History Main / ActuallyADoomBot

13th Apr '17 3:20:34 PM Discar
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* In ''Anime/PsychoPass'', [[spoiler:Chief Kasei]] had an array of cyborg body doubles as it was first revealed at the end of episode 16. Whenever it gets damaged or destroyed, there would always be another one. But the brain residing that body does not. In [[Anime/PsychoPassTheMovie the movie]], [[spoiler:it turns out that the SEAUn chairman is a body double because the real one was assassinated by mercenaries hired by the Sibyl system themselves]].

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* In ''Anime/PsychoPass'', [[spoiler:Chief Kasei]] had an array of cyborg body doubles as it was first revealed at the end of episode 16. Whenever it gets damaged or destroyed, there would always be another one. But the brain residing that body does not. In [[Anime/PsychoPassTheMovie the movie]], [[spoiler:it turns out that the SEAUn [=SEAUn=] chairman is a body double because the real one was assassinated by mercenaries hired by the Sibyl system themselves]].themselves]].
* ''Manga/MyMonsterSecret'': Perverts have the ability to control wind and steam in order to make themselves sexier by giving tantalizing glimpses of their naked bodies. The most powerful, like the Charismatic Pervert, can create life-like doubles out of steam, which Shiho only discovers after she seemingly defeats her mother in a pervert contest. [[OnlySaneMan Asahi is the only one who finds any of this odd]].
-->'''Asahi:''' What even ''are'' perverts, anyway?
6th Apr '17 8:40:05 AM ritzoreo
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** Absurdly enough, the following story arc to the ''Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'', also overseen by Johns, featured a Luthor robot who did Lex's dirty work for about half of the ''Comicbook/NewKrypton'' saga.
4th Apr '17 12:42:43 PM DaibhidC
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** Even before that, ''Comicbook/SecretWarriors'' revealed that [[spoiler: Nick's brother, Jake, was one of the first people to acquire an LMD, created by accident when he was retrieving the technology they were based on. It was that LMD that became the villainous Scorpio, while the real Jake was a deep-cover agent known only to his brother. This basically meant every post-WWII appearance by Jake prior to the reveal was actually the LMD.]]
29th Mar '17 1:47:46 AM XenMon2
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** The Mars People in ''Metal Slug 3'' impersonates General Morden in the preultimate level, he rides on the very same helicopter in ''1'' and attacks you with his bazooka, once you take him down with the anti air gun, he reveals himself as the Mars People and kidnaps the hero for cloning.
** The Amadeus Syndicate in ''Metal Slug 4'' built robotic clones of Allen O'Neil and General Morden to [[FalseFlagOperation trick the heroes into believing that the Rebel has returned.]]
** Subverted in ''Metal Slug Defense'', the description of Cyborg Allen suggested that the aforementioned robot Allen was indeed the real Allen after recovering his GameBreakingInjury.

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** The Mars People in In ''Metal Slug 3'' impersonates 3'', it's revealed that General Morden in was actually a disguised alien and that the preultimate level, he rides on ''real'' Morden has been kidnapped by the very same helicopter in ''1'' and attacks you with his bazooka, once you take him down with the anti air gun, he reveals himself as the Mars People and kidnaps the hero for cloning.
Martians.
** The Amadeus Syndicate in In ''Metal Slug 4'' built robotic clones of 4'', it's revealed that the Morden and Allen O'Neil and General Morden you've been fighting are robots created by the Amadeus Syndicate, presumably to [[FalseFlagOperation trick the heroes into believing that the Rebel Army into fighting for them. The last level has returned.]]
** Subverted in ''Metal Slug Defense'', the description
you fighting a small army of Cyborg Allen suggested that the aforementioned robot Allen was indeed the real Allen after recovering his GameBreakingInjury.Morden robots.
28th Mar '17 9:51:57 AM rafi
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!!Franchise/MarvelUniverse



** The name comes from Doombots which are used by writers in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse to explain how Doctor Doom rarely ever actually "loses" battles. This has been pulled so often, there's [[EpilepticTrees a fan theories]] that ''the real Doctor Doom has never appeared in a comic'', that ''there is no "real" Doctor Doom'', and that Doctor Doom does exist, but not in a true physical form. He might be an electromatic source of dark energy that makes the Doombots that he takes possession of until they get destroyed. Of course, that would mean he actually does lose all those battles, as well as making it not this trope but FightingAShadow. The laftter an theory was explored in ''ComicBook/LokiAgentOfAsgard'', deconstructing it in the process and does it with such a BadassBoast, too.

