History Main / AlienGeometries

5th Nov '17 11:34:56 AM 64SuperNintendo
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[[folder:Myths & Religion]]
* In Christian eschatology, the end of the world is accompanied by the sky ''rolling up like a scroll''. If this wasn't MindScrew enough, it also involves everyone on earth witnessing the return of UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}. At once. Even though the earth is a sphere.

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[[folder:Myths & and Religion]]
* In Christian eschatology, the end of the world is accompanied by the sky ''rolling up like a scroll''. If this wasn't MindScrew enough, it also involves everyone on earth Earth witnessing the return of UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}. At once. Even though the earth is a sphere.
3rd Nov '17 1:48:37 PM PixelKnight
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He once designed a letter-sorting machine whose central component was a wheel that had π equal to ''exactly'' three (he did this because he thought that π = 3 point whatever was "a bit untidy"). This causes it to sort out letters it hasn't had put in yet, among other oddities.\\\

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He once designed a letter-sorting machine whose central component was a wheel that had π equal to ''exactly'' three (he did this because he thought that the usual equation π = 3 point whatever 3-and-a-bit was "a bit untidy"). This causes it to sort out letters it hasn't had put in yet, among other oddities.\\\
10th Oct '17 2:35:59 PM DustSnitch
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* The House of the Maker from ''Literature/TheFirstLaw'' trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. The protagonists enter about halfway up, walk around a bit inside but never ascend or descend, then exit on the roof. Most of the characters can't wait to get out of the place, even if it does involve crossing the narrow, rail-less, hundred-foot-high bridge. And there's always the possibility of leaving the place ''before'' entering it.
* This happens a lot in ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' when the Powers of Chaos are involved.
** In Creator/GrahamMcNeill's ''Warhammer 40000'' ''Literature/{{Ultramarines}}'' novel ''Dead Sky Black Sun'', the city in the [[{{Mordor}} Eye of Chaos]] features this — producing a MobileMaze with it.
** In Creator/DanAbnett's ''Literature/{{Eisenhorn}}'' novel ''Xenos'', the saruthi "tetrascapes" include regular octagons that nevertheless tessalate. Eisenhorn rescues some [[NewMeat green soldiers]] from such a tetrascape, and later chooses them over experienced soldiers to go into one. Wise of him: the green soldiers had actually seen a tetrascape before, and the experienced ones hadn't. As a result, the "greens" manage to shoot and kill dozens of enemies, but the elite Deathwatch Space Marine attached to Eisenhower's squad can't hit ''anything'' thanks to the effect the twisted geometries have on ballistics.
** In Creator/DanAbnett's Literature/GauntsGhosts novel ''His Last Command'', a [[CoolGate Chaos warp gate]] throws Maggs and Mkoll into a place where [[AlienSky stones hang in the sky and the stars are all wrong (both)]], as well as being [[EvilIsDeathlyCold bitterly cold]]. Also, their vox units register as both within ten kilometers and out of range.
** In Creator/BenCounter's ''Literature/HorusHeresy'' novel ''Galaxy In Flames'', Death's Tomb is bigger on the inside than the outside — as well as other repulsive features.



* ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves'' starts with a [[color:blue:house]] that is 3/8ths inch BiggerOnTheInside than on the outside. They are only able to measure all the way across because [[spoiler:a closet mysteriously appeared in the house when they left for a week]]. They also get slightly different measurements with every method they try until confirming the final number with a very accurate method -- you'd ''normally'' think this is because of measurement deficiencies, but in retrospect... Also, this discrepancy disappearing is, believe it or not, the cue for things to get worse.
* ''Literature/ThursdayNext'''s Uncle Mycroft, among his other {{Mad Scien|tist}}ce projects, developed "Nextian Geometry" with his wife, said to be based on how a cylinder looks like a rectangle from the side, which allows one to use a circular cutter on dough without any left over: it makes circles tesselate.
* Creator/RobertAHeinlein:
** The short story ''Literature/AndHeBuiltACrookedHouse'' involves an architect who, inspired by higher-dimensional geometry and high real-estate prices, builds a house in the shape of an unfolded hypercube. Then an earthquake makes it fold in on itself into a hypercube, so to the architect's delight it's eight times roomier on the inside than on the outside. Just one small problem: the house's new topology makes it a bit difficult to leave once you're inside. When you do get outside, you may have a whole new problem.
*** A math-nerd resident of ''VideoGame/SecondLife'' actually went and reproduced the Crooked House in 3d, and if it's still rezed somewhere public you can actually walk through it. Not a real hypercube of course but some excellent special effects. [[http://nwn.blogs.com/nwn/2006/06/_and_he_rezzed_.html Here's the story with video.]]
*** Another math-nerd made a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUPY0J5es5Q film adaptation]] of the story as his final for Geometry.
** The short story ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps'' involves a time-travel machine, constructed by aliens, housed in a building which is described in these terms
** ''Literature/GloryRoad'' had the hero and companions invading a tower "where the architect used a pretzel for a straight-edge." It's so convoluted that it took hundreds of spies decades to figure out a route to the MacGuffin.
** ''Literature/TheNumberOfTheBeast'', as well: we're only seeing dimensions x, y, z; but there are at least three others which can be rotated around or extended along, and which apparently can be used to travel between universes. This is a conceit to let him run through every literary universe ever, and have a massive CrossOver event. The novel culminates in a party, in what is effectively the Crooked House, with every single character he created attending (plus several guests). Special mention goes to the [[AcceptableTargets literary]] [[TakeThat critics]] lounge, which was shaped like a Klein bottle... once you were inside.

