1 Days Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

History Literature / Winnetou

18th May '16 9:27:06 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* UndercoverCopReveal: Sort of. In "Winnetou III", Thick Fred Walker is an undercover detective as well as a legitiate Westman, but Charlie sees through his cover very quickly and warns him to be more careful. Then again, Charlie himself was quickly figured out by Old Death in "Winnetou II" as a more-or-less-undercover detective in search of a couple of fugitives -- but he was still rather young and unexperienced back then.

to:

* UndercoverCopReveal: Sort of. In "Winnetou III", Thick Fred Walker is an undercover detective as well as a legitiate legitimate Westman, but Charlie sees through his cover very quickly and warns him to be more careful. Then again, Charlie himself was quickly figured out by Old Death in "Winnetou II" as a more-or-less-undercover detective in search of a couple of fugitives -- but he was still rather young and unexperienced back then.
18th May '16 9:20:58 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CreatorProvincialism: Travelling abroad, especially in North and South America, Karl May's heroes have a tendency to meet and rub shoulders with German immigrants. Somewhat justified in that, well, there really ''were'' quite a lot of Germans seeking their fortunes abroad in that period. In fact, the official language of the US was ''almost'' German instead of English.

to:

* CreatorProvincialism: Travelling abroad, especially in North and South America, Karl May's heroes have a tendency to meet and rub shoulders with German immigrants. Somewhat justified in that, well, there really ''were'' quite a lot of Germans seeking their fortunes abroad in that period. In fact, the official language of the US was ''almost'' German instead of English.
18th May '16 9:19:16 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Bowdlerized: After Karl May's death his widow Klara gave the firm that published the books (which renamed itself Karl-May-Verlag the right to make text alterations as it saw fit, and the publisher made extensive use of this. This took many forms, such as rearranging chapters, replacing foreign loanwords by more German ones, making deletions and additions, changing the names of many supporting and even a few lead characters, and suppressing some of May's more pacifist paragraphs to please the Nazis. As literary scholars and Karl May fans noted, this made the most commonly produced editions of May's works unusable for scholarly analysis. In more recent years new editions based on the original ones have been produced, however.

to:

* Bowdlerized: After Karl May's death his widow Klara gave the firm that published the books (which renamed itself Karl-May-Verlag Karl-May-Verlag) the right to make text alterations as it saw fit, and the publisher made extensive use of this. This took many forms, such as rearranging chapters, replacing foreign loanwords by more German ones, making deletions and additions, changing the names of many supporting and even a few lead characters, and suppressing some of May's more pacifist paragraphs to please the Nazis. As literary scholars and Karl May fans noted, this made the most commonly produced editions of May's works unusable for scholarly analysis. In more recent years new editions based on the original ones have been produced, however.
18th May '16 8:06:07 AM goldeneyes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AggressiveCategorism: Done quite realistically, in that people from lots of different cultures (or even just different tribes) regard people from ''any'' other culture with hostility and scorn, or at least contemptuous indifference.



* AndTheAdventureContinues: There is almost no finality to any of the books, they either blend one into the other, or are left open-ended, with a few mentions regarding part of the characters. Often, Winnetou and Old Shatterhand aren't mentioned.

to:

* AndTheAdventureContinues: There is almost no finality to any of the books, they either blend one into the other, or are left open-ended, with a few mentions regarding part some of the characters. Often, Winnetou and Old Shatterhand aren't mentioned.even mentioned in the last pages.
* ApologisesALot



* AuthorAvatar: The hero of a Karl May novel is often this (many are also written in first-person narration). In-story it is also made clear that the man going by the name Kara Ben Nemsi in the Orient cycle is the same as the Westmann Old Shatterhand alias Charlie. A common misconception ''in-story'' is that "Charlie" had acquired his nickname on the basis of great stature and physical strength (while May himself had been a small thin guy). In fact, whenever there is a description of Old Shatterhand in the text, he is described as being "average height, average built", with "hands as slender and as white as a woman's", making his strength come off as even more of a surprise. Those who know about May's conflict with the Law are also aware of ''how'' he escaped police custody. (Yes, he knocked his two guards out, while in chains.)In his later years a more self-conscious Karl May also interpreted Kara Ben Nemsi's sidekick Hadschi Halef Omar as a personification of his own anima.



* BerserkButton: Played with. In certain ''specific'' circumstances, Charlie being treated in a certain way acts as a trigger for Winnetou.



* Bowdlerized: After Karl May's death his widow Klara gave the firm that published the books (which renamed itself Karl-May-Verlag the right to make text alterations as it saw fit, and the publisher made extensive use of this. This took many forms, such as rearranging chapters, replacing foreign loanwords by more German ones, making deletions and additions, changing the names of many supporting and even a few lead characters, and suppressing some of May's more pacifist paragraphs to please the Nazis. As literary scholars and Karl May fans noted, this made the most commonly produced editions of May's works unusable for scholarly analysis. In more recent years new editions based on the original ones have been produced, however.



* {{Brownface}}: Frenchman Pierre Briece as Winnetou. Granted, Brice didn't need make-up, as he has naturally bronzed skin, and Winnetou is always described as looking more like a Roman with lightly bronzed skin rather than a Native American. (As an aside, Brice also played a Roman general in the Romanian-French co-production "The Dacians".)

to:

* {{Brownface}}: Frenchman Pierre Briece as Winnetou. Granted, Brice didn't need make-up, as he has naturally bronzed skin, and Winnetou is always described as looking more like a Roman with lightly bronzed skin rather than a Native American. (As an aside, Brice also played a Roman general in the Romanian-French co-production "The Dacians".)
* BrutalHonesty: Old Shatterhand, when pushed. Trust us, you ''don't'' want to push. You really, really don't.



* CommitmentIssues: Old Shatterhand, according to himself, is profoundly disinterested in marriage. Eventually, somewhere between adventures, he ''does'' get married. Twice.
* CondescendingCompassion: Old Shatterhand, though mostly depending on how the reader decides to view things.



* CreatorProvincialism: Travelling abroad, especially in North and South America, Karl May's heroes have a tendency to meet and rub shoulders with German immigrants. Somewhat justified in that, well, there really ''were'' quite a lot of Germans seeking their fortunes abroad in that period. In fact, the official language of the US was ''almost'' German instead of English.



* CulturalPosturing: Yes, but not only the white men towards people of other color. It's made clear that most cultures think themselves better in some ways than everybody else.
* CulturedBadass: Karl May presents his Avatar Old Shatterhand/Kara Ben Nemsi that way: Fluent in too many languages to number and well-versed in the cultures of people all over the world, he takes it good-naturedly when comical relief characters mock him as a "bookworm".



* Determinator: Old Shatterhand and Winnetou. Especially if their objective is the other one's freedom.



* DisneyVillainDeath: The Schut, eponymous villain of the final volume of the Orient Cycle, falls to his death with his horse while trying to escape by jumping across a canyon. Averted with "the General", who does fall off a cliff, and a huge boulder falls on top of him, but who survives long enough to endure a horrible agony while the heroes are pretty much standing around helplessly, because they can not lift the rocks.



* DreadfulMusician: The ''entire population of New Orleans'' around the mid-1800, apparently. Charlie is too stunned (and deafened) to properly vent his dismayed horror at the scene.
* DrugsAreBad: Opium-addicted Old Death.



* EnragedByIdiocy: Charlie usually has a lot of patience, but even he has his limits. Standing out are his rant to Old Surehand about Old Wabble's latest bout of stupidity, his rage at Halef during a bear hunt, and his threatening another guy with a gun for not wanting to let Judith Silberstein marry an Indian chief in order to ensure their peace -- and her wealth.



* ExactEavesdropping: Seen quite a lot; sneaking up and eavesdropping on both strangers and known enemies is usually a major source of plot-relevant information in the novels. Somewhat justified in that many characters especially in the West are in fact presented as wilderness-savvy scouts and hunters who know quite well how to do just that.



* FelonyMisdemeanor: Hobble Frank is initially left speechless by the fact that other characters are not interested to hear any part of his profound, hard-gained wisdom. ''Then'' he has quite a ''lot'' to say to them...
** Dick Hammerdull does not like being called "fat". But what throws him into a blind rage is his horse being mildly insulted.



* {{Flanderization}}: In Karl May's early serialized stories Winnetou had a distinct darker, more savage side, but at the years passed the author idealized his hero more an more until he finally became a Christ-like figure and the ultimate NobleSavage.

to:

* {{Flanderization}}: In Karl May's early serialized stories Winnetou had a distinct darker, more savage side, but at the years passed the author idealized his hero more an more until he finally became a Christ-like figure and the ultimate NobleSavage. No, make that the ultimate Noble ''Man''



* ForgetfulJones: Taken to both hilarious and tragic extremes with Carpio, Charlie's childhood friend.



* TheFundamentalist: Quite a few, notably being found on ''all'' sides.



* GermanDialects: A number of the people Old Shatterhand meets Out West come from Karl May's native Saxony and speak with a sometimes quite marked Saxon dialect. May also wrote a number of novels and stories set in Bavaria with people speaking Bavarian, but not in a form that made him new friends in Bavaria.
* GermanPeculiarities: Karl May was a patriotic German and so some peculiarities of the day show up. For instance in a story where Winnetou visits Charlie at home in Germany, he arrives just in time for choir practice of the local male voice choir, which does an impromptu recital for him. Winnetou himself has been called "the most German of all Indians" by some people, probably in part due to his preferred drinknote . Here's a scene where he goes into a saloon:
"I'd like a glass of beer, German beer!" said the Indian with a melodious, sonorous voice and in beautiful, fluent English. (...) He received his beer, raised the glass to the light of the window, examined it with the glance of an expert, and drank. "Well!" he told the host, smacking his tongue, "Your beer is good. The Great Manitou of the white men has taught them many arts, and brewing beer is not the least among them."



* GloryHound: Old Wabble, but also quite a few leaders of various Indian and Arabic tribes.
* GlorySeeker: See above.



* GracefulInTheirElement



* HisOwnWorstEnemy: Lots of the bad guys: Rattler, Santer, Tangua, Old Wabble, "the General"...



* HoYay: Between Charlie and Winnetou, aided e. g. by Karl May's delight in describing long, wavy hair, like that of the Apache chief. German writer Arno Schmidt tried to demonstrate a homoerotic subtext in the post-Freudian study Sitara (1963) which caused a bit of storm in a teacup, mainly because he tried to demonstrate often by Joycean word-association games that every canyon appearing in a Karl May story really is a reference to the crevice between the buttocks and every cave really stands for an anus. Pointless really, when Karl May spoke so openly in his books about his love for Winnetou (in the 'soul mate' sense, not the brotherly one), there are kisses and embraces and hand-holding whenever the mood occurs. None of which occur with Charlie's actual wife, Klara.
* HumansAreFlawed: No one's perfect, not even Old Shatterhand and Winnetou. Well, maybe Winnetou.
* HumansAreBastards: And the white men are probably the worst of the lot. And they ''still'' are worth fighting for, all of them.



* IrrationalHatred: Old Wabble hate towards Old Shatterhand is as unexplainable as Old Shatterhand's continued mercy towards Old Wabble. The reason for all this debacle doesn't click until the very end.



