History Literature / TheWarOfTheWorlds

17th Mar '17 5:45:37 AM Owlorange1995
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* AliensNeverInventedTheWheel: Despite inventing bith tripods and the Heat Ray, the Martians have no concept of the wheel.

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* AliensNeverInventedTheWheel: Despite inventing bith both tripods and the Heat Ray, the Martians have no concept of the wheel.
17th Mar '17 5:45:10 AM Owlorange1995
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Added DiffLines:

* AliensNeverInventedTheWheel: Despite inventing bith tripods and the Heat Ray, the Martians have no concept of the wheel.
3rd Mar '17 11:20:11 PM DoktorSoviet
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Added DiffLines:

* FridgeHorror: The Martian tripods were the scariest, deadliest, most effective weapons that Wells could think of in 1898. [[WorldWarI Just 20 years, humanity would have the weapons technology to reach parity with these weapons]], including some of the very same weapons (chlorine gas being similar to the black smoke). And then, [[TheNineties about a century later]], humanity has invented weapons far more destructive than ''anything'' the Martians ever had in the original novel. Man's capacity to kill itself far outstripped what even science fiction writers could concoct.
20th Feb '17 9:16:55 AM KaputExaltation
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* CoolBoat: The HMS ''Thunder Child''. At the time, a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torpedo_ram torpedo ram]] like ''Thunder Child'' represented the most powerful destructive force in the world - fully armoured, with a sharp ram on the bow, torpedo tubes, heavy guns and powerful engines to take it up to [[RammingAlwaysWorks ramming speed]]. In the real world, however, torpedo rams were completely useless; all that they ever destroyed was a single, grounded ship and a harbour jetty. TheOtherWiki says "''It has been suggested by some that, in view of the limited military value the torpedo ram demonstrated, Wells's immortalization of the type in what would become a literary classic was the torpedo ram's [[TakeThat greatest achievement]].''"

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* CoolBoat: The HMS ''Thunder Child''. At the time, a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torpedo_ram torpedo ram]] like ''Thunder Child'' represented the most powerful destructive force in the world - fully armoured, with a sharp ram on the bow, torpedo tubes, heavy guns and powerful engines to take it up to [[RammingAlwaysWorks ramming speed]]. In the real world, however, torpedo rams were completely useless; all that they ever destroyed was a single, grounded ship and a harbour jetty. TheOtherWiki says "''It has been suggested by some that, in view of the limited military value the torpedo ram demonstrated, Wells's immortalization of the type in what would become a literary classic was the torpedo ram's [[TakeThat [[DamnedByFaintPraise greatest achievement]].''"
4th Jan '17 5:11:59 AM Spindriver
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* AliensAndMonsters: Wells was quite advanced for his time in emphasizing the sheer alien-ness of the Martians.

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* AliensAndMonsters: Wells was quite advanced for his time in emphasizing the sheer alien-ness of the Martians. But this makes them totally unsympathetic to humans; the horror and the pity of this war are all on the human side.
4th Jan '17 5:09:55 AM Spindriver
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* AliensAndMonsters

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* AliensAndMonstersAliensAndMonsters: Wells was quite advanced for his time in emphasizing the sheer alien-ness of the Martians.
4th Jan '17 5:08:32 AM Spindriver
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** Dying off to disease also fits in with the parallels with imperialism (see NotSoDifferent below): Many European explorers especially in Africa died from diseases they had never encountered before.
*** On the other hand these diseases did not delay the imperialist conquest of Africa for long (if at all) and the reverse effect - indigenous populations being hit hard by imported diseases - was much more common, even in European history, as in the Black Death. But having Earth's population being decimated by Martian measles would have made for too much of a DownerEnding.

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** Dying off to disease also fits in with the parallels with imperialism (see NotSoDifferent below): Many European explorers especially in Africa died from diseases they had never encountered before.
***
before. On the other hand hand, these diseases did not delay the imperialist conquest of Africa for long (if at all) and the reverse effect - indigenous populations being hit hard by imported diseases - was much more common, even in European history, as in the Black Death. But having Earth's population being decimated by Martian measles would have made for too much of a DownerEnding.



* DownerEnding: Provisional; although humanity survives, and is reasonably confident of its ability to hold off any further Martian invasions, it's clearly been a desperately close thing, and the Martians remain technologically vastly superior. The narrator is still suffering nightmares.
-->''It may be, on the other hand, that the destruction of the Martians is only a reprieve. To them, and not to us, perhaps, is the future ordained.''



* EasilyThwartedAlienInvasion
* FirstContact

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* EasilyThwartedAlienInvasion
EasilyThwartedAlienInvasion: Albeit not by human efforts.
* FirstContactFirstContact: Not that there's any communication involved.



* InfantImmortality: Averted early on, and by ''humans'' no less: a young boy is trampled to death in the mob panic of the first attack.

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* InfantImmortality: InfantImmortality:
**
Averted early on, and by ''humans'' no less: a young boy is trampled to death in the mob panic of the first attack.



** ''Literature/TheTripods'', a series of young-adult novels by Creator/JohnChristopher, is in all but name a sequel set in an AlternateContinuity where the Martians were successful in dominating the world.
*** Except Christopher's aliens are three-legged chlorine-breathers from a (different star's) world with ''higher'' gravity than Earth, and they took over via MindControl ("The Trippy Show") rather than war.
** There was, of course, an actual (and, dubiously, claimed to be "authorized") sequel. It was almost entirely unrelated to the original book (setting the original invasion in Boston, America, among other things) and involved the cannibalisation of Martian technology by Earthly masterminds, including the man who both supported the publication of and lent his title to the book. This was called (and was, indeed, about) ''[[Literature/EdisonsConquestOfMars Edison's Conquest of Mars]]''.

