History Literature / WaterMargin

7th Oct '17 8:11:02 AM DrFajardo
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* YouAllMeetInAnInn: The inn of Zhu Gui, the 'Daylight Crocodile', is where most of our heroes get recruited.

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* YouAllMeetInAnInn: The inn of Zhu Gui, the 'Daylight 'Dry-Land Crocodile', is where most of our heroes get recruited.
20th Aug '17 2:39:46 PM nombretomado
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* CulturalTranslation / XMeetsY: Adaptations for western audiences are often pitched as "the Chinese ''RobinHood''".

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* CulturalTranslation / XMeetsY: CulturalTranslation: Adaptations for western audiences are often pitched as "the Chinese ''RobinHood''".
18th Jun '17 5:32:03 PM Wuz
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''Water Margin'' (Traditional: 水滸傳; Simplified: 水浒传; Pinyin: Shuǐhǔ Zhuàn), also known as ''Outlaws Of The Marsh'', is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the "Four Great Classical Novels" of Chinese literature]] along with ''Literature/JourneyToTheWest'', ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'' and ''Literature/DreamOfTheRedChamber''.

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''Water Margin'' (Traditional: 水滸傳; Simplified: 水浒传; Pinyin: Shuǐhǔ Zhuàn), ''Shuǐhǔ Zhuàn''), also known as ''Outlaws Of The Marsh'', is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the "Four Great Classical Novels" of Chinese literature]] along with ''Literature/JourneyToTheWest'', ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'' and ''Literature/DreamOfTheRedChamber''.
18th Jun '17 5:31:01 PM Wuz
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''Water Margin'' (Traditional: 水滸傳 Simplified: 水浒传), also known as ''Outlaws Of The Marsh'', is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the "Four Great Classical Novels" of Chinese literature]] along with ''Literature/JourneyToTheWest'', ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'' and ''Literature/DreamOfTheRedChamber''.

to:

''Water Margin'' (Traditional: 水滸傳 水滸傳; Simplified: 水浒传), 水浒传; Pinyin: Shuǐhǔ Zhuàn), also known as ''Outlaws Of The Marsh'', is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the "Four Great Classical Novels" of Chinese literature]] along with ''Literature/JourneyToTheWest'', ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'' and ''Literature/DreamOfTheRedChamber''.
22nd Apr '17 2:31:44 PM nombretomado
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The earliest surviving example of the {{Wuxia}} genre, ''Water Margin'' has been translated many times, and adapted to other media such as film, television and comics. Probably the best known adaption is the successful 1973 Nippon Television series which was broadcast in many countries, effectively introducing this epic work to Western popular culture. Perhaps the ''second'' best known, and much much looser, adaptation is the ''{{Suikoden}}'' video game series. Mostly just the first game, with the rest drawing basically ''nothing'' from the original story other than the concept of 108 protagonists. (Other video game adaptations include {{Koei}}'s TurnBasedStrategy game ''Bandit Kings of Ancient China'' and Creator/DataEast's FightingGame ''Outlaws of the Lost Dynasty''.)

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The earliest surviving example of the {{Wuxia}} genre, ''Water Margin'' has been translated many times, and adapted to other media such as film, television and comics. Probably the best known adaption is the successful 1973 Nippon Television series which was broadcast in many countries, effectively introducing this epic work to Western popular culture. Perhaps the ''second'' best known, and much much looser, adaptation is the ''{{Suikoden}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'' video game series. Mostly just the first game, with the rest drawing basically ''nothing'' from the original story other than the concept of 108 protagonists. (Other video game adaptations include {{Koei}}'s TurnBasedStrategy game ''Bandit Kings of Ancient China'' and Creator/DataEast's FightingGame ''Outlaws of the Lost Dynasty''.)
23rd Mar '17 12:40:42 PM TheNicestGuy
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* FalseFlagOperation: This was Song Jiang's ploy to force General Qin Ming to join their band. While they wined and dined him in captivity, a bandit dressed in his armor led a force to pillage his hometown. Qin Ming initially declines their invitation to stay, but when he gets home he finds he's thoroughly unwelcome, and his family has already been executed. This plan actually succeeds, even though Song Jiang fesses up to the whole thing immediately. Qin Ming doesn't even hold a grudge.
21st Mar '17 9:51:16 PM TheNicestGuy
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* UnspokenPlanGuarantee: This is used numerous times, being a particular trademark of characters who qualify as TheStrategist. It's customary for the characters to lampshade it by following the non-explanation with remarks about what a marvelous plan it is.
21st Mar '17 1:06:29 PM TheNicestGuy
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* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: Bribery is not just for the rich, but for everyone, so it's more like The Rules Screw You If You Don't Have Money. Venality is portrayed as a way of life in the Song Dynasty, to the point that officials often expect a "tip" just for doing their jobs correctly. Even relatively honorable characters will sometimes accept a bribe just to avoid giving offense. Note that the "rules" that are screwed by money aren't limited to those of the government, but sometimes include the chivalrous tenets of the "gallant fraternity". For example, Wang Lun tries to buy off men who want to join the Liangshan outlaws if he's afraid they'll show him up.
21st Mar '17 12:06:09 PM TheNicestGuy
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* BribeBackfire: When Ximen Qing is implicated in the murder of Wu Dalang, both his accepted ''and'' rejected bribes contribute to his death. His bribe to the coroner is seemingly accepted, but really the coroner set it aside to give to Dalang's brother Wu Song as evidence. Meanwhile, his bribes to the court to avoid prosecution are gladly accepted, but it's implied that if he ''had'' been prosecuted Wu Song wouldn't have felt the need to kill him. (Then again, if convicted he probably would have died anyway.)
19th Mar '17 6:36:51 PM TheNicestGuy
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* BestServedCold: Wu Song doesn't exactly bide his time when he hears rumors that his brother was poisoned by his adulterous sister-in-law, but considering his anger and his reputation it's impressive that he proceeded as politely as he did. He sought evidence and testimony, and he gathered neighbors as witnesses and stenographers before forcing a confession out of the poisoner and her accomplice. ''Then'' he stabbed, disemboweled, sacrificed, and beheaded his sister-in-law and her lover. He even tried to take the matter to court first, and it's implied that if the adulterer hadn't gotten the case dismissed through bribery Wu Song wouldn't have killed them.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.WaterMargin