History Magazine / Mad

26th Sep '17 10:05:04 PM JMQwilleran
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** In the ''Series/MalcomInTheMiddle'' parody, the last few panels of Malcolm's final monologue zoom out a window to show him in the back of a truck, being taken to an insane asylum.

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** In the ''Series/MalcomInTheMiddle'' ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' parody, the last few panels of Malcolm's final monologue zoom out a window to show him in the back of a truck, being taken to an insane asylum.


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* WritingLines: One of the covers of #481, which spoofed ''Film/TheSimpsonsMovie'', parodied Bart Simpson's writing of lines with Alfred E. Neuman as Bart writing "I WILL NOT USE THE SIMPSONS MOVIE TO SELL MAD".
25th Sep '17 10:34:48 PM JMQwilleran
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Added DiffLines:

-->'''[[https://www.tomrichmond.com/2007/05/11/dud-the-lousy-hunter/ Tom Richmond]]''': "Doing art for MAD is not about just drawing. Itís about adding humor on a visual level. That might be using funny images or adding visual gags. No extra pay, sadly."
24th Sep '17 5:09:31 PM nombretomado
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* JoinTheArmyTheySaid: They once did a parody of the "Army Strong" ads called "[[http://www.madmagazine.com/blog/2014/12/30/madvertising-tuesday-army-stuck Army Stuck]]." "[[ComeForTheXStayForTheY Come for the dough. Stay for the quagmire.]] There's stuck. And there's being stuck in the middle of another country's war with no end in sight."

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* JoinTheArmyTheySaid: They once did a parody of the "Army Strong" ads called "[[http://www.madmagazine.com/blog/2014/12/30/madvertising-tuesday-army-stuck Army Stuck]]." "[[ComeForTheXStayForTheY "[[JustForFun/ComeForTheXStayForTheY Come for the dough. Stay for the quagmire.]] There's stuck. And there's being stuck in the middle of another country's war with no end in sight."
5th Aug '17 5:35:30 AM StFan
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* PowerPerversionPotential: In their parody of ''Film/{{X-Men}}'', Professor Xavier is shown using Cerebro to watch women shower.

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* PowerPerversionPotential: In their parody of ''Film/{{X-Men}}'', ''Film/XMen1'', Professor Xavier is shown using Cerebro to watch women shower.
30th Jul '17 12:23:21 PM nombretomado
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** "[[Main/ETTheExtraTerrestrial Q.T. -- The Quasi-Terrestrial]]" ends with Q.T. going up the ramp of the spaceship...and Richard Dreyfuss coming down, thankful that they finally made a sequel to ''[[Film/CloseEncountersOfTheThirdKind Gross Encounters of the Turd Kind]]'' allowing him to get away from all those crazy aliens.

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** "[[Main/ETTheExtraTerrestrial "[[Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial Q.T. -- The Quasi-Terrestrial]]" ends with Q.T. going up the ramp of the spaceship...and Richard Dreyfuss coming down, thankful that they finally made a sequel to ''[[Film/CloseEncountersOfTheThirdKind Gross Encounters of the Turd Kind]]'' allowing him to get away from all those crazy aliens.
21st Jul '17 12:54:57 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* BlatantLies: One picture has Richard Nixon as George Washington. Holding an axe behind his back, he says "I cannot tell a lie! I DIDN'T DO IT!!"