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** The name comes from Doombots which are used by writers in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse Marvel Universe to explain how Doctor Doom rarely ever actually "loses" battles. This has been pulled so often, there's [[EpilepticTrees a fan theories]] that ''the real Doctor Doom has never appeared in a comic'', that ''there is no "real" Doctor Doom'', and that Doctor Doom does exist, but not in a true physical form. He might be an electromatic source of dark energy that makes the Doombots that he takes possession of until they get destroyed. Of course, that would mean he actually does lose all those battles, as well as making it not this trope but FightingAShadow. The laftter an theory was explored in ''ComicBook/LokiAgentOfAsgard'', deconstructing it in the process and does it with such a BadassBoast, too.



* In the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, BigBad ComicBook/{{Thanos}} has duplicates called Thanosi that are indistinguishable from the original. Like Doombots, these are used (usually by Thanos creator Jim Starlin) to explain away defeats. Particularly more embarrassing ones.

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* In the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, BigBad ComicBook/{{Thanos}} has duplicates called Thanosi that are indistinguishable from the original. Like Doombots, these are used (usually by Thanos creator Jim Starlin) to explain away defeats. Particularly more embarrassing ones.



** This has become more complex since the original Mysterio acquired a couple of imitators who also use this identity. And they don't really get along with each other. A storyline in ''Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man'' #11-13 (October-December, 2006) had all three Mysterios independently seeking a confrontation with Spidey, resulting in a rather complicated MeleeATrois scenario. With Spidey having trouble telling which is which, and further confused because the original was supposed to be dead.
** In ''ComicBook/SpiderMen'', [[spoiler:Mysterio doesn't actually have an ComicBook/UltimateMarvel counterpart. "Ultimate Mysterio" is actually a robot double he was controlling all along.]]
** Perhaps the most infamous usage of this trick in Spider-Man history is the first "death" of Aunt May. She peacefully died of old age in a realistic and tasteful manner; Peter and the other characters mourned her and eventually moved on. However, later editor-in-chief Bob Harras ''demanded'' that she be brought back to life. So, Aunt May was found alive and it was revealed that ComicBook/NormanOsborn had hired an actress to impersonate Aunt May perfectly, and kept up the charade even on her deathbed, meaning Peter (and the readers) cried over a total stranger.
* Another famed Spidey villain who does this trick in the Hobgoblin, Roderick Kingsley. Despite being souped up with the Goblin Formula, he isn't stupid - he'll send out random schmoes powered up and brainwashed to do his bidding and if they die, no skin off his back. If they do good, then he's more than willing to let them keep going, but if they screw up, he'll step in personally and kill the schmook himself. Just ask Jason Macendale... oh, wait...

to:

** *** This has become more complex since the original Mysterio acquired a couple of imitators who also use this identity. And they don't really get along with each other. A storyline in ''Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man'' #11-13 (October-December, 2006) had all three Mysterios independently seeking a confrontation with Spidey, resulting in a rather complicated MeleeATrois scenario. With Spidey having trouble telling which is which, and further confused because the original was supposed to be dead.
** *** In ''ComicBook/SpiderMen'', [[spoiler:Mysterio doesn't actually have an ComicBook/UltimateMarvel counterpart. "Ultimate Mysterio" is actually a robot double he was controlling all along.]]
** *** Perhaps the most infamous usage of this trick in Spider-Man history is the first "death" of Aunt May. She peacefully died of old age in a realistic and tasteful manner; Peter and the other characters mourned her and eventually moved on. However, later editor-in-chief Bob Harras ''demanded'' that she be brought back to life. So, Aunt May was found alive and it was revealed that ComicBook/NormanOsborn had hired an actress to impersonate Aunt May perfectly, and kept up the charade even on her deathbed, meaning Peter (and the readers) cried over a total stranger.
* ** Another famed Spidey villain who does this trick in the Hobgoblin, Roderick Kingsley. Despite being souped up with the Goblin Formula, he isn't stupid - he'll send out random schmoes powered up and brainwashed to do his bidding and if they die, no skin off his back. If they do good, then he's more than willing to let them keep going, but if they screw up, he'll step in personally and kill the schmook himself. Just ask Jason Macendale... oh, wait...



