History Main / AirStrikeImpossible

8th Apr '18 3:05:45 PM eroock
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A common form of TheClimax. Done correctly, it shows off the main character's courage, resolve, and ImprobablePilotingSkills, allows them to defeat the BigBad in one fell swoop, and provides plenty of chances for SugarWiki/VisualEffectsOfAwesome. Rather than trying to top this, it's often best to just put it at the end of the story and wrap things up as soon as it's over.

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A common form of TheClimax. Done correctly, it shows off the main character's courage, resolve, and ImprobablePilotingSkills, allows them to defeat the BigBad in one fell swoop, and provides plenty of chances for SugarWiki/VisualEffectsOfAwesome. Rather than trying to top this, it's often best to just put it at the end of the story and wrap things up as soon as it's over.
over. Compare AerialCanyonChase when this trope plays out as a chase scene.
8th Apr '18 1:45:03 PM AnoBakaDesu
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** ''Film/TheLastJedi'' features several on both sides of the conflict:
*** During the Action Prologue, Poe gives the First Order Dreadnought a nasty case of "Trench Run Disease", hugging its hull and picking off its defensive guns to clear the way for the Resistance's fleet of heavy bombers. When Hux asks why Poe's X-Wing isn't taken down, Captain Canady retorts that the lone starfighter is too small and agile for the surface cannons to intercept, and bemoans that his crew should have sent out fighters instead of thinking they're invulnerable.
*** The Resistance bombers, with the assistance of Poe and his fellow starfighter pilots, slog their way through a swarm of TIE fighters, with several bombers being picked off on their way to their target due to the furball's intensity. Most of the bombers are taken out in one fell swoop due to a nasty case of Disaster Dominoes, but the sole remaining bomber is able to release its payload just before being destroyed, taking down the Dreadnought.
*** Kylo Ren returns the favor in his TIE Silencer later on, skillfully evading the Resistance fleet's defensive fire, flying through the hangar bay of the ''Raddus'' and blowing up the remaining Resistance starfighters before they can launch.
*** Finally, the Resistance soldiers have to try and destroy the First Order's Battering Ram Cannon with a small force of old speeders. [[spoiler:Unfortunately, RealityEnsues, as they can't break through the screening force's defenses with such meager equipment and they are forced to break off without success.]]



*** ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat5TheUnsungWar Unsung War/Squadron Leader]]'' did this best: you are attacked by a wing of the Yuke counterparts of the squad that has been plaguing you all game, flying [[CoolPlane Sukhoi Su-35s]] and obviously not under the same altitude restriction you are. The canyon is particularly low in this instance (although it's rather lenient with its anti-air, as it simply causes an automatic missile lock and fire which can be evaded like any other missile), and much of the EnemyChatter (and your chatter) is devoted to how insane the skills going around are.

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*** ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat5TheUnsungWar Unsung War/Squadron Leader]]'' ''VideoGame/AceCombat5TheUnsungWar'' did this best: you are attacked by a wing of the Yuke counterparts of the squad that has been plaguing you all game, flying [[CoolPlane Sukhoi Su-35s]] and obviously not under the same altitude restriction you are. The canyon is particularly low in this instance (although it's rather lenient with its anti-air, as it simply causes an automatic missile lock and fire which can be evaded like any other missile), and much of the EnemyChatter (and your chatter) is devoted to how insane the skills going around are.