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** ''Literature/TheTripods'', a series of young-adult novels by Creator/JohnChristopher, is in all but name a sequel set in an AlternateContinuity where the Martians were successful in dominating the world.
*** Except
world.[[note]]Except Christopher's aliens are three-legged chlorine-breathers from a (different star's) world with ''higher'' gravity than Earth, and they took over via MindControl ("The Trippy Show") rather than war.
war.[[/note]]
** There was, of course, an actual (and, very dubiously, claimed to be "authorized") sequel. It was almost entirely unrelated to the original book (setting the original invasion in Boston, America, among other things) and involved the cannibalisation of Martian technology by Earthly masterminds, including the man who both supported the publication of and lent his title to the book. This was called (and was, indeed, about) ''[[Literature/EdisonsConquestOfMars Edison's Conquest of Mars]]''.



* TakeThat: Especially to the loathed towns of Woking and Bromley (see above).
** Also, there are veiled and not-so- veiled ShoutOut's and TakeThat's to the Grossmith Brothers' ''TheDiaryOfANobody'', published five years earlier. To begin with, the narrator's wife is called ''Carrie'', as is Mrs Pooter. This hints that the central character is a bit of a Charles Pooter, suddenly abrupted from petty-bourgeois life and given a ''really'' interesting set of events to diarise. And the working-class artilleryman, given a break in social norms, is free to really pour vitriol on his social betters in a [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech crowning piece of Class War]]. He could be describing Pooter:

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* TakeThat: Especially to the loathed towns of Woking and Bromley (see above). \n** Also, there are veiled and not-so- veiled ShoutOut's and TakeThat's to the Grossmith Brothers' ''TheDiaryOfANobody'', published five years earlier. To begin with, the narrator's wife is called ''Carrie'', as is Mrs Pooter. This hints that the central character is a bit of a Charles Pooter, suddenly abrupted from petty-bourgeois life and given a ''really'' interesting set of events to diarise. And the working-class artilleryman, given a break in social norms, is free to really pour vitriol on his social betters in a [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech crowning piece of Class War]]. He could be describing Pooter:



* VillainousValour: The narrator acknowledges that the Martian operate like cool-headed professional soldiers; they not only have superior technology, they know how to use it. Nor does the book deny the (possibly desperate) courage required to cross millions of miles of space to launch an invasion against much more numerous and little-known opposition in far-from-indestructible machines.



* YouCouldHaveUsedYourPowersForGood: In the 1953 movie especially. The understanding of science and advancement of technology necessary to create the war machine's force fields and skeleton beams is hundreds, if not thousands of years ahead of human understanding. With that at their beck and call, certainly the Martians could have come up with a better solution to their climate change problem than invading Earth.
** Or perhaps not, just because they had the technology to potentially engineer a fix for their own planet doesn't mean it didn't make more practical/economic sense to use what they already had at hand and just move over to the perfectly good planet next door who's inhabitants can't stop them. You can genetically engineer a grass that only grows to a uniform 3'' height, or you can just take a lawnmower and cut what's already there to that height, which is the easier option?

to:

* YouCouldHaveUsedYourPowersForGood: In the 1953 movie especially. The understanding of science and advancement of technology necessary to create the war machine's force fields and skeleton beams is hundreds, if not thousands of years ahead of human understanding. With that at their beck and call, certainly the Martians could have come up with a better solution to their climate change problem than invading Earth.
**
Earth. Or perhaps not, just because they had the technology to potentially engineer a fix for their own planet doesn't mean it didn't make more practical/economic sense to use what they already had at hand and just move over to the perfectly good planet next door who's inhabitants can't stop them. You can genetically engineer a grass that only grows to a uniform 3'' height, or you can just take a lawnmower and cut what's already there to that height, which is the easier option?
19th Dec '16 4:05:07 PM LBHills
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* BodyHorror: The bacteria that the Martians fell victim to? ''Necrotic'' bacteria.

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* BodyHorror: The One of the types of bacteria that the Martians fell victim to? ''Necrotic'' to are ''necrotic'' bacteria.
19th Dec '16 4:02:49 PM LBHills
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At this point, when the full consequences of defeat have become apparent, the Martians disappear. Returning to London, the narrator finds that all the Martians have conveniently dropped dead, their remains being picked apart by birds. It was only later that they figure out that the aliens died from nothing more than common illness, as they had virtually no immunity to Earth's microbiological lifeforms.

to:

At this point, when the full consequences of defeat have become apparent, the Martians disappear. Returning suddenly stop appearing. After returning to London, the narrator finds that all the Martians have conveniently mysteriously dropped dead, their remains being picked apart by birds. It was only later that they figure out that the aliens died from nothing more than common illness, as they had virtually no immunity to Earth's microbiological lifeforms.
24th Oct '16 9:28:06 AM Quirderph
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** There was, of course, an actual (and, dubiously, claimed to be "authorized") sequel. It was almost entirely unrelated to the original book (setting the original invasion in Boston, America, among other things) and involved the cannibalisation of Martian technology by Earthly masterminds, including the man who both supported the publication of and lent his title to the book. This was called (and was, indeed, about) ''Edison's Conquest of Mars''.

to:

** There was, of course, an actual (and, dubiously, claimed to be "authorized") sequel. It was almost entirely unrelated to the original book (setting the original invasion in Boston, America, among other things) and involved the cannibalisation of Martian technology by Earthly masterminds, including the man who both supported the publication of and lent his title to the book. This was called (and was, indeed, about) ''Edison's ''[[Literature/EdisonsConquestOfMars Edison's Conquest of Mars''.Mars]]''.
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