History Main / AdaptationDisplacement

17th Jun '18 12:37:46 PM mimitchi33
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* For the various ''[[WesternAnimation/NoddysToylandAdventures Noddy]]'' series, this trope varies depending on the country. In the United Kingdom (and to some extent Australia and Canada), this trope is averted, as the stories are pretty much a staple of British childhoods. In other countries, the trope is played straight, with people thinking that either ''Noddy's Toyland Adventures'', ''Make Way For Noddy'' or ''Series/TheNoddyShop'', depending on which version they remember, was its own thing.

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* For the various ''[[WesternAnimation/NoddysToylandAdventures Noddy]]'' series, this trope varies depending on the country. In the United Kingdom (and to some extent Australia and Canada), this trope is averted, as the stories are pretty much a staple of British childhoods. In other countries, the trope is played straight, with people thinking that either ''Noddy's Toyland Adventures'', ''Make Way For Noddy'' or ''Series/TheNoddyShop'', depending on which version they remember, was its own thing. There's also some people who think that ''The Noddy Shop'' was not connected to the ''Noddy'' franchise at all. [[https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20120603200824AAy80Ra This post is an example of the second type of displacement]].


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* The titular character of ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold'' was originally a character from a series of shorts made for ''Series/SesameStreet''.
12th Jun '18 9:20:21 AM jamespolk
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* Rodgers and Hammerstein's first two musicals, ''Theatre/{{Oklahoma}}'' and ''Carousel'', are legendary works of American theatre, whereas the plays on which they are based, ''Green Grow the Lilacs'' and ''Liliom'' (by renowned playwright Ferenc Molnar), are all but unknown in America. In Europe, ''Liliom'' is more popular than ''Carousel''.

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* Rodgers and Hammerstein's Creator/RodgersAndHammerstein:
** Their
first two musicals, ''Theatre/{{Oklahoma}}'' and ''Carousel'', are legendary works of American theatre, whereas the plays on which they are based, ''Green Grow the Lilacs'' and ''Liliom'' (by renowned playwright Ferenc Molnar), are all but unknown in America. In Europe, ''Liliom'' is more popular than ''Carousel''.''Carousel''.
** One of their most famous works, ''Theatre/SouthPacific'', was based on two stories from James A. Michener's short story collection ''Literature/TalesOfTheSouthPacific'', now mostly forgotten.
6th Jun '18 10:52:31 AM OlfinBedwere
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* ''The Girlfriend Experience'' originated as a 2009 Creator/StevenSoderbergh film, which did virtually no business and was regarded by most who saw it as one of Soderbergh's worst films. Chances are most of the TV version's viewers never even realized it was based on the film unless they saw the film's writers credited in the end-of-episode credits.
3rd Jun '18 12:22:47 AM MarkLungo
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* In 1986, the ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' franchise got an AnimatedAdaptation called ''WesternAnimation/RamboTheForceOfFreedom''. In the cartoon, John Rambo was part of a Franchise/GIJoe-like team (the titular "Force of Freedom") who went on missions around the world battling against a paramilitary terrorist organization named S.A.V.A.G.E. (short for Specialist-Administrators of Vengeance, Anarchy and Global Extortion - although in a toy advertisement included on a VHS tape of episodes from the series, it's said to mean the Secret Army of Vengeance And Global Evil). The cartoon was filled with hand-to-hand combat and gunfire, with accurately-illustrated guns; yet unlike the original R-rated films, there was never any sensational violence, blood or gore, since this series was intended for family viewing. Moreover, no one ever died or got (seriously) hurt. The only real injury on the show happened when Rambo broke his arm in a survival episode. Rambo (who was seldom called by his first name, even by Trautman) used violence as a last resort and relied on his resources and guile to outwit his opponents a character trait not consistent with the later films (Rambo avoids deliberately killing anyone in the first movie). Additionally, there were no references to Vietnam, POWs, or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.note

