History Main / ANuclearError

8th Dec '16 5:49:28 AM jgkitarel
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*** And even so, it's by-and-large suspected that every North Korean nuclear weapon tested to date has been a fizzle (nuclear weapons parlance for a '''dud''')

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*** And even so, it's by-and-large suspected that every North Korean nuclear weapon tested to date has been a fizzle (nuclear weapons parlance for a '''dud''')'''dud''')[[note]]It should be noted that a fizzle just means that the nuke didn't reach the expected yield, ''not'' that it didn't detonate at all. A fizzle can still yield a blast measured in kilotons, with the largest fizzle, a failure of a fusion secondary during a 1 megaton nuke test, reaching an estimated 250 kilotons. Considering that it still means partial fusion was reached, the test was considered a partial success.[[/note]]
2nd Oct '16 10:09:20 AM Bissek
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* "99 Luftballons". The titular balloons show up as unidentified blips on a radar screen, so one side sends fighter jets to investigate. The other side takes this as an attack and retaliates with the nukes.

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* "99 Luftballons". The titular balloons show up as unidentified blips on a radar screen, so one side sends fighter jets to investigate. The other side takes this as an attack and retaliates with the nukes. Fortunately for the world, a hundred ordinary toyshop balloons would not have a large enough return to show up on a radar screen IRL.
19th Sep '16 6:31:05 PM Aquillion
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** Another, probably more correct explanation is that Soviets expected USA to hit big targets (i.e. cities) and wanted military facilities to survive, not the civilian population.
25th Aug '16 6:28:56 AM jamespolk
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[[folder:Western Animation]]
* The main topic of 1962 animated short "WesternAnimation/TheHole". Two construction workers debate the danger of an accidental nuclear war. The more skeptical one suggests that science and technology are fallible and could lead to a nuclear holocaust. The animation shows a rat chewing through the power lines at an early warning missile radar station.
[[/folder]]
6th Aug '16 8:55:16 AM migmit
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** Another, probably more correct explanation is that Soviets expected USA to hit big targets (i.e. cities) and wanted military facilities to survive, not the civilian population.
19th Jul '16 1:16:49 PM AgProv
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* Britain's contribution to nearly starting WW3 involved a front-line Vulcan nuclear bomber on patrol in West Germany (awaiting orders to turn right and head for Leningrad) - and a [[NoodleImplement chocolate biscuit]]. What happened is that the particular sort of chocolate biscuit issued to RAF aircrew (as part of the SpotOfTea even nuclear bomber crews get) was prone to exploding in a semi-pressurised cabin at high altitude. Bored crews used to lay one out in a prominent position, on top of the Flight Engineer's console, and lay bets on how long it took to detonate. On this occassion, a Tunnock's Teacake dunked in tea exploded in such a way that fragments of tea-soaked biscuit found their way inside the flight engineer's console. In which 1960's computer circuitry was used to arm and activate the nuke prior to a stand-off launch. A short-circuit was caused and the console lit up indicating the weapon was armed and ready for launch. The crew managed to land in time and the bomb was deactivated. But after that the RAF issued a different sort of biscuit to flight crews. (Come on, you cannot cancel the tea-break for British service personnel...)

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* Britain's contribution to nearly starting WW3 involved a front-line Vulcan nuclear bomber on patrol in West Germany (awaiting orders to turn right and head for Leningrad) - and a [[NoodleImplement [[NoodleImplements chocolate biscuit]]. What happened is that the particular sort of chocolate biscuit issued to RAF aircrew (as part of the SpotOfTea even nuclear bomber crews get) was prone to exploding in a semi-pressurised cabin at high altitude. Bored crews used to lay one out in a prominent position, on top of the Flight Engineer's console, and lay bets on how long it took to detonate. On this occassion, a Tunnock's Teacake dunked in tea exploded in such a way that fragments of tea-soaked biscuit found their way inside the flight engineer's console. In which 1960's computer circuitry was used to arm and activate the nuke prior to a stand-off launch. A short-circuit was caused and the console lit up indicating the weapon was armed and ready for launch. The crew managed to land in time and the bomb was deactivated. But after that the RAF issued a different sort of biscuit to flight crews. (Come on, you cannot cancel the tea-break for British service personnel...)
19th Jul '16 1:12:25 PM AgProv
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* Britain's cpntribution to nearly starting WW3 involved a front-line Vulcan nuclear bomber on patrol in West Germany (awaiting orders to turn right and head for Leningrad) - and a [[NoodleImplement chocolate biscuit]]. What happened is that the particular sort of chocolate biscuit issued to RAF aircrew (as part of the SpotOfTea even nuclear bomber crews get) was prone to exploding in a semi-pressurised cabin at high altitude. Bored crews used to lay one out in a prominent position, on top of the Flight Engineer's console, and lay bets on how long it took to detonate. On this occassion, a Tunnock's Teacake dunked in tea exploded in such a way that fragments of tea-soaked biscuit found their way inside the flight engineer's console. In which 1960's computer circuitry was used to arm and activate the nuke prior to a stand-off launch. A shgort-circuit was caused and the console lit up indicating the weapon was armed and ready for launch. The crew managed to land in time and the bomb was deactivated. But after that the RAF issued a different sort of biscuit to flight crews. (Come on, you cannot cancel the tea-break for British service personnel...)