* TheLancer: Either Winnetou or Old Shatterhand, depending on the situation and who is the acting leader at the time.

to:

* KnowNothingKnowItAll: Hobble-Frank,at least when it comes to formal education. Carpio, when it comes to pretty much ''everything''.
* TheLancer: Either Winnetou or Old Shatterhand, depending on the situation and who is the acting leader at the time.time.
* LastSecondShowoff: Old Shatterhand ''enjoys'' doing this. A lot.



* TheLoad



* LovesOnlyGold: Santer.



* ObliviousToLove: Old Shatterhand to Ntscho-tschi, Martha Vogel, Ingdscha... (Though he ''does'' catch up eventually.)



* OverlyLongName: Some of Charlie's Arabic aliases eminently qualify (see above), but the most famous example is Hadschi Halef Omar Ben Hadschi Abul Abbas Ibn Hadschi Dawuhd al Gossarah. Normally he is just called Hadschi (Hajji) Halef Omar, but reciting his full name is a shibboleth among readers. If you can't pass the "Hadschi Halef test" you're not a true Karl May fan. There's a song Hadschi Halef Omar by Dschinghis Khan to help you learn to recite it.



* QuintessentialBritishGentleman: Lord Castlepool. Sir David Lindsay.

to:

* QuintessentialBritishGentleman: Lord Castlepool. Karl May lived at a time when wealthy British globetrotters were a common trope, so some characters of this type appear in his works. The most well-known examples are Englishman Sir David Lindsay.Lindsay in the Orient Cycle and Scotsman Lord Castlepool in Der Schatz im Silbersee. Lord Castlepool is obsessed with making wagers and travels through the Wild West in search of adventure, paying his guides 50 Dollars per adventure.



* UndercoverCopReveal

to:

* UndercoverCopRevealVerbalTic: Most Plucky Comic Relief characters have one. Sam Hawkens' constant "If I'm not mistaken, hihi!" became a catchphrase. Old Wabble's "It's clear" comes close.
* UndercoverCopReveal: Sort of. In "Winnetou III", Thick Fred Walker is an undercover detective as well as a legitiate Westman, but Charlie sees through his cover very quickly and warns him to be more careful. Then again, Charlie himself was quickly figured out by Old Death in "Winnetou II" as a more-or-less-undercover detective in search of a couple of fugitives -- but he was still rather young and unexperienced back then.



* ViolenceIstheOnlyOption

to:

* ViolenceIstheOnlyOptionViolenceIstheOnlyOption: Old Wabble tends to act this way, and without a minimal amount of planning too.



* VisionQuest

to:

* VisionQuestVisionQuest: In a very abstract and metaphysical way, this is the reason why Charlie WalksTheEarth. But it's never quite explicitly stated in ''any'' of the printed 30-odd volumes.


Added DiffLines:

* WalkingArmory: Many characters carry a wide collection of rifles, handguns and knifes. And whips, lassos, bolas, poisoned arrows, tomahawks and other exotic weapons. And then there's the most dangerous weapon of all, mostly because usually you don't see it coming: Old Shatterhand's ''fist''.


Added DiffLines:

* WholesomeCrossdresser: Tante Droll (Aunt Droll) is famous as a "Westmann" who looks like a woman (fans are still divided between those who see him as just looking a bit feminine and those who see him as an outright transvestite). Old Surehand's mother is an example of a tough lady disguising herself as a man.
5th May '16 5:02:29 AM goldeneyes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* EvenTheGuysWantHim: Winnetou, at least as far as Old Shatterhand is concerned... And Charlie himself ends up being the object of many men's devotion and excessive affection, if not outright want.

to:

* EvenTheGuysWantHim: Winnetou, at least as far as Old Shatterhand is concerned... And Charlie himself ends up being the object subject of many men's devotion and excessive affection, if not outright want.



* FastestGunInTheWest: Usually avert

to:

* FastestGunInTheWest: Usually avertaverted, in that the gun duels make use of rifles, there is a counting procedure and a certain number of shots that can be fired. If any of the men involved try to shoot faster than allowed, they get a bullet to the head. The only situation presented where being fastest counts is during actual battle, or during a "hands-up" situation.



* RomanticRain: Subverted ''hard'' for Old Shatterhand and Martha Vogel. After realizing that Martha had indeed kissed him in his sleep (a year before, but he's kind of slow when it comes to romance), and after Martha flees in panic, a deeply confused and conflicted Old Shatterhand runs after her, despite the huge summer storm that breaks over the city. He doesn't catch up with her, instead he is eventually forced to seek refuge under some huge linden trees when the storm turns out to be more like a second Flood. The continuous lightning making him anxious, he moves from his initial tree under another, while berating himself for being irrational, as there's no way to correctly predict a lightning strike -- only for a big lightning bolt to strike and burn down the very tree he had been hiding under. Had he stayed put, he would have died. It serves as an eye-opener (what does his aching heart count against the will of God?). Suddenly feeling calm, he returns home, and gives up on Martha.



* StormingTheCastle

to:

* StormingTheCastleStormingTheCastle: In "Satan and Iscariot", once or twice.
* AStormIsComing: Before the confrontation with the Apaches in "Winnetou I", a rare, heavy storm falls. At that point, it's a good thing, as it wipes out the heroes' tracks. But Old Shatterhand can't help a bad feeling creeping up on him...
4th May '16 9:07:13 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DueToTheDead: Soething Charlie and Winnetou always insist on doing, even to their enemies.

to:

* DueToTheDead: Soething Something Charlie and Winnetou always insist on doing, even to their enemies.
4th May '16 7:39:45 AM goldeneyes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheAce: Both Winnetou and Old Shatterhand.



* ActionDad: Old Firehand. The Bear-hunter. Intschu-tschuna, Winnetou's father.
** Hadji Halef Omar becomes a father pretty early on, but he continues to go on adventures with Kara Ben Nemsi. And when his son is old enough (roughly 9 years old), he brings the kid along as well -- much to Kara Ben Nemsi initial misgivings.



* ActionMom: Tahua (Native American) and Amscha (Beduin).



* AdventurerArchaeologist: Kara Ben Nemsi has his Indiana Jones moments, though his interests are based in genuine scientific curiosity and he never brings stuff home for museums.



* BigDamnHeroes: Old Shatterhand and Winnetou, both to each other and to others.



* BirdsOfAFeather: Old Shatterhand and Winnetou.



* ChronicHeroSyndrome: Both Winnetou and Charlie. But ''especially'' Charlie, who can't seem able to help it, no matter who's involved.



* DueToTheDead: Soething Charlie and Winnetou always insist on doing, even to their enemies.



* EverybodySmokes: More or less.



* FaceDeathWithDignity: Pretty much everyone who is ''not'' a DirtyCoward, though usually death itself is avoided. Old Shatterhand is more of a DefiantToTheEnd type if he's irritated enough, but if his attackers treat him respectfully, he responds by not insulting them. But the award on this one must go to Winnetou, who not only predicts his own death with painful clarity and makes plans for both his own burial and the fulfillment of his will, but has to face Charlie's tearful denial and despair at the news to boot.

to:

* ExpectingSomeoneTaller: Most folks who meet Old Shatterhand for the first time. They usually expect a Goliath type, and he's... really not.
* FaceDeathWithDignity: Pretty much everyone who is ''not'' a DirtyCoward, though usually death itself is avoided. Old Shatterhand is more of a DefiantToTheEnd type if he's irritated enough, but if his attackers treat him respectfully, he responds by not insulting them. But the award on this one must go to Winnetou, who not only predicts his own death with painful clarity and makes plans for both his own burial and the fulfillment of his will, but has to face Charlie's tearful denial and despair at the news to boot.



* FastestGunInTheWest: Usually avert



* GoodIsNotSoft: You might as well guess at this point...



* NoHonorAmongThieves

to:

* NoHonorAmongThievesNiceToTheWaiter: Charlie, but only if they actually deserve it.
* NoHonorAmongThieves: The bad guys (pick any group you like) never have much loyalty towards each other, even when they are closely blood-related.
28th Apr '16 7:14:17 AM goldeneyes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AbusiveParents

to:

* AbusiveParentsAbusiveParents: Carpio's family, in general, forcing him to be someone he couldn't, and not giving a crap about his death somewhere in the wilderness.



* ActionGirl

to:

* ActionGirlActionGirl: Quite a few, especially considering the time the books were written. Tahua is probably the best example in the Wild West. Ntscho-tschi, Winnetou's sister, also qualifies. And Kah-o-oto and young Ashta are not far behind. Ellen, Ribanna's daughter in an earlier version of "Old Firehand", was trained by Winnetou himself since early childhood.
** In the Orient cycle, Amscha, daughter of a Beduin chief, is described as an Amazon. She and Kara Ben Nemsi talk about other women who had led Arabic tribes as sheiks, officially or not. And Ingdscha and Shakeera are at least implied to be able to handle themselves in difficult circumstances, even if we don't get to see them in action much.



* AfterActionHealingDrama
* AfterActionPatchUp
* AgainstMyReligion
* AintTooProudToBeg
* AlasPoorVillain: Old Wabble
* TheAlcoholic: Rattler
* AllDesertsHaveCacti: Averted.
* AllOfTheOtherReindeer: Charlie's colleagues from the rail-road building team. Mostly because he is young, hard-working, does not drink, and is German.

to:

* AfterActionHealingDrama
AfterActionHealingDrama: Charlie goes through this once or twice.
* AfterActionPatchUp
AfterActionPatchUp: After several battles, a brief mention of patching up the wounded on both sides is made.
* AgainstMyReligion
AgainstMyReligion: Charlie's usual reason for not killing, not scalping and generally letting bad people get away with less punishment than they would probably deserve.
* AintTooProudToBeg
AintTooProudToBeg: Though he is usually a very proud man, when it comes to convincing Winnetou not to go to his certain death, Charlie has no problem with getting on his knees and begging. And crying.
* AlasPoorVillain: Old Wabble
Wabble.
* TheAlcoholic: Rattler
Rattler.
* AllDesertsHaveCacti: Averted.
Averted. You can consider yourself lucky if there are cacti or other desert vegetation around, since that means water.
* AllOfTheOtherReindeer: Charlie's colleagues from the rail-road building team. Mostly because he is young, hard-working, does not drink, a non-drinker, and is German.



* AncientAfrica
* AncientTomb
* AndTheAdventureContinues

to:

* AncientAfrica
AncientAfrica: Charlie's other destination of choice, after the Wild West.
* AncientTomb
AncientTomb: Kara Ben Nemsi stumbles across a few of these.
* AndTheAdventureContinuesAndTheAdventureContinues: There is almost no finality to any of the books, they either blend one into the other, or are left open-ended, with a few mentions regarding part of the characters. Often, Winnetou and Old Shatterhand aren't mentioned.



* ArchangelGabriel
* ArcSymbol

to:

* ArchangelGabriel
ArchangelGabriel: Mentioned in a few teological discussions about the Kuoran in the Orient cycle. Including a hilarious one between Kara Ben Nemsi and Hadji Halef Omar about whether the Archangel might have made a mistake when he gave Mohammed instructions about the interdictions on eating ham and sausages.
* ArcSymbolArcSymbol: The Silver Lion. The octagonal rings of the Shadows secret organization. The Passiflora. The cross. Interestingly, most symbols are never explained, either because the public knew them, or in order to keep the mystery even beyond the supposed ending of the novel.



* AudienceSurrogate
* AuthorityInNameOnly
* BackToBackBadasses
* BadassBookworm
* BadassBystander
* BadassCrew
* BadassFamily
* BadassInDistress

to:

* AudienceSurrogate
AudienceSurrogate: Charlie, in the beginning. Whoever is the youngest and most inexperienced character around later on.
* AuthorityInNameOnly
AuthorityInNameOnly: Mayors, sherrifs, policemen, military officers, the occasional sheik or even pasha.
* BackToBackBadasses
BackToBackBadasses: Winnetou and Old Shatterhand, ''once''. The rest of the time, they fight side by side. Or, most likely, on physically opposite sides of a trap where they lured their enemies-of-the-week.
* BadassBookworm
BadassBookworm: Charlie is very much a badass, and very, very much a bookworm. To the point where he once refused David Lindsay's offer of an adventure because he wanted to go study the local dialects of the Balkanic region.
* BadassBystander
BadassCrew: In the strictest sense, Robert Surcouf's crew of corsaires is made of these, all the way down to the non-combatant priest. In a broader sense, all teams that form around one hero or another is this.
* BadassCrew
BadassFamily: Winnetou's family, made up of himself, his wise and brave father, his beautiful and resourceful sister, his kind teacher, and eventually his blood-brother.
** Tahua, her BadassPreacher brother I-Khvesti-Pa,and her two famous sons.
* BadassFamily
* BadassInDistress
BadassInDistress: Winnetou and Intschu-tschuna in volume one. Old Shatterhand himself soon afterwards. They both fall under this several times more, either separately or together. Old Firehand, Old Surehand and Apanatschka, as well as their entire group of Westmen acquaintances end up like this at some point.



* BarbarianTribe
* BattleInTheCenterOfTheMind
* BeautyIsNeverTarnished: Played straight with young women, partly subverted with older ones. So it's usually a case of aging, occasionally with the narration pointing out she used to be a beauty in her youth. One particular case is that of Tocbela in "Old Surehand". In her case, her great beauty was ruined early on by shock and madness, and she barely recovers a little sanity when she's in her forties and irrevocably changed physically. Her older sister Tahua, also a famous beauty, was also changed by the trials of her ActionGirl lifestyle.

to:

* BarbarianTribe
BarbarianTribe: The Native Americans are viewed as semi-civilised in most cases, but never as malicious on their own. Individual evilness is a different issue. Same goes for the Arabic tribes.
* BattleInTheCenterOfTheMind
BattleInTheCenterOfTheMind: Kara Ben Nemsi's confrontation with the spirit/energetic vampire/sorcerer in "The Realm of the Silver Lion".
* BeautyIsNeverTarnished: Played straight with young women, partly subverted with older ones. So it's usually a case of aging, occasionally with the narration pointing out she used to be a beauty in her youth. One particular case is that of Tocbela in "Old Surehand". In her case, her great beauty was ruined early on by shock and madness, and she barely recovers a little sanity when she's in her forties and irrevocably changed physically. Her older sister Tahua, also a famous beauty, was also changed by the trials of her ActionGirl lifestyle. lifestyle.
** Winnetou himself never suffers more than light wounds and bruises. Amusingly, the most damage he receives comes as a result of running around the forest at night, trying to spy on two enemy camps at the same time. The morning finds him rather dishevelled, scratched and full of resin. As is Old Shatterhand, for the same reasons.



* Bifauxnen: Colma-Puschi. Kah-o-oto. Amscha, the Beduin.

to:

* Bifauxnen: {{Bifauxnen:}} Colma-Puschi. Kah-o-oto. Amscha, the Beduin.



* BigFancyCastle
* BigFancyHouse

to:

* BigFancyCastle
BigFancyCastle: Some are actual castles. Others are more like fortresses built straight into the mountain rock. Old Shatterhand is particularly impressed by Tattelah-Satah's "castle".
* BigFancyHouse BigFancyHouse: Conrad Werner and Martha Vogel's house. Judith Silberstein also has several.



* Bishōnen: Winnetou. Apanatschka, the young Comanche chief. Young Eagle, who is distantly related to Winnetou.

to:

* Bishōnen: {{Bishōnen:}} Winnetou. Apanatschka, the young Comanche chief. Young Eagle, who is distantly related to Winnetou.



* BlasphemousBoast

to:

* BlasphemousBoastBlasphemousBoast: Some of the bad guys are prone to this. Charlie is usually horrified. In the case Old Cursing-Dry, so is Winnetou. God never fails to punish them, usually using their own words against them.



* BloodFromTheMouth

to:

* BloodFromTheMouthBloodFromTheMouth: When Old Wabble is dying due to his torso being slowly crushed inside a tree, he vomits blood for a while.
** When Winnetou is shot, the bullet hits his lung, causing an internal hemorragy and blood flows out from his mouth at the moment of his death.



* BornLucky

to:

* BornLuckyBornLucky: Old Shatterhand. Lampshaded by most other characters.



* CainAndAbel

to:

* CainAndAbelCainAndAbel: Intschu-tschuna uses the Cain-Abel example to parallel the relationship between the Native Indians and the Whites. The pale-faces are cast as Cain, of course. And even the whites present at the conversation are forced to sort-of agree.



* CataclysmClimax

to:

* CataclysmClimaxCataclysmClimax: In "Winnetou's Heirs", a serious earthquake solves the problem of the giant statue ''and'' the attacking alliance of enemy tribes.



* CelebrityImpersonator

to:

** Old Wabble's "it's clear".
* CelebrityImpersonatorCelebrityImpersonator: Some poor fool thought that pretending to be Old Shatterhand is a good idea. While Old Shatterhand was in the general vicinity. Matters are settled with a classic KO delivered by the real one.



* CharacterOverlap

to:

* CharacterOverlapCharacterOverlap: "Yes, I was Old Shatterhand. Yes, I was Kara Ben Nemsi. Now, I am 'me'."



* ColdBloodedTorture

to:

* ColdBloodedTortureColdBloodedTorture: What most people who fall prisoner to the Indians can expect, whether they are white or red. It's pointed out that the whites are guilty of similarly bloody and brutal treatment of their own prisoners.
** Some Arabic tribes have their moments as well, especially cruel when it involves a mother and her blind baby, and it's done without a specfic reason. She just happens to belong to the wrong tribe.
*** And when it comes down to it, Old Shatterhand himself is capable of this -- though he only practices psychological torture. Still cold-blooded enough not to cave at the victim's pleas, though.



* ComingOfAgeStory

to:

* ComingOfAgeStoryComingOfAgeStory: Mostly for Old Shatterhand, but Winnetou has his own evolutional arc.



* ConvenientlyPlacedSharpThing



* CoolAndUnusualPunishment

to:

* CoolAndUnusualPunishmentCoolAndUnusualPunishment: Some of Old Shatterhand's choices concerning their enemies.



* CorporalPunishment

to:

* CorporalPunishmentCorporalPunishment: What Old Wabble's bandits and "the general" receive as punishment for their evil deeds... at first.
** Done as an institutionalized form of punishment in the Ottoman Empire.



* CrisisOfFaith: Klekih-Petra, in his youth. Old Surehand.

to:

* CrisisOfFaith: Klekih-Petra, in his youth. Old Surehand.Surehand in the eponymous novel, as mentioned in his conversations with Old Shatterhand. And Old Shatterhand reveals that he himself had not always been exempt.



* CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass: Charlie, sometimes done intentionally.

to:

* CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass: Charlie, sometimes done mostly exaggerated intentionally.



* TheCynic: A staple of most bad guys. Charlie is particularly disgusted by this character trait.
* CynicismCatalyst: Tragic events are in the past of most people in the Wild West.

to:

* TheCynic: A staple of most bad guys. Charlie is particularly disgusted by this character trait.
trait. (Especially in women.)
* CynicismCatalyst: Tragic events are in the past of most people in the Wild West. Some point out to Old Shatterhand that if ''he'' had lived through similar pain, he wouldn't be quite so idealist. This opinion is proven wrong when Winnetou's death pushes Charlie not towards revenge, but towards deeper spiritual development.



* DamselScrappy



* DangerousTerrain

to:

* DangerousTerrainDangerousTerrain: The salt flats. Any cave they have to enter, on either continent. The hidden icy ravines in the short story featuring Eskimos. Canyons, due to the lack of both hiding places and the possibility to see your enemies coming.



* DarkestAfrica
* DawnOfTheWildWest

to:

* DarkestAfrica
DarkestAfrica: Charlie eventually makes his way south of the Sahara and ends up here.
* DawnOfTheWildWest DawnOfTheWildWest: Mostly before Charlie's time, but some of its figures are still known.



* DeadManWriting

to:

* DeadManWritingDeadManWriting: Winnetou's final will.



* DeadPersonImpersonation: Small Hunter.

to:

* DeadPersonImpersonation: Small Jonathan Melton/Small Hunter.



* DeathIsDramatic
* DeepSouth

to:

* DeathIsDramatic
DeathIsDramatic: And usually either instantaneous, or a long, drawn-out affair.
* DeepSouth DeepSouth: The location for most of the adventures featuring Old Death and his brother Horton.



* DeusExMachina: Charlie actually has the nerve to ''complain'' about such occurences in literature. Yes, really.

to:

* DeusExMachina: Charlie actually has the nerve to ''complain'' about such occurences in literature. Yes, really.he really is a hypocrite.



* DistantFinale

to:

* DistantFinaleDistantFinale: "Winnetou's Heirs".



* DudeWheresMyRespect?: Old Shatterhand, though most of the time he is too proud to point it out to the culprits. Sometimes, Winnetou will intervene and put them in their place. Occasionally, as in "Satan and Iscariot", it's taken to hilarious extremes, both with the lack of respect and Winnetou's out-of-character reaction. Charlie decides to be amused by the first, and giddily flattered by the latter.

to:

* DudeWheresMyRespect?: DudeWheresMyRespect: Old Shatterhand, though most of the time he is too proud to point it out to the culprits. Sometimes, Winnetou will intervene and put them in their place. Occasionally, as in "Satan and Iscariot", it's taken to hilarious extremes, both with the lack of respect and Winnetou's out-of-character reaction. Charlie decides to be amused by the first, and giddily flattered by the latter.



* EarnYourHappyEnding
* TheEngineer: Charlie, even after not actually professing anymore.

to:

* EarnYourHappyEnding
EarnYourHappyEnding: Old Shatterhand lampshades this in "Winnetou's Heirs", and he is referring to ''everyone''. Including his old-time enemies.
* TheEngineer: Charlie, even after not actually professing anymore.anymore, still occasionally proves he has a head for numbers and architecture.



* EvenTheGuysWantHim: Winnetou, at least as far as Old Shatterhand is concerned... And Charlie himself ends up being the object of any en's devotion and excessive affection, if not outright want.

to:

* EvenTheGuysWantHim: Winnetou, at least as far as Old Shatterhand is concerned... And Charlie himself ends up being the object of any en's many men's devotion and excessive affection, if not outright want.



* FairForItsDay: Most of Karl May's works were not only FairForItsDay, but actually so progressive for their era it managed to offend a ''lot'' of very different types of people in his native Germany, from the trash papers to the clergy.

to:

* FairForItsDay: Most of Karl May's works were not only FairForItsDay, but actually so progressive for their era it that they managed to offend a ''lot'' of very different types of people in his native Germany, from the trash papers to the clergy.



* TheFatalist

to:

* TheFatalistTheFatalist: A staple of most Arabs and Turks. Kara Ben Nemsi is not impressed by it.



* FateWorseThanDeath

to:

* FateWorseThanDeathFateWorseThanDeath: Slavery, for one. Profound humiliation is a close second.



* FeetofClay
* TheFettered

to:

* FeetofClay
FeetOfClay: Several pseudo-bad characters come to this conclusion about Old Shatterhand. Needless to say, they are proven wrong -- by circumstances, because he would never bother trying to convince them otherwise.
* TheFetteredTheFettered: Old Shatterhand only lets himself loose ''once'', when Winnetou is killed (though he is hardly rational at that point). It's enough to get an idea what would happen if he did it more often.



* FightingForAHomeland

to:

* FightingForAHomelandFightingForAHomeland: The Native Americans.



* GeniusBruiser
* GentlemanAdventurer
* GentlemanAndAScholar
* GetItOverWith: Ols Shatterhand.
* GloryDays

to:

* GeniusBruiser
GeniusBruiser: Old Shatterhand.
* GentlemanAdventurer
GentlemanAdventurer: Sir David Lindsay. Lord Castlepool.
* GentlemanAndAScholar
GentlemanAndAScholar: Old Shatterhand.
* GetItOverWith: Ols Shatterhand.
Old Shatterhand, when threatened with death by his captors. Obviously, they never do.
* GloryDaysGloryDays: In the distant past of both the Arabic cities, and, less popular at the time, the Native Americans.



* TheHeretic
* TheHermit

to:

* TheHeretic
TheHeretic: Old Wabble.
* TheHermitTheHermit: Tattelah-Satah. The Peder. Marah Durimeh.



* HeroicWannabe

to:

* HeroicWannabeHeroicWannabe: Old Wabble.



* HiddenElfVillage: Well, they're not elves, but otherwise they probbaly qualify...
* HiddenInPlainSight
* HidingBehindReligion
* HighPriest

to:

* HiddenElfVillage: The Peder's hidden village. Well, they're not elves, but otherwise they probbaly probably qualify...
* HiddenInPlainSight
HidingBehindReligion: Several representatives of different religions, much to Charlie's distaste.
* HidingBehindReligion
* HighPriest
HighPriest: Tattelah-Satah, in a way.



** Winnetou himself is this to Ribanna's son/daughter (depending on what version of the book you're reading) and acts as a personal trainer to the kid.



* HopeBringer

to:

* HopeBringerHopeBringer: Old Shatterhand.



* Hypocrite: A lot of the bad guys, and bad women.

to:

* Hypocrite: {{Hypocrite:}} A lot of the bad guys, and bad women.



* TheIngenue

to:

* TheIngenueTheIngenue: Martha Vogel. Ingdscha. Subverted with Ntscho-tschi, who is shown to be very mature in her thinking, and knowing a lot about the world despite her relative young age and limited personal experience.



* InjunCountry
* InMysteriousWays: Occasionally, God's ways involve Old Shatterhand in some shape or form.

to:

* InjunCountry
InjunCountry: The setting for most of the Wild West adventures.
* InMysteriousWays: Occasionally, God's mysterious ways involve Old Shatterhand in some shape or form.



* InvincibleHero
* IronWoobie: Old Shatterhand and Winnetou, if one thinks about it and ignores the stoic attitudes.
* IShouldWriteABookAboutThis
* Jerkass
* JudgeJuryAndExecutioner

to:

* InvincibleHero
InvincibleHero: Winnetou and Old Shatterhand come off as this, despite getting captured and/or wounded several times.
* IronWoobie: Old Shatterhand and Winnetou, if one thinks about it their actual experiences and ignores the stoic attitudes.
* IShouldWriteABookAboutThis
IShouldWriteABookAboutThis: The reason you're reading these series in the first place.
* Jerkass
Jerkass: Old Wabble. Santer. The Meltons.
* JudgeJuryAndExecutionerJudgeJuryAndExecutioner: How the Law functions in the Wild West.



* KickTheDog

to:

* KickTheDogKickTheDog: Old Wabble.



* LockedInTheDungeon

to:

* LockedInTheDungeonLockedInTheDungeon: Lots of people, including Old Shatterhand once or twice. Though the definition of "dungeon" is a bit loose here.



* MightMakesRight: White man policy in ''any'' setting.

to:

* MightMakesRight: White man man's policy in ''any'' setting.



* MoralDilemma

to:

* MoralDilemmaMoralDilemma: Usually involving the rights of Native American tribes, though the situations are rarely black and white.



* MysteryCult

to:

* MysteryCultMysteryCult: The Shadows.



* NotSoHarmlessVillain

to:

* NotSoHarmlessVillainNotSoHarmlessVillain: Old Wabble.



* OnlyKnownbyTheirNickname

to:

* OnlyKnownbyTheirNicknameOnlyKnownByTheirNickname: Often the case even between old friends.



* PacifismBackfire

to:

* PacifismBackfirePacifismBackfire: Usually for Old Shatterhand.



* PrayerPose

to:

* PrayerPosePrayerPose: The buried statue in "The Realm of the Silver Lion".



* RealMenLoveJesus

to:

* RealMenLoveJesusRealMenLoveJesus: Old Shatterhand, and eventually Winnetou.



* SecretIdentity

to:

* SecretIdentitySecretIdentity: Old Shatterhand is sometimes in situations that require this.
27th Apr '16 9:03:03 AM goldeneyes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BestFriend: Winnetou and Old Shatterhand both acknowledge each other as this, even stating at different moments that they are each other's ''only'' friend, in the "truest, most noble sense of the word".



* BigBrotherMentor: Winnetou to Old Shatterhand, at least at first. They both learn from the other one various skills, but Winnetou is in fact a couple of years older than Charlie.



* ChaseScene
* TheChosenOne
* ChristmasEpisode

to:

* ChaseScene
ChaseScene: A ''lot''. Their length in both time and space varies from minutes to months and may span continents.
* TheChosenOne
ChildhoodFriends: Charlie and Carpio.
* ChristmasEpisodeTheChosenOne: Old Shatterhand.
* ChristmasEpisode: "Holy Night!"



