History Literature / TheTalmud

29th Aug '17 2:04:02 PM hannahstohelit
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* JesusWasWayCool: Averted and inverted...maybe. It's very controversial whether any passages refers to Jesus ''at all'', as the term Yeshu, while very similar to Jesus' Hebrew name Yeshua, was a very common given name during the first century BCE. There are also a great number of major discrepancies between the life of Jesus and the life of Yeshu as described in the Talmud, ranging from being killed differently on different days in different cities, and only having a disciple with the same name in common. It's likely the Talmud was codified a while before Jesus was even born, and Yeshu himself and his step-father are associated with being alive during events that occurred in 104 BC and 135 BC respectively, thus making it rather…well, impossible, for him to be Jesus. In modern times the argument is mainly used by anti-semites to imply that the Talmud is inherently anti-Christian. Regardless of who Yeshu is, none of the Talmud editions have much good to say about him, and some specifically say (in Gittin 57) that he's being [[FireAndBrimstoneHell punished in Hell]] for [[ValuesDissonance being an apostate]].

to:

* JesusWasWayCool: Averted and inverted...maybe. It's very controversial whether any passages refers to Jesus ''at all'', as the term Yeshu, while very similar to Jesus' Hebrew name Yeshua, was a very common given name during the first century BCE. There are also a great number of major discrepancies between the life of Jesus and the life of Yeshu as described in the Talmud, ranging from being killed differently on different days in different cities, and only having a disciple with the same name in common. It's likely Since there is historical context given for many of the Talmud was codified a while before Jesus was even born, and stories which include the Talmudic Yeshu, some of which make Yeshu himself and his step-father are associated with being out to have been alive during events that occurred in 104 BC and 135 BC respectively, thus making it rather…well, impossible, seems pretty darn unlikely for him the Yeshu mention to be have been Jesus. In modern times the argument is mainly used by anti-semites to imply that the Talmud is inherently anti-Christian. Regardless of who Yeshu is, none of the Talmud editions have much good to say about him, and some specifically say (in Gittin 57) that he's being [[FireAndBrimstoneHell punished in Hell]] for [[ValuesDissonance being an apostate]].
24th Aug '17 9:46:09 AM bedrockperson
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The Talmud was a frequent target of anti-semitic pogroms in the European Middle Ages, due to its denial of Jesus' divinity and a possible claim that he was an illegitimate son of a Roman soldier. Maybe. It's actually unclear if the Talmud ever mentions Jesus, but regardless this was the assumption that many used to persecute Jewish populations.

to:

The Talmud was a frequent target of anti-semitic pogroms in the European Middle Ages, due to its denial of Jesus' divinity and a possible claim that he was an illegitimate son of a Roman soldier. Maybe. Sort of. The figure assumed to be Jesus is mentioned as being alive at the turn of the first century BC, and his step-father is mentioned as being among those martyred by the Romans in 135 BC, making the connection particularly hard to swallow. It's actually unclear if the Talmud ever mentions Jesus, Jesus or just several people that were named Jesus (or "Yeshu) but regardless regardless, this was the assumption that many used to persecute Jewish populations.
24th Aug '17 9:43:27 AM bedrockperson
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* JesusWasWayCool: Averted and inverted...maybe. It's very controversial whether any passages refers to Jesus ''at all'', as the term Yeshu, while very similar to Jesus' Hebrew name Yeshua, was a very common given name during the first century BCE. There are also a great number of major discrepancies between the life of Jesus and the life of Yeshu as described in the Talmud, ranging from being killed differently on different days in different cities, and only having a disciple with the same name in common. Since it's likely the Talmud was codified a while before Jesus was even born, the argument is mainly used by anti-semites to imply that the Talmud is inherently anti-Christian. Regardless of who Yeshu is, none of the Talmud editions have much good to say about him, and some specifically say (in Gittin 57) that he's being [[FireAndBrimstoneHell punished in Hell]] for [[ValuesDissonance being an apostate]].

to:

