History Main / ABNegative

1st Dec '16 9:50:39 PM lucy24
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* In ''Series/DeGrassi'', Holly J. only learns that she is adopted after discovering that she is type B, while both her parents are AB. She says--incorrectly--that children tend to have the same blood type as their parents, and Revelations Ensue. In fact there is absolutely nothing unlikely about two AB parents having a B child. Even if the script had been reversed--an AB child with B parents--it might only have implied that her ''father'' wasn’t who she thought.
29th Oct '16 8:48:04 PM mlsmithca
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*** Which seems to be based on ''Archie Gives Blood'', a season one episode of ''Series/AllInTheFamily'' where Archie donates blood, and is concerned the recipient will not be Caucasian, because [[ArtisticLicenseBiology he believes blood can only be given to a recipient of the same race as the donor.]]

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*** Which seems to be based on ''Archie "Archie Gives Blood'', Blood", a season one episode of ''Series/AllInTheFamily'' where Archie donates blood, and is concerned the recipient will not be Caucasian, because [[ArtisticLicenseBiology he believes blood can only be given to a recipient of the same race as the donor.]]



* ''Series/TwinPeaks'': In the first episode of the second season, the blood of the killer [[spoiler:later revealed to be Leland]] is said to be " a rare type, AB Negative"

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* ''Series/TwinPeaks'': In the first episode of the second season, the blood of the killer [[spoiler:later revealed to be Leland]] is said to be " a "a rare type, AB Negative"Negative".



* In the present day scene at the end of one episode of ''Series/YoungIndianaJones'' (Which took place in a hospital waiting room), a doctor comes out and asks if anyone present has a certain blood type, as they're running low and there's a kid with that blood type who needs immediate surgery. The person who Indy had been telling part of his life story to over the course of the episode volunteers to donate.

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* In the present day scene at the end of one episode of ''Series/YoungIndianaJones'' (Which (which took place in a hospital waiting room), a doctor comes out and asks if anyone present has a certain blood type, as they're running low and there's a kid with that blood type who needs immediate surgery. The person who Indy had been telling part of his life story to over the course of the episode volunteers to donate.donate.
* BSM Williams in ''Series/ItAintHalfHotMum'' has Type AB blood. In the episode "It's a Wise Child", this provides the Concert Party with evidence that, contrary to what Williams suspects, he is not Gunner Parkins' father, as Parkins has Type O blood.
10th Oct '16 7:33:24 AM TheWanderer
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Blood in fiction really comes in only two types: universal donor (O-, rare) and special needs (common), so that blood banks are overtaxed whenever the plot requires. Specifically, type O is considered to be a universal donor type. In reality, even the rarest blood type isn't all that hard to find a match for (AB-, the rarest type, is found in roughly 1% of people, but people with it are compatible with blood from roughly 1/6th of humanity. O-, the universal donor, can be found in 5-10% of humanity). In ideal medical conditions, doctors do prefer to match blood type as exactly as possible, especially when doing organ transplants to reduce the risk of rejection, but in a life-or-death situation--which is the only situation this trope would find worthwhile--any compatible blood type will do. The situation of needing rare blood types is an actual problem that happens in medicine, but usually deals with other red cell antigens, most of which are rarely mentioned outside the blood banking community.

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Blood in fiction really comes in only two types: universal donor (O-, rare) and special needs (common), so that blood banks are overtaxed whenever the plot requires. Specifically, type O is considered to be a universal donor type. In reality, even the rarest blood type isn't all that hard to find a match for (AB-, for. (AB- may be the rarest blood type, is being found in roughly 1% of people, but people with it are compatible with blood from roughly 1/6th of humanity. They can get blood from anyone else who is AB-, anyone who is A- or B-, and then there's O-, the universal donor, which can be found in 5-10% of humanity). humanity.)

