History Main / ANuclearError

12th Oct '15 4:13:07 PM TheKaizerreich
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** There was also a case of the USA losing a nuclear bomb, never to be found again. What happened was that an F-86 fighter plane collided with a B-47 bomber carrying the device. To prevent an explosion and loss of the crew, the bomb was dropped. Several unsuccessful searches later, the bomb was presumed lost somewhere in Wassaw Sound off the shores of Tybee Island. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1958_Tybee_Island_mid-air_collision Read the story here.]]
9th Sep '15 11:49:31 AM MsChibi
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* In ''Manga/DeathNote'', Mello gets control of the notebook briefly, and threatens that he will write the President's name in the book and force him to launch a nuke and start WorldWarIII [[SadisticChoice if]] the President doesn't comply with Mello's request to fund the search for Kira. It's not known whether the threat was real, or whether Mello was just bluffing.
6th Sep '15 6:37:49 PM MechWarrior
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** In 1983, war tensions were high between NATO and the Warsaw Pact. For a few years, the USSR under Brezhnev and Andropov were terrified that a United States first strike was imminent, and had instituted the [=RYaN=] (from the Russian meaning something like "Nuclear Rocket Attack") program to find any hints of warlike intentions. [[note]](To make things even worse on this score, the agents tasked with finding this information were berated if they didn't gather positive signs of preparation for a US first strike -- anything that suggested the US was NOT about to nuke Moscow was derided as "misinformation" --, and so liberally interpreted every scrap of info in the worst possible sense. In short, the Soviets were talking themselves, quite by accident, into the very nuclear war they feared was coming from the other side.)[[/note]] In the summer of '83, the Able Archer '83 exercises (a NATO communications exercise meant to simulate the first week of WorldWarThree, culminating on the last day with a rehearsal of an expected nuclear exchange) were held, this coinciding with the controversial arrival of Pershing nuclear missiles [[note]]which were capable of hitting Russia within five to six minutes, well under any sort of Soviet early-warning capability[[/note]]. The Soviets were monitoring in real time and were becoming increasingly alarmed at the exercise. The coinciding of the two events sent Soviet suspicions through the roof. [[FromBadToWorse And, the Soviet early-warning satellite system was fundamentally flawed.]] The system registered five [=ICBM=]s from three separate launches headed towards Russia.[[note]]In reality, what had happened was that sunlight reflecting off the Earth hit in just the right manner to appear to the satellite's IR sensors to be missile launches.[[/note]] [[OnlySaneMan Stanislav Petrov]], the officer in charge of the station, realized quickly that the United States would not launch a first strike with just five missiles - had they actually intended to initiate war they'd have launched ''everything'', in an attempt to cut the head off their enemy before it could retaliate significantly. Suspecting an equipment error, he shut down the first two alarms, and explained to his superiors that he was ignoring the third, citing the fact that only five missiles had been launched. Had he instead given credence to the alarms, the Soviet Union would most likely have launched a "counter"-strike, which the USA would have correctly seen as a first strike. An actual counter-strike would have followed, and we wouldn't be reading TVTropes right now. [[ForWantOfANail And, to top it all off, Petrov wasn't supposed to be the man on duty that day. He had taken the shift for another operator who was sick.]] Needless to say, Petrov - the man who very literally ''saved humanity'' - was [[NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished promptly relieved of duty]] pending [[HauledBeforeASenateSubCommittee an official inquiry.]] (For what it's worth, they decided he'd acted properly and he was reinstated.)
