History Magazine / Mad

22nd Sep '16 1:34:16 AM DeepRed
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Not to be confused with MutuallyAssuredDestruction.
9th Sep '16 9:57:27 PM Valiona
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** Discussed in one "Lighter Side of" strip, when a man gets depressed by reading a book with such an ending, and his friends tell him not to read books like that if they make him sad. He explains that he has no choice, since the "book" in question is his checkbook.



* EntitledBastard: In one "Lighter Side of" strip, a hippie calls cops "Fascist pigs," then yells for help from the police when a man attacks him. The police then ignore him, saying that there's nobody there but them, the pigs.



* EvilLawyerJoke: Used quite frequently, and discussed in one Lighter Side strip, in which it a lawyer points out that no one likes lawyers until they need one.
* ExplosiveDecompression: The fate of one worker in "Outland".



* EvilLawyerJoke: Used quite frequently, and discussed in one Lighter Side strip, in which it a lawyer points out that no one likes lawyers until they need one.
* ExplosiveDecompression: The fate of one worker in "Outland".


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* NotInThisForYourRevolution: A man throws a Molotov cocktail at a recruiting office, and a bunch of hippies praise him as a hero, but he says that he's just a {{pyromaniac}}.


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** In the parody of Dog Day Afternoon, Sonny uses proper manners while answering the phone, even identifying himself, and the caller greets him by announcing the presence of police outside the bank and demanding his surrender.


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* SkewedPriorities: This is quite common as a source of humor. For example, in one "Lighter Side Of..." strip, a teacher scolds a student for [[PrayerIsALastResort praying in class, when she's clearly doing so because a nut is shooting up the school]].
30th Aug '16 5:44:29 PM Twentington
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* LudicrousGibs: Used frequently in ''Spy vs. Spy'' ever since Peter Kuper took over. Also, nearly any one-page gag written by Michael Gallagher, especially if Tom Bunk is handling the art. (Oddly, Gallagher tends to avert this when someone else is drawing for him.)

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* LudicrousGibs: Used frequently in ''Spy vs. Spy'' ever since Peter Kuper took over. Also, nearly any one-page gag written drawn by Michael Gallagher, Tom Bunk, especially if Tom Bunk is handling Michael Gallagher wrote the art. material. (Oddly, Gallagher usually tends to avert this be much tamer when someone else is drawing for him.other artists draw his concepts.)



* MayTheFarceBeWithYou: TropeNamer. They naturally did satires of all six movies, each of them under a "department" with this label.

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* MayTheFarceBeWithYou: TropeNamer. They naturally did satires Their parodies of the first two ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogies were all six movies, each of them under a "department" "Departments" with this label. name.



** Discussed in ''The Lion King'' parody when Simba, watching Scar flee into exile, tells his subjects to never speak well of him again, and TheSimpsons in attendance note that people spoke well of Richard Nixon after his death.

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** Discussed in ''The Lion King'' parody when Simba, watching Scar flee into exile, tells his subjects to never speak well of him again, and TheSimpsons The Simpsons in attendance note that people spoke well of Richard Nixon after his death.



** Creator/SergioAragones' ''A Mad Look At...'' almost never uses dialogue; if a character needs to speak, it's usually represented through pantomiming or icons in a speech balloon, or very rarely, a "gesundheit." On one occasion, bodyguards listening to soccer on their earpieces scream "GOAL!".

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** Creator/SergioAragones' ''A Mad Look At...'' almost never uses dialogue; if a character needs to speak, it's usually represented through pantomiming or icons in a speech balloon, or very rarely, a "gesundheit." On one occasion, bodyguards listening to soccer on their earpieces scream "GOAL!".



** {{Literature/The Frog Prince}} spoofs have been done several times. Don Martin in particular is very fond of these.

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** {{Literature/The Frog Prince}} spoofs have been done several times. Don Martin in particular is was very fond of these.



* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: One issue had the Fold-In on the front cover, instead of its usual spot on the inside back cover.

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* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: One issue had the Fold-In on the front cover, instead of its usual spot on the inside back cover. Their year-end "20 Dumbest" lists usually move the Fold-In to that feature as well.



* SuicideAsComedy: Frequently done, especially with completely outlandish suicide methods (such as eating until you become heavy enough to cause an elevator to exceed the weight limit).
** A subscription ad on the letters page carried the headline "WHY KILL YOURSELF? ... Just because you missed the last issue of Mad. The drawing would be of a man or woman about to commit suicide in an outlandish way.

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* SuicideAsComedy: Frequently done, especially with completely outlandish suicide methods (such as a Duck Edwing article where people off themselves in strange ways, such as gorging on popcorn and wrapping themselves in a heated blanket to make the popcorn burst them open, or eating until you become heavy enough to cause so much food in an elevator to that they make it exceed the weight limit).
** A subscription ad on the letters page carried the headline "WHY KILL YOURSELF? ... Just because you missed the last issue of Mad. Mad?" The drawing would be of a man or woman about to commit suicide in an outlandish way.
30th Aug '16 5:35:26 PM Twentington
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** Grey Blackwell drew almost any article pertaining to ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' because he was able to mimic the show's art style very well. (Viviano also handled the two covers pertaining to the same.)

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** Grey Blackwell drew almost any article pertaining to Most of the ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' parodies were drawn by Grey Blackwell because he was easily able to mimic replicate the show's art style very well. (Viviano also (although Viviano handled the two ''South Park''-themed covers pertaining to the same.)for similar reasons).