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* ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves'' starts The Starfish structures in ''Literature/BlindLake'' have disturbing interior geometry. Robot probes (and people) who go in too far don't come back. The deep interior seems to be entirely exempt from the usual rules of time and space.
* In Creator/JohnCWright's ''Literature/ChroniclesOfChaos'', Vanity's secret passages often don't add up, geometrically,
with a [[color:blue:house]] that is 3/8ths inch BiggerOnTheInside than on the outside. They are only able places they go to measure all the way across because [[spoiler:a closet mysteriously appeared and lead from.
* Creator/CSLewis:
** In ''Literature/ThatHideousStrength'', one character is briefly imprisoned
in the house when they left for a week]]. They also get "Objectivity Room", where everything is slightly different measurements with every method they try until confirming off—the spots on the final number with a very accurate method -- you'd ''normally'' think this is because table are arranged ''just'' short of measurement deficiencies, but in retrospect... Also, this discrepancy disappearing is, believe it or not, obeying a pattern (even a broken one), the cue for things to get worse.
* ''Literature/ThursdayNext'''s Uncle Mycroft, among his other {{Mad Scien|tist}}ce projects, developed "Nextian Geometry" with his wife, said to be based
similar specks on how a cylinder the ceiling are ''almost'' the mirror-image of the table, and the peak of the arched entryway looks like it might be just a rectangle from ''fraction'' off-center to the side, which allows one left. Or not. Maybe the right? And let's not start on the paintings... JustifiedTrope: The room was specifically built this way to drive people crazy so they'd be suitable hosts for the demonic powers.
** ''Literature/TheLastBattle'', the final volume of ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'', ends in a world that's essentially the opposite of reality, in that the closer you get to the center, the more there is.
** He also appeared
to use this in ''Literature/OutOfTheSilentPlanet'', but the room turns out be normal human geometry, just a circular cutter on dough very unusual sort.
* In Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''[[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire A Clash of Kings]],'' Danaerys enters the House of the Undying Ones in Qarth. Once in the antechamber, she makes four consecutive right-hand turns
without any left over: it makes circles tesselate.
returning to her starting point.
* Creator/RobertAHeinlein:
** The short story ''Literature/AndHeBuiltACrookedHouse'' involves an architect who, inspired
In Creator/AmbroseBierce's "The Damned Thing", a creature, judged by higher-dimensional geometry and high real-estate prices, builds ignorant folk to be a house in mountain lion (from its leavings, since the shape of an unfolded hypercube. Then an earthquake makes it fold in on creature itself into is never seen), is a hypercube, so to color that the architect's delight it's eight times roomier on the inside than on the outside. Just one small problem: the house's new topology human eye cannot see and makes it a bit difficult to leave once you're inside. When you do get outside, you may have a whole new problem.
*** A math-nerd resident of ''VideoGame/SecondLife'' actually went
noises that the human ear cannot hear. This inverts this already inverted trope because the color is natural and reproduced it is humanity that has become too alien (or at least insensitive) to comprehend it.
* In
the Crooked House in 3d, and if it's still rezed somewhere public you can actually walk through it. Not a real hypercube of course but some excellent special effects. [[http://nwn.blogs.com/nwn/2006/06/_and_he_rezzed_.html Here's ''Literature/{{Deathstalker}}'' series the story with video.]]
*** Another math-nerd made a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUPY0J5es5Q film adaptation]]
[=AIs=] of the story as his final for Geometry.
** The short story ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps'' involves a time-travel machine,
Shub constructed by aliens, housed in a building which is described in these terms
** ''Literature/GloryRoad'' had the hero and companions invading a tower "where the architect used a pretzel
world of their own to live on. Unfortunately for a straight-edge." It's so convoluted that humans who might visit, it took hundreds of spies decades to figure out a route to the MacGuffin.
** ''Literature/TheNumberOfTheBeast'', as well: we're only seeing
exists in more dimensions x, y, z; but there are at least three others which than they can be rotated around or perceive and so is unhealthy to look at for extended along, and which apparently can be used to travel between universes. This is a conceit to let him run through every literary universe ever, and have a massive CrossOver event. periods of time. The novel culminates in Madness Maze, despite a party, in what is effectively the Crooked House, with every single character he created attending (plus several guests). Special mention goes to the [[AcceptableTargets literary]] [[TakeThat critics]] lounge, which was shaped like a Klein bottle... once relatively innocuous appearance, had convoluted, nigh-sentient path designs that would either evolve you were inside.into a higher being or tear you apart.



* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'': The Aelfinn and Eelfinn ("the Finn") inhabit one or more separate dimensions described by the author as having radically different natural laws. Successive windows do not show what one might expect. That the magic system in the series is heavily geometric likely has a great deal to do with why its use is explicitly forbidden there. The doorways into their realm also resemble this in the "real world", and are described as "twisted".\\\
Though it's less apparent, the same is true of the Ways, an artificially constructed dimension meant for quick travel. Except in one dream sequence (which, for complicated reasons, probably reflects the reality of the Ways), the realm is extremely dark, but travelers there have noted that by the arc of the bridges they're walking on, the platform they've just arrived at should be directly beneath the last. During the dream sequence, it becomes apparent that the platform-islands extend infinitely downward—and unless you follow the bridges with your eyes, appear to be on the same plane. The doorways seem to be a description of a three-dimensional Möbius strip.
* A rare ''Franchise/StarWars'' example can be found in Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse novel ''Lando Calrissian and the Mindharp of Sharu''. In it the titular character finds the titular artifact - which seems to exist in several dimensions simultaneously and as such it really hurts just to look at it. Lando then uses it to unlock the passage into the Great Pyramid of Sharu - where he is expanded in size several dozen times, while his droid companion is shrunk to the size of a louse. There are even more examples in the book: the aliens who built it were [[StarfishAliens very, very alien indeed]] by ''Franchise/StarWars'' standards.
* Creator/StephenKing:
** ''Literature/NightShift'' - Inverted in the short story "I Am the Doorway". An alien lifeform [[HumansThroughAlienEyes sees]] a boy walking with a sieve under his arm: "an abominated creature that moved and respired and carried a device of wood and wire under its arm, a device constructed of geometrically impossible right angles."
** In the short story ''Literature/FourteenOhEight'', the titular room's door is crooked to both the left and the right. Or not at all. Maybe it can move? And it gets worse from there.
** In the novel ''Literature/FromABuick8,'' the titular car is actually an interdimensional portal/device that only looks like a car. It's noted that the human eye perceives it as a car because that's the only image the mind can supply for the actual shape of the device.
* A significant plot device in Creator/MadeleineLEngle's ''Literature/AWrinkleInTime'' deals with folding space-time through a fourth space-dimension for teleportation.
* Creator/CSLewis used something similar in ''Literature/ThatHideousStrength''. One character is briefly imprisoned in the "Objectivity Room", where everything is slightly off—the spots on the table are arranged ''just'' short of obeying a pattern (even a broken one), the similar specks on the ceiling are ''almost'' the mirror-image of the table, and the peak of the arched entryway looks like it might be just a ''fraction'' off-center to the left. Or not. Maybe the right? And let's not start on the paintings...
** JustifiedTrope: The room was specifically built this way to drive people crazy so they'd be suitable hosts for the demonic powers.
** He also appeared to use this in ''Literature/OutOfTheSilentPlanet'', but the room turns out be normal human geometry, just a very unusual sort.
* Creator/HPLovecraft loved non-Euclidean geometry:
** The sunken city of R'lyeh in ''Literature/TheCallOfCthulhu''. The gate that seals the Great Old One himself opens, and the sailors can't even be sure whether it's a vertical door or a horizontal hatch -- even though one of them climbed or walked up its surface! Shortly afterward, a unfortunate human is swallowed up by an angle of masonry which is acute, but behaves as if it were obtuse.
** The Antarctic city in ''Literature/AtTheMountainsOfMadness''.
** Perhaps most explicit in "Literature/TheDreamsInTheWitchHouse" where a mathematics student discovers the unearthly topology of his own bedroom serves as an extra-dimensional portal. Well, he ''was'' renting it because of its reputation as being haunted. This was a bad idea.
* The cave in ''Literature/HollowPlaces.'' Its layout transforms with every visit. Rooms change in shape and order. Corridors alter directions. Formations appear and disappear. On one occasion, the cave led up to what should be miles in the sky rather than descend into the ground (which, of course, could not be seen from outside). During Austin’s (the protagonist's) final trip, he encounters paths that loop into each other in impossible ways. The only consistent features are the presence of the inscribed column and the primary anomaly wherein people are teleported to the location of their choosing after walking eighty-one steps past said column.
* "Literature/TheHoundsOfTindalos", by Lovecraft's friend Creator/FrankBelknapLong, features ravenous creatures of weird geometry who travel through time and space, and the only way to avoid them once they're on your trail is to completely avoid sharp angles (such as in a completely circular room).
* ''Literature/{{Eon}}'', by Greg Bear, features an asteroid hollowed out by people from ..elsewhere, with seven chambers running along its internal axis. The first six contain cities, parks, a spaceport and loading area, and power generators. The seventh chamber [[spoiler:goes on forever, contains objects made from redistributing probability over space, and a mathematical singularity running along its centre.]] And ''then'' things start to get weird.



