History Main / AbsurdlyHighLevelCap

10th Aug '17 2:56:03 AM ironcommando
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* [[http://www.kongregate.com/games/xmmmx99/the-perfect-tower The Perfect Tower]] is an IdleGame that takes this to an extreme. The level cap on certain upgrades can reach 100000, and if you max yourself out, most enemies of a same tier won't even be able to scratch you. But once the enemy's level gets high enough and their damage and health go over the numerical {{Cap}} (about 10^324)... they tier up, and if their tier is higher than yours, they don't take any damage from your tower AND they OneHitKill you. To counter this, you need to tier up your own tower, and in order to do so you need to max out all your tower's upgrades. Doing this resets your upgrades, which also means you need to buy all the massively leveled upgrades all over again to get to the next tier and so on, making this game a huge example of a ludicrously high level cap.

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* [[http://www.kongregate.com/games/xmmmx99/the-perfect-tower The Perfect Tower]] is an IdleGame that takes this to an extreme. The level cap on certain upgrades can reach 100000, and if you max yourself out, most enemies of a same tier won't even be able to scratch you. But once the enemy's level gets high enough and their damage and health go over the numerical {{Cap}} (about 10^324)...10^308)... they tier up, and if their tier is higher than yours, they don't take any damage from your tower AND they OneHitKill you. To counter this, you need to tier up your own tower, and in order to do so you need to max out all your tower's upgrades. Doing this resets your upgrades, which also means you need to buy all the massively leveled upgrades all over again to get to the next tier and so on, making this game a huge example of a ludicrously high level cap.
2nd Aug '17 3:44:29 PM thatother1dude
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' surpasses ''Fallout 2'' in absurdness by merit of the revamped [[SkillScoresAndPerks perk system]]. Like ''Skyrim'', there's an effective level cap (above which there is [[EmptyLevels no possible gain from leveling up]] besides a small HP increase), in this case 318, and a hard level cap of ''none''--unless you count level '''[[UsefulNotes/PowersOfTwoMinusOne 65535]]''', above which the game will literally break due to overflow.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' surpasses ''Fallout 2'' in absurdness by merit of the revamped [[SkillScoresAndPerks perk system]]. Like ''Skyrim'', there's an effective level cap (above which there is [[EmptyLevels no possible gain from leveling up]] besides up but a small HP increase), increase]]), in this case 318, 318 (lower if you find the items that increase your base stats), and a hard level cap of ''none''--unless you count level '''[[UsefulNotes/PowersOfTwoMinusOne 65535]]''', above which the game will literally break due to overflow.
18th Jul '17 9:55:22 PM GastonRabbit
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* ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' does this two different ways, the first cap being with character levels. The level cap for the three playable characters is 99, in a game where you can comfortably finish at level 50, and [=HP=] will max out at about level 55 or so. Past level 60, the characters become powerful enough that the enemies in the final dungeon are pathetic, even without magic spamming.
** The other AbsurdlyHighLevelCap is in weapon levels. Getting the final Weapon Orbs is either done through a [[GoodBadBugs glitch]] or [[RandomDrops randomly dropping in treasure chests in the final dungeon]], and they may end up [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]]. Even then, grinding for those last few weapon levels is fairly pointless. The charged attacks past level five are AwesomeButImpractical, since in the time it takes you to charge any higher, you'll have not only hit the damage cap, but could spam the lower-level attacks much faster for greater overall damage.
* Similarly, ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' has a level cap of 99, but the game (including the BonusBoss) can be beaten at level 50, and that is the highest level that normal enemies are in the game. The player will reach all their characters' stat caps not too long after, and leveling up more will only give miniscule max HP gains.