In ideal medical conditions, doctors do prefer to match blood type as exactly as possible, especially when doing organ transplants to reduce the risk of rejection, but in a life-or-death situation--which is the only situation this trope would find worthwhile--any compatible blood type will do. The situation of needing rare blood types is an actual problem that happens in medicine, but usually deals with other red cell antigens, most of which are rarely mentioned outside the blood banking community.
23rd Aug '16 6:26:25 AM Eievie
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Although most of the real world gets by quite peacefully with the more common blood types, in the world of entertainment only the rarest will do; if a character's blood type is mentioned, you can bet, if not your bottom dollar, then certainly one of the lower ones that it's going to be rare and special.

Blood in fiction really comes in only two types: universal donor (O-, rare) and special needs (common), so that blood banks are overtaxed whenever the plot requires. Specifically, type O is considered to be a universal donor type. In reality, even the rarest blood type isn't all that hard to find a match for (AB-, the rarest type, is found in roughly 1% of people, but people with it are compatible with blood from roughly 1/6th of humanity. O-, the universal donor, can be found in 5-10% of humanity). In ideal medical conditions, doctors do prefer to match blood type as exactly as possible, especially when doing organ transplants to reduce the risk of rejection, but in a life-or-death situation - which is the only situation this trope would find worthwhile - any compatible blood type will do. The situation of needing rare blood types is an actual problem that happens in medicine, but usually deals with other red cell antigens, most of which are rarely mentioned outside the blood banking community.

to:

Although most of the real world gets by quite peacefully with the more common blood types, in the world of entertainment only the rarest will do; [[TheLawOfConservationOfDetail if a character's blood type is mentioned, you can bet, if not your bottom dollar, then certainly one of the lower ones bet that it's going to be rare and special.

special]].

Blood in fiction really comes in only two types: universal donor (O-, rare) and special needs (common), so that blood banks are overtaxed whenever the plot requires. Specifically, type O is considered to be a universal donor type. In reality, even the rarest blood type isn't all that hard to find a match for (AB-, the rarest type, is found in roughly 1% of people, but people with it are compatible with blood from roughly 1/6th of humanity. O-, the universal donor, can be found in 5-10% of humanity). In ideal medical conditions, doctors do prefer to match blood type as exactly as possible, especially when doing organ transplants to reduce the risk of rejection, but in a life-or-death situation - which situation--which is the only situation this trope would find worthwhile - any worthwhile--any compatible blood type will do. The situation of needing rare blood types is an actual problem that happens in medicine, but usually deals with other red cell antigens, most of which are rarely mentioned outside the blood banking community.
21st Jul '16 6:59:27 PM Arcorann
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' second season episode "Blood Feud," Mr. Burns needs a OO- transplant, and Bart is the only person in town with the same blood type. He uses it as a bargaining chip. While it is correctly described as rare, its rarity is greatly exaggerated.
** They make a point of it being double-O negative, not just O-neg. It may be a case of fictionalized blood type.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' second season episode "Blood Feud," Mr. Burns needs a OO- (double-O negative) transplant, and Bart is the only person in town with the same blood type. He uses it as a bargaining chip. While it is correctly described as rare, its rarity is greatly exaggerated.\n** They make a point of it being double-O negative, not just O-neg. It may be a case of fictionalized blood type.
14th Jul '16 7:15:52 AM gravious
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* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' features a scene in which Jack struggles to find a donor for Boone and, failing to find a match among the other survivors, reveals himself to be O- and performs the transfusion using his own blood. He actually got Charlie to ask nearly everyone in the camp their blood type but only 4 people knew.

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* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' features a scene in which Jack struggles to find a universal O- donor (needed in emergencies when a blood type cannot be determined) for Boone and, failing Boone. Failing to find a match among the other survivors, reveals himself to be O- O+ (which could put Boone into shock if he is not an O type himself) and performs the transfusion using his own blood. He actually got Charlie Hurley to ask nearly everyone in the camp their blood type but only 4 people knew.
14th Jul '16 7:08:59 AM gravious
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* A key plot point in Creator/JamesHerbert's [[AfterTheEnd post-apocalyptic]] AlternateHistory '''48'' is that only those with this blood type have immunity to ThePlague that wiped out most of the population.