* FightScene

to:

* FightSceneFightScene: Many, many, many.
* FirstNameBasis: Old Shatterhand's closest friends can call him Charlie. Winnetou takes it one step further and adapts the name to "Scharlih", which Old Shatterhand seems to be positively enamored with. The fact that the change comes at a distinctly dark and painful moment for Winnetou (after his father and sister are murdered) as well as the contextual conversation where this happens only serve to deepen the meaningful development of their relationship.



* FriendlyEnemy

to:

* FriendlyEnemyFreudianTrio: Halef - Id, Charlie - Ego, Winnetou - Superego.
* AFriendInNeed: This is generally enough to set Old Shatterhand going faster than lightning, whether that friend is Bloody Fox, Old Surehand, Apanatschka, Bob, Sam Hawkens, Hadji Halef Omar or Martha Vogel. He is hilariously ''less'' concerned about Winnetou, because well, it's ''Winnetou''.
* FriendlessBackground: Old Shatterhand, despite being quite friendly as a person, actually has practically no friends before coming to the West, and no one as close as Winnetou.
* FriendlyEnemy: Pida, Tangua's son.
* FriendshipTrinket: Winnetou's hair lock.



* GoodSamaritan

to:

* GoodSamaritanGoodSamaritan: Winnetou and Old Shatterhand, but also a lot of their many friends as well.



* Hypocrite

to:

* HypocriteHurtingHero: Winnetou after losing his family. Charlie after losing Winnetou.
* Hypocrite: A lot of the bad guys, and bad women.
** More amusingly, especially since they disagree so rarely, whenever either Winnetou or Old Shatterhand thinks that the other one has gone a bit over-the-top with the bravery and endangered himself pointlessly, only for them to switch roles a bit later on.



* InsultOfEndearment: The dreaded "greenhorn" is always the way Sam Hawkens views Old Shatterhand, no matter how experienced he becomes. He eventually becomes immune to it.



* IntergenerationalFriendship: Old Shatterhand tends to make friends with people who are either younger or older than him. Mostly older, both men and women.



* TheLeader

to:

* TheLeader TheLancer: Either Winnetou or Old Shatterhand, depending on the situation and who is the acting leader at the time.
* TheLeader: Winnetou, even though Old Shatterhand's much more talkative nature might give you a different impression...



* LikeBrotherandSister

to:

* LikeBrotherandSisterLikeBrotherandSister: Old Shatterhand and Ntscho-tschi, much to her chagrin. In fact, this seems to be Old Shatterhand's approach to most young, attractive women he meets. Their own feelings on the matter vary.



* ObfuscatingStupidity

to:

* ObfuscatingStupidityObfuscatingStupidity: Old Shatterhand. Occasionally some of his friends as well.
* OldFriend: Carpio in "Holy Night!



* TheOnlyOneITrust: Winnetou and Old Shatterhand.



* ThePampas: Once Charlie goes to South America.

to:

* ThePampas: Once When Charlie goes to South America.



* PlatonicDeclarationOfLove: Winnetou and Old Shatterhand, all the bloody time, and completely honest and open about it, too.
* PlatonicLifePartners: Winnetou and Old Shatterhand. Kara Ben Nemsi and Hadji Halef Omar.
* PleaseDontLeaveMe: Pretty much literally Charlie's reaction when Winnetou foreshadows his own death.



* TheRival: Conrad Werner versus Old Shatterhand. Old Shatterhand decides that IWantMyBelovedToBeHappy, and bows out of the competition without even acknowledging his feelings to the girl.



* SaveTheVillain: What Old Shatterhand constantly tries to do, though he is surprisingly astute in recognizing faked remorse and shows no mercy when the situation requires it.



* StayWithMeUntilIDie: Charlie gets to hold a lot of friends as they die, and at least one enemy.



* SympathyForTheDevil: Something Charlie can't seem to stop doing...
* SympathyForTheHero: Something that happens to Charlie in "The Realm of the Silver Lion".



* TragicBromance: If read in the context of May's ''entire'' body of work, Winnetou's death marks a deep change in Charlie, who gradually turns inwards and becomes involved in more "spiritual" adventures. This happens in the Orient cycle, though Winnetou is mentioned in the beginning.



* TrueCompanions

to:

* TrueCompanionsTrueCompanions: Winnetou and Old Shatterhand, plus whatever friends they gathered around at any given time.



* WasOnceAMan

to:

* WasOnceAManWasOnceAMan: The "energetic vampire".



* WhipItGood
* YouLookFamiliar: Karin Dor played the role of Ellen Patterson in ''The Treasure of Silver Lake''. In ''Last of the Renegades'', she played Winnetou's Love Interest, an Indian girl Ribanna. And in "Winnetou and Shatterhand in the Valley of Death" she plays Mabel, the daughter of major Kingsley.

to:

* WhipItGood
WhipItGood: Don't give Halef any excuse to reach for his whip.
* WorthyOpponent: What everyone thinks of Old Shatterhand and Winnetou, no matter how much they might want to personally strangle them.
* YouAreNotAlone: Winnetou manages to do this for Charlie... some 30 years after his death. Lampshaded by other characters.
* YouLookFamiliar: Karin Dor played the role of Ellen Patterson in ''The ''Tas,he Treasure of Silver Lake''. In ''Last of the Renegades'', she played Winnetou's Love Interest, an Indian girl Ribanna. And in "Winnetou and Shatterhand in the Valley of Death" she plays Mabel, the daughter of major Kingsley.
27th Apr '16 6:51:20 AM goldeneyes
Is there an issue? Send a Message
This list shows the last 10 events of 72. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.Winnetou