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* In ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefrontII2017'', most Starfighter Assault maps feature objectives that requires the attacking side to fly in tight airspace to shoot them down.
** The Fondor Shipyards' second phase has Rebel players flying through a narrow shaft to destroy several shield generators, while the Imperial players follow suit to shoot down the Rebels.
** The third phase of the battle over Ryloth requires the Republic's starfighters to enter the Lucrehulk Battleship's core and shoot it down. It's slightly larger than Fondor Shipyards' generator section, but still hard to stay inside the hull to make repeated passes at the core.
** The opening section of the strike on the Resurgent-class Star Destroyer has the Resistance's ships try to take down generators dwelling in the corridors of the ship's front. It's not necessary to actually dive into the Star Destroyer's hallways, but with the heavy amount of turret defenses and starfighter interference, it's by far your safest bet.
** The first two phases of the D'Qar Evacuation operation has the First Order trying to destroy makeshift shield generators, first by blasting open said generators, then flying in and shooting the small reactors. It's helped by the ambient magnetic field repelling you from the generators, giving you slightly more time each pass. Interestingly, the magnetic fields in the second phase and onwards can equally screw you over as you try to shoot down enemy starfighters and Bunkerbuster-class corvettes.
** Unrelated to Starfighter Assault; in the final mission of the ''Resurrection'' DLC campaign, [[spoiler:Iden, Shriv and Zay try to infiltrate a Resurgent-class Star Destroyer in stolen TIE Fighters, but with no way to get in without blowing their cover, decide to engage in a dogfight with the surrounding squadrons, before settling for flying into the Star Destroyer's engine section. It's subverted, however, since the ship jumps into hyperspace as Inferno Squad enters its reactor, disabling the stolen TIE Fighters and leaving Iden and co. to continue the infiltration on foot]].
19th Mar '18 5:00:41 PM borgjones
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] a low-level strike against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by 178 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers of the US Army Air Forces. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the USAAF’s “Oil Plan” targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). Ploesti was believed to be the Third Reich’s AchillesHeel, and the bomber crews were all warned in advance that as long as the target was destroyed, it would be considered worthwhile even [[HeroicSacrifice if every plane was lost and every man was killed]]. The attack force was assembled in Libya, where a full-scale mock-up of Ploesti was assembled in the Sahara Desert for practice runs, as the mission required careful choreography and split-second timing to hit the target area from multiple directions at treetop level (well below the minimum safe altitude to drop bombs, requiring the ordnance to have time-delay fuses), overwhelming its defenses while also preventing any American planes from being hit by the blast of bombs already dropped. Originally called Operation Soapsuds, it was renamed Tidal Wave at the recommendation of UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill. To avoid tipping off the Germans as to Ploesti’s vulnerability, Allied commanders chose to stop all reconnaissance flights over the area. Unfortunately, this meant they weren’t aware of a failed Soviet raid that prompted the ''Luftwaffe'' and the Romanian military to heavily augment the defenses. [[FinaglesLaw Things immediately started going wrong once the mission got started]]. One bomber crashed on takeoff, one of the lead planes (''Wong Wongo'', flown by 1st Lt. Brian Flavelle) crashed into the Mediterranean, eleven more had to abort due to fuel problems, the bombers got separated because [[WeAreStrugglingTogether two Group commanders couldn’t agree on engine settings]], and mission commander Brigadier General Uzal Ent made a critical navigational error. Only one plane, 1st Lt. John Palm’s ''Brewery Wagon'', attacked as planned, and was shot down in flames with no survivors as they made their bomb run. The carefully-planned timing went completely to hell, and the attacking bombers faced not only much heavier opposition than anticipated, but also friendly bombs exploding in their faces and many near-collisions with other [=B-24s=]. The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries at point-blank range and pilots having to maneuver over and around smokestacks, trees, and even fence lines and haystacks. 53 American bombers were lost[[note]] ''Jose Carioca'', a B-24 of the 93rd Bombardment Group, was shot down by a Romanian fighter over the city’s outskirts, spun out of control, crashed on a street, and slid several blocks before exploding in the Ploesti Women’s Prison, killing the bomber’s crew and nearly 100 civilians on the ground[[/note]], and 55 more came back with serious damage and casualties aboard[[note]] One B-24 had 365 distinct holes shot in it[[/note]]. 440 men (average age 19) were killed[[note]]One Romanian farmer grabbed his rifle when a B-24 crashed into the field outside his house. He found nine of the ten Americans aboard dead, while an 18-year-old gunner was still barely conscious despite having been [[BodyHorror torn in half at the waist]]. The farmer [[MercyKill shot him in the head to ease his agony]][[/note]] and 220 more captured or missing. Five men received the Medal of Honor, more than any other single operation in history, three of them posthumous[[note]] Lt. Col. Addison Baker, commander of the 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), and his copilot, Maj. John Jerstad, posthumously received theirs for maintaining their Group Lead position after heavy damage to their B-24, ''Hell’s Wench'', forced them to jettison their bombs before reaching their target—the Columbia Aquila refinery—, then staying at the controls and trying to gain altitude to allow their crew to bail out. 2nd Lt. Lloyd Herbert Hughes of the 398th BG(H) posthumously received his for staying on his bomb run ''while burning alive'' after his plane, ''Ole Kickapoo'' was badly damaged by ground fire, then set afire by the explosion of a bomb from another B-24. Hughes’s bomber crashed moments after dropping their bombs on the Steaua Romana refinery, killing Hughes and four of his crew and mortally wounding four more, leaving two others miraculously uninjured. Col. John “Killer” Kane, commander of the 98th Bombardment Group, and Col. Leon Johnson, commander of the 44th, were the only surviving recipients, leading their respective groups through hellish fire to hit the Astra Romana and Columbia Aquila complexes[[/note]]. The refineries were damaged, [[DownerEnding but not critically]], as most of them were operating below capacity anyway. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] a low-level strike against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by 178 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers of the US Army Air Forces. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the USAAF’s “Oil Plan” targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). Ploesti was believed to be the Third Reich’s AchillesHeel, and the bomber crews were all warned in advance that as long as the target was destroyed, it would be considered worthwhile even [[HeroicSacrifice if every plane was lost and every man was killed]]. The attack force was assembled in Libya, where a full-scale mock-up of Ploesti was assembled in the Sahara Desert for practice runs, as the mission required careful choreography and split-second timing to hit the target area from multiple directions at treetop level (well below the minimum safe altitude to drop bombs, requiring the ordnance to have time-delay fuses), overwhelming its defenses while also preventing any American planes from being hit by the blast of bombs already dropped. Originally called Operation Soapsuds, it was renamed Tidal Wave at the recommendation of UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill. To avoid tipping off the Germans as to Ploesti’s vulnerability, Allied commanders chose to stop all reconnaissance flights over the area. Unfortunately, this meant they weren’t aware of a failed Soviet raid that prompted the ''Luftwaffe'' and the Romanian military to heavily augment the defenses. [[FinaglesLaw Things immediately started going wrong once the mission got started]]. One bomber crashed on takeoff, one of the lead planes (''Wong Wongo'', flown by 1st Lt. Brian Flavelle) crashed into the Mediterranean, eleven more had to abort due to fuel problems, the bombers got separated because [[WeAreStrugglingTogether two Group commanders couldn’t agree on engine settings]], and mission commander Brigadier General Uzal Ent made a critical navigational error. Only one plane, 1st Lt. John Palm’s ''Brewery Wagon'', attacked as planned, and was shot down in flames with no survivors as they made their bomb run. The carefully-planned timing went completely to hell, and the attacking bombers faced not only much heavier opposition than anticipated, but also friendly bombs exploding in their faces and many near-collisions with other [=B-24s=]. The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries at point-blank range and pilots having to maneuver over and around smokestacks, trees, and even fence lines and haystacks. 53 American bombers were lost[[note]] ''Jose Carioca'', a B-24 of the 93rd Bombardment Group, was shot down by a Romanian fighter over the city’s outskirts, spun out of control, crashed on a street, and slid several blocks before exploding in the Ploesti Women’s Prison, killing the bomber’s crew and nearly 100 civilians on the ground[[/note]], and 55 more came back with serious damage and casualties aboard[[note]] One B-24 had 365 distinct holes shot in it[[/note]]. 440 men (average age 19) were killed[[note]]One Romanian farmer grabbed his rifle when a B-24 crashed into the field outside his house. He found nine of the ten Americans aboard dead, while an 18-year-old gunner was still barely conscious despite having been [[BodyHorror torn in half at the waist]]. The farmer [[MercyKill shot him in the head to ease his agony]][[/note]] and 220 more captured or missing. Five men received the Medal of Honor, more than any other single operation in history, three of them posthumous[[note]] Lt. Col. Addison Baker, commander of the 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), and his copilot, Maj. John Jerstad, posthumously received theirs for maintaining their Group Lead position after heavy damage to their B-24, ''Hell’s Wench'', forced them to jettison their bombs before reaching their target—the Columbia Aquila refinery—, then staying at the controls and trying to gain altitude to allow their crew to bail out. 2nd Lt. Lloyd Herbert Hughes of the 398th BG(H) posthumously received his for staying on his bomb run ''while burning alive'' after his plane, ''Ole Kickapoo'' was badly damaged by ground fire, then set afire by the explosion of a bomb from another B-24. Hughes’s bomber crashed moments after dropping their bombs on the Steaua Romana refinery, killing Hughes and four of his crew and mortally wounding four more, leaving two others miraculously uninjured. Col. John “Killer” Kane, commander of the 98th Bombardment Group, and Col. Leon Johnson, commander of the 44th, were the only surviving recipients, leading their respective groups through hellish fire to hit the Astra Romana and Columbia Aquila complexes[[/note]]. The refineries were damaged, [[DownerEnding but not critically]], critically, as most of them were operating below capacity anyway.anyway, and in fact, within a month, [[SenselessSacrifice most of them were producing considerably more fuel and lubricants than they had the day before the attack]]. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.
12th Mar '18 3:35:08 PM borgjones
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* As part of the British counter-operation against the German Navy's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_Dash Channel Dash]] in 1942, the Fleet Air Arm's 825 Squadron, consisting of six Fairey Swordfish biplane torpedo bombers, was ordered on standby to perform a night attack (to minimize the Swordfish's disadvantage of low speed). When the German fleet was detected during the day, however, the Swordfishes were the only aircraft available to perform a strike, and so, 825 was launched, despite the known danger. Though five fighter squadrons were promised as escort, in the end, only a single squadron of ten planes arrived on time. Nearing the fleet, the force found their target - the battleships ''Scharnhorst'' and ''Gneisenau'' and the heavy cruiser ''Prinz Eugen'' - escorted by at least 40 other warships and over 200 aircraft. Nevertheless, the Swordfishes pushed on for the attack. In the end, all six of the Swordfishes were lost to fighter or anti-aircraft fire, with only five out of eighteen crew members surviving, while damage to the German fleet was minimal. Nevertheless, the crews' courage was recognized, [[WorthyOpponent even by the German officers]].

