History Literature / We

11th May '17 10:38:03 AM Gess
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* AMillionIsAStatistic: D-503 proudly reflects how an industrial accident got a score of people incinerated and none of their colleagues so much as flinched or hesitated for a moment.

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* AMillionIsAStatistic: D-503 proudly reflects on how an industrial accident got a score of people incinerated and none of their colleagues so much as flinched or hesitated from their duty for a moment.
18th Apr '17 10:29:16 AM Golondrina
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* AMillionIsAStatistic: D-503 proudly reflects how an industrial accident got a score of people incinerated and none of their colleagues so much as flinched or hesitated for a moment.



* LesCollaborateurs: [[spoiler: D-503 becomes one at the end.]]



* LaResistance: The Mephi.
* LesCollaborateurs: [[spoiler: D-503 becomes one at the end.]]


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* AMillionIsAStatistic: D-503 proudly reflects how an industrial accident got a score of people incinerated and none of their colleagues so much as flinched or hesitated for a moment.


Added DiffLines:

* LaResistance: The Mephi.
17th Feb '17 6:19:32 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* ScienceMarchesOn: Latest researches describe people who actually lost or innately don't have fantasy. In fact, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphantasia aphantasiacs]] don't behave as creepy zombie robots.
4th Oct '16 10:44:40 PM R.G.
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One of the earliest known {{Dystopia}} novels, written by Yevgeny Zamyatin in 1921 and predating ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'' (1932), ''Literature/{{Anthem}}'' and ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' (1949), which it directly inspired. It's also notable for being the first work banned by [[MediaWatchdog Goskomizdat]], not published in the Soviet Union until 1988, and some part of the description of the One State read as frighteningly similar to Stalinism -- eight years before it began to take shape. (The Soviets especially didn't like the book's implication that theirs was not the ''final'', destined-for-success revolution.)

to:

One of the earliest known {{Dystopia}} novels, written by Yevgeny Zamyatin in 1921 and predating ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'' (1932), ''Literature/{{Anthem}}'' (1938) and ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' (1949), which it directly inspired. It's also notable for being the first work banned by [[MediaWatchdog Goskomizdat]], not published in the Soviet Union until 1988, and some part of the description of the One State read as frighteningly similar to Stalinism -- eight years before it began to take shape. (The Soviets especially didn't like the book's implication that theirs was not the ''final'', destined-for-success revolution.)
4th Oct '16 10:44:12 PM R.G.
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One of the earliest known {{Dystopia}} novels, written by Yevgeny Zamyatin in 1921 and predating both ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'' (1932) and ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' (1949), which it directly inspired. It's also notable for being the first work banned by [[MediaWatchdog Goskomizdat]], not published in the Soviet Union until 1988, and some parts of the description of the One State read as frighteningly similar to Stalinism -- eight years before it began to take shape. (The Soviets especially didn't like the book's implication that theirs was not the ''final'', destined-for-success revolution.)

to:

One of the earliest known {{Dystopia}} novels, written by Yevgeny Zamyatin in 1921 and predating both ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'' (1932) (1932), ''Literature/{{Anthem}}'' and ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' (1949), which it directly inspired. It's also notable for being the first work banned by [[MediaWatchdog Goskomizdat]], not published in the Soviet Union until 1988, and some parts part of the description of the One State read as frighteningly similar to Stalinism -- eight years before it began to take shape. (The Soviets especially didn't like the book's implication that theirs was not the ''final'', destined-for-success revolution.)
12th Aug '16 9:21:47 AM mlsmithca
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* BittersweetEnding or BolivianArmyEnding, depending on how you see the odds; [[spoiler: D-503 is basically gone as a person, but LaResistance may well win after all.]]

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* BittersweetEnding BittersweetEnding: This or a BolivianArmyEnding, depending on how you see the odds; [[spoiler: D-503 is basically gone as a person, but LaResistance may well win after all.]]



* FreeLoveFuture ''and'' NoSexAllowed: Yes, "every number belongs to every other number," but everyone is issued so many sex tickets based on their hormone levels, and sex without a ticket is outlawed. The worst of 2 opposite {{dystopian edict}}s!

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* FreeLoveFuture ''and'' NoSexAllowed: FreeLoveFuture: Yes, "every number belongs to every other number," but everyone is issued so many sex tickets based on their hormone levels, and sex without a ticket is outlawed. The worst of 2 opposite {{dystopian edict}}s!
8th Jun '16 9:42:37 AM Morgenthaler
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Eight months after reading ''We'', Creator/GeorgeOrwell sat down and started writing ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' as a direct cultural translation of the story. Both Orwell and Creator/KurtVonnegut (who based ''PlayerPiano'' on ''We'') have accused AldousHuxley of stealing the plot of ''We'' for ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'', although Huxley always denied it. Creator/AynRand's ''{{Anthem}}'' is uncannily similar to ''We''. Last but not least, ''We'' heavily influenced ''Film/{{Equilibrium}}'' in all its campy glory, so much that it could very well be considered an over-the-top ''We: TheMovie''.

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Eight months after reading ''We'', Creator/GeorgeOrwell sat down and started writing ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' as a direct cultural translation of the story. Both Orwell and Creator/KurtVonnegut (who based ''PlayerPiano'' on ''We'') have accused AldousHuxley of stealing the plot of ''We'' for ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'', although Huxley always denied it. Creator/AynRand's ''{{Anthem}}'' ''Literature/{{Anthem}}'' is uncannily similar to ''We''. Last but not least, ''We'' heavily influenced ''Film/{{Equilibrium}}'' in all its campy glory, so much that it could very well be considered an over-the-top ''We: TheMovie''.
21st May '16 2:46:42 PM Ihnatus
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* ScienceMarchesOn: Latest researches describe people who actually lost or innately don't have fantasy. In fact, [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphantasia aphantasiacs] don't behave as creepy zombie robots.

to:

* ScienceMarchesOn: Latest researches describe people who actually lost or innately don't have fantasy. In fact, [https://en.[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphantasia aphantasiacs] aphantasiacs]] don't behave as creepy zombie robots.
21st May '16 2:42:17 PM Ihnatus
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Added DiffLines:

* ScienceMarchesOn: Latest researches describe people who actually lost or innately don't have fantasy. In fact, [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphantasia aphantasiacs] don't behave as creepy zombie robots.
31st Dec '15 2:51:11 AM CassandraLeo
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* {{Dystopia}}: One of the earliest known examples (although Creator/JackLondon's lesser-known ''Literature/TheIronHeel'' predates it by over a decade). It is widely considered to be one of three TropeCodifiers of the genre, alongside ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'' and ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'', both of which it predated, and the latter of which is acknowledged [[WordOfGod by its own author]] to be a direct cultural translation of this work for Western audiences. (Many literary scholars believe ''We'' to have influenced ''Brave New World'' as well).

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* {{Dystopia}}: One of the earliest known examples (although Creator/JackLondon's lesser-known ''Literature/TheIronHeel'' predates it by over a decade). It is widely considered to be one of three TropeCodifiers {{Trope Codifier}}s of the genre, alongside ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'' and ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'', both of which it predated, and the latter of which is acknowledged [[WordOfGod by its own author]] to be a direct cultural translation of this work for Western audiences. (Many literary scholars believe ''We'' to have influenced ''Brave New World'' as well).
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