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* ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' does this two different ways, the first cap being with character levels. The level cap for the three playable characters is 99, in a game where you can comfortably finish at level 50, and [=HP=] HP will max out at about level 55 or so. Past level 60, the characters become powerful enough that the enemies in the final dungeon are pathetic, even without magic spamming.
**
spamming. The other AbsurdlyHighLevelCap is in weapon levels. Getting the final Weapon Orbs is either done through a [[GoodBadBugs glitch]] or [[RandomDrops randomly dropping in treasure chests in the final dungeon]], and they may end up [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]]. Even then, grinding for those last few weapon levels is fairly pointless. The charged attacks past level five are AwesomeButImpractical, since in the time it takes you to charge any higher, you'll have not only hit the damage cap, but could spam the lower-level attacks much faster for greater overall damage.
* Similarly, ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' has a level cap of 99, but the game (including the BonusBoss) can be beaten at level 50, and that is the highest level that normal enemies are in the game. The player will reach all their characters' stat caps not too long after, and leveling up more will only give miniscule max HP gains.



* In the ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, you're likely to beat the [[FinalBoss Elite]] [[BossRush Four]] with Pokémon around level 50 or so. Later generations have added endgame content that will probably bring your Pokémon up to level 60-70, even though the level cap is 100. Of course, [[TrueFinalBoss Red]] and [[BonusBoss Barry]] have teams in the 80s.
** In the ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon'' Series the final Boss, be it [[spoiler:Rayquaza, Primal Dialga, Bittercold or Dark Matter]], can be defeated around level 30 and 40, and like in the Main Series, the Level caps at 100. However, post-credits storylines can usually take the player up to around level 60, and in some of the games, a couple of the bonus dungeons will require the player to be near or even at the level cap to stand a chance of beating them.

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* In the ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, you're likely to beat the [[BossRush Elite Four]] and [[FinalBoss Elite]] [[BossRush Four]] Champion]] with Pokémon around level 50 or so. Later generations have added endgame content that will probably bring your Pokémon up to level 60-70, even though the level cap is 100. Of course, [[TrueFinalBoss Red]] and [[BonusBoss Barry]] have teams in the 80s.
** In the ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon'' Series series the final Boss, be it [[spoiler:Rayquaza, Primal Dialga, Bittercold Bittercold, or Dark Matter]], can be defeated around level 30 and 40, and like in the Main Series, main series, the Level level caps at 100. However, post-credits storylines can usually take the player up to around level 60, and in some of the games, a couple of the bonus dungeons will require the player to be near or even at the level cap to stand a chance of beating them.



* In ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'', the highest tier spells are learned at around level 54 and you can go up to 99, but you only need to be about level 30 to defeat the final boss of the first game, while level 40 is enough for the final bosses of ''The Lost Age'' and ''Dark Dawn''.

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* In ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'', the highest tier highest-tier spells are learned at around level 54 and you can go up to 99, but you only need to be about level 30 to defeat the final boss of the first game, while level 40 is enough for the final bosses of ''The Lost Age'' and ''Dark Dawn''.



* While the first ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' had a sensible max level (level 27; just above what you'd end with) ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'', ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'', and the ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigi Mario & Luigi]]'' series cap at 99 (100 in ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPartnersInTime''.) The Amazy Dayzee in both of the pre-Wii Paper Mario games is the only enemy that will give the necessary Star Points to do so, however. This isn't hard to do in the first ''Paper Mario'', since these creatures only appear in one predictable place and give enough Star Points to max your levels early on, but doing so in ''The Thousand-Year Door'' requires supreme patience. Just maxing out badge points alone to 99 requires 32 level-ups; a few more than you'd typically beat the FinalBoss with.
** ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiBowsersInsideStory Bowser's Inside Story]]'' also about halves the effect of each level up after 50, making it even more pointless. Doesn't help that you need to keep resetting the final dungeon to even find enemies worth fighting for more experience. However, once you get to "rainbow rank" you can kill most bosses in one hit.
** ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam'' has this with its level cap. In theory, it's level 100, but in practice... not only does the effect halve as you go up, but the amount of experience required to get there means you'd have to spend an additional 60 or so hours just grinding to reach it. In a game which usually takes about 35 hours to complete. On the bright side, if you do get there, even the final boss dies in one turn.
** ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPaperJam'' is similar. You can beat the final boss in the low to mid-thirties, and can be strong enough to fight the BonusBoss [[spoiler:Dry Bowser]] at Level 50.

