} once prevented the ''Galileo'' probe, which was exploring UsefulNotes/{{Jupiter}}, from crashing into [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter the moon Europa]]. Europa has a chance of holding life, and they don't want risk "infecting" the moon with microbes from Earth, which could kill all life on Europa before it is even confirmed to exist. (They de-orbited ''Galileo'' into Jupiter instead.)[[note]]The ''Cassini'' spacecraft, currently in orbit around Saturn, it's is expected to be deorbited into Saturn in September 2017, to avoid contamination of [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfSaturn the moon Enceladus]], known to have a subsurface water ocean[[/note]] ocean.[[/note]] For the protection of any ecosystems that might exist on possibly life-bearing worlds, there exist specific international rules governing how "clean" spacecraft must be if they are going to contact such worlds. NASA has Planetary Protection Officers charged with overseeing the compliance with these rules. (''Galileo'' itself would have been in the least strict classification, being a remote sensing platform that would not be expected to physically contact a possibly life-bearing world. The ''Huygens'' lander was in a higher category, since it was to land on a world we cannot be certain contains no life of any kind. A lander like ''Viking'' is in the most strict category, since it needs to be both clean enough to not risk contaminating the target world, but also its own life-detecting experiments. This is required because it was proven with the portions of the Surveyor 3 probe recovered by Apollo 12 that microbes can survive for years in protected spots inside spacecraft otherwise exposed to open space.)
* Laws established for the protection of endangered species often require that they be left entirely undisturbed by humans, even when taking action might preserve individual members of that species (e.g. letting baby sea turtles crawl into the sea without help). Like the prime directive, Prime Directive, this can have bizarrely inconsistent effects. Areas are made inaccessible to development because they are an edge territory for a protected species, while the nearby area where they thrive has no protection at all.



1st Nov '16 9:12:34 PM PaulA
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* In the interstellar society of Creator/SamuelRDelany's ''Empire Star'', there's a more complicated and limited version about the distribution of technology. If a culture is "simplex", you may import [[LowCultureHighTech higher-tech stuff]] into it, because the culture won't have the imagination to do anything much with it anyway. If it's "complex", you can't bring in higher-tech stuff because it could create a social upheaval. ''Simplex'' and ''complex'' aren't themselves concepts indicating technological advancement as such, more like the narrowness or breadth of the culture's thinking.

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* In the interstellar society of Creator/SamuelRDelany's ''Empire Star'', ''Literature/EmpireStar'', there's a more complicated and limited version about the distribution of technology. If a culture is "simplex", you may import [[LowCultureHighTech higher-tech stuff]] into it, because the culture won't have the imagination to do anything much with it anyway. If it's "complex", you can't bring in higher-tech stuff because it could create a social upheaval. ''Simplex'' and ''complex'' aren't themselves concepts indicating technological advancement as such, more like the narrowness or breadth of the culture's thinking.
29th Oct '16 3:55:30 PM ShorinBJ
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** The series has been [[ContinuitySnarl somewhat inconsistent]] over where the borders of the rule lie. One fairly consistent point is that unless the culture in question is already aware of sentient life beyond their planet, or is technologically advanced enough (i.e. they possess Warp Drive) that such contact is inevitable in the immediate future, it's forbidden for Federation personnel to expose their existence to the aliens of the week. Multiple stories involve this being violated by accident, requiring the crew to scramble to do damage control. Standard procedure in the ''TNG'' era seems to be ''inducing LaserGuidedAmnesia via invasive brain surgery''. There is usually a hole somewhere "big enough to fly the ''Enterprise'' through". Gene Coon, who is credited with creating it in ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', reportedly remarked that his original intent was for it to apply only to ''viable pre-warp'' cultures.

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** The series has been [[ContinuitySnarl somewhat inconsistent]] over where the borders of the rule lie. One fairly consistent point is that unless the culture in question is already aware of sentient life beyond their planet, or is technologically advanced enough (i.e. they possess Warp Drive) warp drive) that such contact is inevitable in the immediate future, it's forbidden for Federation personnel to expose their existence to the aliens of the week. Multiple stories involve this being violated by accident, requiring the crew to scramble to do damage control. Standard procedure in the ''TNG'' era seems to be ''inducing LaserGuidedAmnesia via invasive brain surgery''. There is usually a hole somewhere "big enough to fly the ''Enterprise'' through". Gene Coon, who is credited with creating it in ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', reportedly remarked that his original intent was for it to apply only to ''viable pre-warp'' cultures.