** The Library of the Unseen University is a particularly strong example -- the presence of so many ancient magical texts distorts space-time like an elephant on a trampoline, dimensions and gravity being twisted into the kind of topographical spaghetti that would cause even Creator/MCEscher to go for a good lie down (or sideways). That's quite apart from the fact that it serves as a gateway into L-Space, and is therefore linked to all libraries everywhere in all points of space, time and reality. Technically, it contains every book that has ever been written, every book that is ever going to be written, and every book that ever ''could'' have been written (whether it actually was written or not). Once, the Librarian took a trip deep into the shelves, passed tribes of lost students, and ended up in the same library in the past.
** In addition, Pratchett explains that any sufficiently large collection of books (magical or otherwise) can exert the same effect as the Unseen University Library; the equation goes "Knowledge = Power = Energy = Matter = Mass". And since mass warps space around it, so does a high quantity of knowledge.

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** The Library of the Unseen University is a particularly strong example -- the presence of has so many ancient magical texts that it distorts space-time like an elephant on a trampoline, dimensions and gravity being twisted into the kind of topographical spaghetti that would cause even Creator/MCEscher to go for a good lie down (or sideways).sideways. That's quite apart from the fact that it serves as a gateway into L-Space, and is therefore linked to all libraries everywhere in all points of space, time and reality. Technically, it contains every book that has ever been written, every book that is ever going to be written, and every book that ever ''could'' have been written (whether it actually was written or not). Once, the Librarian took a trip deep into the shelves, passed tribes of lost students, and ended up in the same library in the past.
**
past. In addition, Pratchett explains that any sufficiently large collection of books (magical or otherwise) can exert the same effect as the Unseen University Library; the equation goes "Knowledge = Power = Energy = Matter = Mass". And Library since mass warps space around it, so does a any high quantity of knowledge.knowledge can warp space as if it were a huge amount of mass.



** The Tooth Fairy's house in ''Hogfather'' is another example of this trope. The exterior portion of the Tooth Fairy's domain are also a rather interesting take on this trope as the Alien Geometries present are actually based off the poor understanding of size, proportion and three-dimensional imagery present in a child's drawing. The massive white gap where there ought to be a horizon is particular unsettling.

to:

** The Tooth Fairy's house in ''Hogfather'' is another example of this trope. The exterior portion of the Tooth Fairy's domain are also a rather interesting take on this trope as the in ''Hogfather'' has Alien Geometries present are actually based off the poor understanding of size, proportion and three-dimensional imagery present in a child's drawing. The massive white gap where there ought to be a horizon is particular unsettling.



* In Creator/JohnCWright's ''Literature/ChroniclesOfChaos'', Vanity's secret passages often don't add up, geometrically, with the places they go to and lead from.
* In ''Time's Eye'', by Creator/ArthurCClarke, there are spherical alien objects that apparently have a 1-to-3 ratio for their diameters and circumferences, instead of a one-to-pi ratio.
* The Starfish structures in ''Literature/BlindLake'' have disturbing interior geometry. Robot probes (and people) who go in too far don't come back. The deep interior seems to be entirely exempt from the usual rules of time and space.

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* While ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'''s Hell and Purgatory have clearly defined geography, that of Paradise is more complicated. The spheres of {{Heaven}} correspond to the celestial spheres of a geocentric universe, but can equally well be seen as orbiting around {{God}} in the Empyrean, or as all existing in the same space. To enter Paradise or cross between the spheres, one must AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence, rather than doing any physical climbing. The structure of Heaven has been interpreted as an early description of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3-sphere#In_literature fourth-dimensional hypersphere]].
* In Creator/JohnCWright's ''Literature/ChroniclesOfChaos'', Vanity's secret passages often don't add up, geometrically, with ''Literature/AnElegyForTheStillLiving'', the main character spends a few minutes walking down a forest path before realising he is seeing the same scenery looping over and over again. Also, this passage:
-->''After the man had fallen through every place and every time that ever he had even imagined, he began to fall through
the places they go to and lead from.
* In ''Time's Eye'', by Creator/ArthurCClarke, there are spherical alien objects
that apparently have a 1-to-3 ratio for their diameters and circumferences, instead of a one-to-pi ratio.
* The Starfish
his mind could not conceive. He passed into structures that did not follow geometry, saw shapes that had no edges or sides, that extended into themselves and into all directions. He saw triangles with one hundred eighty one degrees. He saw minds that had no reason or morality. He saw colors indescribable to others. He saw the true shapes of his dreams, and the ten dimensions of the earth and sky. He saw what no one saw, felt what no one felt. He heard sounds with his finger tips, and tasted with his ears. He had secrets whispered to him in ''Literature/BlindLake'' have disturbing interior geometry. Robot probes (and people) who go in too far don't come back. a language that can't be translated.''
* ''Literature/{{Eon}}'', by Greg Bear, features an asteroid hollowed out by people from ..elsewhere, with seven chambers running along its internal axis.
The deep interior seems to be entirely exempt first six contain cities, parks, a spaceport and loading area, and power generators. The seventh chamber [[spoiler:goes on forever, contains objects made from the usual rules of time redistributing probability over space, and space.a mathematical singularity running along its centre.]] And ''then'' things start to get weird.