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* While the first ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' had a sensible max level (level 27; just above what you'd end with) with), ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'', ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'', and the ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigi Mario & Luigi]]'' series cap at 99 (100 in ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPartnersInTime''.) ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPartnersInTime''). The Amazy Dayzee in both of the pre-Wii Paper Mario ''Paper Mario'' games is the only enemy that will give the necessary Star Points to do so, however. This isn't hard to do in the first ''Paper Mario'', since these creatures only appear in one predictable place and give enough Star Points to max your levels early on, but doing so in ''The Thousand-Year Door'' requires supreme patience. Just maxing out badge points alone to 99 requires 32 level-ups; a few more than you'd typically beat the FinalBoss with.
** ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiBowsersInsideStory Bowser's Inside Story]]'' also about nearly halves the effect of each level up after 50, making it even more pointless. Doesn't help that you need to keep resetting the final dungeon to even find enemies worth fighting for more experience. However, once you get to "rainbow rank" you can kill most bosses in one hit.
** In theory, the level cap in ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam'' has this with its level cap. In theory, it's is level 100, but in practice... not only does the effect halve as you go up, but the amount of experience required to get there means you'd have to spend an additional 60 or so hours just grinding to reach it. In a game which usually takes about 35 hours to complete. On the bright side, if you do get there, even the final boss dies in one turn.
** ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPaperJam'' is similar. You In ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPaperJam'', you can beat the final boss in the low low- to mid-thirties, and can be strong enough to fight the BonusBoss [[spoiler:Dry Bowser]] at Level 50.



* Games in the ''VideoGame/TalesSeries'' have level caps of either 200 or 255, depending on the game. Normal game content typically lasts until your party's levels are in the upper 50s, [[NewGamePlus EXP modifiers notwithstanding.]] Even with the "earn ten times as much EXP" bonus, you're liable to still only be in the upper 100s by the endgame, so you'll still have to grind to reach the maximum level.

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* Games in the ''VideoGame/TalesSeries'' have level caps of either 200 or 255, depending on the game. Normal game content typically lasts until your party's levels are in the upper 50s, [[NewGamePlus EXP modifiers notwithstanding.]] notwithstanding]]. Even with the "earn ten times as much EXP" bonus, you're liable to still only be in the upper 100s by the endgame, so you'll still have to grind to reach the maximum level.



* The ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' series tends to play this straight, with the exceptions of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'', ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'', as they don't have the traditional level-up system. Otherwise most games have a Level cap of 99, and can mostly be completed fine by a party at Level 50.
** The original ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' applies if you're using an average strength party. The final boss can be beaten at level 25 or so well before the level cap of 50. If you're playing with a weaker party (say all mages) or playing a duo or solo run, you're grateful for the ability to level. Even at level 50 a solo Thief or Black Mage has a hard time beating the final dungeon.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' plays this straighter than the rest, given the nature of the Sphere Grid. And that's not even considering if you want to start replacing nodes with the HP needed to max out your counter while using the "Break HP Limit" weapon skills. There's actually nowhere enough nodes on the entire grid to max all stats including HP and MP even if you go through the 100-1000 hour effort (depending on how many leveling-up shortcuts you abuse) of clearing all nodes and replacing them with optimal versions and activating them with all characters, so. Depending on if you count the practical level cap or the theoretical, it's either absurdly high or unattainably high.
*** It also plays it straight with blitzball players' levels. The cap is 99, but you can easily win all of the important items that blitzball has to offer by a much lower level. Players only gain XP by performing actions (passing, shooting, making a save), and considering the length of BB games, few players will gain that much each match. Higher-level passing and shooting abilities increase the amount of XP per action, but they require substantially more HP to perform, and since HP goes up with level, low-level players can't abuse the highest-level abilities to level up quickly. Probably the fastest way to get a full level 99 team is to move the two players lined up as defenders as close to each other as possible and constantly spam the best passing move they can handle, making sure to rotate different players into those spots if one wants to keep the team evenly leveled.