* JesusWasWayCool: Averted and inverted...maybe. It's very controversial whether any passages refers to Jesus ''at all'', as the term Yeshu, while very similar to Jesus' Hebrew name Yeshua, was a very common given name during the first century BCE. There are also a great number of major discrepancies between the life of Jesus and the life of Yeshu as described in the Talmud, ranging from being killed differently on different days in different cities, and only having a disciple with the same name in common. Since it's It's likely the Talmud was codified a while before Jesus was even born, and Yeshu himself and his step-father are associated with being alive during events that occurred in 104 BC and 135 BC respectively, thus making it rather…well, impossible, for him to be Jesus. In modern times the argument is mainly used by anti-semites to imply that the Talmud is inherently anti-Christian. Regardless of who Yeshu is, none of the Talmud editions have much good to say about him, and some specifically say (in Gittin 57) that he's being [[FireAndBrimstoneHell punished in Hell]] for [[ValuesDissonance being an apostate]].
28th Jan '17 11:01:32 AM nngnna
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Nezikin, Moed, and Nashim, being the most practical of the three, are the most commonly studied; Kodshim is virtually useless, as there is no temple in Jerusalem right now, and much of Zeraim is considered to apply only to ''Eretz Yisrael'' and as such non-Israeli rabbis don't have much use for it (Israeli rabbis, on the other hand, do have some use, particularly since religious Jews started taking up farming as part of the Religious Zionist movement...although not ''that'' much use, since modern mechanized farming reduces the number of people needed to run a farm). As for Tohorot...

to:

Nezikin, Moed, and Nashim, being the three most practical of the three, bunch, are the most commonly studied; Kodshim is virtually useless, as there is no temple in Jerusalem right now, and much of Zeraim is considered to apply only to ''Eretz Yisrael'' and as such non-Israeli rabbis don't have much use for it (Israeli rabbis, on the other hand, do have some use, particularly since religious Jews started taking up farming as part of the Religious Zionist movement...although not ''that'' much use, since modern mechanized farming reduces the number of people needed to run a farm). As for Tohorot...
5th Jan '17 6:49:53 AM bedrockperson
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The Talmud was a frequent target of anti-semitic pogroms in the European Middle Ages, due to its denial of Jesus' divinity and a possible claim that he was an illegitimate son of a Roman soldier.

to:

The Talmud was a frequent target of anti-semitic pogroms in the European Middle Ages, due to its denial of Jesus' divinity and a possible claim that he was an illegitimate son of a Roman soldier. Maybe. It's actually unclear if the Talmud ever mentions Jesus, but regardless this was the assumption that many used to persecute Jewish populations.
5th Jan '17 6:46:31 AM bedrockperson
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* JesusWasWayCool: Averted and inverted; none of the Talmud editions have much good to say about him, and some specifically say (in Gittin 57) that he's being [[FireAndBrimstoneHell punished in Hell]] for [[ValuesDissonance being an apostate]].
** And it's very controversial whether said passage refers to Jesus ''at all''. Yeshu was a very common given name during the first century BCE. It's mainly used by anti-semites to imply that the Talmud is inherently anti-Christian.

to:

* JesusWasWayCool: Averted and inverted; inverted...maybe. It's very controversial whether any passages refers to Jesus ''at all'', as the term Yeshu, while very similar to Jesus' Hebrew name Yeshua, was a very common given name during the first century BCE. There are also a great number of major discrepancies between the life of Jesus and the life of Yeshu as described in the Talmud, ranging from being killed differently on different days in different cities, and only having a disciple with the same name in common. Since it's likely the Talmud was codified a while before Jesus was even born, the argument is mainly used by anti-semites to imply that the Talmud is inherently anti-Christian. Regardless of who Yeshu is, none of the Talmud editions have much good to say about him, and some specifically say (in Gittin 57) that he's being [[FireAndBrimstoneHell punished in Hell]] for [[ValuesDissonance being an apostate]].
** And it's very controversial whether said passage refers to Jesus ''at all''. Yeshu was a very common given name during the first century BCE. It's mainly used by anti-semites to imply that the Talmud is inherently anti-Christian.
6th Dec '16 9:20:37 PM ImperialMajestyXO
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A collection of rabbinical discussions of Jewish customs and theology. It is divided into the Mishnah (written about 200 CE), which is the first written collection of Jewish laws; and the Gemara (about 500 CE), which is a discussion of the Mishnah and Jewish works, including what Christians know as [[Literature/TheBible the Old Testament]]. Intellectual study and discussion of the Talmud has an important role among the customs and history of many Jews. If you have a story in which one of the characters is a [[GoodShepherd rabbi]], you can be fairly sure that they [[TheSmartGuy know a lot]] about the Talmud. And if you [[SchmuckBait wish to debate them or hear them expound]], you will [[SesquipedalianLoquaciousness get what you ask for]].