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* In 1986, the ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' franchise got an AnimatedAdaptation called ''WesternAnimation/RamboTheForceOfFreedom''. In the cartoon, John Rambo was part of a Franchise/GIJoe-like team (the titular "Force of Freedom") who went on missions around the world battling against a paramilitary terrorist organization named S.A.V.A.G.E. (short for Specialist-Administrators of Vengeance, Anarchy and Global Extortion - although in a toy advertisement included on a VHS tape of episodes from the series, it's said to mean the Secret Army of Vengeance And Global Evil). The cartoon was filled with hand-to-hand combat and gunfire, with accurately-illustrated guns; yet unlike the original R-rated films, there was never any sensational violence, blood or gore, since this series was intended for family viewing. Moreover, no one ever died or got (seriously) hurt. The only real injury on the show happened when Rambo broke his arm in a survival episode. Rambo (who was seldom called by his first name, even by Trautman) used violence as a last resort and relied on his resources and guile to outwit his opponents a character trait not consistent with the later films (Rambo avoids deliberately killing anyone in the first movie). Additionally, there were no references to Vietnam, POWs, UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, [=POWs=], or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.note Disorder.
3rd Jun '18 12:18:24 AM MarkLungo
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* There exists a {{Franchise/Rambo}} cartoon called WesternAnimation/RamboTheForceOfFreedom. It's basically a GI Joe knockoff.
In the cartoon, John Rambo was part of a G.I. Joe-like team called "The Force of Freedom." They went on missions around the world battling against a paramilitary terrorist organization named S.A.V.A.G.E. (short for Specialist-Administrators of Vengeance, Anarchy and Global Extortion - although in a toy advertisement included on a VHS tape of episodes from the series, it's said to mean the Secret Army of Vengeance And Global Evil). The cartoon was filled with hand-to-hand combat and gunfire, with accurately-illustrated guns; yet unlike the original R-rated films, there was never any sensational violence, blood or gore, since this series was intended for family viewing. Moreover, no one ever died or got (seriously) hurt. The only real injury on the show happened when Rambo broke his arm in a survival episode. Rambo (who was seldom called by his first name, even by Trautman) used violence as a last resort and relied on his resources and guile to outwit his opponents a character trait not consistent with the later films (Rambo avoids deliberately killing anyone in the first movie). Additionally, there were no references to Vietnam, POWs, or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.note
* The '80s ''WesternAnimation/{{Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles|1987}}'' cartoon is vastly more familiar to the public than the [[Comicbook/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesMirage original black-and-white comics]]. An example of this is that in every ''Turtles''-related review by WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic, he constantly criticizes an adaptation for not being "faithful" when its actually using something from the ''comic'' instead of the '80s series (such as his constant complaints about April's lack of yellow jumpsuits in the films, or that Judith Hoag looks nothing like April, when her portrayal did in fact resemble the original comic's version).