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* The ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' series tends to play this straight, with the exceptions of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'', ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'', and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'', as they don't have the traditional level-up system. Otherwise most games have a Level cap of 99, and can mostly be completed fine by a party at Level 50.
** The original ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' applies if you're using an average strength average-strength party. The final boss can be beaten at level 25 or so well before the level cap of 50. If you're playing with a weaker party (say (say, all mages) or playing a duo or solo run, you're grateful for the ability to level. Even at level 50 a solo Thief or Black Mage has a hard time beating the final dungeon.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' plays this straighter than the rest, given the nature of the Sphere Grid. And that's not even considering if you want to start replacing nodes with the HP needed to max out your counter while using the "Break HP Limit" weapon skills. There's actually nowhere enough nodes on the entire grid to max all stats including HP and MP even if you go through the 100-1000 hour effort (depending on how many leveling-up shortcuts you abuse) of clearing all nodes and replacing them with optimal versions and activating them with all characters, so. Depending on if you count the practical level cap or the theoretical, it's either absurdly high or unattainably high.
***
high.\\
It also plays it straight with blitzball players' levels. The cap is 99, but you can easily win all of the important items that blitzball has to offer by a much lower level. Players only gain XP by performing actions (passing, shooting, making a save), and considering the length of BB games, few players will gain that much each match. Higher-level passing and shooting abilities increase the amount of XP per action, but they require substantially more HP to perform, and since HP goes up with level, low-level players can't abuse the highest-level abilities to level up quickly. Probably the fastest way to get a full level 99 team is to move the two players lined up as defenders as close to each other as possible and constantly spam the best passing move they can handle, making sure to rotate different players into those spots if one wants to keep the team evenly leveled.



* The earlier ''VideoGame/RuneFactory'' games had a maximum level of 99, far beyond what you needed to complete the game. ''VideoGame/RuneFactory3'' bumps this up to ''10,000''.
** The followup for the 3DS, VideoGame/RuneFactory4, boosts this to 50,000, while curiously decreasing the skill level cap to 99. Given that you can eventually craft level- and stat- raising items in bulk, the only real limit to that is your willingness to craft and consume each one of them one by one.

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* The earlier ''VideoGame/RuneFactory'' games had a maximum level of 99, far beyond what you needed to complete the game. ''VideoGame/RuneFactory3'' bumps this up to ''10,000''.
**
''10,000''. The followup for the 3DS, VideoGame/RuneFactory4, boosts this to 50,000, while curiously decreasing the skill level cap to 99. Given that you can eventually craft level- and stat- raising stat-raising items in bulk, the only real limit to that is your willingness to craft and consume each one of them one by one.



** In ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'', the level cap is 30 at 65535 EXP, but you can curbstomp the Dragonlord well before then, around Level 24 (you need a minimum of Level 20 to have the least chance at beating him). If you reach level 30, the king will lampshade this by saying "Thou art strong enough! Why can thou not defeat the Dragonlord?"
*** Unlike most others on this list, however, it actually becomes ''easier'' to gain levels, as the XP amount between levels is static at that point, even though you're dealing more damage and taking less in return. However, since 98% of the entire game is grind, it's all a matter of whether you even want to bother grinding more than you have to.

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** In ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'', the level cap is 30 at 65535 EXP, but you can curbstomp the Dragonlord well before then, around Level 24 (you need a minimum of Level 20 to have the least chance at beating him). If you reach level 30, the king will lampshade this by saying "Thou art strong enough! Why can thou not defeat the Dragonlord?"
***
Dragonlord?" Unlike most others on this list, however, it actually becomes ''easier'' to gain levels, as the XP amount between levels is static at that point, even though you're dealing more damage and taking less in return. However, since 98% of the entire game is grind, grinding, it's all a matter of whether you even want to bother grinding more than you have to.