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* As part of the British counter-operation against the German Navy's Kriegsmarine's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_Dash Channel Dash]] in 1942, the Fleet Air Arm's 825 Squadron, consisting of six Fairey Swordfish biplane torpedo bombers, was ordered on standby to perform a night attack (to minimize the Swordfish's disadvantage of low speed). When the German fleet was detected during the day, however, the Swordfishes were the only aircraft available to perform a strike, and so, 825 was launched, despite the known danger. Though five fighter squadrons were promised as escort, in the end, only a single squadron of ten planes arrived on time. Nearing the fleet, the force found their target - the battleships ''Scharnhorst'' and ''Gneisenau'' and the heavy cruiser ''Prinz Eugen'' - escorted by at least 40 other warships and over 200 aircraft. Nevertheless, the Swordfishes pushed on for the attack. In the end, all six of the Swordfishes were lost to fighter or anti-aircraft fire, with only five out of eighteen crew members surviving, while damage to the German fleet was minimal. Nevertheless, the crews' courage was recognized, [[WorthyOpponent even by the German officers]].
7th Mar '18 1:58:21 PM dlchen145
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Added DiffLines:

* As part of the British counter-operation against the German Navy's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_Dash Channel Dash]] in 1942, the Fleet Air Arm's 825 Squadron, consisting of six Fairey Swordfish biplane torpedo bombers, was ordered on standby to perform a night attack (to minimize the Swordfish's disadvantage of low speed). When the German fleet was detected during the day, however, the Swordfishes were the only aircraft available to perform a strike, and so, 825 was launched, despite the known danger. Though five fighter squadrons were promised as escort, in the end, only a single squadron of ten planes arrived on time. Nearing the fleet, the force found their target - the battleships ''Scharnhorst'' and ''Gneisenau'' and the heavy cruiser ''Prinz Eugen'' - escorted by at least 40 other warships and over 200 aircraft. Nevertheless, the Swordfishes pushed on for the attack. In the end, all six of the Swordfishes were lost to fighter or anti-aircraft fire, with only five out of eighteen crew members surviving, while damage to the German fleet was minimal. Nevertheless, the crews' courage was recognized, [[WorthyOpponent even by the German officers]].
22nd Feb '18 3:12:22 PM bitemytail
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Comic Books]]
* ''ComicBook/DeffSkwadron'':
** ''Sink Da Grimlug'' involves an airstrike against a gigantic ship equipped with anti air weapons. The orks end up landing (crashing) onto it and just igniting the ship's ammo supplies after it becomes clear they can't destroy it via airstrike.
** ''38 Seconds Over Big Scrap Alley'' is a bombing run over heavy anti-air fire. Rather than dropping bombs, they drop in hungry squigs ([[ButtMonkey and an unfortunate Killboy]]).
[[/folder]]
22nd Dec '17 7:33:14 AM dlchen145
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] a low-level strike against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by 178 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers of the US Army Air Forces. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the USAAF’s “Oil Plan” targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). Ploesti was believed to be the Third Reich’s AchillesHeel, and the bomber crews were all warned in advance that as long as the target was destroyed, it would be considered worthwhile even [[HeroicSacrifice if every plane was lost and every man was killed]]. The attack force was assembled in Libya, where a full-scale mock-up of Ploesti was assembled in the Sahara Desert for practice runs, as the mission required careful choreography and split-second timing to hit the target area from multiple directions at treetop level (well below the minimum safe altitude to drop bombs, requiring the ordnance to have time-delay fuses), overwhelming its defenses while also preventing any American planes from being hit by the blast of bombs already dropped. Originally called Operation Soapsuds, it was renamed Tidal Wave at the recommendation of UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill. To avoid tipping off the Germans as to Ploesti’s vulnerability, Allied commanders chose to stop all reconnaissance flights over the area. Unfortunately, this meant they weren’t aware of a failed Soviet raid that prompted the ''Luftwaffe'' and the Romanian military to heavily augment the defenses. [[FinaglesLaw Things immediately started going wrong once the mission got started]]. One bomber crashed on takeoff, one of the lead planes (''Wong Wongo'', flown by 1st Lt. Brian Flavelle) crashed into the Mediterranean, eleven more had to abort due to fuel problems, the bombers got separated because [[WeAreStrugglingTogether two Group commanders couldn’t agree on engine settings]], and mission commander Brigadier General Uzal Ent made a critical navigational error. Only one plane, 1st Lt. John Palm’s ''Brewery Wagon'', attacked as planned, and was shot down in flames with no survivors as they made their bomb run. The carefully-planned timing went completely to hell, and the attacking bombers faced not only much heavier opposition than anticipated, but also friendly bombs exploding in their faces and many near-collisions with other [=B-24s=]. The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries at point-blank range and pilots having to maneuver over and around smokestacks, trees, and even fence lines and haystacks. 53 American bombers were lost[[note]] ''Jose Carioca'', a B-24 of the 93rd Bombardment Group, was shot down by a Romanian fighter over the city’s outskirts, spun out of control, crashed on a street, and slid several blocks before exploding in the Ploesti Women’s Prison, killing the bomber’s crew and nearly 100 civilians on the ground[[/note]], and 55 more came back with serious damage and casualties aboard[[note]] One B-24 had 365 distinct holes shot in it[[/note]]. 440 men (average age 19) were killed[[note]]One Romanian farmer grabbed his rifle when a B-24 crashed into the field outside his house. He found nine of the ten Americans aboard dead, while an 18-year-old gunner was still barely conscious despite having been [[BodyHorror torn in half at the waist]]. The farmer [[MercyKill shot him in the head to ease his agony]][[/note]] and 220 more captured or missing. Five men received the Medal of Honor, more than any other single operation in history, three of them posthumous[[note]] Lt. Col. Addison Baker, commander of the 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), and his copilot, Maj. John Jerstad, posthumously received theirs for maintaining their Group Lead position after heavy damage to their B-24, ''Hell’s Wench'', forced them to jettison their bombs before reaching their target—the Columbia Aquila refinery—, then staying at the controls and trying to gain altitude to allow their crew to bail out. 2nd Lt. Lloyd Herbert Hughes of the 398th BG(H) posthumously received his for staying on his bomb run ''while burning alive'' after his plane, ''Ole Kickapoo'' was badly damaged by ground fire, then set afire by the explosion of a bomb from another B-24. Hughes’s bomber crashed moments after dropping their bombs on the Steaua Romana refinery, killing Hughes and four of his crew and mortally wounding four more, leaving two others miraculously uninjured. Col. John “Killer” Kane, commander of the 98th Bombardment Group, and Col. Leon Johnson, commander of the 44th, were the only surviving recipients, leading their respective groups through hellish fire to hit the Astra Romana and Columbia Aquila complexes[[/note]]. The refineries were damaged, [[DownerEnding but not critically]], and within a month [[SenselessSacrifice were producing considerably more fuel and lubricants than they had the day before the attack]]. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] a low-level strike against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by 178 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers of the US Army Air Forces. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the USAAF’s “Oil Plan” targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). Ploesti was believed to be the Third Reich’s AchillesHeel, and the bomber crews were all warned in advance that as long as the target was destroyed, it would be considered worthwhile even [[HeroicSacrifice if every plane was lost and every man was killed]]. The attack force was assembled in Libya, where a full-scale mock-up of Ploesti was assembled in the Sahara Desert for practice runs, as the mission required careful choreography and split-second timing to hit the target area from multiple directions at treetop level (well below the minimum safe altitude to drop bombs, requiring the ordnance to have time-delay fuses), overwhelming its defenses while also preventing any American planes from being hit by the blast of bombs already dropped. Originally called Operation Soapsuds, it was renamed Tidal Wave at the recommendation of UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill. To avoid tipping off the Germans as to Ploesti’s vulnerability, Allied commanders chose to stop all reconnaissance flights over the area. Unfortunately, this meant they weren’t aware of a failed Soviet raid that prompted the ''Luftwaffe'' and the Romanian military to heavily augment the defenses. [[FinaglesLaw Things immediately started going wrong once the mission got started]]. One bomber crashed on takeoff, one of the lead planes (''Wong Wongo'', flown by 1st Lt. Brian Flavelle) crashed into the Mediterranean, eleven more had to abort due to fuel problems, the bombers got separated because [[WeAreStrugglingTogether two Group commanders couldn’t agree on engine settings]], and mission commander Brigadier General Uzal Ent made a critical navigational error. Only one plane, 1st Lt. John Palm’s ''Brewery Wagon'', attacked as planned, and was shot down in flames with no survivors as they made their bomb run. The carefully-planned timing went completely to hell, and the attacking bombers faced not only much heavier opposition than anticipated, but also friendly bombs exploding in their faces and many near-collisions with other [=B-24s=]. The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries at point-blank range and pilots having to maneuver over and around smokestacks, trees, and even fence lines and haystacks. 53 American bombers were lost[[note]] ''Jose Carioca'', a B-24 of the 93rd Bombardment Group, was shot down by a Romanian fighter over the city’s outskirts, spun out of control, crashed on a street, and slid several blocks before exploding in the Ploesti Women’s Prison, killing the bomber’s crew and nearly 100 civilians on the ground[[/note]], and 55 more came back with serious damage and casualties aboard[[note]] One B-24 had 365 distinct holes shot in it[[/note]]. 440 men (average age 19) were killed[[note]]One Romanian farmer grabbed his rifle when a B-24 crashed into the field outside his house. He found nine of the ten Americans aboard dead, while an 18-year-old gunner was still barely conscious despite having been [[BodyHorror torn in half at the waist]]. The farmer [[MercyKill shot him in the head to ease his agony]][[/note]] and 220 more captured or missing. Five men received the Medal of Honor, more than any other single operation in history, three of them posthumous[[note]] Lt. Col. Addison Baker, commander of the 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), and his copilot, Maj. John Jerstad, posthumously received theirs for maintaining their Group Lead position after heavy damage to their B-24, ''Hell’s Wench'', forced them to jettison their bombs before reaching their target—the Columbia Aquila refinery—, then staying at the controls and trying to gain altitude to allow their crew to bail out. 2nd Lt. Lloyd Herbert Hughes of the 398th BG(H) posthumously received his for staying on his bomb run ''while burning alive'' after his plane, ''Ole Kickapoo'' was badly damaged by ground fire, then set afire by the explosion of a bomb from another B-24. Hughes’s bomber crashed moments after dropping their bombs on the Steaua Romana refinery, killing Hughes and four of his crew and mortally wounding four more, leaving two others miraculously uninjured. Col. John “Killer” Kane, commander of the 98th Bombardment Group, and Col. Leon Johnson, commander of the 44th, were the only surviving recipients, leading their respective groups through hellish fire to hit the Astra Romana and Columbia Aquila complexes[[/note]]. The refineries were damaged, [[DownerEnding but not critically]], and within a month [[SenselessSacrifice as most of them were producing considerably more fuel and lubricants than they had the day before the attack]].operating below capacity anyway. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.



** To emphasize the difficulty of torpedo bombing, at the Battle of Midway four American squadrons (three Navy, and one Army) launched torpedo attacks on the Japanese carriers. Not a single American air-launched torpedo struck its target that day. The three Navy squadrons were savaged by Japanese defenders, with Torpedo 8 being almost entirely wiped out[[note]]The Army squadron escaped relatively unharmed thanks to the high speed and defensive armament of their B-26 Marauders, but failed to hit any of their targets[[/note]]. Ultimately the Japanese carriers were destroyed by American dive bombers, which had the good timing and luck to press their attacks while the Japanese were [[MadeOfExplodium arming and fueling their planes]] for their first attempt at sinking the American fleet.

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** To emphasize the difficulty of torpedo bombing, at the Battle of Midway four American squadrons (three Navy, and one Army) launched torpedo attacks on the Japanese carriers. Not a single American air-launched torpedo struck its target that day. The three Navy squadrons were savaged by Japanese defenders, with Torpedo 8 being almost entirely wiped out[[note]]The Army squadron escaped relatively unharmed thanks to the high speed and defensive armament of their B-26 Marauders, but failed to hit any of their targets[[/note]]. Ultimately the Japanese carriers were destroyed by American dive bombers, which had the good timing and luck to press their attacks while the Japanese Japanese fighters were away, and the carriers [[MadeOfExplodium arming and fueling their planes]] for their first attempt at sinking the American fleet.
21st Dec '17 2:57:37 PM YT45
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* The plot of ''The Bridges At Toko-Ri'' focuses on a US Navy pilot with a wife and children undertaking a high-risk mission to destroy a pair of strategically-vital bridges in North Korea.



* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] a low-level strike against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by 178 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers of the US Army Air Forces. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the USAAF’s “Oil Plan” targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). Ploesti was believed to be the Third Reich’s AchillesHeel, and the bomber crews were all warned in advance that as long as the target was destroyed, it would be considered worthwhile even [[HeroicSacrifice if every plane was lost and every man was killed]]. The attack force was assembled in Libya, where a full-scale mock-up of Ploesti was assembled in the Sahara Desert for practice runs, as the mission required careful choreography and split-second timing to hit the target area from multiple directions at treetop level (well below the minimum safe altitude to drop bombs, requiring the ordnance to have time-delay fuses), overwhelming its defenses while also preventing any American planes from being hit by the blast of bombs already dropped. Originally called Operation Soapsuds, it was renamed Tidal Wave at the recommendation of UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill. To avoid tipping off the Germans as to Ploesti’s vulnerability, Allied commanders chose to stop all reconnaissance flights over the area. Unfortunately, this meant they weren’t aware of a failed Soviet raid that prompted the ''Luftwaffe'' and the Romanian military to heavily augment the defenses. [[FinaglesLaw Things immediately started going wrong once the mission got started]]. One bomber crashed on takeoff, one of the lead planes (''Wong Wongo'', flown by 1st Lt. Brian Flavelle) crashed into the Mediterranean, eleven more had to abort due to fuel problems, the bombers got separated because [[WeAreStrugglingTogether two Group commanders couldn’t agree on engine settings]], and mission commander Brigadier General Uzal Ent made a critical navigational error. Only one plane, 1st Lt. John Palm’s ''Brewery Wagon'', attacked as planned, and was shot down in flames with no survivors as they made their bomb run. The carefully-planned timing went completely to hell, and the attacking bombers faced not only much heavier opposition than anticipated, but also friendly bombs exploding in their faces and many near-collisions with other [=B-24s=]. The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries at point-blank range and pilots having to maneuver over and around smokestacks, trees, and even fence lines and haystacks. 53 American bombers were lost[[note]] ''Jose Carioca'', a B-24 of the 93rd Bombardment Group, was shot down by a Romanian fighter over the city’s outskirts, spun out of control, crashed on a street, and slid several blocks before exploding in the Ploesti Women’s Prison, killing the bomber’s crew and nearly 100 civilians on the ground[[/note]], and 55 more came back with serious damage and casualties aboard[[note]] One B-24 had 365 distinct holes shot in it[[/note]]. 440 men (average age 19) were killed[[One Romanian farmer grabbed his rifle when a B-24 crashed into the field outside his house. He found nine of the ten Americans aboard dead, while an 18-year-old gunner was still barely conscious despite having been [[BodyHorror torn in half at the waist]]. The farmer [[MercyKill shot him in the head to ease his agony]][[/note]] and 220 more captured or missing. Five men received the Medal of Honor, more than any other single operation in history, three of them posthumous[[note]] Lt. Col. Addison Baker, commander of the 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), and his copilot, Maj. John Jerstad, posthumously received theirs for maintaining their Group Lead position after heavy damage to their B-24, ''Hell’s Wench'', forced them to jettison their bombs before reaching their target—the Columbia Aquila refinery—, then staying at the controls and trying to gain altitude to allow their crew to bail out. 2nd Lt. Lloyd Herbert Hughes of the 398th BG(H) posthumously received his for staying on his bomb run ''while burning alive'' after his plane, ''Ole Kickapoo'' was badly damaged by ground fire, then set afire by the explosion of a bomb from another B-24. Hughes’s bomber crashed moments after dropping their bombs on the Steaua Romana refinery, killing Hughes and four of his crew and mortally wounding four more, leaving two others miraculously uninjured. Col. John “Killer” Kane, commander of the 98th Bombardment Group, and Col. Leon Johnson, commander of the 44th, were the only surviving recipients, leading their respective groups through hellish fire to hit the Astra Romana and Columbia Aquila complexes[[/note]]. The refineries were damaged, [[DownerEnding but not critically]], and within a month [[SenselessSacrifice were producing considerably more fuel and lubricants than they had the day before the attack]]. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] a low-level strike against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by 178 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers of the US Army Air Forces. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the USAAF’s “Oil Plan” targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). Ploesti was believed to be the Third Reich’s AchillesHeel, and the bomber crews were all warned in advance that as long as the target was destroyed, it would be considered worthwhile even [[HeroicSacrifice if every plane was lost and every man was killed]]. The attack force was assembled in Libya, where a full-scale mock-up of Ploesti was assembled in the Sahara Desert for practice runs, as the mission required careful choreography and split-second timing to hit the target area from multiple directions at treetop level (well below the minimum safe altitude to drop bombs, requiring the ordnance to have time-delay fuses), overwhelming its defenses while also preventing any American planes from being hit by the blast of bombs already dropped. Originally called Operation Soapsuds, it was renamed Tidal Wave at the recommendation of UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill. To avoid tipping off the Germans as to Ploesti’s vulnerability, Allied commanders chose to stop all reconnaissance flights over the area. Unfortunately, this meant they weren’t aware of a failed Soviet raid that prompted the ''Luftwaffe'' and the Romanian military to heavily augment the defenses. [[FinaglesLaw Things immediately started going wrong once the mission got started]]. One bomber crashed on takeoff, one of the lead planes (''Wong Wongo'', flown by 1st Lt. Brian Flavelle) crashed into the Mediterranean, eleven more had to abort due to fuel problems, the bombers got separated because [[WeAreStrugglingTogether two Group commanders couldn’t agree on engine settings]], and mission commander Brigadier General Uzal Ent made a critical navigational error. Only one plane, 1st Lt. John Palm’s ''Brewery Wagon'', attacked as planned, and was shot down in flames with no survivors as they made their bomb run. The carefully-planned timing went completely to hell, and the attacking bombers faced not only much heavier opposition than anticipated, but also friendly bombs exploding in their faces and many near-collisions with other [=B-24s=]. The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries at point-blank range and pilots having to maneuver over and around smokestacks, trees, and even fence lines and haystacks. 53 American bombers were lost[[note]] ''Jose Carioca'', a B-24 of the 93rd Bombardment Group, was shot down by a Romanian fighter over the city’s outskirts, spun out of control, crashed on a street, and slid several blocks before exploding in the Ploesti Women’s Prison, killing the bomber’s crew and nearly 100 civilians on the ground[[/note]], and 55 more came back with serious damage and casualties aboard[[note]] One B-24 had 365 distinct holes shot in it[[/note]]. 440 men (average age 19) were killed[[One killed[[note]]One Romanian farmer grabbed his rifle when a B-24 crashed into the field outside his house. He found nine of the ten Americans aboard dead, while an 18-year-old gunner was still barely conscious despite having been [[BodyHorror torn in half at the waist]]. The farmer [[MercyKill shot him in the head to ease his agony]][[/note]] and 220 more captured or missing. Five men received the Medal of Honor, more than any other single operation in history, three of them posthumous[[note]] Lt. Col. Addison Baker, commander of the 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), and his copilot, Maj. John Jerstad, posthumously received theirs for maintaining their Group Lead position after heavy damage to their B-24, ''Hell’s Wench'', forced them to jettison their bombs before reaching their target—the Columbia Aquila refinery—, then staying at the controls and trying to gain altitude to allow their crew to bail out. 2nd Lt. Lloyd Herbert Hughes of the 398th BG(H) posthumously received his for staying on his bomb run ''while burning alive'' after his plane, ''Ole Kickapoo'' was badly damaged by ground fire, then set afire by the explosion of a bomb from another B-24. Hughes’s bomber crashed moments after dropping their bombs on the Steaua Romana refinery, killing Hughes and four of his crew and mortally wounding four more, leaving two others miraculously uninjured. Col. John “Killer” Kane, commander of the 98th Bombardment Group, and Col. Leon Johnson, commander of the 44th, were the only surviving recipients, leading their respective groups through hellish fire to hit the Astra Romana and Columbia Aquila complexes[[/note]]. The refineries were damaged, [[DownerEnding but not critically]], and within a month [[SenselessSacrifice were producing considerably more fuel and lubricants than they had the day before the attack]]. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.
21st Dec '17 2:45:39 PM YT45
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] a low-level strike against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by 178 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers of the US Army Air Forces. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the USAAF’s “Oil Plan” targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). Ploesti was believed to be the Third Reich’s AchillesHeel, and the bomber crews were all warned in advance that as long as the target was destroyed, it would be considered worthwhile even [[HeroicSacrifice if every plane was lost and every man was killed]]. The attack force was assembled in Libya, where a full-scale mock-up of Ploesti was assembled in the Sahara Desert for practice runs, as the mission required careful choreography and split-second timing to hit the target area from multiple directions at treetop level (well below the minimum safe altitude to drop bombs, requiring the ordnance to have time-delay fuses), overwhelming its defenses while also preventing any American planes from being hit by the blast of bombs already dropped. Originally called Operation Soapsuds, it was renamed Tidal Wave at the recommendation of UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill. To avoid tipping off the Germans as to Ploesti’s vulnerability, Allied commanders chose to stop all reconnaissance flights over the area. Unfortunately, this meant they weren’t aware of a failed Soviet raid that prompted the ''Luftwaffe'' and the Romanian military to heavily augment the defenses. [[FinaglesLaw Things immediately started going wrong once the mission got started]]. One of the lead planes crashed on the way, the bombers got separated because [[WeAreStrugglingTogether two Group commanders couldn’t agree on engine settings]], and mission commander Brigadier General Uzal Ent made a critical navigational error. Only one plane, ''Brewery Wagon'', attacked as planned, and was shot down in flames with no survivors as they made their bomb run. The carefully-planned timing went completely to hell, and the attacking bombers faced not only much heavier opposition than anticipated, but also friendly bombs exploding in their faces and many near-collisions with other [=B-24s=]. The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries at point-blank range and pilots having to maneuver over and around smokestacks, trees, and even fence lines and haystacks. 53 American bombers were lost, and 55 more came back with serious damage and casualties aboard[[note]] One B-24 had 365 distinct holes shot in it[[/note]]. 440 men (average age 19) were killed and 220 more captured or missing. Five men received the Medal of Honor, more than any other single operation in history. The refineries were damaged, [[DownerEnding but not critically]], and within a month [[SenselessSacrifice were producing considerably more fuel and lubricants than they had the day before the attack]]. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] a low-level strike against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by 178 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers of the US Army Air Forces. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the USAAF’s “Oil Plan” targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). Ploesti was believed to be the Third Reich’s AchillesHeel, and the bomber crews were all warned in advance that as long as the target was destroyed, it would be considered worthwhile even [[HeroicSacrifice if every plane was lost and every man was killed]]. The attack force was assembled in Libya, where a full-scale mock-up of Ploesti was assembled in the Sahara Desert for practice runs, as the mission required careful choreography and split-second timing to hit the target area from multiple directions at treetop level (well below the minimum safe altitude to drop bombs, requiring the ordnance to have time-delay fuses), overwhelming its defenses while also preventing any American planes from being hit by the blast of bombs already dropped. Originally called Operation Soapsuds, it was renamed Tidal Wave at the recommendation of UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill. To avoid tipping off the Germans as to Ploesti’s vulnerability, Allied commanders chose to stop all reconnaissance flights over the area. Unfortunately, this meant they weren’t aware of a failed Soviet raid that prompted the ''Luftwaffe'' and the Romanian military to heavily augment the defenses. [[FinaglesLaw Things immediately started going wrong once the mission got started]]. One bomber crashed on takeoff, one of the lead planes (''Wong Wongo'', flown by 1st Lt. Brian Flavelle) crashed on into the way, Mediterranean, eleven more had to abort due to fuel problems, the bombers got separated because [[WeAreStrugglingTogether two Group commanders couldn’t agree on engine settings]], and mission commander Brigadier General Uzal Ent made a critical navigational error. Only one plane, 1st Lt. John Palm’s ''Brewery Wagon'', attacked as planned, and was shot down in flames with no survivors as they made their bomb run. The carefully-planned timing went completely to hell, and the attacking bombers faced not only much heavier opposition than anticipated, but also friendly bombs exploding in their faces and many near-collisions with other [=B-24s=]. The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries at point-blank range and pilots having to maneuver over and around smokestacks, trees, and even fence lines and haystacks. 53 American bombers were lost, lost[[note]] ''Jose Carioca'', a B-24 of the 93rd Bombardment Group, was shot down by a Romanian fighter over the city’s outskirts, spun out of control, crashed on a street, and slid several blocks before exploding in the Ploesti Women’s Prison, killing the bomber’s crew and nearly 100 civilians on the ground[[/note]], and 55 more came back with serious damage and casualties aboard[[note]] One B-24 had 365 distinct holes shot in it[[/note]]. 440 men (average age 19) were killed killed[[One Romanian farmer grabbed his rifle when a B-24 crashed into the field outside his house. He found nine of the ten Americans aboard dead, while an 18-year-old gunner was still barely conscious despite having been [[BodyHorror torn in half at the waist]]. The farmer [[MercyKill shot him in the head to ease his agony]][[/note]] and 220 more captured or missing. Five men received the Medal of Honor, more than any other single operation in history.history, three of them posthumous[[note]] Lt. Col. Addison Baker, commander of the 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), and his copilot, Maj. John Jerstad, posthumously received theirs for maintaining their Group Lead position after heavy damage to their B-24, ''Hell’s Wench'', forced them to jettison their bombs before reaching their target—the Columbia Aquila refinery—, then staying at the controls and trying to gain altitude to allow their crew to bail out. 2nd Lt. Lloyd Herbert Hughes of the 398th BG(H) posthumously received his for staying on his bomb run ''while burning alive'' after his plane, ''Ole Kickapoo'' was badly damaged by ground fire, then set afire by the explosion of a bomb from another B-24. Hughes’s bomber crashed moments after dropping their bombs on the Steaua Romana refinery, killing Hughes and four of his crew and mortally wounding four more, leaving two others miraculously uninjured. Col. John “Killer” Kane, commander of the 98th Bombardment Group, and Col. Leon Johnson, commander of the 44th, were the only surviving recipients, leading their respective groups through hellish fire to hit the Astra Romana and Columbia Aquila complexes[[/note]]. The refineries were damaged, [[DownerEnding but not critically]], and within a month [[SenselessSacrifice were producing considerably more fuel and lubricants than they had the day before the attack]]. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.
21st Dec '17 1:56:10 PM YT45
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] was a strong, 178-bomber low-altitude raid against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by the US Army Air Force. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the US's ''Oil Plan'' targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' machine-gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries and pilots having to maneuver over fence lines and haystacks. The mission was costly failure, with a third of the force destroyed and another third damaged for cosmetic and quickly repaired damage to the facilities. No fewer than 5 'Medals of Honor' (US military awards for bravery) were awarded to the survivors. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.
* The events in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MiG_Alley MiG Alley]] also served as inspiration for canyon runs (certainly for the one in ''Film/{{Firefox}}'', if not ''Star Wars''), since a plane in pursuit often took damage from the dust kicked up by the running plane, aiding evasion, and that region of North Korea is lousy with convenient canyons.