** In some instances, though, there have been {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s who use a similar rule on the Federation protagonists, [[DeconstructedTrope just to point out how douchey it looks when you're on the short end of it.]] Big example being "Prime Factors" in ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'', where aliens that were entirely aware of and even sympathetic to ''Voyager'''s situation and capable of transporting most of the way across the galaxy decided that they had to be LawfulStupid about sending the ship well on its way home. Of course, part of it was that they were just unwilling to lose a potential source of entertainment that ''Voyager's'' extensive database could provide. In the end groups of low-ranking crew and citizens from both sides just trade for it, [[StatusQuoIsGod and the tech turns out to be incompatible.]]

to:

** In some instances, though, there have been {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s who use a similar rule on the Federation protagonists, [[DeconstructedTrope just to point out how douchey it looks when you're on the short end of it.]] Big example being "Prime Factors" in ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'', where aliens that were entirely aware of and even sympathetic to ''Voyager'''s ''Voyager's'' situation and capable of transporting most of the way across the galaxy decided that they had to be LawfulStupid about sending the ship well on its way home. Of course, part of it was that they were just unwilling to lose a potential source of entertainment that ''Voyager's'' extensive database could provide. In the end groups of low-ranking crew and citizens from both sides just trade for it, [[StatusQuoIsGod and the tech turns out to be incompatible.]]



** By the time of ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration The Next Generation]]'', the Prime Directive has been interpreted to prohibit interference in the internal affairs of other cultures even if the culture is an advanced star-faring civilization. This came up during the brief Klingon civil war, where the Federation was unable to directly get involved, although they did block and expose the Romulains who were supporting one of the sides, which helped win the war for their side.

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** By the time of ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration The Next Generation]]'', the Prime Directive has been interpreted to prohibit interference in the internal affairs of other cultures even if the culture is an advanced star-faring civilization. This came up during the brief Klingon civil war, where the Federation was unable to directly get involved, although they did block and expose the Romulains Romulans who were supporting one of the sides, which helped win the war for their side.



** Disturbingly invoked (and possibly incorrectly at that) in an episode of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. Janeway and Paris are stranded on a prewarp (but still advanced) planet that is using a source of energy that will literally wipe out all life on the planet the next day. Despite Paris' wish to warn them, Janeway orders him not to, citing the Prime Directive... despite the fact that this interference would literally save everyone and doesn't seem to contradict the actual Prime Directive.

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** Disturbingly invoked (and possibly incorrectly at that) in an episode of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. Janeway and Paris are stranded on a prewarp pre-warp (but still advanced) planet that is using a source of energy that will literally wipe out all life on the planet the next day. Despite Paris' wish to warn them, Janeway orders him not to, citing the Prime Directive... despite the fact that this interference would literally save everyone and doesn't seem to contradict the actual Prime Directive.



** TOS' "The Paradise Syndrome" indicated that the Starfleet of the time disagreed - the ''Enterprise'''s mission is to prevent an extinction-event asteroid strike (but still without revealing themselves to the natives). Evidently Starfleet re-interpreted the Prime Directive to no longer be a shield for less developed cultures but rather a dogma at some point between TOS and TNG.
** In the TNG episode "Symbiosis", the Ornarans are suffering from a fatal disease and are dependent on medicine provided by the Brekkians, but this has led to the Ornaran society falling apart, while the Brekkians have become so wealthy from the profits that they have centered their entire society on exploiting the Ornarans. It doesn't take long for Dr. Crusher to realize the disease was cured ages ago, and that they were suffering from the withdrawal symptoms; the "medicine" is actually a highly addictive drug. She wants to put an end to this, but Capt. Picard points to the Prime Directive, saying they cannot interfere. Picard then points out they can't interfere to maintain the status quo either. The Ornaran ships were no longer able to make supply runs for the medicine, and they wanted the ''Enterprise'''s help in repairing their fleet; by refusing, the Ornarans would have to face the withdrawal and hopefully get over it on their own.