** And in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'', the level cap is 99; you'll be needing over 65535 XP ''per level'' when you get much past 50! Oh, and did I mention that XP is not shared between vocations (classes), so you could be a level 99 warrior but only a level 1 mage? And you can reset back to level 1 if you want, in order to get more skill points and a "special" item related to the vocation...

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** And in In ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'', the level cap is 99; you'll be needing over 65535 XP ''per level'' when you get much past 50! Oh, and did I mention that XP is not shared between vocations (classes), so you could be a level 99 warrior but only a level 1 mage? mage. And you can reset back to level 1 if you want, in order to get more skill points and a "special" item related to the vocation...vocation.
14th Jul '17 3:25:03 PM tadaru
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* Similarly, ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' has a level cap of 99, but the game (including the BonusBoss) can be beaten at level 50, and that is the highest level that normal enemies are in the game. The player will reach all their characters' stat caps not too long after, and leveling up more will only give miniscule max HP gains.
6th Jul '17 6:15:20 PM ironcommando
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* [[http://www.kongregate.com/games/xmmmx99/the-perfect-tower The Perfect Tower]] is an IdleGame that takes this to an extreme. The level cap on certain upgrades can reach 100000, and if you max yourself out, most enemies of a same tier won't even be able to scratch you. But once the enemy's level gets high enough and their damage and health go over the numerical {{Cap}} (about 10^324)... they tier up, and if their tier is higher than yours, they don't take any damage from your tower AND they OneHitKill you. To counter this, you need to tier up your own tower, and in order to do so you need to max out all your tower's upgrades. Doing this resets your upgrades, which also means you need to buy all the massively leveled upgrades all over again to get to the next tier and so on, making this game a huge example of a ludicrously high level cap.
30th Jun '17 7:16:44 AM PinkCelebi
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* There is no level cap in ''VideoGame/{{Gemcraft}}''; instead, it has a cap on how much experience you can get due to the fact beating the same field twice gives you only difference between your new and old record - fail to beat it and you get nothing.
** Downplayed in ''The Forgotten'' due to the fact it's much harder to grind than in the later games. You can reach the last level as early as late 50s, but if you go out of your way to grind on all levels, you will likely reach it with level somewhere in 80s, which will allow you to max out most of the skills.
** Maxing out all skills in ''Gem of Eternity'' requires your level to somewhere around 200. This is much higher than the level required to beat the game, but also nowhere the level you can get by grinding as much as you can. This entry is unique in the fact that each of the level's battle modes are considered to be unique for the purpose of gaining levels.
** In ''Labyrinth'' and ''Chasing Shadows'' it's high enough to make even Disgaea hang its head in shame. By stacking difficulty, talisman bonuses, and battle settings/traits, you can gain billions of XP per level. and with 169 fields in ''Labyrinth'' and up to 191 in ''Chasing Shadows'' (including Magician's Pouch-exclusive and Steam-exclusive fields), your wizard level can get absurdly high. The soft level cap is generally considered to be somewhere around Level 10,000 in ''Labyrinth'' and 50,000 in ''Chasing Shadows''.
15th Jun '17 5:28:57 PM Kadorhal
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Note that this is not about games with really big numbers as the level cap, but for games where poor pacing of experience means you won't get anywhere near the cap without absurd amounts of LevelGrinding. A game can have a level cap of, say, 30, but if you're only level 10 or so by the end of the game, it counts. (Likewise, if the level cap is something like 999, but is easily attainable by the end of the game, this trope does not apply.)

