History Main / AdamSmithHatesYourGuts

13th May '16 7:10:06 AM REV6Pilot
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* Ammunition in ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' becomes exponentially more expensive the further into the game you go: Ammunition in early-game ammo kiosks will set you back a dozen credits, and by the end-game it's in the tens of thousands range. Of course, the game has an economy that can be best described as MoneyForNothing incarnate, so you've got practically nothing ''but'' ammo you can spend your ever-increasing cash reserve on. The same goes with the "death" regeneration cost, about 10% of your total funds. Normally this isn't a problem but some of the areas, while having lower-level enemies, can be more tricky, and with rewards less reduced, can quickly drain your cash reserves if you're too careless.

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* Ammunition in ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' becomes exponentially more expensive the further into the game you go: Ammunition in early-game ammo kiosks will set you back a dozen credits, and by the end-game it's in the tens of thousands range. Of course, the game has an economy that can be best described as MoneyForNothing incarnate, so you've got practically nothing ''but'' ammo you can spend your ever-increasing cash reserve on. The same goes with the "death" regeneration cost, about 10% cost of 7% of your total funds. Normally this isn't a problem but some of the areas, while having lower-level enemies, can be more tricky, and with rewards less reduced, can quickly drain your cash reserves if you're too careless.
19th Apr '16 12:48:54 PM case
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* In the browser game ''VideoGame/CookieClicker'', the costs for buildings start out reasonable, but increase by 15% with each successive building of the same type you purchase. Where the first clicker (the least-efficient building) costs 15 cookies to produce, the 150th will set you back over 19,000,000,000, and building more expensive buildings can cost in the trillions after you've built enough.
** The similar game ''AdventureCapitalist'' has the same phenomenon. By the ''middle'' of the game, a lemonade stand can cost ''nonillions of dollars'' just because you already have a large number of them. [[note]]One nonillion dollars is not just more than the value of everything ever produced in human history. It is more than the theoretical value of the planet. You cross that value at 1002 lemonade stands. [=McDonald=]'s, for reference, has over 35,000 restaurants, and opening a new franchise costs less than a nonillion dollars.[[/note]]

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* Most [[IdleGame Idle Games]] incorporate this in some way:
**
In the browser game ''VideoGame/CookieClicker'', the costs for buildings start out reasonable, but increase by 15% with each successive building of the same type you purchase. Where the first clicker (the least-efficient building) costs 15 cookies to produce, the 150th will set you back over 19,000,000,000, and building more expensive buildings can cost in the trillions after you've built enough.
** The similar game ''AdventureCapitalist'' has the same phenomenon. By the ''middle'' of the game, ''AdventureCapitalist'', a lemonade stand can cost ''nonillions of dollars'' just because you already have a large number of them. [[note]]One nonillion dollars is not just more than the value of everything ever produced in human history. It is more than the theoretical value of the planet. You cross that value at 1002 lemonade stands. [=McDonald=]'s, for reference, has over 35,000 restaurants, and opening a new franchise costs [[{{Understatement}} substantially]] less than a nonillion dollars.[[/note]]
27th Mar '16 6:23:11 PM Totema
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** Using a heart block almost invariably costs more in the dungeon for a respective region than in the open field.
26th Mar '16 11:26:00 AM Josef5678
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* In ''VideoGame/TinyTower'', the price to build a floor goes up with each new floor built, even if the floor is always empty and therefore not making any coins.
21st Mar '16 9:55:58 AM ObsidianFire
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It's worth noting that, in RealLife, a person like the player character would have a ''perfectly inelastic'' demand for certain commodities. This means that, no matter what the price is, the player ''will'' manage to raise the funds ''and'' be willing to fork them over simply because they ''need'' to buy these items. Any merchants who [[GenreSavvy are aware of this]] [[TruthInTelevision can and will charge absurd amounts of money]], because they know it will sell regardless, so long as there isn't someone selling it cheaper nearby. The most audacious form of the trope, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Price_gouging Price Gouging]] is a two edged sword, however: In many places raising the price of gasoline and bottled water during a hurricane isn't just good way to be branded a {{Jerkass}} by the local community- it can be grounds for criminal charges and seizure of goods. [[note]][[UsefulNotes/CourtSystems Laws vary, obviously]] even within nations- some areas have specific laws against it, some categorize it as [[AnOfferYouCantRefuse extortion]], others consider it a form of public endangerment, and some just have officers point out to the owner the [[TorchesAndPitchforks large angry mob armed with tire irons]] forming outside and the inherent problems of OneRiotOneRanger.[[/note]] Additionally, even strongly pro-capitalist governments tend to pass anti-monopoly laws forbidding this sort of thing in the large scale.

