History Main / AIRoulette

4th Feb '16 11:09:44 AM Soldancer
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** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' features the [[SuicideAttack Sacrifice]] spell. It destroys the party member who casts it, but also insta-kills every signle enemy in the fight with 100% chance to hit. Unfortunately, certain foes ''also'' have Sacrifice, and will use it when low on health. There is not much more frustrating than having your [[TotalPartyKill entire group]] killed randomly after a lengthy dungeon crawl.
2nd Feb '16 5:36:53 PM GrammarNavi
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* An interesting very early racing game example in the days when the player was the only one capable of making mistakes exists in the Creator/{{Sega}} ArcadeGame ''GP Rider''. While you're tasked with completing a race, much less winning it, the single-player version has you racing against a rider named "Wayne" instead of the second player. On each race, Wayne behaves differently: sometimes having good races, sometimes having bad races. This was in 1990. The ports were created in 1992. Wayne isn't a dynamic AI of the type that are in most racing games, especially simulations, due to the fact that he essentially picked "good" or "bad" riding habits uniformly in each race.

to:

* An interesting very early racing game example in the days when the player was the only one capable of making mistakes exists in the Creator/{{Sega}} ArcadeGame UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame ''GP Rider''. While you're tasked with completing a race, much less winning it, the single-player version has you racing against a rider named "Wayne" instead of the second player. On each race, Wayne behaves differently: sometimes having good races, sometimes having bad races. This was in 1990. The ports were created in 1992. Wayne isn't a dynamic AI of the type that are in most racing games, especially simulations, due to the fact that he essentially picked "good" or "bad" riding habits uniformly in each race.
9th Jan '16 10:16:59 AM nombretomado
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* In ''VideoGame/SpongebobSquarepantsBattleForBikiniBottom', there are robot boss versions of some of the characters which follow this trope. Robot Sandy can do her clothesline move 15 times before she shows her weak spot move!

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* In ''VideoGame/SpongebobSquarepantsBattleForBikiniBottom', ''VideoGame/SpongebobSquarepantsBattleForBikiniBottom'', there are robot boss versions of some of the characters which follow this trope. Robot Sandy can do her clothesline move 15 times before she shows her weak spot move!
9th Jan '16 10:16:54 AM nombretomado
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* In SpongebobSquarepants: Battle for Bikini Bottom, there are robot boss versions of some of the characters which follow this trope. Robot Sandy can do her clothesline move 15 times before she shows her weak spot move!

to:

* In SpongebobSquarepants: Battle for Bikini Bottom, ''VideoGame/SpongebobSquarepantsBattleForBikiniBottom', there are robot boss versions of some of the characters which follow this trope. Robot Sandy can do her clothesline move 15 times before she shows her weak spot move!
19th Dec '15 2:40:07 PM nombretomado
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* In the [[SonicTheHedgehog Sonic spinoff game]] ShadowTheHedgehog, the Egg Dealer is LITERALLY this. Its attacks are decided by hitting buttons (using a homing attack) on a slot machine that's on its front.

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* In the [[SonicTheHedgehog [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic spinoff game]] ShadowTheHedgehog, ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'', the Egg Dealer is LITERALLY this. Its attacks are decided by hitting buttons (using a homing attack) on a slot machine that's on its front.
15th Dec '15 11:52:00 AM nombretomado
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* ''WorldOfWarcraft'':

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* ''WorldOfWarcraft'': ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'':
28th Nov '15 9:33:21 PM MyFinalEdits
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* VideoGame/{{Iji}}'s [[FinalBoss General Tor]] is a partial aversion. It starts off as straight AI Roulette, but the probabilities adjust to favour attacks that have already hit you as the fight goes on. Fortunately, this doesn't apply to his [[TacticalSuicideBoss charged shots]] [[PlayingTennisWithTheBoss that you can reflect]].

to:

* VideoGame/{{Iji}}'s [[FinalBoss General Tor]] is a partial aversion. It starts off as straight AI Roulette, but the probabilities adjust to favour attacks that have already hit you as the fight goes on. Fortunately, this doesn't apply to his [[TacticalSuicideBoss charged shots]] [[PlayingTennisWithTheBoss that you can reflect]].
28th Nov '15 2:44:46 PM GhostLad
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[[folder: Platform Game]]
* In the [[SonicTheHedgehog Sonic spinoff game]] ShadowTheHedgehog, the Egg Dealer is LITERALLY this. Its attacks are decided by hitting buttons (using a homing attack) on a slot machine that's on its front.
* VideoGame/{{Iji}}'s [[FinalBoss General Tor]] is a partial aversion. It starts off as straight AI Roulette, but the probabilities adjust to favour attacks that have already hit you as the fight goes on. Fortunately, this doesn't apply to his [[TacticalSuicideBoss charged shots]] [[PlayingTennisWithTheBoss that you can reflect]].
* In SpongebobSquarepants: Battle for Bikini Bottom, there are robot boss versions of some of the characters which follow this trope. Robot Sandy can do her clothesline move 15 times before she shows her weak spot move!
* In the classic '80s game ImpossibleMission, you played a spy sent to infiltrate a mad scientist's underground base and find a secret code. Each room is guarded by killer robots with a variety of randomly selected traits -- some are fast, some are slow; some shoot lightning at you, while others will electrocute you if you bump into them; and some have sensors to detect you while others just blindly patrol along preset courses. You are completely unarmed and all you can do to avoid these robots is to run or somersault over their heads. Since these traits are randomly assigned to robots at the start of the game, the difficulty of rooms will change with each play-through. And sometimes this will make a game nigh unwinnable because there's a fast moving, lightning shooting robot with sensors stuck on a tiny little platform that you absolutely have to get across to win.
[[/folder]]



[[folder: Strategy Game]]
* The AI in ''CompanyOfHeroes'' does this to a degree. While the AI will still use reasonably effective tactics (how effective depends on difficulty, of course), the basic plan seems to be based largely on AI Roulette. It should be noted, however, that the AI will, on higher difficulties, still be able to completely fuck you up no matter what he does.
** This is because TheComputerIsACheatingBastard. At all difficulties. The most important thing the difficulty choice affects is how much the opponent cheats.
* While a standard problem in turn-based strategy games, Steel Panthers used to really take the cake, as going harder WIDENS the roulette. It's not unheard of for a king tiger to suddenly turn around to fire at the crew of a destroyed tank while the entire enemy army is lining up on it, or to overrun a position just once, then drive harmlessly away if it doesn't succeed. In short, mid-tier difficulties were the hardest, as easy is colossally stupid, and expert-level difficulties afflicts the enemy WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity as they will pound you into gravel, then randomly give you a game-winning opening, provided they haven't blown up all your guns or chased off your tank hunters. Also the AI's support vehicles have a tendency to get 'stuck' and drive in circles until they finally decide to flee giving you a LOT more time to get to them and shoot them. Sometimes you will even see such insanity as an enemy transport getting its passengers killed because it spotted 'soft targets' before the 'hard targets' and it will attempt to charge up and engage your recons with SMG fire despite the fact there is a tank or AA gun one hex over, [[TooDumbToLive all while forgetting]] to let the soldiers on board disembark. The remake World at War fixes a lot of that, but not all.
[[/folder]]



** Worse, the game also includes cards with random effects that do not exist in the regular card game. These cards are so badly designed (being fundamentally unreliable) that no sane person would put them in his deck. But of course the AI does, most notably the final boss. The only reason the boss stands a chance is because he has twenty times as much HP as you do.
** The game-exclusive cards are, like a lot of older Magic sets, a mixed bag. But [[MookMaker Necropolis of Azar]], Aswan Jaguar, and Rainbow Knights are actually decent.



