History Main / AdamSmithHatesYourGuts

16th Mar '17 9:06:54 AM rjd1922
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** Interestingly, this is actually averted in the ''Videogame/TheLegendOfZelda'', as different stores have different prices on items you might want (the Magic Shield, for example, can cost between 90 and 160 Rupees depending of the store), so you need to keep track of which merchant has the best deals. Also, the most expensive item in the game, the Blue Ring, its sold in a single, ''hidden'' store in all of Hyrule, so you have no option but to pay the full price for it (a whooping 250 Rupees, five less than your maximum wallet limit).

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** Interestingly, this is actually averted in the ''Videogame/TheLegendOfZelda'', ''Videogame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'', as different stores have different prices on items you might want (the Magic Shield, for example, can cost between 90 and 160 Rupees depending of the store), so you need to keep track of which merchant has the best deals. Also, the most expensive item in the game, the Blue Ring, its sold in a single, ''hidden'' store in all of Hyrule, so you have no option but to pay the full price for it (a whooping 250 Rupees, five less than your maximum wallet limit).
12th Mar '17 1:35:47 PM karstovich2
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* ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' has an odd variant of this trope. The 'prices' of buildings and units, in the form of hammers (required production to build it), stays constant, no matter which era you're in. Thus, erecting a building in a newly built town will take exactly the same number of turns in the stone age as it will in the modern era, after building cranes, construction equipment and unionised labour has been invented. At the same time, buildings and units you unlock with better technology that you research later are prohibitively more expensive in terms of hammer cost. This leads to odd situations where you have a new town in the modern era where building a TV station (which is unlocked in the modern era) takes over eight times longer than building a library (unlocked upon learning how to read) or a Colosseum (unlocked by construction), and training a unit of riflemen takes four times as long as training a unit of longbowmen (which would be the opposite of RealLife).

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* ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' has an odd variant of this trope. The 'prices' of buildings and units, in the form of hammers (required production to build it), stays constant, no matter which era you're in. Thus, erecting a building in a newly built town will take exactly the same number of turns in the stone age as it will in the modern era, after building cranes, construction equipment and unionised labour has been invented. At the same time, buildings and units you unlock with better technology that you research later are prohibitively more expensive in terms of hammer cost. This leads to odd situations where you have a new town in the modern era where building a TV station (which is unlocked in the modern era) takes over eight times longer than building a library (unlocked upon learning how to read) or a Colosseum (unlocked by construction), and training a unit of riflemen takes four times as long as training a unit of longbowmen (which would be the opposite of RealLife). That being said, in most forms of the game, it is much easier to ''get more hammers'' later in the game (i.e. have increased productivity) by building improvements.
8th Mar '17 11:54:52 AM nombretomado
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* In ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'', every successive HP Memory upgrade is usually at least twice the price of the one you just bought from the same vendor. [=PowerUP=]s likewise in the first two games. ''[[MegaManStarForce Star Force]]'' does this too.

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* In ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'', every successive HP Memory upgrade is usually at least twice the price of the one you just bought from the same vendor. [=PowerUP=]s likewise in the first two games. ''[[MegaManStarForce ''[[VideoGame/MegaManStarForce Star Force]]'' does this too.
26th Feb '17 7:34:28 PM TheDocCC
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It's worth noting that, in RealLife, a person like the player character would have a ''perfectly inelastic'' demand for certain commodities. This means that, no matter what the price is, the player ''will'' manage to raise the funds ''and'' be willing to fork them over simply because they ''need'' to buy these items. Any merchants who are aware of this [[TruthInTelevision can and will charge absurd amounts of money]], because they know it will sell regardless, so long as there isn't someone selling it cheaper nearby. The most audacious form of the trope, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Price_gouging Price Gouging]] is a two edged sword, however: In many places raising the price of gasoline and bottled water during a hurricane isn't just good way to be branded a {{Jerkass}} by the local community- it can be grounds for criminal charges and seizure of goods. [[note]][[UsefulNotes/CourtSystems Laws vary, obviously]] even within nations- some areas have specific laws against it, some categorize it as [[AnOfferYouCantRefuse extortion]], others consider it a form of public endangerment, and some just have officers point out to the owner the [[TorchesAndPitchforks large angry mob armed with tire irons]] forming outside and the inherent problems of OneRiotOneRanger.[[/note]] Additionally, even strongly pro-capitalist governments tend to pass anti-monopoly laws forbidding this sort of thing in the large scale.