* This is revealed to be the case during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' for the ComicBook/NewGods and ComicBook/{{Darkseid}}. All that Earth has ever seen is somewhat limited projections of the real gods which operate on a higher plane of reality.
* And then there's Prometheus, a DC villain who was created to be a sort of anti-Batman who was so intelligent and well-trained he could almost take out the entire Justice League on his own. Except that he had long since fallen prey to VillainDecay and had been reduced to just another generic baddie who gets his butt kicked by whatever hero happens to be around. The [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League]] miniseries ''Comicbook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice'' attempted to fix this by revealing that the real Prometheus had been in hiding since he almost killed the JLA, and the loser who kept getting kicked around all these years was an impostor, who Prometheus had killed. But now the real deal was back, ready and able to... get killed off in short order by ComicBook/GreenArrow. It was quite a waste, but not nearly the worst thing about that series.
** There were hints that Prometheus would actually return in some form, as both his helmet (which contained most of his knowledge) and the [[{{Lobotomy}} lobotomized]] [[EmptyShell body]] of his sidekick, I.Q., were later shown to be missing. It seems like there was a plan that was regulated to an AbortedArc thanks to the Comicbook/{{New 52}}.



* Franchise/{{Superman}}:
** InvertedTrope: By Creator/GeoffJohns was the revelation in ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' that AxCrazy Toyman was a robot designed to fool even Superman, and the real Toyman was still a HarmlessVillain. (A HarmlessVillain who was still ''indirectly'' responsible for Adam Grant's death, but still...). Also, every other previous incarnation deviating too much from Johns' Toyman? a robot did it...
** Geoff Johns invoked this ''very same trope'' the ''very next issue of'' ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' where every single appearance by ComicBook/{{Brainiac}} in the ComicBook/PostCrisis DCU, prior to Johns' ''Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'' storyline was actually a "Brainiac probe". Even Milton Fine wasn't possessed by Vil Dox's disembodied intelligence, but by nanoprobes.
* Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}:
** Super-villain Toyman's robots look like real human beings, and they are capable of deceive even Kara's XRayVision. In "Day of the Dollmaker" Kara invokes the trope when she warns Toyman that he will answer her questions lest she believes he is actually a robot and tears him apart to verify it.
--->'''Supergirl:''' And how do we know you're even the real Winslow Schott? I've seen one of your robots before -- no, two of them. One here in Gotham, the other on New Krypton. And that one had a part in my world's destruction. A small part, sure, but an important one. Your work is very well made. Impossible to tell apart from real, live human beings, even with my X-Ray vision. So please. Answer Ms. Grant's questions, or else another outburst like that will lead me to believe you're one of Schott's automatons... and I'll start probing to make sure you're real.
** In ''Comicbook/SupergirlRebirth #2'', Kara fights Cyborg Superman. She wins, but she is disappointed when she discovers that it is only a drone.
--->'''Supergirl:''' Of course... Another lie. Another fake. A drone. It exploded but... I barely touched it.



* In one of the ''ComicBook/TheBatmanAdventures'' comics, it was revealed that the redesigned green-skinned, elfin Poison Ivy that appeared in the later episodes of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' was actually a PlantPerson created by the real Ivy to keep up appearances in Gotham while she went on the lam and shacked up with [[Comicbook/SwampThing Alec Holland]]. Disturbingly, the plant actually thought she was the real Ivy right up until the end when she fell victim to CloneDegeneration.



* A fairly literal example from ''Big Bang Comics'' -- Ultiman hints that he has never actually met his archenemy Cortex, and that Cortex commits all his crimes by way of a series of robotic doubles. This isn't a secret on Cortex's part, and he tends to destroy the doubles himself by having them self-destruct upon their capture.



* In the fan-loved "Fragments of Autumn" issue of ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures, [[RobotGirl Lyla]] accidentally shot a policeman.Since droids were recently given legal rights,she was [[DeconstructedTrope put on trial for that,rather that just going through a check up]]. However it was revealed that the policeman was actually another robot and that the whole incident was staged by a corrupt politician.



* {{Subverted}}/{{Averted}} in a (Warren times) [[ComicBook/{{Vampirella}} Vampirella]] story, where your mad scientist of the week produces Vampirella clones. No advanced fanboy bookings, please - the angered real Vampirella killed them all to prove that there is no substitute, and that was it. Astonishingly, none of those clones ever resurfaced in the Harris/Dynamite era. [[SarcasmMode Perhaps because no writer ever bothers to read the Warren comics.]]