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** TOS' "The Paradise Syndrome" indicated that the Starfleet of the time disagreed - the ''Enterprise'''s ''Enterprise's'' mission is to prevent an extinction-event asteroid strike (but still without revealing themselves to the natives). Evidently Evidently, Starfleet re-interpreted the Prime Directive to no longer be a shield for less developed cultures but rather a dogma at some point between TOS and TNG.
** In the TNG episode "Symbiosis", the Ornarans are suffering from a fatal disease and are dependent on medicine provided by the Brekkians, but this has led to the Ornaran society falling apart, while the Brekkians have become so wealthy from the profits that they have centered their entire society on exploiting the Ornarans. It doesn't take long for Dr. Crusher to realize the disease was cured ages ago, and that they were suffering from the withdrawal symptoms; the "medicine" is actually a highly addictive drug. She wants to put an end to this, but Capt. Captain Picard points to the Prime Directive, saying they cannot interfere. Picard then points out they can't interfere to maintain the status quo either. The Ornaran ships were no longer able to make supply runs for the medicine, and they wanted the ''Enterprise'''s ''Enterprise's'' help in repairing their fleet; by refusing, the Ornarans would have to face the withdrawal and hopefully get over it on their own.
19th Oct '16 10:42:40 PM poi99
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** In some instances, though, there have been {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s who use a similar rule on the Federation protagonists,[[DeconstructedTrope just to point out how douchey it looks when you're on the short end of it.]] Big example being "Prime Factors" in ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'', where aliens that were entirely aware of and even sympathetic to ''Voyager'''s situation and capable of transporting most of the way across the galaxy decided that they had to be LawfulStupid about sending the ship well on its way home. Of course, part of it was that they were just unwilling to lose a potential source of entertainment that ''Voyager's'' extensive database could provide. In the end groups of low-ranking crew and citizens from both sides just trade for it, [[StatusQuoIsGod and the tech turns out to be incompatible.]]

to:

** In some instances, though, there have been {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s who use a similar rule on the Federation protagonists,[[DeconstructedTrope protagonists, [[DeconstructedTrope just to point out how douchey it looks when you're on the short end of it.]] Big example being "Prime Factors" in ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'', where aliens that were entirely aware of and even sympathetic to ''Voyager'''s situation and capable of transporting most of the way across the galaxy decided that they had to be LawfulStupid about sending the ship well on its way home. Of course, part of it was that they were just unwilling to lose a potential source of entertainment that ''Voyager's'' extensive database could provide. In the end groups of low-ranking crew and citizens from both sides just trade for it, [[StatusQuoIsGod and the tech turns out to be incompatible.]]
19th Oct '16 4:23:31 PM TheNerevarine
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* In ''ComicBook/BadPlanet'' any alien civilization that mastered interstellar travel joins "the Grid", and one of their laws establish they cannot interact with lesser developed species who still haven't done that.
18th Oct '16 2:24:51 PM Nintendoman01
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* ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'': As explained by Gowasu, the [[TopGod Supreme Kai]] of [[AlternateUniverse Universe 10]], the Kais are forbidden to interfere in the affairs of mortals; their job is to create life, watch over the mortals, and give them guidance. Unfortunately, Gowasu's apprentice, Zamasu, is firmly convinced that HumansAreBastards and openly criticizes this policy, believing that TheGodsMustBeLazy.
14th Oct '16 3:11:00 AM Tron80
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* In ''Comicbook/KryptonNoMore'' storyline: ** Franchise/{{Superman}} gets obsessed with stopping Earth from becoming another Krypton, and fearing pollution could destroy it, he goes on a rampage, destroying supertankers until his cousin Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} stops him, declaring that neither of them has right to impose their will on humans.

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* In ''Comicbook/KryptonNoMore'' storyline: storyline:
** Franchise/{{Superman}} gets obsessed with stopping Earth from becoming another Krypton, and fearing pollution could destroy it, he goes on a rampage, destroying supertankers until his cousin Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} stops him, declaring that neither of them has right to impose their will on humans.
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