History Main / ANuclearError

11th Mar '18 6:35:57 PM ElSquibbonator
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** In 1961, the US almost nuked North Carolina (a state on the USA's eastern coast) with a 3-4 megaton bomb when a mid-air refueling accident damaged a B-52 nuclear bomber aeroplane and forced its crew to bail out, leaving the bombs onboard. The aircraft broke up in mid-air, causing one of the two bombs it had carried to deploy its parachute and arm itself as per a usual bomb-drop. Thankfully, the bomb couldn't have detonated without a crew activated safety switch, so there was no danger of full detonation. The design of the bomber aircraft and bombs, and the routine nature of such flights and refuelings (a fleet of these bombers was in the air at all times, ready to nuke the USSR at a moment's notice if necessary), meant that a repeat of the incident was almost inevitable until the parachute system was replaced. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1961_Goldsboro_B-52_crash More details here.]]

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** In 1961, the US almost nuked North Carolina (a state on the USA's eastern coast) with a 3-4 megaton bomb when a mid-air refueling accident damaged a B-52 nuclear bomber aeroplane and forced its crew to bail out, leaving the bombs onboard. The aircraft broke up in mid-air, causing one of the two bombs it had carried to deploy its parachute and arm itself as per a usual bomb-drop.bomb-drop (unlike normal bombs, nuclear bombs were fitted with parachutes to give the bomber time to escape the blast). Thankfully, the bomb couldn't have detonated without a crew activated safety switch, so there was no danger of full detonation. The design of the bomber aircraft and bombs, and the routine nature of such flights and refuelings (a fleet of these bombers was in the air at all times, ready to nuke the USSR at a moment's notice if necessary), meant that a repeat of the incident was almost inevitable until the parachute system was replaced. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1961_Goldsboro_B-52_crash More details here.]]
14th Feb '18 2:17:08 PM Eddy1215
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* In one episode of ''Series/{{ALF}}'', the titular alien tries to contact the president to voice his concerns about a nuclear disaster. When Willie asked if that's what destroyed Melmac, ALF replies "[[SarcasmMode No, we all plugged our hairdryers in at the same time]]"

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* In one episode of ''Series/{{ALF}}'', the titular alien tries to contact the president to voice his concerns about a nuclear disaster. When Willie asked if that's what destroyed Melmac, ALF replies "[[SarcasmMode No, we all plugged our hairdryers in at the same time]]"time]]".
30th Jan '18 7:30:52 PM Schol-R-LEA
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* ''Film/{{Superman}}'' (1978). The United States would '''never''' test launch missiles with nuclear warheads (armed or not), for exactly the reason shown in the film: any accident could cause vast destruction. Dummy warheads are always used[[note]]There were two exceptions to this. The first was the ''Frigate Bird'' test, which was a live-fire test of a Polaris missile with a 1.5 MT warhead. The test was performed mainly for political reasons, as one of the last open sky tests before the Partial Test Ban took effect; also, it was launched was from a submerged submarine well out to sea, and the missile was not only provided with just enough fuel to reach its target, the warhead was modified so that it wouldn't detonate *below* a minimum height of 30km. The other exceptions were the various high-altitude/near-Earth space effects tests such as the infamous ''Starfish Prime'', which were performed with modified sounding rockets rather than weapon-type missiles - they couldn't reach anywhere except 400km straight up.[[/note]]. Even worse, a newspaper headline before the test mentions that live warheads would be used. So the U.S. military said publicly that they were going to pull this harebrained stunt and ''no one objected''. This of course creates an opportunity by ComicBook/LexLuthor to murder millions in a way that takes the first SuperHero to stop.

to:

* ''Film/{{Superman}}'' (1978). The United States would '''never''' test launch missiles with nuclear warheads (armed or not), for exactly the reason shown in the film: any accident could cause vast destruction. Dummy warheads are always used[[note]]There were two exceptions to this. The first was the ''Frigate Bird'' test, which was a live-fire test of a Polaris missile with a 1.5 MT warhead. The test was performed mainly for political reasons, as one of the last open sky tests before the Partial Test Ban took effect; also, it was launched was from a submerged submarine well out to sea, and the missile was not only provided with just enough fuel to reach its target, the warhead was modified so that it wouldn't detonate *below* '''below''' a minimum height of 30km. The other exceptions were the various high-altitude/near-Earth space effects tests such as the infamous ''Starfish Prime'', which were performed with modified sounding rockets rather than weapon-type missiles - they couldn't reach anywhere except 400km straight up.[[/note]]. Even worse, a newspaper headline before the test mentions that live warheads would be used. So the U.S. military said publicly that they were going to pull this harebrained stunt and ''no one objected''. This of course creates an opportunity by ComicBook/LexLuthor to murder millions in a way that takes the first SuperHero to stop.
30th Jan '18 7:29:41 PM Schol-R-LEA
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* ''Film/{{Superman}}'' (1978). The United States would '''never''' test launch missiles with nuclear warheads (armed or not), for exactly the reason shown in the film: any accident could cause vast destruction. Dummy warheads are always used. Even worse, a newspaper headline before the test mentions that live warheads would be used[[note]]There were two exceptions to this. Th first was the ''Frigate Bird'' test, which was a live-fire of a Polaris missile performed mainly for political reasons, as one of the last open sky tests before the Partial Test Ban took effect; the launch was from a submerged submarine, and the missile was not only provided with just enough fuel to reach it's target, the wardhead was modified so that it wouldn't detonate *below* a minimum height of 30km. The other exceptions were the various high-altitude/near-Earth space effects tests such as the infamous ''Starfish Prime'', which were performed with modified sounding rockets rather than weapon-type missiles - they couldn't reach anywhere except 400km straight up.]]. So the U.S. military said publicly that they were going to pull this harebrained stunt and ''no one objected''. This of course creates an opportunity by ComicBook/LexLuthor to murder millions in a way that takes the first SuperHero to stop.

to:

* ''Film/{{Superman}}'' (1978). The United States would '''never''' test launch missiles with nuclear warheads (armed or not), for exactly the reason shown in the film: any accident could cause vast destruction. Dummy warheads are always used. Even worse, a newspaper headline before the test mentions that live warheads would be used[[note]]There were two exceptions to this. Th The first was the ''Frigate Bird'' test, which was a live-fire test of a Polaris missile with a 1.5 MT warhead. The test was performed mainly for political reasons, as one of the last open sky tests before the Partial Test Ban took effect; the launch also, it was launched was from a submerged submarine, submarine well out to sea, and the missile was not only provided with just enough fuel to reach it's its target, the wardhead warhead was modified so that it wouldn't detonate *below* a minimum height of 30km. The other exceptions were the various high-altitude/near-Earth space effects tests such as the infamous ''Starfish Prime'', which were performed with modified sounding rockets rather than weapon-type missiles - they couldn't reach anywhere except 400km straight up.]].[[/note]]. Even worse, a newspaper headline before the test mentions that live warheads would be used. So the U.S. military said publicly that they were going to pull this harebrained stunt and ''no one objected''. This of course creates an opportunity by ComicBook/LexLuthor to murder millions in a way that takes the first SuperHero to stop.
30th Jan '18 7:27:04 PM Schol-R-LEA
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* ''Film/{{Superman}}'' (1978). The United States would '''never''' test launch missiles with nuclear warheads (armed or not), for exactly the reason shown in the film: any accident could cause vast destruction. Dummy warheads are always used. Even worse, a newspaper headline before the test mentions that live warheads would be used. So the U.S. military said publicly that they were going to pull this harebrained stunt and ''no one objected''. This of course creates an opportunity by ComicBook/LexLuthor to murder millions in a way that takes the first SuperHero to stop.

to:

* ''Film/{{Superman}}'' (1978). The United States would '''never''' test launch missiles with nuclear warheads (armed or not), for exactly the reason shown in the film: any accident could cause vast destruction. Dummy warheads are always used. Even worse, a newspaper headline before the test mentions that live warheads would be used.used[[note]]There were two exceptions to this. Th first was the ''Frigate Bird'' test, which was a live-fire of a Polaris missile performed mainly for political reasons, as one of the last open sky tests before the Partial Test Ban took effect; the launch was from a submerged submarine, and the missile was not only provided with just enough fuel to reach it's target, the wardhead was modified so that it wouldn't detonate *below* a minimum height of 30km. The other exceptions were the various high-altitude/near-Earth space effects tests such as the infamous ''Starfish Prime'', which were performed with modified sounding rockets rather than weapon-type missiles - they couldn't reach anywhere except 400km straight up.]]. So the U.S. military said publicly that they were going to pull this harebrained stunt and ''no one objected''. This of course creates an opportunity by ComicBook/LexLuthor to murder millions in a way that takes the first SuperHero to stop.
20th Jan '18 2:37:31 AM wrpen99
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*** Now we're safely past any shadow of doubt that, yes, North ''does'' have fully functional nukes, and has actually almost produced a thermonuclear warhead as of early 2017, their last test clearly shows signs of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boosted_fission_weapon boosted fission]], which is a last step before the true H-bomb.



[[/folder]]

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* If all the above wasn't enough, the paranoia came back with a vengeance on January 13th, 2018, where a U.S. nuclear alarm system test was accidentally replaced with a full alert. A few minutes after eight in the morning, the entire state of Hawaii received a smartphone notification (along with interrupted TV and radio) that told them to seek shelter for a nuclear attack, which thanks to the suddenness of the alert and the stirrings of relatively nearby North Korea lead to a panic. Though the alarm system wasn't tied to actual nuclear alarm procedures, meaning any government official or those who'd noticed the lack of sirens or other alerts didn't buy it, the event still resulted in at least one death, a heart attack, and a host of anecdotes about someone here or there doing things they only would've done thinking they were about to die.[[/folder]]
22nd Nov '17 7:13:48 PM nombretomado
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* And worse? The world may have been closer to WorldWarIII than even during the CubanMissileCrisis.

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* And worse? The world may have been closer to WorldWarIII than even during the CubanMissileCrisis.UsefulNotes/CubanMissileCrisis.
15th Nov '17 12:46:24 PM nightkiller
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** Even after the Petrov incident, there were still tensions. Two weeks before the Able Archer exercise began, a Marine base in Beirut was hit by a suicide bomber, killing over 200 US Marines. All US bases around the world were put on alert after that, stoking Soviet paranoia. Then, Able Archer '83 entered its crescendo phase -- the simulation of Soviet chemical attacks on Western Europe, and NATO commanders making the decision to launch retaliatory strikes on Eastern Europe. These messages were picked up by Soviet wiretaps, and sent Andropov and the Kremlin into a frothing panic. Soviet and Warsaw Pact troops were sent to their wartime mobilization positions, and nuclear bombers were put in the air as a precaution. It was only tamped down once a Soviet agent named TOPAZ, who had access to Cosmic Top Secret documents at NATO sent off an urgent message to the East German HVA, who passed it to the KGB, stating baldly that NATO had no concrete intentions of attacking, and that the exercise was as it appeared -- just an exercise.

to:

** Even after the Petrov incident, there were still tensions. Two weeks before the Able Archer exercise began, a Marine base in Beirut was hit by a suicide bomber, killing over 200 US Marines. All US bases around the world were put on alert after that, stoking Soviet paranoia. This was followed by considerable encrypted communications traffic between the White House and Downing Street concerning British objections to the U.S. invasion of Grenada (an Commonwealth Realm). Unable to decrypt that traffic, the Soviets assumed it concerned plans for a NATO attack. Then, Able Archer '83 entered its crescendo phase -- the simulation of Soviet chemical attacks on Western Europe, and NATO commanders making the decision to launch retaliatory strikes on Eastern Europe. These messages were picked up by Soviet wiretaps, and sent Andropov and the Kremlin into a frothing panic. Soviet and Warsaw Pact troops were sent to their wartime mobilization positions, and nuclear bombers were put in the air as a precaution. It was only tamped down once a Soviet agent named TOPAZ, who had access to Cosmic Top Secret documents at NATO sent off an urgent message to the East German HVA, who passed it to the KGB, stating baldly that NATO had no concrete intentions of attacking, and that the exercise was as it appeared -- just an exercise.
15th Nov '17 12:28:39 PM nightkiller
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** The Soviet/Russian nuclear briefcase, codenamed "Cheget", after a mountain the the Caucasus, is actually a communication terminal that's ''always'' online, and has been ever since the system was activated in 1983. If it ever loses connection with the "Kazbek"[[note]]Another mountain[[/note]] control system of the Strategic Nuclear Forces, it's regarded as a "Launch" command, because it's taken as a sign that its bearer is incapacitated. There are three such briefcases, one for the President [note]] CPSU General Secretary in Soviet times, actual Soviet President was a technical position that didn't carry much political power until UsefulNotes/LeonidBrezhnev [[/note]], one for the Defence Minister and one for the Chief of General Staff. An actual nuclear strike requires receiving the command from at least two out of three devices.

to:

** The Soviet/Russian nuclear briefcase, codenamed "Cheget", after a mountain the the Caucasus, is actually a communication terminal that's ''always'' online, and has been ever since the system was activated in 1983. If it ever loses connection with the "Kazbek"[[note]]Another mountain[[/note]] control system of the Strategic Nuclear Forces, it's regarded as a "Launch" command, because it's taken as a sign that its bearer is incapacitated. There are three such briefcases, one for the President [note]] CPSU [[note]]CPSU General Secretary in Soviet times, actual Soviet President was a technical position that didn't carry much political power until UsefulNotes/LeonidBrezhnev [[/note]], UsefulNotes/LeonidBrezhnev[[/note]], one for the Defence Minister and one for the Chief of General Staff. An actual nuclear strike requires receiving the command from at least two out of three devices.
15th Nov '17 12:25:58 PM nightkiller
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** The Soviet/Russian nuclear briefcase, codenamed "Cheget", after a mountain the the Caucasus, is actually a communication terminal that's ''always'' online, and has been ever since the system was activated in 1983. If it ever loses connection with the "Kazbek"[[note]]Another mountain[[/note]] control system of the Strategic Nuclear Forces, it's regarded as a "Launch" command, because it's taken as a sign that its bearer is incapacitated. There are three such briefcases, one for the President[note]]CPSU General Secretary in Soviet times, actual Soviet President was a technical position that didn't carry much political power until UsefulNotes/LeonidBrezhnev[[/note]], one for the Defence Minister and one for the Chief of General Staff. An actual nuclear strike requires receiving the command from at least two out of three devices.

to:

** The Soviet/Russian nuclear briefcase, codenamed "Cheget", after a mountain the the Caucasus, is actually a communication terminal that's ''always'' online, and has been ever since the system was activated in 1983. If it ever loses connection with the "Kazbek"[[note]]Another mountain[[/note]] control system of the Strategic Nuclear Forces, it's regarded as a "Launch" command, because it's taken as a sign that its bearer is incapacitated. There are three such briefcases, one for the President[note]]CPSU President [note]] CPSU General Secretary in Soviet times, actual Soviet President was a technical position that didn't carry much political power until UsefulNotes/LeonidBrezhnev[[/note]], UsefulNotes/LeonidBrezhnev [[/note]], one for the Defence Minister and one for the Chief of General Staff. An actual nuclear strike requires receiving the command from at least two out of three devices.
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