History Literature / WhatWereTheyThinkingThe100DumbestEventsInTelevisionHistory

15th Mar '17 10:58:25 PM jameygamer
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# ''Series/TheNewMonkees'' [[note]](attempted revival of Franchise/TheMonkees concept during their return to popularity that didn't even come close to repeating the success or notability of the original, on top of getting the producers sued by the original Monkees. This "new" series and franchise, which replaced the modest accommodations from the original with a fully-functional mansion (complete with its own diner), was meant to go for a while, but the TV show only got 13 episodes in before the curtain was forcibly dropped on the show early).[[/note]]

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# ''Series/TheNewMonkees'' [[note]](attempted revival of Franchise/TheMonkees concept during their return to popularity that didn't even come close to repeating the success or notability of the original, on top of getting the producers sued by the original Monkees. This "new" series and franchise, which replaced the modest accommodations from the original with a fully-functional mansion (complete with its own diner), franchise was meant to go for a while, but the TV show only got 13 episodes in before the curtain was forcibly dropped on the show early).[[/note]]
15th Mar '17 10:57:06 PM jameygamer
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# ''Series/TheNewMonkees'' [[note]](attempted revival of Franchise/TheMonkees concept during their return to popularity that didn't even come close to repeating the success or notability of the original, on top of getting the producers sued by the original Monkees).[[/note]]

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# ''Series/TheNewMonkees'' [[note]](attempted revival of Franchise/TheMonkees concept during their return to popularity that didn't even come close to repeating the success or notability of the original, on top of getting the producers sued by the original Monkees).Monkees. This "new" series and franchise, which replaced the modest accommodations from the original with a fully-functional mansion (complete with its own diner), was meant to go for a while, but the TV show only got 13 episodes in before the curtain was forcibly dropped on the show early).[[/note]]
15th Mar '17 10:44:09 PM jameygamer
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# ''The Wilton North Report'' [[note]](failed news magazine show on FOX which replaced ''The Late Show'' for a mere four weeks. It became a CreatorKiller to the producer and hosts involved, and the show's greenlighting cost FOX Arsenio Hall, who didn't return when ''The Late Show'' began rebroadcasting. He was eventually replaced by future ''Match Game'' host Ross Schafer, and ''The Late Show'' never recovered from this move, eventually being replaced by ''The Chevy Chase Show'', another list entry, which was the final blow to FOX's late-night talk show attempts).[[/note]]

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# ''The Wilton North Report'' [[note]](failed news magazine show on FOX which replaced ''The Late Show'' for a mere four weeks. It became a CreatorKiller to Ended the careers of the producer and hosts involved, and the show's greenlighting cost FOX Arsenio Hall, who didn't return when ''The Late Show'' began rebroadcasting. He was eventually replaced by future ''Match Game'' host Ross Schafer, and ''The Late Show'' never recovered from this move, eventually being replaced by ''The Chevy Chase Show'', another list entry, which was the final blow to FOX's late-night talk show attempts).[[/note]]
15th Mar '17 10:42:37 PM jameygamer
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# ''The Wilton North Report'' [[note]](failed news magazine show on FOX which replaced ''The Late Show'' for a mere four weeks. Ended the careers of the producer and hosts involved, and the show's greenlighting cost FOX Arsenio Hall, who didn't return when ''The Late Show'' began rebroadcasting. He was eventually replaced by future ''Match Game'' host Ross Schafer, and ''The Late Show'' never recovered from this move, eventually being replaced by ''The Chevy Chase Show'', another list entry, which was the final blow to FOX's late-night talk show attempts).[[/note]]

to:

# ''The Wilton North Report'' [[note]](failed news magazine show on FOX which replaced ''The Late Show'' for a mere four weeks. Ended the careers of It became a CreatorKiller to the producer and hosts involved, and the show's greenlighting cost FOX Arsenio Hall, who didn't return when ''The Late Show'' began rebroadcasting. He was eventually replaced by future ''Match Game'' host Ross Schafer, and ''The Late Show'' never recovered from this move, eventually being replaced by ''The Chevy Chase Show'', another list entry, which was the final blow to FOX's late-night talk show attempts).[[/note]]
4th Mar '17 1:31:26 PM Scifimaster92
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# ''Bad Ronald'' [[note]](1974 ABC TV-movie which features an extremely nerdy teen with no social skills hiing in his house after killing a peer by accident; after his mother dies, he remains hidden and a new family buys the house, resulting in their daughter earning his attention with him creating a fantasy world. Was quoted as "processed cheese" by the author, and the movie reportedly had a murky color quality to it when it was aired and also had reportedly not aged well).[[/note]]

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# ''Bad Ronald'' [[note]](1974 ABC TV-movie which features an extremely nerdy teen with no social skills hiing hiding in his house after killing a peer by accident; after his mother dies, he remains hidden and a new family buys the house, resulting in their daughter earning his attention with him creating a fantasy world. Was quoted as "processed cheese" by the author, and the movie reportedly had a murky color quality to it when it was aired and also had reportedly not aged well).[[/note]]
22nd Feb '17 1:56:52 PM jameygamer
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# The inclusion of [[TheScrappy Scrappy-Doo]][[invoked]] in the ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise (1979-88) [[note]] Technically, this did help somewhat with Hanna-Barbera's target demographic of children at the time, which is part of the reason Scrappy remained a regular cast member for at least 6 more years, but the pup's overwhelming {{Hatedom}} caught up to him, the show, and Hanna-Barbera by that point, permanently staining the franchise and finally forcing Hanna-Barbera to eject the character from the show. Scrappy-Doo ended up pulling a FaceHeelTurn and became the BigBad for the 2002 movie, which was one of his very few appearances past the 1980's. [[/note]]

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# The inclusion of [[TheScrappy Scrappy-Doo]][[invoked]] in the ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' franchise (1979-88) [[note]] Technically, this did help somewhat with Hanna-Barbera's target demographic of children at the time, which is part of the reason Scrappy remained a regular cast member for at least 6 more years, but the pup's overwhelming {{Hatedom}} hatred amongst the older fans of the cartoon caught up to him, the show, and Hanna-Barbera by that point, permanently staining the franchise and finally forcing Hanna-Barbera to eject the character from the show. Scrappy-Doo ended up pulling a FaceHeelTurn and became the BigBad for the 2002 movie, which was one of his very few appearances past the 1980's. [[/note]]
4th Jan '17 9:27:21 PM jameygamer
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# Rampant ProductPlacement, particularly in televised sports [[note]] This started with several college football games accepting sponsorship; the uproar over that did less than nothing to start the trend. Technically, the sponsors actually have to pay the teams/colleges to advertise, however, meaning money for university and sports programs. The Rose Bowl, instead to taking full sponsorship, instead uses a "The Rose Bowl, Presented by AT&T/Citi tactic instead [[/note]]

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# Rampant ProductPlacement, particularly in televised sports [[note]] This started with several college football games accepting sponsorship; the uproar over that did less than nothing to start stop the trend.trend from starting. Technically, the sponsors actually have to pay the teams/colleges to advertise, however, meaning money for university and sports programs. The Rose Bowl, instead to taking full sponsorship, instead uses a "The Rose Bowl, Presented by AT&T/Citi tactic instead [[/note]]
4th Jan '17 6:39:20 PM jameygamer
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# ''Film/TheStarWarsHolidaySpecial'' [[note]]1978 TV-movie that's legendary for its awfulness, including 15 minutes of untranslated Wookie speak and variety show-style segments that [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment go absolutely nowhere]], causing Hofstede to actually declare the production "The Worst Two Hours of Television Ever" as the segment title. To date, it has never been officially reaired, Creator/GeorgeLucas is [[OldShame personally ashamed of it]], as are trilogy leads Creator/MarkHamill, Creator/HarrisonFord and Creator/CarrieFisher (who actually had a song at the end of it), and it was exiled from the canon immediately, one of the few parts of the franchise to suffer that fate prior to Creator/{{Disney}}'s purchase of it through Lucasfilm in 2012, 8 years after this book was published. The only person who didn't have much shame for this was Bea Arthur, who appeared as a cantina owner. The holiday special was one of the last gasps of the "variety show" era of TheSeventies, with NBC's ''Pink Lady and Jeff'' (listed further below) entirely ruining the genre two years later. It's also, as of this writing, the sole major program in the book reviewed by WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic and WebVideo/JonTron.[[/note]]

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# ''Film/TheStarWarsHolidaySpecial'' [[note]]1978 TV-movie that's legendary for its awfulness, including 15 minutes of untranslated Wookie speak and variety show-style segments that [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment go absolutely nowhere]], causing Hofstede to actually declare the production "The Worst Two Hours of Television Ever" as the segment title. To date, it has never been officially reaired, Creator/GeorgeLucas is [[OldShame personally ashamed of it]], as are were trilogy leads Creator/MarkHamill, Creator/HarrisonFord Creator/HarrisonFord, and the late Creator/CarrieFisher (who actually had a song at the end of it), it and allegedly owned the only copy of the program before her death), and it was exiled from the canon immediately, one of the few parts of the franchise to suffer that fate prior to Creator/{{Disney}}'s purchase of it through Lucasfilm in 2012, 8 years after this book was published. The only person who didn't have much shame for this was Bea Arthur, who appeared as a cantina owner. The holiday special was one of the last gasps of the "variety show" era of TheSeventies, with NBC's ''Pink Lady and Jeff'' (listed further below) entirely ruining the genre two years later. It's also, as of this writing, the sole major program in the book reviewed by WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic and WebVideo/JonTron.[[/note]]
2nd Jan '17 7:08:22 AM twilicorn
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# ''Film/TheStarWarsHolidaySpecial'' [[note]](1978 TV-movie that's legendary for its awfulness, including 15 minutes of untranslated Wookie speak and variety show-style segments that [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment go absolutely nowhere]]; to date, it has never been officially reaired, and Creator/GeorgeLucas is [[OldShame personally ashamed of it]], as are trilogy leads Creator/MarkHamill, Creator/HarrisonFord and Creator/CarrieFisher, who actually had a song at the end of it, and the special was called "The Worst Two Hours of Television Ever" by Hofstede as its article title and is the sole major program in the book to earn a review from WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic series (it was exiled from the canon immediately, one of the few parts of the franchise to suffer that fate prior to Creator/{{Disney}}'s purchase of it through Lucasfilm in 2012, 8 years after this book was published). The only person who didn't have much shame for this was Bea Arthur, who appeared as a cantina owner. One of the last "variety shows", with NBC's ''Pink Lady and Jeff'' {which is also on this list} entirely ruining the genre two years later).[[/note]]

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# ''Film/TheStarWarsHolidaySpecial'' [[note]](1978 [[note]]1978 TV-movie that's legendary for its awfulness, including 15 minutes of untranslated Wookie speak and variety show-style segments that [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment go absolutely nowhere]]; nowhere]], causing Hofstede to actually declare the production "The Worst Two Hours of Television Ever" as the segment title. To date, it has never been officially reaired, and Creator/GeorgeLucas is [[OldShame personally ashamed of it]], as are trilogy leads Creator/MarkHamill, Creator/HarrisonFord and Creator/CarrieFisher, who Creator/CarrieFisher (who actually had a song at the end of it, it), and the special was called "The Worst Two Hours of Television Ever" by Hofstede as its article title and is the sole major program in the book to earn a review from WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic series (it it was exiled from the canon immediately, one of the few parts of the franchise to suffer that fate prior to Creator/{{Disney}}'s purchase of it through Lucasfilm in 2012, 8 years after this book was published).published. The only person who didn't have much shame for this was Bea Arthur, who appeared as a cantina owner. One The holiday special was one of the last gasps of the "variety shows", show" era of TheSeventies, with NBC's ''Pink Lady and Jeff'' {which is also on this list} (listed further below) entirely ruining the genre two years later).later. It's also, as of this writing, the sole major program in the book reviewed by WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic and WebVideo/JonTron.[[/note]]



# The 1950s quiz show scandals [[note]] Several late-1950s game shows were rigged to help contestants that execs wanted to win, bump players said execs wanted to lose, and generally fabricate "drama". The jig was up when a contestant from ''Dotto'' reported the show to the feds for the rigging. Resulted in the decade-long blacklisting of Jack Barry & Dan Enright, who produced ''Series/TwentyOne'' (the central show involved in the scandal; it was forcibly canceled after champion and NBC anchor Charles Van Doren admitted it was rigged when the champion he defeated, Herb Stempel, reported that show, and it had the added effect of killing Van Doren's NBC and Columbia University careers. It eventually resurfaced with Maury Povich in 2000; this version is not rigged), and led to new laws regarding television that are still in effect to this day; said laws also ended sponsors' control over nonfiction programming after they demanded some of the rigging. The scandals also put a decades-long wound in quiz shows; apart from ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', no new major quiz shows surfaced until the 70's, and it would take ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' in 1999 to revive shows with regular cash prizes from $125,000/$250,000 up.[[/note]]

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# The 1950s quiz show scandals [[note]] Several late-1950s game shows were rigged to help contestants that execs wanted to win, bump players said execs wanted to lose, and generally fabricate "drama". The jig was up when a contestant from ''Dotto'' reported the show to the feds for the rigging. Resulted The brouhaha that ensued resulted in the decade-long blacklisting of Jack Barry & Dan Enright, who produced ''Series/TwentyOne'' (the central show involved in the scandal; it was forcibly canceled after champion and NBC anchor Charles Van Doren admitted it was rigged when the champion he defeated, Herb Stempel, reported that show, and it had the added effect of killing Van Doren's NBC and Columbia University careers. It eventually resurfaced with Maury Povich in 2000; this version is not rigged), and led to new laws regarding television that are still in effect to this day; said laws also ended sponsors' control over nonfiction programming after they demanded some of the rigging. The scandals also put a decades-long wound in quiz shows; apart from ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', no new major quiz shows surfaced until the 70's, and it would take ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' in 1999 to revive shows with regular cash prizes from $125,000/$250,000 up.[[/note]]
8th Dec '16 11:23:43 AM jameygamer
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# The 1950s quiz show scandals [[note]](Several late-1950s game shows were rigged to help contestants that execs wanted to win, bump players said execs wanted to lose, and generally fabricate "drama". The jig was up when a contestant from ''Dotto'' reported the show to the feds for the rigging. Resulted in the decade-long blacklisting of Jack Barry & Dan Enright, who produced ''Series/TwentyOne'' {the central show involved in the scandal; it was forcibly canceled after champion and NBC anchor Charles Van Doren admitted it was rigged when the champion he defeated, Herb Stempel, reported that show, and it had the added effect of killing Van Doren's NBC and Columbia University careers. It eventually resurfaced with Maury Povich in 2000; this version is not rigged}, and led to new laws regarding television that are still in effect to this day; said laws also ended sponsors' control over nonfiction programming after they demanded some of the rigging. The scandals also put a decades-long wound in quiz shows; apart from ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', no new major quiz shows surfaced until the 70's, and it would take ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' in 1999 to revive shows with regular cash prizes from $250,000 up).[[/note]]

to:

# The 1950s quiz show scandals [[note]](Several [[note]] Several late-1950s game shows were rigged to help contestants that execs wanted to win, bump players said execs wanted to lose, and generally fabricate "drama". The jig was up when a contestant from ''Dotto'' reported the show to the feds for the rigging. Resulted in the decade-long blacklisting of Jack Barry & Dan Enright, who produced ''Series/TwentyOne'' {the (the central show involved in the scandal; it was forcibly canceled after champion and NBC anchor Charles Van Doren admitted it was rigged when the champion he defeated, Herb Stempel, reported that show, and it had the added effect of killing Van Doren's NBC and Columbia University careers. It eventually resurfaced with Maury Povich in 2000; this version is not rigged}, rigged), and led to new laws regarding television that are still in effect to this day; said laws also ended sponsors' control over nonfiction programming after they demanded some of the rigging. The scandals also put a decades-long wound in quiz shows; apart from ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', no new major quiz shows surfaced until the 70's, and it would take ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' in 1999 to revive shows with regular cash prizes from $250,000 up).$125,000/$250,000 up.[[/note]]
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