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!!Franchise/TheDCU
* This is revealed to be the case during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' for the ComicBook/NewGods and ComicBook/{{Darkseid}}. All that Earth has ever seen is somewhat limited projections of the real gods which operate on a higher plane of reality.
* And then there's Prometheus, a DC villain who was created to be a sort of anti-Batman who was so intelligent and well-trained he could almost take out the entire Justice League on his own. Except that he had long since fallen prey to VillainDecay and had been reduced to just another generic baddie who gets his butt kicked by whatever hero happens to be around. The [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League]] miniseries ''Comicbook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice'' attempted to fix this by revealing that the real Prometheus had been in hiding since he almost killed the JLA, and the loser who kept getting kicked around all these years was an impostor, who Prometheus had killed. But now the real deal was back, ready and able to... get killed off in short order by ComicBook/GreenArrow. It was quite a waste, but not nearly the worst thing about that series.
** There were hints that Prometheus would actually return in some form, as both his helmet (which contained most of his knowledge) and the [[{{Lobotomy}} lobotomized]] [[EmptyShell body]] of his sidekick, I.Q., were later shown to be missing. It seems like there was a plan that was regulated to an AbortedArc thanks to the Comicbook/{{New 52}}.
* Franchise/{{Superman}}:
** InvertedTrope: By Creator/GeoffJohns was the revelation in ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' that AxCrazy Toyman was a robot designed to fool even Superman, and the real Toyman was still a HarmlessVillain. (A HarmlessVillain who was still ''indirectly'' responsible for Adam Grant's death, but still...). Also, every other previous incarnation deviating too much from Johns' Toyman? a robot did it...
** Geoff Johns invoked this ''very same trope'' the ''very next issue of'' ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' where every single appearance by ComicBook/{{Brainiac}} in the ComicBook/PostCrisis DCU, prior to Johns' ''Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'' storyline was actually a "Brainiac probe". Even Milton Fine wasn't possessed by Vil Dox's disembodied intelligence, but by nanoprobes.
* Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}:
** Super-villain Toyman's robots look like real human beings, and they are capable of deceive even Kara's XRayVision. In "Day of the Dollmaker" Kara invokes the trope when she warns Toyman that he will answer her questions lest she believes he is actually a robot and tears him apart to verify it.
--->'''Supergirl:''' And how do we know you're even the real Winslow Schott? I've seen one of your robots before -- no, two of them. One here in Gotham, the other on New Krypton. And that one had a part in my world's destruction. A small part, sure, but an important one. Your work is very well made. Impossible to tell apart from real, live human beings, even with my X-Ray vision. So please. Answer Ms. Grant's questions, or else another outburst like that will lead me to believe you're one of Schott's automatons... and I'll start probing to make sure you're real.
** In ''Comicbook/SupergirlRebirth #2'', Kara fights Cyborg Superman. She wins, but she is disappointed when she discovers that it is only a drone.
--->'''Supergirl:''' Of course... Another lie. Another fake. A drone. It exploded but... I barely touched it.
* In one of the ''ComicBook/TheBatmanAdventures'' comics, it was revealed that the redesigned green-skinned, elfin Poison Ivy that appeared in the later episodes of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' was actually a PlantPerson created by the real Ivy to keep up appearances in Gotham while she went on the lam and shacked up with [[Comicbook/SwampThing Alec Holland]]. Disturbingly, the plant actually thought she was the real Ivy right up until the end when she fell victim to CloneDegeneration.