* AuthorAvatar: Several artists are - or were - known to do this. Dave Berg did it OnceAnEpisode, his "The Lighter Side" including a character named "Kaputnik" meant to be a caricature of himself. It has also been commonly done by Al Jaffee and Sergio Aragonés.

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* AuthorAvatar: Several artists are - or were - known to do this. Dave Berg did it OnceAnEpisode, his "The Lighter Side" including a character named "Kaputnik" meant to be a caricature of himself. It has also been commonly done by Al Jaffee (who even uses a caricature of himself as his signature) and Sergio Aragonés.
28th Aug '16 2:55:47 PM Valiona
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* StealingTheCredit: In the parody of ''Film/{{Contact}}'', as Ellie's research bears fruit, Drumlin tells her that it will look good for him. Ellie takes umbrage at his doing this, but Drumlin reminds her that he gave her the "credit" when her department went over budget.


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** In the ''Series/MalcomInTheMiddle'' parody, the last few panels of Malcolm's final monologue zoom out a window to show him in the back of a truck, being taken to an insane asylum.
25th Aug '16 11:46:41 AM Twentington
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* AbsenteeActor: A literal example in parodies from time to time, such as "Goofies" (''Film/TheGoonies'') which is notably missing Martha Plimpton's character Stef.

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* AbsenteeActor: AbsenteeActor:[[invoked]] A literal example in parodies from time to time, such as "Goofies" (''Film/TheGoonies'') which is notably missing Martha Plimpton's character Stef.
21st Aug '16 12:04:44 PM nombretomado
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For decades a key influence on [[TheParody parodists]] and satirists in all entertainment media, ''Mad'' began in 1952 as a full-color ComicBook, ''Tales Calculated to Drive You Mad'', published by ECComics. Harvey Kurtzman, the founding editor and writer, started it when he complained how other artists got more money with more page counts, especially when he was so meticulous with his war comics. His publisher, William Gaines, suggested that he do a humor book on top of his present work since that material came easily for him.

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For decades a key influence on [[TheParody parodists]] and satirists in all entertainment media, ''Mad'' began in 1952 as a full-color ComicBook, ''Tales Calculated to Drive You Mad'', published by ECComics.Creator/ECComics. Harvey Kurtzman, the founding editor and writer, started it when he complained how other artists got more money with more page counts, especially when he was so meticulous with his war comics. His publisher, William Gaines, suggested that he do a humor book on top of his present work since that material came easily for him.



* TwistEnding: Especially in the ECComics era. Most movie parodies end with an altered version of the film's ending, sometimes revealing something about the plot that had been concealed all along.

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* TwistEnding: Especially in the ECComics Creator/ECComics era. Most movie parodies end with an altered version of the film's ending, sometimes revealing something about the plot that had been concealed all along.
31st Jul '16 3:49:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* GetIntoJailFree: [[DeconstructedTrope Deconstructed]] when they point out that Michael of PrisonBreak will have to serve his own sentence even if he clears his brother's name.

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* GetIntoJailFree: [[DeconstructedTrope Deconstructed]] when they point out that Michael of PrisonBreak Series/PrisonBreak will have to serve his own sentence even if he clears his brother's name.
26th Jul '16 4:30:29 PM Valiona
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* CompressedAdaptation: To varying degrees in the film parodies. Most of the time, each of the major scenes gets one (or in some cases two) panels, but often, a fair amount of the film isn't even referenced, particularly toward the ending.



** In the parody of "Up the Academy", the main characters are set to the academy as punishment for various offenses (stealing, getting a girl pregnant, being a disgrace to the family).

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** In the parody of "Up the Academy", the main characters are set to the academy as punishment for various offenses (stealing, getting a girl pregnant, being a disgrace to the family).family), under the belief that it would ruin their careers. One mob boss's subordinate [[EvenEvilHasStandards pleads with him to reconsider, as it's too cruel of a thing to do to his son]].



* CreatorKiller: {{invoked}} MAD is relatively quick to label works as this.

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* CreatorKiller: {{invoked}} MAD is relatively quick to label works as this.having destroyed the careers of those involved.


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* DamnedByAFoolsPraise: This is sometimes used as a joke, albeit often with the twist that someone praising the things they do is the proof that they're a fool.


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* EvilVersusEvil: Winthorpe and Valentine's conflict with the Duke brothers in the parody of ''Film/TradingPlaces'' is considered this, with one person saying that the "two old sharks" [[ALighterShadeOfBlack were practically lovable compared to the protagonists]].


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* HandWave: This trope is frequently made fun of in parodies when MAD notices it, and they sometimes come up with their own when they notice a PlotHole.


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** In one article parodying advertisements for comic books, they say that the comic book about Superman's death will be a hit among readers who honestly believe that Warner Brothers would kill off "a character worth billions of dollars."


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* ObstructiveBureaucrat: Often made fun of, particularly in [=HMOs=]' heyday, when characters who need lifesaving vital medical treatment will have to fill out extensive paperwork first.
17th Jul '16 12:15:11 PM nombretomado
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* TakeThatCritics: Not necessarily their critics, but in the 80s, Mad ran a piece in which film critics made several promises concerning their trade, such as dismissing all ChuckNorris films as mindless violence, and deriding them as boring if they even try to have a plot.

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* TakeThatCritics: Not necessarily their critics, but in the 80s, Mad ran a piece in which film critics made several promises concerning their trade, such as dismissing all ChuckNorris Creator/ChuckNorris films as mindless violence, and deriding them as boring if they even try to have a plot.
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