to:

A collection of rabbinical discussions of Jewish [[UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}} Jewish]] customs and theology. It is divided into the Mishnah (written about 200 CE), which is the first written collection of Jewish laws; and the Gemara (about 500 CE), which is a discussion of the Mishnah and Jewish works, including what Christians know as [[Literature/TheBible the Old Testament]]. Intellectual study and discussion of the Talmud has an important role among the customs and history of many Jews. If you have a story in which one of the characters is a [[GoodShepherd rabbi]], you can be fairly sure that they [[TheSmartGuy know a lot]] about the Talmud. And if you [[SchmuckBait wish to debate them or hear them expound]], you will [[SesquipedalianLoquaciousness get what you ask for]].
24th Jul '16 6:29:58 PM SantosLHalper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* EldritchLocation: The Rabbis enter the realm of Pardes and encounter a palace made of marble so pure that it looks like water. Those who did not understand what they saw went mad.

to:

* EldritchLocation: The Rabbis enter the realm of Pardes {{Heaven}} and encounter a palace made of marble so pure that it looks like water. Those who did not understand what they saw went mad.



* GoMadFromTheRevelation: Rabbi Akiva, Ben Azzai, Ben Zoma, and Elisha ben Avuyah travel to the mystical realm of Pardes. Ben Azzai dies, Ben Zoma goes insane, and Elisha ben Avuyah does a FaceHeelTurn. Only Rabbi Akiva entered in peace and left in peace.

to:

* GoMadFromTheRevelation: Rabbi Akiva, Ben Azzai, Ben Zoma, and Elisha ben Avuyah travel to the mystical realm of Pardes.{{Heaven}}. Ben Azzai dies, Ben Zoma goes insane, and Elisha ben Avuyah does a FaceHeelTurn. Only Rabbi Akiva entered in peace and left in peace.
24th Jun '16 8:08:04 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheJudge : Much advice for arbitrating civil disputes between Jews is contained within.

to:

* TheJudge : Much advice for arbitrating adjudicating civil disputes between Jews is contained within.
24th Nov '15 6:48:11 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The existence of an "oral" Torah was a hotly contested issue before the Roman conquest of Judah; the Sadducees (an extinct political/religious entity tied to the priesthood and Hasamonean kings of Judah) vigorously denied any oral law. Their opponents, the Pharisees (the ancestors of modern-day rabbinical Judaism) accepted the oral law. Today, there are still groups of Jews (Karaites, and the dwindling Samaritan community) that reject the validity of the Talmud.[[note]]Disputes over the validity of the oral tradition are rather common in the Abrahamic tradition; the Protestant Reformation in UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} was largely about the validity of the "Church tradition" that plays an important role in both Catholic and Orthodox doctrine, and there are substantial movements in contemporary UsefulNotes/{{Islam}} (which, it should be noted, is about as old now as Christianity was when the Reformation happened) looking closely at reevaluating the ''Hadith'' (the "oral law" of Islam, consisting of things the Prophet is said to have said using modern techniques of textual criticism and analysis to see what he actually said and what he probably didn't).[[/note]]

to:

The existence of an "oral" Torah was a hotly contested issue before the Roman conquest of Judah; the Sadducees (an extinct political/religious entity tied to the priesthood and Hasamonean kings of Judah) vigorously denied any oral law. Their opponents, the Pharisees (the ancestors of modern-day rabbinical Judaism) accepted the oral law. Today, there are still groups of Jews (Karaites, and the dwindling Samaritan community) that reject the validity of the Talmud.[[note]]Disputes over the validity of the oral tradition are rather common in the Abrahamic tradition; the Protestant Reformation in UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} was largely about the validity of the "Church tradition" that plays an important role in both Catholic and Orthodox doctrine, and there are substantial movements in contemporary UsefulNotes/{{Islam}} (which, it should be noted, is about as old now as Christianity was when the Reformation happened) looking closely at reevaluating the ''Hadith'' (the "oral law" of Islam, consisting of things the Prophet is said to have said using modern techniques of textual criticism and analysis to see what he actually said and what he probably didn't). As always, the children follow the footsteps of the parent...[[/note]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 72. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheTalmud