History Main / AirLaunchedWeapons

7th Jun '16 9:21:17 AM Doug86
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Everyone became an expert on this from coverage of the first UsefulNotes/GulfWar in the United States. It's OlderThanTheyThink; folks seriously started looking into guided munitions after the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar and the Germans used radio-guided glide-bombs with some success in UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo. This is basically the idea of somehow getting the bomb itself to adjust where and how it falls based on what the aircraft is doing. The main one that most casual viewers are familiar with are laser-guided (which find something that's being illuminated with a special laser, possibly operated by ground troops, though some modern strike aircraft have their own target illuminating laser), going back to the late 1960s, and teleguided (which adjust while the bombardier keeps the target in his sights, or in some instances the bombardier looks at a television image transmitted from a TV camera in the nose of the bomb and uses that to steer it onto the target by remote control). Typical targets for "smart bombs" may include anything from the foundation of a bridge to a single individual armored vehicle to an enemy command post building.

to:

Everyone became an expert on this from coverage of the first UsefulNotes/GulfWar in the United States. It's OlderThanTheyThink; folks seriously started looking into guided munitions after the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar and the Germans used radio-guided glide-bombs with some success in UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. This is basically the idea of somehow getting the bomb itself to adjust where and how it falls based on what the aircraft is doing. The main one that most casual viewers are familiar with are laser-guided (which find something that's being illuminated with a special laser, possibly operated by ground troops, though some modern strike aircraft have their own target illuminating laser), going back to the late 1960s, and teleguided (which adjust while the bombardier keeps the target in his sights, or in some instances the bombardier looks at a television image transmitted from a TV camera in the nose of the bomb and uses that to steer it onto the target by remote control). Typical targets for "smart bombs" may include anything from the foundation of a bridge to a single individual armored vehicle to an enemy command post building.
4th Mar '16 2:54:48 PM Doug86
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Airplanes and helicopters can provide [[MoreDakka quite a lot of dakka]]. This can be a strafing run from a [[{{Peanuts}} Sopwith Camel]]'s machineguns, up to the machinegun/cannon combo mounted on later Spitfires, then through the [[GatlingGood 30mm GAU-8 Avenger]] that the A-10 is built around. And then some--the AC-130 gunship ("don't think of it as an airplane, think of it as a [[DoomyDoomsOfDoom flying castle of doom]])" flown by the USAF currently mounts a 25mm Gatling cannon as its small gun. Also on board are a 40mm former ground-to-air cannon (now air-to-ground) and a 105mm ''howitzer'' plus extremely sophisticated sensors and fire control computers allowing it to find targets on the ground with great efficiency and engage them accurately.

to:

Airplanes and helicopters can provide [[MoreDakka quite a lot of dakka]]. This can be a strafing run from a [[{{Peanuts}} [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Sopwith Camel]]'s machineguns, up to the machinegun/cannon combo mounted on later Spitfires, then through the [[GatlingGood 30mm GAU-8 Avenger]] that the A-10 is built around. And then some--the AC-130 gunship ("don't think of it as an airplane, think of it as a [[DoomyDoomsOfDoom flying castle of doom]])" flown by the USAF currently mounts a 25mm Gatling cannon as its small gun. Also on board are a 40mm former ground-to-air cannon (now air-to-ground) and a 105mm ''howitzer'' plus extremely sophisticated sensors and fire control computers allowing it to find targets on the ground with great efficiency and engage them accurately.
24th Oct '15 3:30:39 PM demonfiren
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* Chengdu J-20, another prototype stealth fighter design but this one's from - surprise, surprise - ''China''. It's Chinese name fittingly translates as "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Annihilator Twenty]]".

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* Chengdu J-20, another prototype stealth fighter design but this one's from - surprise, surprise - ''China''. It's Its Chinese name fittingly translates as "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Annihilator Twenty]]".
24th Oct '15 3:29:51 PM demonfiren
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* F-35 Lightning II. If the F-22 is the CoolPlane equivalent to EliteMooks, then this is GoddamnedBats for enemy ground forces. Not as good a dogfighter as the F-22, the F-35's hat is ground attack similar to the F-117. It's real boons however are its VTOL capability, advanced ECM suite and comparatively lower cost when compared to the F-22: the US military ordered more than '''2400 planes'''. Unfortunately, the project is plagued with delays (introduction in 2016 at the earliest) and overspending (the current projected costs of the program are '''323 billion dollars''').

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* F-35 Lightning II. If the F-22 is the CoolPlane equivalent to EliteMooks, then this is GoddamnedBats DemonicSpiders for enemy ground forces. Not as good a dogfighter as the F-22, the F-35's hat is ground attack similar to the F-117. It's real boons however are its VTOL capability, advanced ECM suite and comparatively lower cost when compared to the F-22: the US military ordered more than '''2400 planes'''. Unfortunately, the project is plagued with delays (introduction in 2016 at the earliest) and overspending (the current projected costs of the program are '''323 billion dollars''').
17th Jan '14 6:17:11 AM LongLiveHumour
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Everyone became an expert on this from coverage of the first GulfWar in the United States. It's OlderThanTheyThink; folks seriously started looking into guided munitions after the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar and the Germans used radio-guided glide-bombs with some success in UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo. This is basically the idea of somehow getting the bomb itself to adjust where and how it falls based on what the aircraft is doing. The main one that most casual viewers are familiar with are laser-guided (which find something that's being illuminated with a special laser, possibly operated by ground troops, though some modern strike aircraft have their own target illuminating laser), going back to the late 1960s, and teleguided (which adjust while the bombardier keeps the target in his sights, or in some instances the bombardier looks at a television image transmitted from a TV camera in the nose of the bomb and uses that to steer it onto the target by remote control). Typical targets for "smart bombs" may include anything from the foundation of a bridge to a single individual armored vehicle to an enemy command post building.

to:

Everyone became an expert on this from coverage of the first GulfWar UsefulNotes/GulfWar in the United States. It's OlderThanTheyThink; folks seriously started looking into guided munitions after the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar and the Germans used radio-guided glide-bombs with some success in UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo. This is basically the idea of somehow getting the bomb itself to adjust where and how it falls based on what the aircraft is doing. The main one that most casual viewers are familiar with are laser-guided (which find something that's being illuminated with a special laser, possibly operated by ground troops, though some modern strike aircraft have their own target illuminating laser), going back to the late 1960s, and teleguided (which adjust while the bombardier keeps the target in his sights, or in some instances the bombardier looks at a television image transmitted from a TV camera in the nose of the bomb and uses that to steer it onto the target by remote control). Typical targets for "smart bombs" may include anything from the foundation of a bridge to a single individual armored vehicle to an enemy command post building.
15th Jan '14 9:14:05 AM Nohbody
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These occupy a place somewhere between "iron bombs" and "smart bombs" in both technology and application. It is basically a bomb casing that is designed to split open fifty or a hundred meters in the air over the target and discharge hundreds or thousands of "submunitions," basically grenades. They are extremely useful against dug-in infantry, and, with slightly larger shaped-charge submunitions, can damage or destroy even armored vehicles in the target area, as a tank's armor is generally thinnest on the roof. This idea is also OlderThanTheyThink, having first been developed by the Soviets between the World Wars, copied by the Germans during the war, then developed further by all parties in the [[ColdWar postwar era]]. Politically controversial because they sometimes litter the area with duds, which later endanger civilians in the area. A notable example of its infamy was the massive drama created when Carlos Cardoen, a Chilean entrepreneur owner of Cardoen Weapons, sold this type of weapons to Saddam Hussein, though he argued that the transaction was well known for the US and it was done before the second Gulf War.

to:

These occupy a place somewhere between "iron bombs" and "smart bombs" in both technology and application. It is basically a bomb casing that is designed to split open fifty or a hundred meters in the air over the target and discharge hundreds or thousands of "submunitions," basically grenades. They are extremely useful against dug-in infantry, and, with slightly larger shaped-charge submunitions, can damage or destroy even armored vehicles in the target area, as a tank's armor is generally thinnest on the roof. This idea is also OlderThanTheyThink, having first been developed by the Soviets between the World Wars, copied by the Germans during the war, then developed further by all parties in the [[ColdWar [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar postwar era]]. Politically controversial because they sometimes litter the area with duds, which later endanger civilians in the area. A notable example of its infamy was the massive drama created when Carlos Cardoen, a Chilean entrepreneur owner of Cardoen Weapons, sold this type of weapons to Saddam Hussein, though he argued that the transaction was well known for the US and it was done before the second Gulf War.



Anti-shipping missiles ([[{{Shipping}} no, not that kind of shipping!]]) themselves tend to be very large, in some instances basically smallish robot airplanes in their own right ("cruise missiles" is one term for these), with very large warheads, for obvious reasons; these typically skim only a few feet above the surface of the ocean at just under the speed of sound or are launched from 150 miles plus and fly at stratospheric height. Sometimes "cruise missiles" are also used against land targets, such as airfields. Some "cruise missiles" and anti-ship missiles in the ColdWar era had tactical nuclear warheads. This was an area far more studied by the Soviets than the Americans, who had the naval aircraft to do closer-ranged attacks.

to:

Anti-shipping missiles ([[{{Shipping}} no, not that kind of shipping!]]) themselves tend to be very large, in some instances basically smallish robot airplanes in their own right ("cruise missiles" is one term for these), with very large warheads, for obvious reasons; these typically skim only a few feet above the surface of the ocean at just under the speed of sound or are launched from 150 miles plus and fly at stratospheric height. Sometimes "cruise missiles" are also used against land targets, such as airfields. Some "cruise missiles" and anti-ship missiles in the ColdWar UsefulNotes/ColdWar era had tactical nuclear warheads. This was an area far more studied by the Soviets than the Americans, who had the naval aircraft to do closer-ranged attacks.



American [=AirLand=] Battle doctrine during the ColdWar envisioned use of large number of helicopter gunships heavily laden with, for some designs, up to sixteen long-range antitank guided missiles, for use not only as highly mobile antitank missile platform but also to go deep behind the forward edge of the battle area and attack Warsaw Pact second-echelon units before they got to the front. (However, the deep attack concept only was done at the tactical rather than operational level and Apache gunships with their Hellfire missiles weren't deployed in Europe until late 1987.) The Soviets also built helicopter gunships and armed transports but they were general purpose battlefield close air support platforms akin to a rotary Il-2 Shturmovik, as the antitank task fell upon other ground-based systems.

to:

American [=AirLand=] Battle doctrine during the ColdWar UsefulNotes/ColdWar envisioned use of large number of helicopter gunships heavily laden with, for some designs, up to sixteen long-range antitank guided missiles, for use not only as highly mobile antitank missile platform but also to go deep behind the forward edge of the battle area and attack Warsaw Pact second-echelon units before they got to the front. (However, the deep attack concept only was done at the tactical rather than operational level and Apache gunships with their Hellfire missiles weren't deployed in Europe until late 1987.) The Soviets also built helicopter gunships and armed transports but they were general purpose battlefield close air support platforms akin to a rotary Il-2 Shturmovik, as the antitank task fell upon other ground-based systems.



The SR-71 mentioned above helped show another property. Properly made and shaped, some aircraft can look less threatening than others. This being the ColdWar USAF, a lot of money was poured into the idea. The result: 'stealth'. Various tricks like shaping, radar-absorbent materials, and other stuff that I'm not cleared for. You have to keep one thing in mind though. Stealth is low observability, not an InvisibilityCloak. In practice it drastically reduces detection range of radars which can leave huge gaps in the defense grid, through which a stealth plane can slip through. In air combat the opponent also likewise has to come a lot closer before his radar can lock on. [[CoolPlane The only aircraft known to use it]], so far, are these:

to:

The SR-71 mentioned above helped show another property. Properly made and shaped, some aircraft can look less threatening than others. This being the ColdWar UsefulNotes/ColdWar USAF, a lot of money was poured into the idea. The result: 'stealth'. Various tricks like shaping, radar-absorbent materials, and other stuff that I'm not cleared for. You have to keep one thing in mind though. Stealth is low observability, not an InvisibilityCloak. In practice it drastically reduces detection range of radars which can leave huge gaps in the defense grid, through which a stealth plane can slip through. In air combat the opponent also likewise has to come a lot closer before his radar can lock on. [[CoolPlane The only aircraft known to use it]], so far, are these:
21st Dec '13 5:33:05 PM LongLiveHumour
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Everyone became an expert on this from coverage of the first GulfWar in the United States. It's OlderThanTheyThink; folks seriously started looking into guided munitions after the SpanishCivilWar and the Germans used radio-guided glide-bombs with some success in WorldWarTwo. This is basically the idea of somehow getting the bomb itself to adjust where and how it falls based on what the aircraft is doing. The main one that most casual viewers are familiar with are laser-guided (which find something that's being illuminated with a special laser, possibly operated by ground troops, though some modern strike aircraft have their own target illuminating laser), going back to the late 1960s, and teleguided (which adjust while the bombardier keeps the target in his sights, or in some instances the bombardier looks at a television image transmitted from a TV camera in the nose of the bomb and uses that to steer it onto the target by remote control). Typical targets for "smart bombs" may include anything from the foundation of a bridge to a single individual armored vehicle to an enemy command post building.

to:

Everyone became an expert on this from coverage of the first GulfWar in the United States. It's OlderThanTheyThink; folks seriously started looking into guided munitions after the SpanishCivilWar UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar and the Germans used radio-guided glide-bombs with some success in WorldWarTwo.UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo. This is basically the idea of somehow getting the bomb itself to adjust where and how it falls based on what the aircraft is doing. The main one that most casual viewers are familiar with are laser-guided (which find something that's being illuminated with a special laser, possibly operated by ground troops, though some modern strike aircraft have their own target illuminating laser), going back to the late 1960s, and teleguided (which adjust while the bombardier keeps the target in his sights, or in some instances the bombardier looks at a television image transmitted from a TV camera in the nose of the bomb and uses that to steer it onto the target by remote control). Typical targets for "smart bombs" may include anything from the foundation of a bridge to a single individual armored vehicle to an enemy command post building.
2nd Dec '13 9:48:00 AM kenceo
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Most bombing was done by letting the ordnance drop and just free-fall down to the target. Very difficult to avoid, but also difficult to aim--this is why the main methods were either to divebomb (ride the bomb a slight way to the target in a dive, centering the target in the gunsight before releasing; can be very accurate, especially if the pilot waits until the last possible moment to drop the bomb and pull out of the dive, but also extremely dangerous to the pilot) or to [[MacrossMissileMassacre carpet bomb]].

to:

Most bombing was done by letting the ordnance drop and just free-fall down to the target. Very difficult to avoid, but also difficult to aim--this is why the main methods were either to divebomb (ride the bomb a slight way to the target in a dive, centering the target in the gunsight before releasing; can be very accurate, especially if the pilot waits until the last possible moment to drop the bomb and pull out of the dive, but also extremely dangerous to the pilot) or to [[MacrossMissileMassacre carpet bomb]].
bomb.
28th Oct '13 6:31:19 AM MichaelMikes
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* B-2 Spirit. Called a stealth 'bomber', the Spirit really is a strategic heavy bomber, capable of striking anywhere in the world (with tanker support), passing through air defenses as if they were not there, and unleashing major destruction. The thing's cost is upwards of 2 billion US dollars apiece (literally, more than worth its weight in gold), and it's meant to really not look like any other bomber, whether you're looking at it with radar, infrared, or just your eyes. Visually, it appears to be a big black flying wing. On radar, it appears to not exist. Unless you're using the ADF rader that detects it via the disturbances it leaves in the air behind it. So far, it has lived up to its purported capabilities in all its deployments, and the only B-2 loss until now has been due to a peacetime crash.

to:

* B-2 Spirit. Called a stealth 'bomber', the Spirit really is a strategic heavy bomber, capable of striking anywhere in the world (with tanker support), passing through air defenses as if they were not there, and unleashing major destruction. The thing's cost is upwards of 2 billion US dollars apiece (literally, more than worth its weight in gold), and it's meant to really not look like any other bomber, whether you're looking at it with radar, infrared, or just your eyes. Visually, it appears to be a big black flying wing. On radar, it appears to not exist. Unless exist, unless you're using the ADF rader [[AussiesWithArtillery ADF's]] Jindalee Radar that detects can detect it via the disturbances it leaves in the air behind it. So far, it has lived up to its purported capabilities in all its deployments, and the only B-2 loss until now has been due to a peacetime crash.
28th Oct '13 6:07:03 AM MichaelMikes
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These occupy a place somewhere between "iron bombs" and "smart bombs" in both technology and application. It is basically a bomb casing that is designed to split open fifty or a hundred meters in the air over the target and discharge hundreds or thousands of "submunitions," basically grenades. They are extremely useful against dug-in infantry, and, with slightly larger shaped-charge submunitions, can damage or destroy even armored vehicles in the target area, as a tank's armor is generally thinnest on the roof. This idea is also OlderThanTheyThink, having first been developed by the Soviets between the World Wars, copied by the Germans during the war, then developed further by all parties in the [[ColdWar postwar era]]. Politically controversial because they sometimes litter the area with duds, which later endanger civilians in the area. A notable example of its infamous-ness was the massive drama created when Carlos Cardoen, a Chilean entrepreneur owner of Cardoen Weapons, sold this type of weapons to Saddam Hussein, though he argued that the transaction was well known for the US and it was done before the second Gulf War.

to:

These occupy a place somewhere between "iron bombs" and "smart bombs" in both technology and application. It is basically a bomb casing that is designed to split open fifty or a hundred meters in the air over the target and discharge hundreds or thousands of "submunitions," basically grenades. They are extremely useful against dug-in infantry, and, with slightly larger shaped-charge submunitions, can damage or destroy even armored vehicles in the target area, as a tank's armor is generally thinnest on the roof. This idea is also OlderThanTheyThink, having first been developed by the Soviets between the World Wars, copied by the Germans during the war, then developed further by all parties in the [[ColdWar postwar era]]. Politically controversial because they sometimes litter the area with duds, which later endanger civilians in the area. A notable example of its infamous-ness infamy was the massive drama created when Carlos Cardoen, a Chilean entrepreneur owner of Cardoen Weapons, sold this type of weapons to Saddam Hussein, though he argued that the transaction was well known for the US and it was done before the second Gulf War.
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