[[folder: Platform Game]]
* In the [[SonicTheHedgehog Sonic spinoff game]] ShadowTheHedgehog, the Egg Dealer is LITERALLY this. Its attacks are decided by hitting buttons (using a homing attack) on a slot machine that's on its front.
* VideoGame/{{Iji}}'s [[FinalBoss General Tor]] is a partial aversion. It starts off as straight AI Roulette, but the probabilities adjust to favour attacks that have already hit you as the fight goes on. Fortunately, this doesn't apply to his [[TacticalSuicideBoss charged shots]] [[PlayingTennisWithTheBoss that you can reflect]].
* In SpongebobSquarepants: Battle for Bikini Bottom, there are robot boss versions of some of the characters which follow this trope. Robot Sandy can do her clothesline move 15 times before she shows her weak spot move!
* In the classic '80s game ImpossibleMission, you played a spy sent to infiltrate a mad scientist's underground base and find a secret code. Each room is guarded by killer robots with a variety of randomly selected traits -- some are fast, some are slow; some shoot lightning at you, while others will electrocute you if you bump into them; and some have sensors to detect you while others just blindly patrol along preset courses. You are completely unarmed and all you can do to avoid these robots is to run or somersault over their heads. Since these traits are randomly assigned to robots at the start of the game, the difficulty of rooms will change with each play-through. And sometimes this will make a game nigh unwinnable because there's a fast moving, lightning shooting robot with sensors stuck on a tiny little platform that you absolutely have to get across to win.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Strategy Game]]
* The AI in ''CompanyOfHeroes'' does this to a degree. While the AI will still use reasonably effective tactics (how effective depends on difficulty, of course), the basic plan seems to be based largely on AI Roulette. It should be noted, however, that the AI will, on higher difficulties, still be able to completely fuck you up no matter what he does.
** This is because TheComputerIsACheatingBastard. At all difficulties. The most important thing the difficulty choice affects is how much the opponent cheats.
* While a standard problem in turn-based strategy games, Steel Panthers used to really take the cake, as going harder WIDENS the roulette. It's not unheard of for a king tiger to suddenly turn around to fire at the crew of a destroyed tank while the entire enemy army is lining up on it, or to overrun a position just once, then drive harmlessly away if it doesn't succeed. In short, mid-tier difficulties were the hardest, as easy is colossally stupid, and expert-level difficulties afflicts the enemy WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity as they will pound you into gravel, then randomly give you a game-winning opening, provided they haven't blown up all your guns or chased off your tank hunters. Also the AI's support vehicles have a tendency to get 'stuck' and drive in circles until they finally decide to flee giving you a LOT more time to get to them and shoot them. Sometimes you will even see such insanity as an enemy transport getting its passengers killed because it spotted 'soft targets' before the 'hard targets' and it will attempt to charge up and engage your recons with SMG fire despite the fact there is a tank or AA gun one hex over, [[TooDumbToLive all while forgetting]] to let the soldiers onboard disembark. The remake World at War fixes a lot of that, but not all.
[[/folder]]
7th Nov '15 2:59:57 PM Prfnoff
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* Enemies in ''BookwormAdventures'' invariably use this tactic. And it's a good thing, too, because if they used their abilities intelligently many of them would be able to [[CycleOfHurting stunlock]] Lex.
* An interesting very early racing game example in the days when the player was the only one capable of making mistakes exists in Sega arcade game GP Rider. While you're tasked with completing a race, much less winning it, the single-player version has you racing against a rider named "Wayne" instead of the second player. On each race, Wayne behaves differently: sometimes having good races, sometimes having bad races. This was in 1990. The ports were created in 1992. Wayne isn't a dynamic AI of the type that are in most racing games, especially simulations, due to the fact that he essentially picked "good" or "bad" riding habits uniformly in each race.

to:

* Enemies in ''BookwormAdventures'' ''VideoGame/BookwormAdventures'' invariably use this tactic. And it's a good thing, too, because if they used their abilities intelligently many of them would be able to [[CycleOfHurting stunlock]] Lex.
* An interesting very early racing game example in the days when the player was the only one capable of making mistakes exists in Sega arcade game GP Rider.the Creator/{{Sega}} ArcadeGame ''GP Rider''. While you're tasked with completing a race, much less winning it, the single-player version has you racing against a rider named "Wayne" instead of the second player. On each race, Wayne behaves differently: sometimes having good races, sometimes having bad races. This was in 1990. The ports were created in 1992. Wayne isn't a dynamic AI of the type that are in most racing games, especially simulations, due to the fact that he essentially picked "good" or "bad" riding habits uniformly in each race.
23rd Sep '15 10:36:57 AM TheUnsquished
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* VideoGame/{{Iji}}'s [[FinalBoss General Tor]] is a partial aversion. It starts off as straight AI Roulette, but the probabilities adjust to favour attacks that have already hit you as the fight goes on. Fortunately, this doesn't apply to his [[TacticalSuicideBoss charged shots]] [[PlayingTennisWithTheBoss that you can reflect]] ForMassiveDamage.

to:

* VideoGame/{{Iji}}'s [[FinalBoss General Tor]] is a partial aversion. It starts off as straight AI Roulette, but the probabilities adjust to favour attacks that have already hit you as the fight goes on. Fortunately, this doesn't apply to his [[TacticalSuicideBoss charged shots]] [[PlayingTennisWithTheBoss that you can reflect]] ForMassiveDamage.reflect]].
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