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tidal_Wave Operation Tidal Wave]] was a strong, 178-bomber low-altitude raid low-level strike against the Ploiești oil refineries conducted by 178 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers of the US Army Air Force. Forces. These facilities supplied Germany with 1/2 of her petroleum products, and taking them out was widely regarded as the most critical element of the US's ''Oil Plan'' USAAF’s “Oil Plan” targeting all natural and synthetic oil production facilities including the wells at Balaton (west Hungary) and Auschwitz-III/Monowitz plant (Upper Silesia). Ploesti was believed to be the Third Reich’s AchillesHeel, and the bomber crews were all warned in advance that as long as the target was destroyed, it would be considered worthwhile even [[HeroicSacrifice if every plane was lost and every man was killed]]. The attack force was assembled in Libya, where a full-scale mock-up of Ploesti was assembled in the Sahara Desert for practice runs, as the mission required careful choreography and split-second timing to hit the target area from multiple directions at treetop level (well below the minimum safe altitude to drop bombs, requiring the ordnance to have time-delay fuses), overwhelming its defenses while also preventing any American planes from being hit by the blast of bombs already dropped. Originally called Operation Soapsuds, it was renamed Tidal Wave at the recommendation of UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill. To avoid tipping off the Germans as to Ploesti’s vulnerability, Allied commanders chose to stop all reconnaissance flights over the area. Unfortunately, this meant they weren’t aware of a failed Soviet raid that prompted the ''Luftwaffe'' and the Romanian military to heavily augment the defenses. [[FinaglesLaw Things immediately started going wrong once the mission got started]]. One of the lead planes crashed on the way, the bombers got separated because [[WeAreStrugglingTogether two Group commanders couldn’t agree on engine settings]], and mission commander Brigadier General Uzal Ent made a critical navigational error. Only one plane, ''Brewery Wagon'', attacked as planned, and was shot down in flames with no survivors as they made their bomb run. The carefully-planned timing went completely to hell, and the attacking bombers faced not only much heavier opposition than anticipated, but also friendly bombs exploding in their faces and many near-collisions with other [=B-24s=]. The incredibly low altitude resulted in the bombers' machine-gunners gunners trading fire with anti-aircraft batteries at point-blank range and pilots having to maneuver over and around smokestacks, trees, and even fence lines and haystacks. The mission was costly failure, 53 American bombers were lost, and 55 more came back with a third of the force destroyed and another third damaged for cosmetic and quickly repaired serious damage to and casualties aboard[[note]] One B-24 had 365 distinct holes shot in it[[/note]]. 440 men (average age 19) were killed and 220 more captured or missing. Five men received the facilities. No fewer Medal of Honor, more than 5 'Medals of Honor' (US military awards for bravery) any other single operation in history. The refineries were awarded to damaged, [[DownerEnding but not critically]], and within a month [[SenselessSacrifice were producing considerably more fuel and lubricants than they had the survivors.day before the attack]]. Ultimately the Ploesti refineries only stopped supplying the Germans in the aftermath of Malinovsky and Tobulkhin's ''Jassy–Kishinev'' Offensive of August 1944, during which Soviet troops secured the facilities as Rumania switched sides.
* Several major air strikes by USAAF B-17s against targets in central and southern Germany without friendly fighter escorts. The first Schweinfurt-Regensburg raid, for instance cost 60 bombers shot down, another 60 damaged beyond repair, and over 1,000 casualties, without doing enough damage to the target (a ball-bearing manufacturing plant). Missions against Stuttgart and Bremen had a similar butcher’s bill for equally-disappointing results. In the face of unsustainable losses, the 8th Air Force had to limit its bombing missions to occupied France and the Low Countries where Allied fighters could protect the heavies in the fall of 1943 until the long-range P-51 Mustang became available.
* The events in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MiG_Alley MiG Alley]] also served as inspiration for canyon runs (certainly for the one in ''Film/{{Firefox}}'', if not ''Star Wars''), since a plane in pursuit often took damage from the dust kicked up by the running plane, aiding evasion, and that region of North Korea (and northeast China) is lousy with convenient canyons.



