History Literature / TheSoundAndTheFury

7th Feb '16 8:47:01 AM Freshmeat
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''The Sound and the Fury'' (1929) is one of WilliamFaulkner's most famous novels, and considered by many to be his MagnumOpus. Because it's by William Faulkner, it is both mildly incomprehensible and heart-wrenchingly tragic (once you manage to figure out what's going on). The book, about the [[BigScrewedUpFamily extremely dysfunctional Compson family]], is set in the DeepSouth during the early 1900s. The main story is about the four Compson siblings: Benjy, Quentin, Jason, and Caddy. The book is divided into four sections, each told by a different member of the Compson family. The first section is from the perspective of Benjy, who is mentally disabled and doesn't ''quite'' understand what is going on. The second section is told by Quentin, who by that time has pretty much forsaken his family and is a student at Harvard. Quentin has issues. The third section is told by Jason, and it is the first section that is in any way comprehensible. The last section is a standard third person omniscient narrative focusing on Dilsey, the Compsons' black cook, and the only character who realizes the self-destructive behaviors of the Compsons.
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''The Sound and the Fury'' (1929) is one of WilliamFaulkner's most famous novels, and considered by many to be his MagnumOpus.novels. Because it's by William Faulkner, it is both mildly incomprehensible and heart-wrenchingly tragic (once you manage to figure out what's going on). The book, about the [[BigScrewedUpFamily extremely dysfunctional Compson family]], is set in the DeepSouth during the early 1900s. The main story is about the four Compson siblings: Benjy, Quentin, Jason, and Caddy. The book is divided into four sections, each told by a different member of the Compson family. The first section is from the perspective of Benjy, who is mentally disabled and doesn't ''quite'' understand what is going on. The second section is told by Quentin, who by that time has pretty much forsaken his family and is a student at Harvard. Quentin has issues. The third section is told by Jason, and it is the first section that is in any way comprehensible. The last section is a standard third person omniscient narrative focusing on Dilsey, the Compsons' black cook, and the only character who realizes the self-destructive behaviors of the Compsons.
8th Sep '15 7:04:29 PM zymish
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''The Sound and the Fury'' (1929) is one of WilliamFaulkner's most famous novels, and considered by many to be his MagnumOpus. Because it's by William Faulkner, it is both mildly incomprehensible and heart-wrenchingly tragic (once you manage to figure out what's going on). The book, about the [[BigScrewedUpFamily extremely dysfunctional Compson family]], is set in the DeepSouth during the early 1900s. The main story is about the four Compson siblings: Benjy, Quentin, Jason, and Caddy. The book is divided into four sections, each told by a different member of the Compson family. The first section is from the perspective of Benjy, who is mentally retarded and doesn't ''quite'' understand what is going on. The second section is told by Quentin, who by that time has pretty much forsaken his family and is a student at Harvard. Quentin has issues. The third section is told by Jason, and it is the first section that is in any way comprehensible. The last section is a standard third person omniscient narrative focusing on Dilsey, the Compsons' black cook, and the only character who realizes the self-destructive behaviors of the Compsons.
to:
''The Sound and the Fury'' (1929) is one of WilliamFaulkner's most famous novels, and considered by many to be his MagnumOpus. Because it's by William Faulkner, it is both mildly incomprehensible and heart-wrenchingly tragic (once you manage to figure out what's going on). The book, about the [[BigScrewedUpFamily extremely dysfunctional Compson family]], is set in the DeepSouth during the early 1900s. The main story is about the four Compson siblings: Benjy, Quentin, Jason, and Caddy. The book is divided into four sections, each told by a different member of the Compson family. The first section is from the perspective of Benjy, who is mentally retarded disabled and doesn't ''quite'' understand what is going on. The second section is told by Quentin, who by that time has pretty much forsaken his family and is a student at Harvard. Quentin has issues. The third section is told by Jason, and it is the first section that is in any way comprehensible. The last section is a standard third person omniscient narrative focusing on Dilsey, the Compsons' black cook, and the only character who realizes the self-destructive behaviors of the Compsons.
24th Jul '15 10:21:45 PM Iruparatso
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* InnocentInaccurate: One of the reasons that Benjy's section is difficult to understand is that he himself cannot understand much that is going on around him (he is mentally retarded). While he frequently narrates flashbacks, but he narrates said flashbacks in present tense as if they're happening right now because he has no concept of time.
to:
* InnocentInaccurate: One of the reasons that Benjy's section is difficult to understand is that he himself cannot understand much that is going on around him (he is mentally retarded). While he frequently narrates flashbacks, but he narrates said flashbacks in present tense as if they're happening right now because he has no concept of time.

* NonPOVProtagonist: Caddy, the main character of the novel, is the only Compson child not to receive a section told from her POV.
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* NonPOVProtagonist: Caddy, the main character of the novel, is the only Compson child not to receive a section told from her POV. This is narratively demonstrated in an anecdote from the Compson siblings' childhood in which Caddy climbs a tree and all her brothers look up to see her panties covered in mud. While Caddy is doing the action, it's her brothers' different points of view of the incident which dictate the course of the novel.

* OneMarioLimit: Averted with Jason and Jason Jnr. Also averted with the two Quentins, which is just one of the many, many things which makes Benjy's narrative difficult to follow.
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* OneMarioLimit: Averted with Jason and Jason Jnr.Jr. Also averted with the two Quentins, which is just one of the many, many things which makes Benjy's narrative difficult to follow.