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* A key plot point in Creator/JamesHerbert's [[AfterTheEnd post-apocalyptic]] AlternateHistory '''48'' is that only those with this AB- blood type have immunity to ThePlague that wiped out most of the population.
14th Jul '16 7:04:09 AM gravious
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* A key plot point in Creator/JamesHerbert's [[AfterTheEnd post-apocalyptic]] AlternateHistory '''48'' is that only those with this blood type have immunity to ThePlague that wiped out most of the population.
13th Jun '16 9:04:03 PM Doug86
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* Rare blood types always uncover parentage secrets on soap operas. ''Series/AllMyChildren'' used it a few years ago to reveal that Jack was Greenlee's father, though the rare blood type was never named. Much worse, ''{{One Life to Live}}'' back in the 80s had Tina find her lost son because they both had [[ArtisticLicenseBiology Blood Type G]].

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* Rare blood types always uncover parentage secrets on soap operas. ''Series/AllMyChildren'' used it a few years ago to reveal that Jack was Greenlee's father, though the rare blood type was never named. Much worse, ''{{One Life to Live}}'' ''Series/OneLifeToLive'' back in the 80s had Tina find her lost son because they both had [[ArtisticLicenseBiology Blood Type G]].
22nd May '16 7:50:49 PM PaulA
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*** Also theorized in ''Literature/AnnoDracula''.
* ''{{Everworld}}'' uses this trope correctly when the main characters have to give an emergency blood transfusion to Galahad. April volunteers because she's O-, the universal donor.

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*** ** Also theorized in ''Literature/AnnoDracula''.
* ''{{Everworld}}'' In ''Literature/DraculaChaChaCha'' by Creator/KimNewman, the vampire [[Series/HancocksHalfHour Anthony Aloysius St John Hancock]] boasts that he can only ''drink'' AB-.
* ''Literature/{{Everworld}}''
uses this trope correctly when the main characters have to give an emergency blood transfusion to Galahad. April volunteers because she's O-, the universal donor.



* The ''HancocksHalfHour'' episode "The Blood Donor" is an iconic piece of British comedy. The Hancock character is nervous about giving blood at first but changes his mind when he discovers that his blood is AB- (although at one point the doctor tells him he is rhesus ''positive'', causing him to remark "Rhesus? They're monkeys, aren't they?"). On returning home he pesters the hospital to make sure his blood is given to "the right sort of person", but then [[spoiler:he injures himself, is rushed back to hospital and is given a transfusion of the blood he has just donated. HereWeGoAgain.]]
** This is really TruthInTelevision given that the Rh factor is indeed named after the Rhesus monkey in which it was first discovered.
** In ''Literature/DraculaChaChaCha'' by Creator/KimNewman, the vampire Anthony Aloysius St John Hancock boasts that he can only ''drink'' AB-.

to:

* The ''HancocksHalfHour'' ''Series/HancocksHalfHour'' episode "The Blood Donor" is an iconic piece of British comedy. The Hancock character is nervous about giving blood at first but changes his mind when he discovers that his blood is AB- (although at one point the doctor tells him he is rhesus ''positive'', causing him to remark "Rhesus? They're monkeys, aren't they?"). This is really TruthInTelevision given that the Rh factor is indeed named after the Rhesus monkey in which it was first discovered. On returning home he pesters the hospital to make sure his blood is given to "the right sort of person", but then [[spoiler:he injures himself, is rushed back to hospital and is given a transfusion of the blood he has just donated. HereWeGoAgain.]]
** This is really TruthInTelevision given that the Rh factor is indeed named after the Rhesus monkey in which it was first discovered.
** In ''Literature/DraculaChaChaCha'' by Creator/KimNewman, the vampire Anthony Aloysius St John Hancock boasts that he can only ''drink'' AB-.
]]
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