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* BlatantLies: One picture has Richard Nixon UsefulNotes/RichardNixon as George Washington.UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington. Holding an axe behind his back, he says "I cannot tell a lie! I DIDN'T DO IT!!"
7th Jul '17 4:55:34 AM foxley
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* OldTimeyAnkleTaboo: There is a ''Monroe'' strip where the title character went on a fishing trip with his grandfather and at one point is shown his grandfather's collection of skin magazines. Monroe is disappointed by the fact that none of the women in the magazines are naked, but his grandfather disagrees.
-->'''Monroe''': They're all ''wearing'' clothes!
-->'''Grandpa''': Not quite. You can see just a hint of ankle. And look! Toes!
5th Jul '17 1:10:27 PM DynamiteXI
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** Bill Elder was drawing hot chicks since the book's start. The lady in red in "Dragged Net!" in #3 is a good example.
** Wallace Wood's women, either. The preface to the 2002 re-release of ''The Mad Reader'' goes out of its way to point out all of the fanservice contained in Wood's ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'' parody.
** Jack Rickard and George Woodbridge drew some very attractive women as well, although their styles were a little more understated.
** Every so often, we get [[NakedPeopleAreFunny full-frontal female nudity]] (usually in the "A Mad Look At [X]" department), although done in the trademark crude, cartoonish style. It's usually for purposes of DistractedByTheSexy towards a bufoonish male character.


Added DiffLines:

** Bill Elder was drawing hot chicks since the book's start. The lady in red in "Dragged Net!" in #3 is a good example.
** Wallace Wood's women. The preface to the 2002 re-release of ''The Mad Reader'' goes out of its way to point out all of the fanservice contained in Wood's ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'' parody.
** Jack Rickard and George Woodbridge drew some very attractive women as well, although their styles were a little more understated.
** Every so often, we get [[NakedPeopleAreFunny full-frontal female nudity]] (usually in the "A Mad Look At [X]" department), although done in the trademark crude, cartoonish style. It's usually for purposes of DistractedByTheSexy towards a bufoonish male character.
16th Jun '17 7:52:26 PM Twentington
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For decades a key influence on [[TheParody parodists]] and satirists in all entertainment media, ''Mad'' began in 1952 as a full-color ComicBook, ''Tales Calculated to Drive You Mad'', published by Creator/ECComics. Harvey Kurtzman, the founding editor and writer, started it when he complained how other artists got more money with more page counts, especially when he was so meticulous with his war comics. His publisher, William Gaines, suggested that he do a humor book on top of his present work since that material came easily for him.

Kurtzman began by satirizing popular comic book genres of the time (horror, crime, SF and adventure), but soon found his niche concentrating on parodies of specific comic books and strips, TV shows, films, and classic literature, as well as broader satire of American pop culture. EC artists, such as Jack Davis, Will Elder and John Severin, accustomed mostly to drawing in a "serious" style, were encouraged to cut loose for ''Mad'', resulting in panels filled to capacity with outrageous caricatures, physics-defying antics, gross-out humor and innumerable [[FunnyBackgroundEvent background signage gags]].

In July 1955, with issue 24, ''Mad'' became a black-and-white magazine (only to become color again in the 2000s). Contrary to popular belief, EC did not do this in order to escape UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode. Rather, Kurtzman had received an offer from the more lucrative magazine market, and so EC publisher Bill Gaines proposed the change in format in order to retain him. Nevertheless, the new medium benefitted from the lack of [[MoralGuardians censorship]], as well as the broader range of subject matter and media available (including prose and photo features). By late 1956, ''Mad'' had become EC's only surviving publication. As history shows, it was more than enough for the company to prosper with.

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, ''Mad'' began to take on its most familiar (and commercially successful) form, with a long-lasting team of core writers (Jerry [=DeFuccio=], Dick [=DeBartolo=], Frank Jacobs) and artists (Don Martin, Al Jaffee, Dave Berg, Mort Drucker, Angelo Torres, Bob Clarke, Paul Coker (jr.), Norman Mingo (long time cover artist), George Woodbridge, [[ComicStrip/SpyVsSpy Antonio Prohías]], Creator/SergioAragones) [[EqualOpportunityOffender and a willingness to take on]] [[AcceptableTargets any target it felt it could get away with]]. More recent contributors (since the 1980s) include writers Desmond Devlin, Arnie Kogen, Michael Gallagher, Charlie Kadau and Joe Raiola, and more recent artists include Don "Duck" Edwing, Tom Bunk, Sam Viviano, Rick Tulka, Tom Richmond, and James Warhola.