* ParentalFavoritism: Mrs. Compson only cares for her son Jason, and pays little attention to any of her other children.
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* ParentalFavoritism: Mrs. Compson only cares for her vicious son Jason, and pays little attention to any of her other children.
18th Sep '14 9:44:29 AM mlsmithca
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* LiteraryAllusionTitle: "The sound and the fury" is [[ShoutOutToShakespeare a quote from]] Theatre/{{Macbeth}}; upon hearing of the suicide of his wife, the title character describes life as "a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing." The first part of the book could be seen as "a tale told by an idiot," while the title is more generally symbolic of all the meaningless traditions the Compsons desperately cling to, [[spoiler: which ultimately culminate in their demise]].
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* LiteraryAllusionTitle: "The sound and the fury" is [[ShoutOutToShakespeare a quote from]] Theatre/{{Macbeth}}; ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}''; upon hearing of the suicide of his wife, the title character describes life as "a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing." The first part of the book could be seen as "a tale told by an idiot," while the title is more generally symbolic of all the meaningless traditions the Compsons desperately cling to, [[spoiler: which ultimately culminate in their demise]].
18th Sep '14 9:43:40 AM mlsmithca
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* BigBrotherInstinct: All the Compson boys have strong opinions on Caddy. Quentin's definitely falls into this trope. The reason he confesses to incest with her is that, if the two of them committed an act that atrocious, they would at least endure whatever punishment they deserved together.

* BigBrotherInstinct: All the Compson boys have strong opinions on Caddy. Quentin's definitely falls into this trope. The reason he confesses to incest with her is that, if the two of them committed an act that atrocious, they would at least endure whatever punishment they deserved together.

* {{Jerkass}}: Jason.
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* {{Jerkass}}: {{Jerkass}}: ** Jason.

* LiteraryAllusionTitle: "the sound and the fury" is [[ShoutOutToShakespeare a quote from]] Theatre/{{Macbeth}}. ** And the first part could be seen as "a tale told by an idiot." ** [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic It's symbolic of all the meaningless traditions the Compsons desperately cling to]], [[spoiler: which ultimately culminate in their demise]].
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* LiteraryAllusionTitle: "the "The sound and the fury" is [[ShoutOutToShakespeare a quote from]] Theatre/{{Macbeth}}. ** And Theatre/{{Macbeth}}; upon hearing of the suicide of his wife, the title character describes life as "a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing." The first part of the book could be seen as "a tale told by an idiot." ** [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic It's idiot," while the title is more generally symbolic of all the meaningless traditions the Compsons desperately cling to]], to, [[spoiler: which ultimately culminate in their demise]].

* LiteraryAllusionTitle: "the sound and the fury" is [[ShoutOutToShakespeare a quote from]] Theatre/{{Macbeth}}. ** And the first part could be seen as "a tale told by an idiot." ** [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic It's symbolic of all the meaningless traditions the Compsons desperately cling to]], [[spoiler: which ultimately culminate in their demise]].TheNounAndTheNoun

* SlidingScaleofIdealismVersusCynicism:
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* SlidingScaleofIdealismVersusCynicism:SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism:

** Quentin, with his ideals, though often misguided, of honor and gentlemanly conduct, is at the idealistic end. Sufficed to say, reality and lofty ideals don't always mix well.
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** Quentin, with his ideals, though often misguided, of honor and gentlemanly conduct, is at the idealistic end. Sufficed Suffice to say, reality and lofty ideals don't always mix well.

** Faulkner himself is much more on the idealistic side than his characters-- the ending shows that [[spoiler:it is Dilsey and her family who will inherit the earth, because they are held up by some degree of hope]].
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** Faulkner himself is much more on the idealistic side than his characters-- characters - the ending shows that [[spoiler:it is Dilsey and her family who will inherit the earth, because they are held up by some degree of hope]].

* TheNounAndTheNoun

* UnreliableNarrator: Quentin. It can be difficult at times to discern what really happened. ** Arguably, all of the narrators qualify to a greater or lesser extent. The ''most'' reliable (in the sense of partiality) narrator is Benjy, who is also mentally retarded.
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* UnreliableNarrator: Quentin. It can be difficult at times to discern what really happened. ** Arguably, all All of the narrators qualify to a greater or lesser extent. The ''most'' reliable (in the sense of partiality) narrator is Benjy, who is also mentally retarded. At the other end of the spectrum, it can be difficult to discern from Quentin's narration what really happened.
24th Oct '13 6:23:17 PM Katsuhagi
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* InnocentInaccurate: One of the reasons that Benjy's section is difficult to understand is that he himself cannot understand much that is going on around him (he is mentally retarded). ** To elaborate, Benjy frequently narrates flashbacks, but he narrates said flashbacks in present tense as if they're happening right now because he has no concept of time.
to:
* InnocentInaccurate: One of the reasons that Benjy's section is difficult to understand is that he himself cannot understand much that is going on around him (he is mentally retarded). ** To elaborate, Benjy retarded). While he frequently narrates flashbacks, but he narrates said flashbacks in present tense as if they're happening right now because he has no concept of time.
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