to:

* Britain's cpntribution contribution to nearly starting WW3 involved a front-line Vulcan nuclear bomber on patrol in West Germany (awaiting orders to turn right and head for Leningrad) - and a [[NoodleImplement chocolate biscuit]]. What happened is that the particular sort of chocolate biscuit issued to RAF aircrew (as part of the SpotOfTea even nuclear bomber crews get) was prone to exploding in a semi-pressurised cabin at high altitude. Bored crews used to lay one out in a prominent position, on top of the Flight Engineer's console, and lay bets on how long it took to detonate. On this occassion, a Tunnock's Teacake dunked in tea exploded in such a way that fragments of tea-soaked biscuit found their way inside the flight engineer's console. In which 1960's computer circuitry was used to arm and activate the nuke prior to a stand-off launch. A shgort-circuit short-circuit was caused and the console lit up indicating the weapon was armed and ready for launch. The crew managed to land in time and the bomb was deactivated. But after that the RAF issued a different sort of biscuit to flight crews. (Come on, you cannot cancel the tea-break for British service personnel...)
19th Jul '16 1:11:06 PM AgProv
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* Britain's cpntribution to nearly starting WW3 involved a front-line Vulcan nuclear bomber on patrol in West Germany (awaiting orders to turn right and head for Leningrad) - and a [[NoodleImplement chocolate biscuit]]. What happened is that the particular sort of chocolate biscuit issued to RAF aircrew (as part of the SpotOfTea even nuclear bomber crews get) was prone to exploding in a semi-pressurised cabin at high altitude. Bored crews used to lay one out in a prominent position, on top of the Flight Engineer's console, and lay bets on how long it took to detonate. On this occassion, a Tunnock's Teacake dunked in tea exploded in such a way that fragments of tea-soaked biscuit found their way inside the flight engineer's console. In which 1960's computer circuitry was used to arm and activate the nuke prior to a stand-off launch. A shgort-circuit was caused and the console lit up indicating the weapon was armed and ready for launch. The crew managed to land in time and the bomb was deactivated. But after that the RAF issued a different sort of biscuit to flight crews. (Come on, you cannot cancel the tea-break for British service personnel...)
27th May '16 5:40:21 AM foxley
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* ''Literature/AlexRider'': In ''Skeleton Key'', General Sarov plans to detonate a nuclear bomb atop the rusting Russian nuclear submarines in the naval base, which are armed with nuclear missiles. The resulting fallout cloud will contaminate most of Western Europe and allow Russia to return to the glory of its Soviet days, or so Sarov believes.
11th May '16 4:56:44 PM weaponer
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* "Dormant," a scary, scary SF short story by Creator/AEVanVogt, describes a robotic nuclear weapon landed on Earth from a long-ago war which is activated by fallout from nuclear bomb tests. On detonation, it thrusts the Earth into the Sun, because it doesn't know it's not the same war and would have had no choice even if it had.

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* "Dormant," a scary, scary SF short story by Creator/AEVanVogt, describes a robotic nuclear weapon landed on Earth from a long-ago war which is activated by fallout from nuclear bomb tests. On detonation, it almost thrusts the Earth into the Sun, because it doesn't know it's not the same war and would have had no choice even if it had.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ANuclearError