!!Other
* A fairly literal example from ''Big Bang Comics'' -- Ultiman hints that he has never actually met his archenemy Cortex, and that Cortex commits all his crimes by way of a series of robotic doubles. This isn't a secret on Cortex's part, and he tends to destroy the doubles himself by having them self-destruct upon their capture.
* In the fan-loved "Fragments of Autumn" issue of ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures, [[RobotGirl Lyla]] accidentally shot a policeman.Since droids were recently given legal rights,she was [[DeconstructedTrope put on trial for that,rather that just going through a check up]]. However it was revealed that the policeman was actually another robot and that the whole incident was staged by a corrupt politician.
* {{Subverted}}/{{Averted}} in a (Warren times) [[ComicBook/{{Vampirella}} Vampirella]] ComicBook/{{Vampirella}} story, where your mad scientist of the week produces Vampirella clones. No advanced fanboy bookings, please - the angered real Vampirella killed them all to prove that there is no substitute, and that was it. Astonishingly, none of those clones ever resurfaced in the Harris/Dynamite era. [[SarcasmMode Perhaps because no writer ever bothers to read the Warren comics.]]
26th Feb '17 6:15:13 AM lrrose
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* In ''ComicBook/MassEffectRedemption'', Liara manages to track down and shoot the reclusive Shadow Broker, only to realize that what she just shot was a humanoid-shaped communication device.
14th Feb '17 2:54:49 PM ILikeRobots
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** The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea'' subseries does this twice. In the first game, BigBad Gharnef creates two clones of himself during his chapter. Stat-wise, the clones look identical to the real Gharnef, and the game ''acts'' as though they're immune to non-starlight damage, but they really aren't. The real one could be any of the three (it's random, and changes every time), but you'll know a clone when you kill it because they don't have death quotes. They also all appear to be carrying the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Falchion]], but two of them are fakes... which, interestingly enough, also follow this trope: their stats show up the same as the real one, but when dropped they turn out to be just an ordinary Steel Sword.
** In ''New Mystery'', the Roro you fight as the boss of Chapter 6x turns out to be just a clone. You won't fight the ''real'' Roro until 12x... where he's accompanied by [[UpToEleven an entire army of Roros]]. There are three 'boss' Roros with slightly higher stats, and a whole bunch of {{Mook}} Roros. The {{Mooks}} spawn constantly until you kill the real one, which could be any of the three 'boss' versions. (like Gharnef, it's random) This trope is also discussed in-story, it's implied Roro has taken this to such extremes even ''he'' doesn't know which of his clones is the real one anymore.

to:

** The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea'' subseries does this twice. ** In the first game, ''Videogame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight,'' BigBad Gharnef creates two clones of himself during his chapter. Stat-wise, the clones look identical to the real Gharnef, and the game ''acts'' as though they're immune to non-starlight damage, but they really aren't. The real one could be any of the three (it's random, and changes every time), but you'll know a clone when you kill it because they don't have death quotes. They also all appear to be carrying the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Falchion]], but two of them are fakes... which, interestingly enough, also follow this trope: their stats show up the same as the real one, but when dropped they turn out to be just an ordinary Steel Sword.
** In ''New Mystery'', ''[[Videogame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem New Mystery]]'', the Roro you fight as the boss of Chapter 6x turns out to be just a clone. You won't fight the ''real'' Roro until 12x... where he's accompanied by [[UpToEleven an entire army of Roros]]. There are three 'boss' Roros with slightly higher stats, and a whole bunch of {{Mook}} Roros. The {{Mooks}} spawn constantly until you kill the real one, which could be any of the three 'boss' versions. (like Gharnef, it's random) This trope is also discussed in-story, it's implied Roro has taken this to such extremes even ''he'' doesn't know which of his clones is the real one anymore.



** The Japanese version of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'' also says that [[spoiler:The Black Knight]] that Ike defeated in ''Path of Radiance'' was a "ghost" created by malfunctioning warp powder. The English localization, however, thinking that was ridiculous, changed it to an instance of ILetYouWin using existing canon and characterization.

to:

** The Japanese version of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn'' also says that [[spoiler:The Black Knight]] that Ike defeated in ''Path of Radiance'' ''Videogame/FireEmblemPathOfRadiance'' was a "ghost" created by malfunctioning warp powder. The English localization, however, thinking that was ridiculous, changed it to an instance of ILetYouWin using existing canon and characterization.
14th Feb '17 1:41:30 PM ILikeRobots
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia'' does this twice. In the first game, BigBad Gharnef creates two clones of himself during his chapter. Stat-wise, the clones look identical to the real Gharnef, and the game ''acts'' as though they're immune to non-starlight damage, but they really aren't. The real one could be any of the three (it's random, and changes every time), but you'll know a clone when you kill it because they don't have death quotes. They also all appear to be carrying the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Falchion]], but two of them are fakes... which, interestingly enough, also follow this trope: their stats show up the same as the real one, but when dropped they turn out to be just an ordinary Steel Sword.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblem:''
** The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea'' subseries
does this twice. In the first game, BigBad Gharnef creates two clones of himself during his chapter. Stat-wise, the clones look identical to the real Gharnef, and the game ''acts'' as though they're immune to non-starlight damage, but they really aren't. The real one could be any of the three (it's random, and changes every time), but you'll know a clone when you kill it because they don't have death quotes. They also all appear to be carrying the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Falchion]], but two of them are fakes... which, interestingly enough, also follow this trope: their stats show up the same as the real one, but when dropped they turn out to be just an ordinary Steel Sword.