* In Creator/StephenBaxter's short story collection ''Vacuum Diagrams'', the story [[http://kasmana.people.cofc.edu/MATHFICT/mfview.php?callnumber=mf906 The Eighth Room]] deals with something similar to Heinlein's story. However, in this case, the room was not created accidentally... it's more of a logic puzzle. There's also another short story by Baxter called "[[http://kasmana.people.cofc.edu/MATHFICT/mfview.php?callnumber=mf907 Shell]]", set on a planet that is ''folded in on itself''. There is no sky — people looking up see [[HollowWorld the other side of the planet curving over them, as if it's a shell]]. When one character uses a hot-air balloon to explore the other side, she witnesses the "shell" flatten out and then become curved normally, while the land she just left curves into a shell over the sky.
* In Creator/AmbroseBierce's "The Damned Thing", a creature, judged by ignorant folk to be a mountain lion (from its leavings, since the creature itself is never seen), is a color that the human eye cannot see and makes noises that the human ear cannot hear. This inverts this already inverted trope because the color is natural and it is humanity that has become too alien (or at least insensitive) to comprehend it.
* In the ''Literature/{{Deathstalker}}'' series the [=AIs=] of Shub constructed a world of their own to live on. Unfortunately for humans who might visit, it exists in more dimensions than they can perceive and so is unhealthy to look at for extended periods of time. The Madness Maze, despite a relatively innocuous appearance, had convoluted, nigh-sentient path designs that would either evolve you into a higher being or tear you apart.
* In ''Literature/{{Flatland}}'', the two-dimensional protagonist A. Square struggles to fathom the third dimension when he is introduced to it by a travelling sphere, and it [[GoMadFromTheRevelation almost drives him insane]]. In a dream he sees that inhabitants of one-dimensional Lineland are similarly incapable of comprehending the second dimension. And let's not even get into [[IgnorantOfTheirOwnIgnorance Pointland's issues]].
* Many sequels have been written. ''Flatterland'' (Ian Stewart) has even ''more'' bizarre geometry, including a hyperbolic world, a fractal world, a grid world, and so on.
* ''Threshold'' by Caitlin Kieran contains a fossil in a shape that cannot exist, causing the heroine to [[GoMadFromTheRevelation black out when she looks at it too long.]] What is this sinister shape? [[WritersCannotDoMath A regular heptagon.]]
* In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' novel ''The Final Fury'', Captain Janeway, Tuvok, and Neelix arrive aboard a Fury planet wherein the hallways and doors meet at angles that aren't quite "right" -- literally and figuratively -- and the aliens themselves despise those who follow the "right-angle" or "right-hand path."

to:

* In Creator/StephenBaxter's short story collection ''Vacuum Diagrams'', the story [[http://kasmana.people.cofc.edu/MATHFICT/mfview.php?callnumber=mf906 The Eighth Room]] deals with something similar to Heinlein's story. However, in this case, the room was not created accidentally... it's more of a logic puzzle. There's also another short story by Baxter called "[[http://kasmana.people.cofc.edu/MATHFICT/mfview.php?callnumber=mf907 Shell]]", set on a planet that is ''folded in on itself''. There is no sky — people looking up see [[HollowWorld the other side House of the planet curving over them, as if it's a shell]]. When one character uses a hot-air balloon to explore the other side, she witnesses the "shell" flatten out and then become curved normally, while the land she just left curves into a shell over the sky.
* In Creator/AmbroseBierce's "The Damned Thing", a creature, judged
Maker from ''Literature/TheFirstLaw'' trilogy by ignorant folk to be Joe Abercrombie. The protagonists enter about halfway up, walk around a mountain lion (from its leavings, since the creature itself is bit inside but never seen), is a color that ascend or descend, then exit on the human eye cannot see and makes noises that roof. Most of the human ear cannot hear. This inverts this already inverted trope because characters can't wait to get out of the color is natural and place, even if it is humanity that has become too alien (or at least insensitive) to comprehend does involve crossing the narrow, rail-less, hundred-foot-high bridge. And there's always the possibility of leaving the place ''before'' entering it.
* In the ''Literature/{{Deathstalker}}'' series the [=AIs=] of Shub constructed a world of their own to live on. Unfortunately for humans who might visit, it exists in more dimensions than they can perceive and so is unhealthy to look at for extended periods of time. The Madness Maze, despite a relatively innocuous appearance, had convoluted, nigh-sentient path designs that would either evolve you into a higher being or tear you apart.
* In ''Literature/{{Flatland}}'', the two-dimensional protagonist A. Square struggles to fathom the third dimension when he is introduced to it by a travelling sphere, and it [[GoMadFromTheRevelation almost drives him insane]]. In a dream he sees that inhabitants of one-dimensional Lineland are similarly incapable of comprehending the second dimension. And let's not even get into [[IgnorantOfTheirOwnIgnorance Pointland's issues]].
*
issues]]. Many sequels have been written. ''Flatterland'' (Ian Stewart) has even ''more'' bizarre geometry, including a hyperbolic world, a fractal world, a grid world, and so on.
* ''Threshold'' In the first ''Gatekeepers'' book (Anthony Horowitz), the main character is prevented from escaping evil witches trying to sacrifice him to let the [[EldrichAbomination Old Ones]] [[SealedEvilInACan back into the world]] by Caitlin Kieran contains some sort of higher-dimensional loop: no matter which direction he sets out in, he always ends up back at his starting point. Of course, it might have been just a fossil in a shape that cannot exist, mental effect, not actually altering space.
* [[TVGenius The Laputans]] from ''Literature/GulliversTravels'' use these for their houses... [[RealityEnsues
causing the heroine them all to [[GoMadFromTheRevelation black out when she looks at it too long.]] What is this sinister shape? [[WritersCannotDoMath A regular heptagon.collapse.]]
* In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' novel ''The Final Fury'', Captain Janeway, Tuvok, ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'':
** The interior of Slartibartfast's Bistromathics ship in ''Literature/LifeTheUniverseAndEverything''.
** The new
and Neelix arrive aboard improved Guide in ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'' shifts through a Fury planet wherein the hallways and doors meet at angles few inexplicable forms.
* ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves'' starts with a [[color:blue:house]]
that aren't quite "right" -- literally and figuratively -- and is 3/8ths inch BiggerOnTheInside than on the aliens themselves despise those who follow outside. They are only able to measure all the "right-angle" way across because [[spoiler:a closet mysteriously appeared in the house when they left for a week]]. They also get slightly different measurements with every method they try until confirming the final number with a very accurate method -- you'd ''normally'' think this is because of measurement deficiencies, but in retrospect... Also, this discrepancy disappearing is, believe it or "right-hand path."not, the cue for things to get worse.