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It's worth noting that, in RealLife, a person like the player character would have a ''perfectly inelastic'' demand for certain commodities. This means that, no matter what the price is, the player ''will'' manage to raise the funds ''and'' be willing to fork them over simply because they ''need'' to buy these items. Any merchants who [[GenreSavvy are aware of this]] this [[TruthInTelevision can and will charge absurd amounts of money]], because they know it will sell regardless, so long as there isn't someone selling it cheaper nearby. The most audacious form of the trope, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Price_gouging Price Gouging]] is a two edged sword, however: In many places raising the price of gasoline and bottled water during a hurricane isn't just good way to be branded a {{Jerkass}} by the local community- it can be grounds for criminal charges and seizure of goods. [[note]][[UsefulNotes/CourtSystems Laws vary, obviously]] even within nations- some areas have specific laws against it, some categorize it as [[AnOfferYouCantRefuse extortion]], others consider it a form of public endangerment, and some just have officers point out to the owner the [[TorchesAndPitchforks large angry mob armed with tire irons]] forming outside and the inherent problems of OneRiotOneRanger.[[/note]] Additionally, even strongly pro-capitalist governments tend to pass anti-monopoly laws forbidding this sort of thing in the large scale.



** Played straight in the Pit of 100 Trials. There is a sleazy merchant who occasionally shows up in certain rooms to sell you various items at inflated prices. The lower you go, the more dangerous it gets, and the more likely it is you'll be running out of healing items. ''[[GenreSavvy He knows this]]''. By the time you get near the bottom, he'll be selling items for ''twenty times'' what they'd be worth in a normal shop. Since you're likely to be maxed out in coins yet an inch near death at this point, ''these items might actually be worthwhile''

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** Played straight in the Pit of 100 Trials. There is a sleazy merchant who occasionally shows up in certain rooms to sell you various items at inflated prices. The lower you go, the more dangerous it gets, and the more likely it is you'll be running out of healing items. ''[[GenreSavvy He ''He knows this]]''.this''. By the time you get near the bottom, he'll be selling items for ''twenty times'' what they'd be worth in a normal shop. Since you're likely to be maxed out in coins yet an inch near death at this point, ''these items might actually be worthwhile''



* In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 2}}'', the jackass fairy Trish, exiled from her happy fairy realm for her utter greed, opens up a healing service, which charges an obscene price the first time, her prices rising for the same amount each time her services are used. When healing services are readily available in the overworld at much lower prices, Trish is DangerouslyGenreSavvy in putting her stall ''right in front of the level boss' door'' - you can leave the level to get healed cheaply, or fall into her trap, unless you were smart enough to stock on items. She can also offer ice creams that increase various stats, a service also available in various Sumaru restaurants, and at a point she's left at the single source of trade. To absolutely no one's surprise, she starts selling stuff at five times its street value. There ''is'' an option to scatter a rumor to give her a HeelRealization to lower her prices... which she promptly ignores, putting all prices back as they were.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 2}}'', the jackass fairy Trish, exiled from her happy fairy realm for her utter greed, opens up a healing service, which charges an obscene price the first time, her prices rising for the same amount each time her services are used. When healing services are readily available in the overworld at much lower prices, Trish is DangerouslyGenreSavvy in putting puts her stall ''right in front of the level boss' door'' - you can leave the level to get healed cheaply, or fall into her trap, unless you were smart enough to stock on items. She can also offer ice creams that increase various stats, a service also available in various Sumaru restaurants, and at a point she's left at the single source of trade. To absolutely no one's surprise, she starts selling stuff at five times its street value. There ''is'' an option to scatter a rumor to give her a HeelRealization to lower her prices... which she promptly ignores, putting all prices back as they were.
3rd Mar '16 11:07:13 AM Scorpion451
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It's worth noting that, in RealLife, a person like the player character would have a ''perfectly inelastic'' demand for certain commodities. This means that, no matter what the price is, the player ''will'' manage to raise the funds ''and'' be willing to fork them over simply because they need to buy these items in order to finish the game. Any merchants who [[GenreSavvy are aware of this]] [[TruthInTelevision can and will charge absurd amounts of money]], because they know it will sell regardless. Note that the above is only true if there isn't another merchant in town offering the same commodity.