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** In 1983, war tensions were high between NATO and the Warsaw Pact. For a few years, the USSR under Brezhnev and Andropov were terrified that a United States first strike was imminent, and had instituted the [=RYaN=] (from the Russian meaning something like "Nuclear Rocket Attack") program to find any hints of warlike intentions. [[note]](To make things even worse on this score, the agents tasked with finding this information were berated if they didn't gather positive signs of preparation for a US first strike -- anything that suggested the US was NOT about to nuke Moscow was derided as "misinformation" --, and so liberally interpreted every scrap of info in the worst possible sense. In short, the Soviets were talking themselves, quite by accident, into the very nuclear war they feared was coming from the other side.)[[/note]] In the summer of '83, the Able Archer '83 exercises (a NATO communications exercise meant to simulate the first week of WorldWarThree, culminating on the last day with a rehearsal of an expected nuclear exchange) were held, this coinciding with the controversial arrival of Pershing nuclear missiles [[note]]which were capable of hitting Russia within five to six minutes, well under any sort of Soviet early-warning capability[[/note]]. The Soviets were monitoring in real time and were becoming increasingly alarmed at the exercise. The coinciding of the two events sent Soviet suspicions through the roof. [[FromBadToWorse And, the Soviet early-warning satellite system was fundamentally flawed.]] The system registered five [=ICBM=]s from three separate launches headed towards Russia.[[note]]In reality, what had happened was that sunlight reflecting off the Earth hit in just the right manner to appear to the satellite's IR sensors to be missile launches.[[/note]] [[OnlySaneMan Stanislav Petrov]], the officer in charge of the station, realized quickly that the United States would not launch a first strike with just five missiles - had they actually intended to initiate war they'd have launched ''everything'', in an attempt to cut the head off their enemy before it could retaliate significantly. Suspecting an equipment error, he shut down the first two alarms, and explained to his superiors that he was ignoring the third, citing the fact that only five missiles had been launched. Had he instead given credence to the alarms, the Soviet Union would most likely have launched a "counter"-strike, which the USA would have correctly seen as a first strike. An actual counter-strike would have followed, and we wouldn't be reading TVTropes [[HomePage TVTropes]] right now. [[ForWantOfANail And, to top it all off, Petrov wasn't supposed to be the man on duty that day. He had taken the shift for another operator who was sick.]] Needless to say, Petrov - the man who very literally ''saved humanity'' - was [[NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished promptly relieved of duty]] pending [[HauledBeforeASenateSubCommittee an official inquiry.]] (For what it's worth, they decided he'd acted properly and he was reinstated.)
10th Aug '15 4:39:51 PM LtFedora
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** The film opens with a disclaimer from the US Air Force, assuring moviegoers that their safeguards would prevent such events from happening.
10th Aug '15 4:36:51 PM LtFedora
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheIronGiant'' features a mistake regarding USS ''Nautilus''. In the film, the army orders the sub to launch a nuclear missile at the giant. However, ''Nautilus'' was an ''attack submarine'', designed to find and sink ballistic missile subs. The first ballistic missile submarine for the US Navy, USS ''George Washington'', would not enter service until 1959, two years after the events of the film.
20th Jul '15 3:00:17 AM DanielOlive
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** The US nuclear weapons laboratories apparently think that their nukes could not be made to detonate without the codes, even if the labs themselves tried. To date, this has not been tested.
23rd Jun '15 6:32:57 AM Arivne
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** In 1961, the US almost nuked North Carolina (a state on the USA's eastern coast) with a 3-4 megaton bomb when a mid-air refueling accident damaged a B-52 nuclear bomber aeroplane and forced its crew to bail out, leaving the bombs onboard. The aircraft broke up in mid-air, causing one of the two bombs it had carried to deploy its parachute and arm itself as per a usual bomb-drop. The bomb only failed to detonate because a final, single-element safety switch had not been flipped by the crew. The design of the bomber aircraft and bombs, and the routine nature of such flights and refuelings (a fleet of these bombers was in the air at all times, ready to fly north and nuke the USSR at a moment's notice), meant that a repeat of the incident was almost inevitable if the hardware was not modified (it was eventuallly replaced). [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1961_Goldsboro_B-52_crash More details here.]]
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** In 1961, the US almost nuked North Carolina (a state on the USA's eastern coast) with a 3-4 megaton bomb when a mid-air refueling accident damaged a B-52 nuclear bomber aeroplane and forced its crew to bail out, leaving the bombs onboard. The aircraft broke up in mid-air, causing one of the two bombs it had carried to deploy its parachute and arm itself as per a usual bomb-drop. The bomb only failed to detonate because a final, single-element safety switch had not been flipped by the crew. The design of the bomber aircraft and bombs, and the routine nature of such flights and refuelings (a fleet of these bombers was in the air at all times, ready to fly north and nuke the USSR at a moment's notice), meant that a repeat of the incident was almost inevitable if the hardware was not modified (it was eventuallly eventually replaced). [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1961_Goldsboro_B-52_crash More details here.]]

** In 1983, war tensions were high between NATO and the Warsaw Pact. For a few years, the USSR under Brezhnev and Andropov were terrified that a United States first strike was imminent, and had instuted the [=RYaN=] (from the Russian meaning something like "Nuclear Rocket Attack") program to find any hints of warlike intentions. [[note]](To make things even worse on this score, the agents tasked with finding this information were berated if they didn't gather positive signs of preparation for a US first strike -- anything that suggested the US was NOT about to nuke Moscow was derided as "misinformation" --, and so liberally interpreted every scrap of info in the worst possible sense. In short, the Soviets were talking themselves, quite by accident, into the very nuclear war they feared was coming from the other side.)[[/note]] In the summer of '83, the Able Archer '83 exercises (a NATO communications exercise meant to simulate the first week of WorldWarThree, culminating on the last day with a rehearsal of an expected nuclear exchange) were held, this coinciding with the controversial arrival of Pershing nuclear missiles [[note]]which were capable of hitting Russia within five to six minutes, well under any sort of Soviet early-warning capability[[/note]]. The Soviets were monitoring in real time and were becoming increasingly alarmed at the exercise. The coinciding of the two events sent Soviet suspicions through the roof. [[FromBadToWorse And, the Soviet early-warning satellite system was fundamentally flawed.]] The system registered five [=ICBM=]s from three separate launches headed towards Russia.[[note]]In reality, what had happened was that sunlight reflecting off the Earth hit in just the right manner to appear to the satellite's IR sensors to be missile launches.[[/note]] [[OnlySaneMan Stanislav Petrov]], the officer in charge of the station, realized quickly that the United States would not launch a first strike with just five missiles - had they actually intended to initiate war they'd have launched ''everything'', in an attempt to cut the head off their enemy before it could retaliate significantly. Suspecting an equipment error, he shut down the first two alarms, and explained to his superiors that he was ignoring the third, citing the fact that only five missiles had been launched. Had he instead given credence to the alarms, the Soviet Union would most likely have launched a "counter"-strike, which the USA would have correctly seen as a first strike. An actual counter-strike would have followed, and we wouldn't be reading TVTropes right now. [[ForWantOfANail And, to top it all off, Petrov wasn't supposed to be the man on duty that day. He had taken the shift for another operator who was sick.]] Needless to say, Petrov - the man who very literally ''saved humanity'' - was [[NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished promptly relieved of duty]] pending [[HauledBeforeASenateSubCommittee an official inquiry.]] (For what it's worth, they decided he'd acted properly and he was reinstated.)
to:
** In 1983, war tensions were high between NATO and the Warsaw Pact. For a few years, the USSR under Brezhnev and Andropov were terrified that a United States first strike was imminent, and had instuted instituted the [=RYaN=] (from the Russian meaning something like "Nuclear Rocket Attack") program to find any hints of warlike intentions. [[note]](To make things even worse on this score, the agents tasked with finding this information were berated if they didn't gather positive signs of preparation for a US first strike -- anything that suggested the US was NOT about to nuke Moscow was derided as "misinformation" --, and so liberally interpreted every scrap of info in the worst possible sense. In short, the Soviets were talking themselves, quite by accident, into the very nuclear war they feared was coming from the other side.)[[/note]] In the summer of '83, the Able Archer '83 exercises (a NATO communications exercise meant to simulate the first week of WorldWarThree, culminating on the last day with a rehearsal of an expected nuclear exchange) were held, this coinciding with the controversial arrival of Pershing nuclear missiles [[note]]which were capable of hitting Russia within five to six minutes, well under any sort of Soviet early-warning capability[[/note]]. The Soviets were monitoring in real time and were becoming increasingly alarmed at the exercise. The coinciding of the two events sent Soviet suspicions through the roof. [[FromBadToWorse And, the Soviet early-warning satellite system was fundamentally flawed.]] The system registered five [=ICBM=]s from three separate launches headed towards Russia.[[note]]In reality, what had happened was that sunlight reflecting off the Earth hit in just the right manner to appear to the satellite's IR sensors to be missile launches.