* The cave in ''Literature/HollowPlaces.'' Its layout transforms with every visit. Rooms change in shape and order. Corridors alter directions. Formations appear and disappear. On one occasion, the cave led up to what should be miles in the sky rather than descend into the ground (which, of course, could not be seen from outside). During Austin’s (the protagonist's) final trip, he encounters paths that loop into each other in impossible ways. The only consistent features are the presence of the inscribed column and the primary anomaly wherein people are teleported to the location of their choosing after walking eighty-one steps past said column.
* "Literature/TheHoundsOfTindalos", by Lovecraft's friend Creator/FrankBelknapLong, features ravenous creatures of weird geometry who travel through time and space, and the only way to avoid them once they're on your trail is to completely avoid sharp angles (such as in a completely circular room).
* Creator/HPLovecraft loved non-Euclidean geometry:
** The sunken city of R'lyeh in ''Literature/TheCallOfCthulhu''. The gate that seals the Great Old One himself opens, and the sailors can't even be sure whether it's a vertical door or a horizontal hatch -- even though one of them climbed or walked up its surface! Shortly afterward, a unfortunate human is swallowed up by an angle of masonry which is acute, but behaves as if it were obtuse.
** The Antarctic city in ''Literature/AtTheMountainsOfMadness''.
** Perhaps most explicit in "Literature/TheDreamsInTheWitchHouse" where a mathematics student discovers the unearthly topology of his own bedroom serves as an extra-dimensional portal. Well, he ''was'' renting it because of its reputation as being haunted. This was a bad idea.
* In ''Literature/JoeGolemAndTheDrowningCity'' this is a trait of the [[EldritchAbomination elder creatures]] and their artifacts. The Pentajulum of Lecter (essentially an ornate heart), an object with the power to trespass realms is described as having eternally changing features, being sometimes round, sometimes angled, sometimes both at the same time, and having incomprehensible geometries, sometimes appearing to be four-dimensional and things of the sort.
* ''Literature/{{MARZENA}}'' makes use of the Gromoviti Znaci, the Thunder Mark of Perun from Slavic Mythology, which doubles up as an optical illusion making you see all matters of shapes and figures. There's also the G-Net, which by not being bound by earthly laws and by being fully accessible via holo wearables, allows its users and denizens to see and do geometrically impossible things.
* Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy features a(n oxymoronically) straightforward example: Time is fundamentally the same as space, meaning that there are technically four spatial dimensions and [[MindScrew no such thing as time]]. The trope is even discussed in-universe when Yalda hypothesizes "four-space" and Giorgio [[LampshadeHanging points out how batshit insane it sounds]].
-->'''Giorgio:''' So according to your theory, an object could have a trajectory entirely [[TitleDrop orthogonal]] to our own?\\
'''Yalda:''' Yes.\\
'''Giorgio:''' It could move with ''infinite velocity''?\\
'''Yalda:''' Yes, that's how we'd describe it. But that's no stranger than saying that a vertical pole has an 'infinite slope': unlike a mountain road, it gets where it's going vertically without bothering to go anywhere horizontally. An object that gets where it's going without bothering to move across what we call time isn't doing anything pathological; in reality, there's nothing 'infinite' about it.
* In Creator/LarryNiven's ''Literature/{{Protector}}'' the Brennan Monster amuses himself by creating full scale replicas of some of Escher's art, using things like artificial gravity to make them work.



* In the Literature/StarTrekShatnerverse novel ''The Return'', The Borg have built a hypercube base inside a subspace tunnel.
* ''Literature/TheLastBattle'', the final volume of ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'', ends in a world that's essentially the opposite of reality, in that the closer you get to the center, the more there is.
* In ''Literature/AnElegyForTheStillLiving'', the main character spends a few minutes walking down a forest path before realising he is seeing the same scenery looping over and over again. Also, this passage:
-->''After the man had fallen through every place and every time that ever he had even imagined, he began to fall through the places that his mind could not conceive. He passed into structures that did not follow geometry, saw shapes that had no edges or sides, that extended into themselves and into all directions. He saw triangles with one hundred eighty one degrees. He saw minds that had no reason or morality. He saw colors indescribable to others. He saw the true shapes of his dreams, and the ten dimensions of the earth and sky. He saw what no one saw, felt what no one felt. He heard sounds with his finger tips, and tasted with his ears. He had secrets whispered to him in a language that can't be translated.''
* In Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''[[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire A Clash of Kings]],'' Danaerys enters the House of the Undying Ones in Qarth. Once in the antechamber, she makes four consecutive right-hand turns without returning to her starting point.
* In Creator/LarryNiven's ''Literature/{{Protector}}'' the Brennan Monster amuses himself by creating full scale replicas of some of Escher's art, using things like artificial gravity to make them work.
* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'':
** The interior of Slartibartfast's Bistromathics ship in ''Literature/LifeTheUniverseAndEverything''.
** The new and improved Guide in ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'' shifts through a few inexplicable forms.
* In the ''Literature/VenusPrime'' series, the interior of the Amalthean world-ship is described as being made up of nested spiral shells. The diagrams at the back of the last book don't help to make it any easier to comprehend.
* The intricate geometric designs that Cryptics use instead of heads in ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'' invoke this trope. And in ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'', a Cryptic named Pattern manifests in the Physical Realm as a complex geometric pattern, implied to be based in quantum uncertainty.
* Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy features a(n oxymoronically) straightforward example: Time is fundamentally the same as space, meaning that there are technically four spatial dimensions and [[MindScrew no such thing as time]]. The trope is even discussed in-universe when Yalda hypothesizes "four-space" and Giorgio [[LampshadeHanging points out how batshit insane it sounds]].
-->'''Giorgio:''' So according to your theory, an object could have a trajectory entirely [[TitleDrop orthogonal]] to our own?\\
'''Yalda:''' Yes.\\
'''Giorgio:''' It could move with ''infinite velocity''?\\
'''Yalda:''' Yes, that's how we'd describe it. But that's no stranger than saying that a vertical pole has an 'infinite slope': unlike a mountain road, it gets where it's going vertically without bothering to go anywhere horizontally. An object that gets where it's going without bothering to move across what we call time isn't doing anything pathological; in reality, there's nothing 'infinite' about it.
* ''Literature/TheThirdPoliceman'' has several different forms of this. The most prominent example would be the police barracks, which are two-dimensional on the outside and seemingly three-dimensional on the inside. There's also Eternity, which loops, and [[spoiler:the inside of Mather's walls.]]