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It's worth noting that, in RealLife, a person like the player character would have a ''perfectly inelastic'' demand for certain commodities. This means that, no matter what the price is, the player ''will'' manage to raise the funds ''and'' be willing to fork them over simply because they ''need'' to buy these items. Any merchants who [[GenreSavvy are aware of this]] [[TruthInTelevision can and will charge absurd amounts of money]], because they know it will sell regardless, so long as there isn't someone selling it cheaper nearby. The most audacious form of the trope, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Price_gouging Price Gouging]] is a two edged sword, however: In many places raising the price of gasoline and bottled water during a hurricane isn't just good way to be branded a {{Jerkass}} by the local community- it can be grounds for criminal charges and seizure of goods. [[note]][[UsefulNotes/CourtSystems Laws vary, obviously]] even within nations- some areas have specific laws against it, some categorize it as [[AnOfferYouCantRefuse extortion]], others consider it a form of public endangerment, and some just have officers point out to the owner the [[TorchesAndPitchforks large angry mob armed with tire irons]] forming outside and the inherent problems of OneRiotOneRanger.[[/note]] Additionally, even strongly pro-capitalist governments tend to pass anti-monopoly laws forbidding this sort of thing in the large scale.
23rd Feb '16 1:24:41 AM Alceister
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** This is done with a literal Creator/AynRand's Revenge. It can be justified, though, as you are in a super-capitalist dystopia, where the 1st act takes you through the medical pavilion and the fisherman's wharf, whilst the 3rd takes you through the uptown residential district, where demand for ammo would be higher.

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** This is done with a literal Creator/AynRand's Revenge. Revenge with the underwater city of Rapture. It can be is justified, though, as though: you are in a super-capitalist dystopia, dystopia in the aftermath of a civil war, where the 1st act takes you through the medical pavilion and the fisherman's wharf, whilst the 3rd takes you through the uptown residential district, where demand for ammo would be higher.higher.
16th Feb '16 11:05:44 PM BattleMaster
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* ''Webcomic/{{Nodwick}}'' once had the explanation that Nodwick's employers were such successful adventurers that they'd ended up wrecking the town's economy due to how much gold, silver, and precious gems they'd brought back: gold was worth less than lead and emeralds were no more valuable than gravel.
7th Feb '16 12:17:34 PM DarkHunter
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* In ''[[VideoGame/{{Recettear}} Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale]]'', '''you''' can be a blood gutter merchant who sets a price of whatever you sell very high. The tactic does work on one RichBitch, but raising item's prices above 200% will piss off most of your customers.[[note]]The page image is a parody of this[[/note]]. Some notable aspects of this:

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* In ''[[VideoGame/{{Recettear}} Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale]]'', Tale]]'' plays with the trope in many ways:
** In this game,
'''you''' can be a blood gutter merchant who sets a price of whatever you sell very high. The tactic does work on one RichBitch, but raising item's prices above 200% will piss off most of your customers.[[note]]The page image is a parody of this[[/note]]. Some notable aspects of this:


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** Also subverted in that many players will also sell high-end adventuring gear at a loss to the various adventurers who come into the shop: this makes it much easier to go through dungeons with those characters, and if the adventurer brings their own personally owned gear rather than borrowed gear from the shop, it frees up extra space to bring back loot. If used intelligently, that extra loot will more than make up for the lost revenue from the initial sale.
7th Feb '16 5:54:57 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In ''VideoGame/FantasyZone'', excluding the engine upgrades, everything you can buy from the shops gets more expensive each time you buy them. The PlayStation2 remake included in ''SEGA Classics Collection'' lets you unlock an setting that turns off price inflation.

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* In ''VideoGame/FantasyZone'', excluding the engine upgrades, everything you can buy from the shops gets more expensive each time you buy them. The PlayStation2 UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 remake included in ''SEGA Classics Collection'' lets you unlock an setting that turns off price inflation.
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