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Note that this is not just about games with really big numbers as the level cap, but for games where poor pacing of experience means you won't get anywhere near the cap without absurd amounts of LevelGrinding. A game can have LevelGrinding; a level cap of, say, 30, but of 999 wouldn't count if you're only you can be reasonably expected to be at least level 10 or so 950 by the end of time you reach the game, it counts. (Likewise, if the endgame. Conversely, a level cap is something like 999, but is easily attainable by of simply 30 would be absurdly-high if you only need to be level 10 to beat the end of the game, this trope does not apply.)
game.



* In the age of [[DownloadableContent DLC]], [[GameMod modding]], and [[ExpansionPack expansion packs]], game companies can add on (or have added on by modders) content that extends gameplay without needing to rework basic mechanics. (Although games with expansions can just add "level cap upper" expansion packs.)

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* In the age of [[DownloadableContent DLC]], [[GameMod modding]], and [[ExpansionPack expansion packs]], game companies can add on (or have added on by modders) content that extends gameplay without needing to rework basic mechanics. (Although Although games with expansions can just add "level cap upper" expansion packs.)



* ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' is a somewhat notorious case for this - ''Battlefield 2'' in particular has the average player go through about sixteen ranks, but the low amount of points gained per kill makes it take forever to actually rank up without going to specific point-farming servers (the requirements, in fact, were actually lowered when it was discovered that the highest-scoring player account - which was actually multiple people playing on one account so they could play more often than normal - would take ''two years'' to reach the highest rank).
* The ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' series zigzags this trope. The main story of each game will get you to about level 30, but the level caps let you go up to 50. These extra levels were intended for your NewGamePlus, known as True Vault Hunter Mode in ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' and ''VideoGame/BorderlandsThePreSequel'' and simply Playthrough 2 in the original game, as well as the raid bosses in the first two games. Completing the main story a second time in this NewGamePlus ''would'' put you right around the level cap... until DLC came along to raise it. The final cap for the original game was 69, but while no Playthrough 3 was ever added, completing Playthrough 2 would cause all enemies to scale to your current level. ''2'' and ''Pre-Sequel'', on the other hand, did add a third playthrough alongside the new level caps[[note]]72 and 70, respectively[[/note]], Ultimate Vault Hunter Mode, in which everything scales with your level, negating all advantages of level-grinding except the additional skill points you'd get in the process; ''2'' took things one step further with Overpower Mode, in which characters that had reached the level cap could level up the enemies and loot they'd encounter even more. All in all, while the level caps were great for players that wanted a challenge, they were completely gratuitous for players that were just interested in one run of the story.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' is a somewhat notorious case for this - ''Battlefield 2'' in particular has the average player go through about sixteen ranks, but the low amount of points gained per kill makes it take forever to actually rank up without going to specific point-farming servers (the servers. The requirements, in fact, were actually lowered when it was discovered that the highest-scoring player account - which was actually multiple people playing on one account so they could play more often than normal - would still take ''two years'' to reach the highest rank).
rank.
* The ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' series zigzags this trope. The main story of each game will get you to about level 30, but the level caps let you go up to 50. These extra levels were intended for your NewGamePlus, known as True Vault Hunter Mode in ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' and ''VideoGame/BorderlandsThePreSequel'' and simply Playthrough 2 in the original game, as well as the raid bosses in the first two games. Completing the main story a second time in like this NewGamePlus ''would'' put you right around the level cap... until DLC came along to raise it. The final cap for the original game was 69, but while no Playthrough 3 was ever added, completing Playthrough 2 would cause all enemies to scale to your current level. ''2'' and ''Pre-Sequel'', on the other hand, did add a third playthrough alongside the new level caps[[note]]72 and 70, respectively[[/note]], Ultimate Vault Hunter Mode, in which everything scales with your level, negating all advantages of level-grinding except the additional skill points you'd get in the process; ''2'' took things one step further with Overpower Mode, in which characters that had reached the level cap could level up the enemies and loot they'd encounter even more. All in all, while the level caps were great for players that wanted a challenge, they were completely gratuitous for players that were just interested in one run of the story.
15th Jun '17 5:21:53 PM Kadorhal
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* Played with by the ''VideoGame/{{Call of Duty}}'' franchise, starting with ''Call of Duty 4: VideoGame/ModernWarfare'' (well, the console versions; PC didn't get to do that until ''Modern Warfare 2''). Players are able to level up (the cap is different for each game), unlocking new weapons, support equipment, and [[RPGElements Perks]] as they go. At the maximum level, the player has the option to [[SelfImposedChallenge "Prestige"]], reverting to level 1, essentially starting again. Later games use this to unlock unique cosmetic elements and extra Custom Class slots, but the early games simply let you start climbing the ladder again, up to five times, not really gaining much of anything for your trouble.
** With Call of Duty ELITE for consoles, it's now possible to have your 1000 hours of gameplay time actually shown to the world. Plus, though ''Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3'' started with 10 Prestige levels, people were getting to Prestige 10 and had nothing further to show, so it was increased to 15th Prestige, then now 20th Prestige. At 80 levels a Prestige, that means leveling up 1600 times. Which means, when something goes wrong and an account is hacked or data lost, you better believe there will be people calling Customer Support. (Who, except in cases of mass resets or widespread viruses, can do absolutely nothing to modify in-game stats. It even says as much on the Support web site, but with 1000 hours of playtime, you can't really fault people for trying.)
* ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' is a somewhat notorious case for this - ''Battlefield 2'' in particular has the average player go through about sixteen ranks, but the low amount of points gained per kill makes it take forever to actually rank up without going to specific point-farming servers (the requirements, in fact, were actually lowered when it was discovered that the highest-scoring player account would take ''two years'' to reach the highest rank).