to:

* In Creator/RobertAHeinlein:
** The short story ''Literature/AndHeBuiltACrookedHouse'' involves an architect who, inspired by higher-dimensional geometry and high real-estate prices, builds a house in
the Literature/StarTrekShatnerverse novel ''The Return'', The Borg shape of an unfolded hypercube. Then an earthquake makes it fold in on itself into a hypercube, so to the architect's delight it's eight times roomier on the inside than on the outside. Just one small problem: the house's new topology makes it a bit difficult to leave once you're inside. When you do get outside, you may have built a whole new problem.
*** A math-nerd resident of ''VideoGame/SecondLife'' actually went and reproduced the Crooked House in 3d, and if it's still rezed somewhere public you can actually walk through it. Not a real
hypercube base inside a subspace tunnel.
* ''Literature/TheLastBattle'',
of course but some excellent special effects. [[http://nwn.blogs.com/nwn/2006/06/_and_he_rezzed_.html Here's the story with video.]]
*** Another math-nerd made a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUPY0J5es5Q film adaptation]] of the story as his
final volume of ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'', ends for Geometry.
** The short story ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps'' involves a time-travel machine, constructed by aliens, housed
in a world that's essentially building which is described in these terms
** ''Literature/GloryRoad'' had
the opposite of reality, in hero and companions invading a tower "where the architect used a pretzel for a straight-edge." It's so convoluted that the closer you get it took hundreds of spies decades to figure out a route to the center, the more there is.
* In ''Literature/AnElegyForTheStillLiving'', the main character spends a few minutes walking down a forest path before realising he is
MacGuffin.
** ''Literature/TheNumberOfTheBeast'', as well: we're only
seeing the same scenery looping over dimensions x, y, z; but there are at least three others which can be rotated around or extended along, and over again. Also, this passage:
-->''After the man had fallen
which apparently can be used to travel between universes. This is a conceit to let him run through every place literary universe ever, and every time that ever he had even imagined, he began to fall through the places that his mind could not conceive. He passed into structures that did not follow geometry, saw shapes that had no edges or sides, that extended into themselves and into all directions. He saw triangles with one hundred eighty one degrees. He saw minds that had no reason or morality. He saw colors indescribable to others. He saw the true shapes of his dreams, and the ten dimensions of the earth and sky. He saw what no one saw, felt what no one felt. He heard sounds with his finger tips, and tasted with his ears. He had secrets whispered to him in a language that can't be translated.''
* In Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''[[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire A Clash of Kings]],'' Danaerys enters the House of the Undying Ones in Qarth. Once in the antechamber, she makes four consecutive right-hand turns without returning to her starting point.
* In Creator/LarryNiven's ''Literature/{{Protector}}'' the Brennan Monster amuses himself by creating full scale replicas of some of Escher's art, using things like artificial gravity to make them work.
* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'':
** The interior of Slartibartfast's Bistromathics ship in ''Literature/LifeTheUniverseAndEverything''.
** The new and improved Guide in ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'' shifts through a few inexplicable forms.
* In the ''Literature/VenusPrime'' series, the interior of the Amalthean world-ship is described as being made up of nested spiral shells. The diagrams at the back of the last book don't help to make it any easier to comprehend.
* The intricate geometric designs that Cryptics use instead of heads in ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'' invoke this trope. And in ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'', a Cryptic named Pattern manifests in the Physical Realm as a complex geometric pattern, implied to be based in quantum uncertainty.
* Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy features a(n oxymoronically) straightforward example: Time is fundamentally the same as space, meaning that there are technically four spatial dimensions and [[MindScrew no such thing as time]]. The trope is even discussed in-universe when Yalda hypothesizes "four-space" and Giorgio [[LampshadeHanging points out how batshit insane it sounds]].
-->'''Giorgio:''' So according to your theory, an object could
have a trajectory entirely [[TitleDrop orthogonal]] to our own?\\
'''Yalda:''' Yes.\\
'''Giorgio:''' It could move
massive CrossOver event. The novel culminates in a party, in what is effectively the Crooked House, with ''infinite velocity''?\\
'''Yalda:''' Yes, that's how we'd describe it. But that's no stranger than saying that a vertical pole has an 'infinite slope': unlike a mountain road, it gets where it's going vertically without bothering to go anywhere horizontally. An object that gets where it's going without bothering to move across what we call time isn't doing anything pathological; in reality, there's nothing 'infinite' about it.
* ''Literature/TheThirdPoliceman'' has
every single character he created attending (plus several different forms of this. The most prominent example would be guests). Special mention goes to the police barracks, [[AcceptableTargets literary]] [[TakeThat critics]] lounge, which are two-dimensional on the outside and seemingly three-dimensional on the inside. There's also Eternity, which loops, and [[spoiler:the inside of Mather's walls.]]was shaped like a Klein bottle... once you were inside.