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It's worth noting that, in RealLife, a person like the player character has what classical economics would have call a ''perfectly inelastic'' demand for certain commodities. This means that, no matter what the price is, the player ''will'' manage to raise the funds ''and'' be willing to fork them over simply because they ''need'' to buy these items. Any merchants who are aware of this [[TruthInTelevision can and will charge absurd amounts of money]], because they know it will sell regardless, so long as there isn't someone selling it cheaper nearby. Of course, behavioral economics reminds us that human beings are not constructs in classical economic theory, and so are prone to making decisions about prices that take into account more than just supply and demand. The most audacious form of the trope, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Price_gouging Price Gouging]] is a two edged sword, however: In many places raising the price of gasoline and bottled water during a hurricane isn't just good way to be branded a {{Jerkass}} by the local community- it can be grounds for criminal charges and seizure of goods. [[note]][[UsefulNotes/CourtSystems Laws vary, obviously]] even within nations- some areas have specific laws against it, some categorize it as [[AnOfferYouCantRefuse extortion]], others consider it a form of public endangerment, and some just have officers point out to the owner the [[TorchesAndPitchforks large angry mob armed with tire irons]] forming outside and the inherent problems of OneRiotOneRanger. Surprisingly, some economists will defend price gouging. If your town is hit by a hurricane and the only guy selling batteries hasn't raised prices, you can bet he's been cleaned out and there's no batteries left in his store. Furthermore, there's no incentive to take risks to get those batteries. However, if the only guy selling batteries charges twenty-five USD for an AA four pack (a 6-8x spike in price), there's a good chance at least a few will be still on the shelves as people buy only what they absolutely need. Furthermore, batteries will flood into the area as sellers try to take advantage of the situation, renewing the supply of batteries and sending the price back down.[[/note]] Additionally, even strongly pro-capitalist governments tend to pass anti-monopoly laws forbidding this sort of thing in the large scale.
19th Feb '17 3:13:04 PM Malady
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* ''VideoGame/JimmyAndThePulsatingMass'': The further along in the plot you go, the more things will cost, even if it used to cost less in the same location.



* VideoGame/MagicalChase: As you progress through the game and buy more items from Halloween Jack, the price of them will steadily increase.

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* VideoGame/MagicalChase: ''VideoGame/MagicalChase'': As you progress through the game and buy more items from Halloween Jack, the price of them will steadily increase.
10th Feb '17 12:36:41 AM HiddenWindshield
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Metro 2033}}'', the only money is bartering with 5.45mm ammo left over from before the apocalypse. The ammo is in perfect condition, and packs more punch than the homemade crap you usually find. therefore, you must choose between supporting the economy and saving your ass in a firefight. There's even an Achievement (Scrooge) for hoarding 500 Bullets.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Metro 2033}}'', the only money is bartering with 5.45mm ammo left over from before the apocalypse. The ammo is in perfect condition, and packs more punch than the homemade crap you usually find. therefore, Therefore, you must choose between supporting the economy and saving your ass in a firefight. There's even an Achievement (Scrooge) for hoarding 500 Bullets.
23rd Jan '17 3:04:06 PM Malady
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* VideoGame/MagicalChase: As you progress through the game and buy more items from Halloween Jack, the price of them will steadily increase.
2nd Jan '17 1:35:51 AM SeptimusHeap
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** An inversion can occur via the Syreen Penetrator [[note]]which, being the [[GreenSkinnedSpaceBabe Blue Skinned Space Babes]] ship, [[FreudWasRight looks EXACTLY like you'd expect]][[/note]], which has the ability to call crew from the opposing ship and capture them. Master this, and you start getting REWARDED for slavery, as you can then sell the enslaved crew back at the inflated price.

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** An inversion can occur via the Syreen Penetrator [[note]]which, being the [[GreenSkinnedSpaceBabe Blue Skinned Space Babes]] ship, [[FreudWasRight looks EXACTLY like you'd expect]][[/note]], expect[[/note]], which has the ability to call crew from the opposing ship and capture them. Master this, and you start getting REWARDED for slavery, as you can then sell the enslaved crew back at the inflated price.
19th Dec '16 8:42:33 AM JesseMB27
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Also despite the name of this trope, it is not to be confused with CapitalismIsBad (though works using the latter can employ this trope as a demonstration of why they believe that).
8th Dec '16 10:18:33 AM Kid
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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' has it in the opposite direction. When freeing the town and thus getting access to it's stores, one store is very obviously meant for the wealthy (it doesn't even let you in without cleaning your shoes first). The few things it sells are so ridiculously overpriced that it is impossible to buy them with even the biggest rupee bag. It is an option though to kick that shop out and replace it by the discounter that a child from your hometown founded, leading to ''much'' lower prices.

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' has it in the opposite direction. When freeing the town and thus getting access to it's its stores, one store is very obviously meant for the wealthy (it doesn't even let you in without cleaning your shoes first). The few things it sells are so ridiculously overpriced that it is impossible to buy them with even the biggest rupee bag. It is an option though to kick that shop out and replace it by the discounter that a child from your hometown founded, leading to ''much'' lower prices.
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