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For decades a key influence on [[TheParody parodists]] and satirists in all entertainment media, ''Mad'' ''MAD'' began in 1952 as a full-color ComicBook, ''Tales Calculated to Drive You Mad'', published by Creator/ECComics. Harvey Kurtzman, the founding editor and writer, started it when he complained how other artists got more money with more page counts, especially when he was so meticulous with his war comics. His publisher, William Gaines, suggested that he do a humor book on top of his present work since that material came easily for him.

Kurtzman began by satirizing popular comic book genres of the time (horror, crime, SF and adventure), but soon found his niche concentrating on parodies of specific comic books and strips, TV shows, films, and classic literature, as well as broader satire of American pop culture. EC artists, such as Jack Davis, Will Elder and John Severin, accustomed mostly to drawing in a "serious" style, were encouraged to cut loose for ''Mad'', ''MAD'', resulting in panels filled to capacity with outrageous caricatures, physics-defying antics, gross-out humor and innumerable [[FunnyBackgroundEvent background signage gags]].

In July 1955, with issue 24, ''Mad'' ''MAD'' became a black-and-white magazine (only to become color again in the 2000s). Contrary to popular belief, EC did not do this in order to escape UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode. Rather, Kurtzman had received an offer from the more lucrative magazine market, and so EC publisher Bill Gaines proposed the change in format in order to retain him. Nevertheless, the new medium benefitted from the lack of [[MoralGuardians censorship]], as well as the broader range of subject matter and media available (including prose and photo features). By late 1956, ''Mad'' ''MAD'' had become EC's only surviving publication. As history shows, it was more than enough for the company to prosper with.

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, ''Mad'' ''MAD'' began to take on its most familiar (and commercially successful) form, with a long-lasting team of core writers (Jerry [=DeFuccio=], Dick [=DeBartolo=], Frank Jacobs) and artists (Don Martin, Al Jaffee, Dave Berg, Mort Drucker, Angelo Torres, Bob Clarke, Paul Coker (jr.), Coker, Norman Mingo (long time cover artist), George Woodbridge, [[ComicStrip/SpyVsSpy Antonio Prohías]], Creator/SergioAragones) [[EqualOpportunityOffender and a willingness to take on]] [[AcceptableTargets any target it felt it could get away with]]. More recent contributors (since the 1980s) include writers Desmond Devlin, Arnie Kogen, Michael Gallagher, Charlie Kadau and Joe Raiola, and more recent artists include Don "Duck" Edwing, Tom Bunk, Sam Viviano, Rick Tulka, Tom Richmond, and James Warhola.



** In one "A Mad Look At", a student tells an apparently offensive joke. The teacher steps out into the hall, laughs, then returns to class to scold the student.

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** In one "A Mad MAD Look At", a student tells an apparently offensive joke. The teacher steps out into the hall, laughs, then returns to class to scold the student.
3rd Jun '17 12:19:51 PM nombretomado
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* RapidFireComedy: Many of the comic book issues managed to overstuff ''every'' panel with little gags. It originated with Will Elder's work in the 1950s, when ''Mad'' was still a comic book; Elder and Kurtzman called these little gags "chicken fat." Kurtzman was reportedly pretty bad about forcing the other artists to follow Elder's example. The stalwart artists such as Angelo Torres and Mort Drucker often engaged in this to varying degrees, as does Tom Richmond in the present day. (Gary Hallgren also went all out in the two parodies he drew, of ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' and ''WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire''.)

to:

* RapidFireComedy: Many of the comic book issues managed to overstuff ''every'' panel with little gags. It originated with Will Elder's work in the 1950s, when ''Mad'' was still a comic book; Elder and Kurtzman called these little gags "chicken fat." Kurtzman was reportedly pretty bad about forcing the other artists to follow Elder's example. The stalwart artists such as Angelo Torres and Mort Drucker often engaged in this to varying degrees, as does Tom Richmond in the present day. (Gary Hallgren also went all out in the two parodies he drew, of ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' and ''WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire''.''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire''.)
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