* In ''Literature/JoeGolemAndTheDrowningCity'' this is a trait of the [[EldritchAbomination elder creatures]] and their artifacts. The Pentajulum of Lecter (essentially an ornate heart), an object with the power to trespass realms is described as having eternally changing features, being sometimes round, sometimes angled, sometimes both at the same time, and having incomprehensible geometries, sometimes appearing to be four-dimensional and things of the sort.
* [[TVGenius The Laputans]] from ''Literature/GulliversTravels'' use these for their houses... [[RealityEnsues causing them all to collapse.]]
* ''Literature/{{MARZENA}}'' makes use of the Gromoviti Znaci, the Thunder Mark of Perun from Slavic Mythology, which doubles up as an optical illusion making you see all matters of shapes and figures. There's also the G-Net, which by not being bound by earthly laws and by being fully accessible via holo wearables, allows its users and denizens to see and do geometrically impossible things.
* In the first ''Gatekeepers'' book (Anthony Horowitz), the main character is prevented from escaping evil witches trying to sacrifice him to let the [[EldrichAbomination Old Ones]] [[SealedEvilInACan back into the world]] by some sort of higher-dimensional loop: no matter which direction he sets out in, he always ends up back at his starting point. Of course, it might have been just a mental effect, not actually altering space.

to:

* Creator/StephenKing:
** ''Literature/NightShift'' - Inverted in the short story "I Am the Doorway". An alien lifeform [[HumansThroughAlienEyes sees]] a boy walking with a sieve under his arm: "an abominated creature that moved and respired and carried a device of wood and wire under its arm, a device constructed of geometrically impossible right angles."
**
In ''Literature/JoeGolemAndTheDrowningCity'' this the short story ''Literature/FourteenOhEight'', the titular room's door is crooked to both the left and the right. Or not at all. Maybe it can move? And it gets worse from there.
** In the novel ''Literature/FromABuick8,'' the titular car is actually an interdimensional portal/device that only looks like
a trait car. It's noted that the human eye perceives it as a car because that's the only image the mind can supply for the actual shape of the [[EldritchAbomination elder creatures]] device.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** In the Literature/StarTrekShatnerverse novel ''The Return'', The Borg have built a hypercube base inside a subspace tunnel.
** In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' novel ''The Final Fury'', Captain Janeway, Tuvok,
and their artifacts. Neelix arrive aboard a Fury planet wherein the hallways and doors meet at angles that aren't quite "right" -- literally and figuratively -- and the aliens themselves despise those who follow the "right-angle" or "right-hand path."
* A rare ''Franchise/StarWars'' example can be found in Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse novel ''Lando Calrissian and the Mindharp of Sharu''. In it the titular character finds the titular artifact - which seems to exist in several dimensions simultaneously and as such it really hurts just to look at it. Lando then uses it to unlock the passage into the Great Pyramid of Sharu - where he is expanded in size several dozen times, while his droid companion is shrunk to the size of a louse. There are even more examples in the book: the aliens who built it were [[StarfishAliens very, very alien indeed]] by ''Franchise/StarWars'' standards.
*
The Pentajulum intricate geometric designs that Cryptics use instead of Lecter (essentially an ornate heart), an object with heads in ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'' invoke this trope. And in ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'', a Cryptic named Pattern manifests in the power to trespass realms is described Physical Realm as having eternally changing features, being sometimes round, sometimes angled, sometimes both at the same time, and having incomprehensible geometries, sometimes appearing a complex geometric pattern, implied to be four-dimensional and things of the sort.
based in quantum uncertainty.
* [[TVGenius The Laputans]] from ''Literature/GulliversTravels'' use these In ''Time's Eye'', by Creator/ArthurCClarke, there are spherical alien objects that apparently have a 1-to-3 ratio for their houses... [[RealityEnsues causing them all to collapse.diameters and circumferences, instead of a one-to-pi ratio.
* ''Literature/TheThirdPoliceman'' has several different forms of this. The most prominent example would be the police barracks, which are two-dimensional on the outside and seemingly three-dimensional on the inside. There's also Eternity, which loops, and [[spoiler:the inside of Mather's walls.
]]
* ''Literature/{{MARZENA}}'' ''Threshold'' by Caitlin Kieran contains a fossil in a shape that cannot exist, causing the heroine to [[GoMadFromTheRevelation black out when she looks at it too long.]] What is this sinister shape? [[WritersCannotDoMath A regular heptagon.]]
* ''Literature/ThursdayNext'''s Uncle Mycroft, among his other {{Mad Scien|tist}}ce projects, developed "Nextian Geometry" with his wife, said to be based on how a cylinder looks like a rectangle from the side, which allows one to use a circular cutter on dough without any left over: it
makes use of circles tesselate.
* In Creator/StephenBaxter's short story collection ''Vacuum Diagrams'',
the Gromoviti Znaci, story [[http://kasmana.people.cofc.edu/MATHFICT/mfview.php?callnumber=mf906 The Eighth Room]] deals with something similar to Heinlein's story. However, in this case, the Thunder Mark room was not created accidentally... it's more of Perun from Slavic Mythology, which doubles up as an optical illusion making you see all matters of shapes and figures. a logic puzzle. There's also another short story by Baxter called "[[http://kasmana.people.cofc.edu/MATHFICT/mfview.php?callnumber=mf907 Shell]]", set on a planet that is ''folded in on itself''. There is no sky — people looking up see [[HollowWorld the G-Net, which by not being bound by earthly laws and by being fully accessible via holo wearables, allows its users and denizens to see and do geometrically impossible things.
* In
other side of the first ''Gatekeepers'' book (Anthony Horowitz), the main planet curving over them, as if it's a shell]]. When one character uses a hot-air balloon to explore the other side, she witnesses the "shell" flatten out and then become curved normally, while the land she just left curves into a shell over the sky.
* In the ''Literature/VenusPrime'' series, the interior of the Amalthean world-ship
is prevented described as being made up of nested spiral shells. The diagrams at the back of the last book don't help to make it any easier to comprehend.
* This happens a lot in ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' when the Powers of Chaos are involved.
** In Creator/GrahamMcNeill's ''Warhammer 40000'' ''Literature/{{Ultramarines}}'' novel ''Dead Sky Black Sun'', the city in the [[{{Mordor}} Eye of Chaos]] features this — producing a MobileMaze with it.
** In Creator/DanAbnett's ''Literature/{{Eisenhorn}}'' novel ''Xenos'', the saruthi "tetrascapes" include regular octagons that nevertheless tessalate. Eisenhorn rescues some [[NewMeat green soldiers]]
from escaping evil witches trying such a tetrascape, and later chooses them over experienced soldiers to sacrifice him to let the [[EldrichAbomination Old Ones]] [[SealedEvilInACan back go into one. Wise of him: the world]] by some sort of higher-dimensional loop: no matter which direction he sets out in, he always ends up back at his starting point. Of course, it might have been just a mental effect, not green soldiers had actually altering space.seen a tetrascape before, and the experienced ones hadn't. As a result, the "greens" manage to shoot and kill dozens of enemies, but the elite Deathwatch Space Marine attached to Eisenhower's squad can't hit ''anything'' thanks to the effect the twisted geometries have on ballistics.
** In Creator/DanAbnett's Literature/GauntsGhosts novel ''His Last Command'', a [[CoolGate Chaos warp gate]] throws Maggs and Mkoll into a place where [[AlienSky stones hang in the sky and the stars are all wrong (both)]], as well as being [[EvilIsDeathlyCold bitterly cold]]. Also, their vox units register as both within ten kilometers and out of range.
** In Creator/BenCounter's ''Literature/HorusHeresy'' novel ''Galaxy In Flames'', Death's Tomb is bigger on the inside than the outside — as well as other repulsive features.
* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'': The Aelfinn and Eelfinn ("the Finn") inhabit one or more separate dimensions described by the author as having radically different natural laws. Successive windows do not show what one might expect. That the magic system in the series is heavily geometric likely has a great deal to do with why its use is explicitly forbidden there. The doorways into their realm also resemble this in the "real world", and are described as "twisted".\\\
Though it's less apparent, the same is true of the Ways, an artificially constructed dimension meant for quick travel. Except in one dream sequence (which, for complicated reasons, probably reflects the reality of the Ways), the realm is extremely dark, but travelers there have noted that by the arc of the bridges they're walking on, the platform they've just arrived at should be directly beneath the last. During the dream sequence, it becomes apparent that the platform-islands extend infinitely downward—and unless you follow the bridges with your eyes, appear to be on the same plane. The doorways seem to be a description of a three-dimensional Möbius strip.
* A significant plot device in Creator/MadeleineLEngle's ''Literature/AWrinkleInTime'' deals with folding space-time through a fourth space-dimension for teleportation.
8th Oct '17 6:57:07 PM PaulA
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* In Creator/LarryNiven's ''[[Literature/KnownSpace Protector]]'' the Brennan Monster amuses himself by creating full scale replicas of some of Escher's art, using things like artificial gravity to make them work.