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* There exists a {{Franchise/Rambo}} cartoon In 1986, the ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' franchise got an AnimatedAdaptation called WesternAnimation/RamboTheForceOfFreedom. It's basically a GI Joe knockoff.
''WesternAnimation/RamboTheForceOfFreedom''. In the cartoon, John Rambo was part of a G.I. Joe-like Franchise/GIJoe-like team called "The Force (the titular "Force of Freedom." They Freedom") who went on missions around the world battling against a paramilitary terrorist organization named S.A.V.A.G.E. (short for Specialist-Administrators of Vengeance, Anarchy and Global Extortion - although in a toy advertisement included on a VHS tape of episodes from the series, it's said to mean the Secret Army of Vengeance And Global Evil). The cartoon was filled with hand-to-hand combat and gunfire, with accurately-illustrated guns; yet unlike the original R-rated films, there was never any sensational violence, blood or gore, since this series was intended for family viewing. Moreover, no one ever died or got (seriously) hurt. The only real injury on the show happened when Rambo broke his arm in a survival episode. Rambo (who was seldom called by his first name, even by Trautman) used violence as a last resort and relied on his resources and guile to outwit his opponents a character trait not consistent with the later films (Rambo avoids deliberately killing anyone in the first movie). Additionally, there were no references to Vietnam, POWs, or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.note
* The '80s ''WesternAnimation/{{Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles|1987}}'' cartoon is vastly more familiar to the public than the [[Comicbook/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesMirage original black-and-white comics]]. An example of this is that in every ''Turtles''-related review by WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic, he constantly criticizes an adaptation for not being "faithful" when its it's actually using something from the ''comic'' instead of the '80s series (such as his constant complaints about April's lack of yellow jumpsuits in the films, or that Judith Hoag looks nothing like April, when her portrayal did in fact resemble the original comic's version).
2nd Jun '18 11:58:47 PM enderheisenberg
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* There exists a {{Franchise/Rambo}} cartoon called WesternAnimation/RamboTheForceOfFreedom. It's basically a GI Joe knockoff.
In the cartoon, John Rambo was part of a G.I. Joe-like team called "The Force of Freedom." They went on missions around the world battling against a paramilitary terrorist organization named S.A.V.A.G.E. (short for Specialist-Administrators of Vengeance, Anarchy and Global Extortion - although in a toy advertisement included on a VHS tape of episodes from the series, it's said to mean the Secret Army of Vengeance And Global Evil). The cartoon was filled with hand-to-hand combat and gunfire, with accurately-illustrated guns; yet unlike the original R-rated films, there was never any sensational violence, blood or gore, since this series was intended for family viewing. Moreover, no one ever died or got (seriously) hurt. The only real injury on the show happened when Rambo broke his arm in a survival episode. Rambo (who was seldom called by his first name, even by Trautman) used violence as a last resort and relied on his resources and guile to outwit his opponents a character trait not consistent with the later films (Rambo avoids deliberately killing anyone in the first movie). Additionally, there were no references to Vietnam, POWs, or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.note
31st May '18 5:25:10 AM jormis29
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* Tracy Lawrence's late 2006-early 2007 hit "Find Out Who Your Friends Are" was originally sung by just him. But partway through the song's chart run, he re-recorded it with Music/TimMcGraw and Music/KennyChesney sharing the lead vocal, and their name recognition helped boost the song all the way to #1 (albeit with the slowest ascent in the chart's history). Nowadays, if you hear the song on radio, there's a ''very'' likely chance that it'll be the version with [=McGraw=] and Chesney.

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* Tracy Lawrence's Music/TracyLawrence's late 2006-early 2007 hit "Find Out Who Your Friends Are" was originally sung by just him. But partway through the song's chart run, he re-recorded it with Music/TimMcGraw and Music/KennyChesney sharing the lead vocal, and their name recognition helped boost the song all the way to #1 (albeit with the slowest ascent in the chart's history). Nowadays, if you hear the song on radio, there's a ''very'' likely chance that it'll be the version with [=McGraw=] and Chesney.
28th May '18 6:33:06 PM PaulA
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* Most Brits, and many from further afield, will be familiar (perhaps overly so) with Quality Street sweet assortments. Far fewer will be aware that the brand name, along with the scene depicted on the packaging, were taken from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_Street_(play) a play by J.M. Barrie]], written three years before he wrote ''Literature/PeterPan''.

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* Most Brits, and many from further afield, will be familiar (perhaps overly so) with Quality Street sweet assortments. Far fewer will be aware that the brand name, along with the scene depicted on the packaging, were taken from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_Street_(play) a play by J.M. Barrie]], written three years before he wrote ''Literature/PeterPan''.''Theatre/{{Peter Pan|1904}}''.
27th May '18 10:47:41 PM wolftickets1969
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* "Battle Flag" was originally released by the funk rock band Pigeonhed in 1997, but didn't take off in popularity until the British big beat group Lo-Fidelity Allstars reworked it the following year.
23rd May '18 7:53:27 PM PaulA
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** ''Theatre/LaTraviata'' is based on the novel ''La dame aux camélias'' by Creator/AlexandreDumas, fils, which was also adapted into the 1936 movie ''Camille''.

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** ''Theatre/LaTraviata'' is based on the novel ''La dame aux camélias'' by Creator/AlexandreDumas, fils, Creator/AlexandreDumasFils, which was also adapted into the 1936 movie ''Camille''.
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