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* Played with by the ''VideoGame/{{Call of Duty}}'' franchise, starting with ''Call of Duty 4: VideoGame/ModernWarfare'' (well, the console versions; PC didn't get to do that until ''Modern Warfare 2'').''World at War''). Players are able to level up (the cap is different for each game), unlocking new weapons, support equipment, and [[RPGElements Perks]] as they go. At the maximum level, the player has the option to [[SelfImposedChallenge "Prestige"]], reverting to level 1, essentially starting again. Later games use this to unlock unique cosmetic elements and extra Custom Class slots, but the early games ''[=CoD4=]'' simply let you start climbing the ladder again, up to five times, not really gaining much of anything for your trouble.
** With Call of Duty ELITE for consoles, it's now possible to have your 1000 hours of gameplay time actually shown to the world. Plus, though ''Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3'' started with 10 Prestige levels, people were getting to Prestige 10 and had nothing further to show, so it was increased to 15th Prestige, then now 20th Prestige. At 80 levels a Prestige, that means leveling up 1600 times. Which means, when something goes wrong and an account is hacked or data lost, you better believe there will be people calling Customer Support. (Who, except in cases of mass resets or widespread viruses, can do absolutely nothing to modify in-game stats. It even says as much on the Support web site, but with 1000 hours of playtime, you can't really fault people for trying.)
* ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' is a somewhat notorious case for this - ''Battlefield 2'' in particular has the average player go through about sixteen ranks, but the low amount of points gained per kill makes it take forever to actually rank up without going to specific point-farming servers (the requirements, in fact, were actually lowered when it was discovered that the highest-scoring player account - which was actually multiple people playing on one account so they could play more often than normal - would take ''two years'' to reach the highest rank).
20th May '17 3:15:36 AM TheDocCC
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Added DiffLines:

** This was changed as of the 1.06 patch; the level cap for the Nexus has been raised. The level cap for multiplayer characters stands.
8th May '17 1:42:34 PM NNinja
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* In ''Esgrima Online'', You could reach a level above 100. The highest level players are around the 105-150 level.

to:

* %%* In ''Esgrima Online'', You could reach a level above 100. The highest level players are around the 105-150 level.
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