to:

* In Creator/LarryNiven's ''[[Literature/KnownSpace Protector]]'' ''Literature/{{Protector}}'' the Brennan Monster amuses himself by creating full scale replicas of some of Escher's art, using things like artificial gravity to make them work.
6th Oct '17 6:36:25 PM Jake18
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** [[http://scp-wiki.net/scp-648 SCP-648 ("The Labyrinth")]]. The maze-like interior of SCP-647 changes on an unpredictable basis, often cutting off personnel inside it from the exit. Over 14 square kilometers of SCP-647 has been explored without reaching any exit or edge.

to:

** [[http://scp-wiki.net/scp-648 SCP-648 ("The Labyrinth")]]. The maze-like interior of SCP-647 SCP-648 changes on an unpredictable basis, often cutting off personnel inside it from the exit. Over 14 square kilometers of SCP-647 SCP-648 has been explored without reaching any exit or edge.
6th Oct '17 6:35:33 PM Jake18
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** [[http://scp-wiki.net/scp-647 SCP-647 ("The Labyrinth")]]. The maze-like interior of SCP-647 changes on an unpredictable basis, often cutting off personnel inside it from the exit. Over 14 square kilometers of SCP-647 has been explored without reaching any exit or edge.

to:

** [[http://scp-wiki.net/scp-647 SCP-647 net/scp-648 SCP-648 ("The Labyrinth")]]. The maze-like interior of SCP-647 changes on an unpredictable basis, often cutting off personnel inside it from the exit. Over 14 square kilometers of SCP-647 has been explored without reaching any exit or edge.
2nd Oct '17 4:49:54 PM WaterBlap
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[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* Creator/DonaldTrump's hair, as portrayed in ''ComicStrip/{{Doonesbury}}''.
[[/folder]]
26th Sep '17 8:18:49 PM Godzillawolf
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* The ''Fanfic/PonyPOVSeries'' has [[BigBad Discord]]'s castle in the [[BadFuture Dark World]]. It constantly shifts both interior and exterior -- seemingly as much of its own will as Discord's -- and for bonus points, even contains a void that's a portal to his cousin [[EldritchAbomination Ponythulhu]]'s domain.

to:

* The ''Fanfic/PonyPOVSeries'' has ''Fanfic/PonyPOVSeries'':
**
[[BigBad Discord]]'s castle in the [[BadFuture Dark World]]. It constantly shifts both interior and exterior -- seemingly as much of its own will as Discord's -- and for bonus points, even contains a void that's a portal to his cousin [[EldritchAbomination Ponythulhu]]'s domain.domain.
** [[TopGod The Elders']] true forms are this. They can be viewed in full, but attempting to follow one part of them to another causes it too seemingly stretch on to eternity. They also appear as a child and an adult at the same time. And that's just what ponies have been able to ''describe'' about them, as most just give up trying at that point. While shown with the Alicorn Elders, this is only explained by WordOfGod indirectly, as mortal ponies who notice such things cannot view the Draconequi Elders Havoc and Entropy, due to their true forms not being safe for their sanity.
25th Sep '17 10:10:02 AM BeerBaron
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* The Daedric ruins in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' fit this trope. They certainly weren't built by man or mer...

to:

* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** In the series' lore, the island of Artaeum combines this with {{Bizarrchitecture}} and, to an extent, being an EldritchLocation. Artaeum is the home of the [[TheOrder Psijic Order]], a powerful MagicalSociety and the oldest monastic order in Tamriel. Artaeum shifts continuously either at random or by decree of the Psijiic Council, often in impossible ways. It can also be made to disappear ''entirely'' from Mundus.
**
The Daedric ruins in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' fit this trope. They certainly weren't built Built by man or mer...the ancient [[OurGodsAreDifferent Daedra]] worshiping Chimer, they are massic monolithic structures constructed in some truly impossible ways.
24th Sep '17 4:37:40 PM TheGreatUnknown
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/TheHaunting1963'' uses this to emphasize Hill House's surreal and unsettling atmosphere. All the doors are hung just slightly off-center and the rooms are built on strange angles. "There isn't a square corner in the place."
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