** ''Fire Emblem Gaiden'' also uses this, but in the "HandWave for the player winning what's supposed to be a HopelessBossFight" form. Dozer, the game's StarterVillain, appears on the map in an early chapter with stats normally too high for you to beat at that point. If you somehow ''do'' manage to defeat him, his NumberTwo reveals he was actually a BodyDouble. [[SchrodingersGun It's likely this is only true if you beat him]], since the body double isn't mentioned anywhere else.

to:

** ''Fire Emblem Gaiden'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemGaiden'' also uses this, but in the "HandWave for the player winning what's supposed to be a HopelessBossFight" form. Dozer, the game's StarterVillain, appears on the map in an early chapter with stats normally too high for you to beat at that point. If you somehow ''do'' manage to defeat him, his NumberTwo reveals he was actually a BodyDouble. [[SchrodingersGun It's likely this is only true if you beat him]], since the body double isn't mentioned anywhere else.
26th Jan '17 1:59:36 AM rafi
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* Marvel's Mephisto has sometimes been impersonated by lesser demons who imitate his form. Such demons are defeated far more easily than the virtually invincible Mephisto.

to:

* Marvel's Mephisto ComicBook/{{Mephisto}} has sometimes been impersonated by lesser demons who imitate his form. Such demons are defeated far more easily than the virtually invincible Mephisto.



* This is revealed to be the case during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' for the ComicBook/NewGods and {{ComicBook/Darkseid}}. All that Earth has ever seen is somewhat limited projections of the real gods which operate on a higher plane of reality.

to:

* This is revealed to be the case during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' for the ComicBook/NewGods and {{ComicBook/Darkseid}}.ComicBook/{{Darkseid}}. All that Earth has ever seen is somewhat limited projections of the real gods which operate on a higher plane of reality.
11th Jan '17 7:45:53 PM NineballCirno
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** ''Challenge Of The Superfriends'' had another example of good guys using this trick. The Legion of Doom found out about a sealed away weapon that could act as a lethal death ray to the heroes and tricked Superman into breaking the vault open. (That's right, this episode suspended the show's NeverSayDie policy.) The Legion of Doom were apparently then able to decimate the heroes mercilessly, often in front of terrified citizens. When it seemed all the heroes had perished and the villains had achieved complete victory, Luthor saw no further need for the thing, and casually threw it away. A ''terrible'' mistake. A day later, the Superfriends reappeared, and after pulping the villains, revealed that they had been hiding in their satellite base (presumably a sort of precursor to the Watchtower) while using android duplicates created by Superman in the Fortress of Solitude to make the Legion believe they had been killed. Once Luthor threw it away, the Apache Chief went into the sewer in protective clothing and destroyed it, permanently. (Of course, [[FridgeLogic when you think about it]], the Legion of Doom should have been suspicious when they seemed to win so easily...)



* ''WesternAnimation/ChallengeOfTheSuperfriends'' had another example of good guys using this trick. The Legion of Doom found out about a sealed away weapon that could act as a lethal death ray to the heroes and tricked Superman into breaking the vault open. (That's right, this episode suspended the show's NeverSayDie policy.) The Legion of Doom were apparently then able to decimate the heroes mercilessly, often in front of terrified citizens. When it seemed all the heroes had perished and the villains had achieved complete victory, Luthor saw no further need for the thing, and casually threw it away. A ''terrible'' mistake. A day later, the Superfriends reappeared, and after pulping the villains, revealed that they had been hiding in their satellite base (presumably a sort of precursor to the Watchtower) while using android duplicates created by Superman in the Fortress of Solitude to make the Legion believe they had been killed. Once Luthor threw it away, the Apache Chief went into the sewer in protective clothing and destroyed it, permanently. (Of course, [[FridgeLogic when you think about it]], the Legion of Doom should have been suspicious when they seemed to win so easily...)
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