[[/note]] [[OnlySaneMan Stanislav Petrov]], the officer in charge of the station, realized quickly that the United States would not launch a first strike with just five missiles - had they actually intended to initiate war they'd have launched ''everything'', in an attempt to cut the head off their enemy before it could retaliate significantly. Suspecting an equipment error, he shut down the first two alarms, and explained to his superiors that he was ignoring the third, citing the fact that only five missiles had been launched. Had he instead given credence to the alarms, the Soviet Union would most likely have launched a "counter"-strike, which the USA would have correctly seen as a first strike. An actual counter-strike would have followed, and we wouldn't be reading TVTropes right now. [[ForWantOfANail And, to top it all off, Petrov wasn't supposed to be the man on duty that day. He had taken the shift for another operator who was sick.]] Needless to say, Petrov - the man who very literally ''saved humanity'' - was [[NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished promptly relieved of duty]] pending [[HauledBeforeASenateSubCommittee an official inquiry.]] (For what it's worth, they decided he'd acted properly and he was reinstated.)
23rd Jun '15 6:31:50 AM Arivne
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Corrected improper Example Indentation.
* So far as anyone knows, there has never been an accidental nuclear detonation. But there have been serious errors, usually resulting from midair collisions, where nuclear weapons have been lost temporarily. Others have occurred where the non-nuclear components of the bomb detonated due to accidents, but as they must detonate in a precise sequence with extremely tight time tolerances, the only result was spreading radioactive material around. The closest Spain ever got was probably when a US bomber was destroyed in a refueling accident, releasing all four bombs in its payload (with the non-nuclear explosives aboard two detonating, spreading contamination to a significant area. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1966_Palomares_B-52_crash More details here.]])
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* So far as anyone knows, there has never been an accidental nuclear detonation. But there have been serious errors, usually resulting from midair collisions, where nuclear weapons have been lost temporarily. Others have occurred where the non-nuclear components of the bomb detonated due to accidents, but as they must detonate in a precise sequence with extremely tight time tolerances, the only result was spreading radioactive material around. around. ** The closest Spain ever got was probably when a US bomber was destroyed in a refueling accident, releasing all four bombs in its payload (with the non-nuclear explosives aboard two detonating, spreading contamination to a significant area. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1966_Palomares_B-52_crash More details here.]])
23rd Jun '15 6:27:21 AM Arivne
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** In the first game, the American armed forces are obliterated by a stand-still nuclear warhead as they storm al-Asad's capital city. But given Modern Warfare's propensity for [[AmbiguousSituation leaving things ambiguous and open to interpretation]], they don't really explain how it goes off or who did it, just that NEST and Seal Team Six start to defuse it, followed by a bright flash of light[[note]]VideoGame/ModernWarfare3 reveals it was set off by Russian terrorist Vladimir Makarov, but given the Infinity Ward fiasco, it's [[FanonDiscontinuity canonocity is debatable]][[/note]]
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** In the first game, the American armed forces are obliterated by a stand-still nuclear warhead as they storm al-Asad's capital city. But given Modern Warfare's propensity for [[AmbiguousSituation leaving things ambiguous and open to interpretation]], they don't really explain how it goes off or who did it, just that NEST and Seal Team Six start to defuse it, followed by a bright flash of light[[note]]VideoGame/ModernWarfare3 reveals it was set off by Russian terrorist Vladimir Makarov, but given the Infinity Ward fiasco, it's its [[FanonDiscontinuity canonocity is debatable]][[/note]]
23rd Jun '15 6:26:26 AM Arivne
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* ''Series/{{Revolution}}'': ** Regarding what happened in the episode "[[Recap/RevolutionS1E20TheDarkTower The Dark Tower]]":
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* ''Series/{{Revolution}}'': ** ''Series/{{Revolution}}''. Regarding what happened in the episode "[[Recap/RevolutionS1E20TheDarkTower The Dark Tower]]":
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