* During UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, one of the earliest major Allied victories in the Pacific was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doolittle_Raid Doolittle Raid]], named for the commander, Colonel Jimmy Doolittle. To pull the raid off, they had to strip any excess weight from a group of twin-engined B-25 Mitchell bombers and launch them from an aircraft carrier that was ''barely'' long enough to actually get the planes airborne, all so they could drop a few firebombs on Japanese cities and make the Japanese think they were at greater risk of attack than they actually were. Most of the planes [[OneWayTrip ended up ditching in China or crashing in the sea]], with only a few landing successfully at airfields in China and Russia.

to:

* During UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, one of the earliest major Allied victories in the Pacific was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doolittle_Raid Doolittle Raid]], named for the commander, Colonel Jimmy Doolittle. To pull the raid off, they had to strip any excess weight from a group of twin-engined B-25 Mitchell bombers and launch them from an aircraft carrier that was ''barely'' long enough to actually get the planes airborne, all so they could drop a few firebombs on Japanese cities and make the Japanese think they were at greater risk of attack than they actually were. Most of the planes [[OneWayTrip ended up ditching in China or crashing in the sea]], with only a few one landing successfully at airfields in China Siberia[[note]] Due to the complicated nature of Stalin’s alliance with the US against Germany and Russia.His nonaggression pact with Japan, the plane and crew were interned for several months. They offered to take their B-25 west and fly with the Red Air Force against the nazis until such time as they could be repatriated, but this was refused. The crew eventually escaped and paid a smuggler to drive them over the Chinese border, where they found friendly KMT forces who sent them home[[/note]].



** To emphasize the difficulty of torpedo bombing, at the Battle of Midway four American squadrons (three Navy, and one Army) launched torpedo attacks on the Japanese carriers. Not a single American air-launched torpedo struck its target that day. The three Navy squadrons were savaged by Japanese defenders, with Torpedo 8 being almost entirely wiped out[[note]]The Army squadron escaped relatively unharmed, but failed to hit any of their targets[[/note]]. Ultimately the Japanese carriers were destroyed by American dive bombers, which had the good timing and luck to press their attacks while the Japanese were [[MadeOfExplodium arming and fueling their planes]] for their first attempt at sinking the American fleet.

to:

** To emphasize the difficulty of torpedo bombing, at the Battle of Midway four American squadrons (three Navy, and one Army) launched torpedo attacks on the Japanese carriers. Not a single American air-launched torpedo struck its target that day. The three Navy squadrons were savaged by Japanese defenders, with Torpedo 8 being almost entirely wiped out[[note]]The Army squadron escaped relatively unharmed, unharmed thanks to the high speed and defensive armament of their B-26 Marauders, but failed to hit any of their targets[[/note]]. Ultimately the Japanese carriers were destroyed by American dive bombers, which had the good timing and luck to press their attacks while the Japanese were [[MadeOfExplodium arming and fueling their planes]] for their first attempt at sinking the American fleet.
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