History Literature / TheSharingKnife

23rd Apr '16 12:43:01 PM Azvolrien
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* CallARabbitASmeerp: Kind of a weird example; the animals are all given their real names, but canoes are invariably called 'narrow boats', a name which usually refers to a kind of canal barge.
5th Nov '15 1:22:16 PM Rday
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* FoodPorn: There are many loving descriptions of the meals Fawn cooks, particularly in ''Passage'' and Dag is amazed at the abundance and variety found at Farmer tables.
30th May '15 2:43:23 PM Azvolrien
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* BreatherEpisode: ''Passage'', though it still has some danger in the form of the river bandits, is mostly a peaceful journey down the river and is the only book that doesn't directly involve a malice.
24th Apr '15 10:05:31 AM DracMonster
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''''The Sharing Knife''''' is a four novel fantasy/romance/western series by Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold set in a post-apocalyptic world, with a culture patterned on aspects of the nineteenth century United States, especially the expanding frontier. It examines the tension between the two cultures: the magical/traditionalist "Lakewalkers", who are fighting an endless war against [[EldritchAbomination malices]], and the techno-agricultural "Farmers", who tends to think the malices are less dangerous and abundant than they are, and believes (falsely) that the Lakewalkers are [[ImAHumanitarian cannibalistic]] [[BlackMagic black mages]]. Though there is some truth in those beliefs.

to:

'''''The Sharing Knife''''' is a four novel fantasy/romance/western series by Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold set in a post-apocalyptic world, with a culture patterned on aspects of the nineteenth century United States, especially the expanding frontier. It examines the tension between the two cultures: the magical/traditionalist "Lakewalkers", who are fighting an endless war a ForeverWar against [[EldritchAbomination malices]], and the techno-agricultural "Farmers", who tends to think the malices are less dangerous and abundant than they are, and believes (falsely) that the Lakewalkers are [[ImAHumanitarian cannibalistic]] [[BlackMagic black mages]]. Though there is some truth in those beliefs.
5th Apr '15 10:29:00 AM Azvolrien
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FantasyAmericana

to:

* FantasyAmericanaFantasyAmericana: The setting is essentially a fantasy version of the Midwest, particularly around the Ohio and Mississippi rivers; WordOfGod maintains that it isn't ''actually'' the Midwest, but the similarities are everywhere from the characters' speech patterns to the map at the front of the book.
13th Mar '15 10:57:25 AM IronicMouse
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* FantasyAmericana
28th Feb '15 4:58:00 PM Azvolrien
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* KaleidoscopeEyes: Dag has a fairly realistic, low-key version; they're essentially brown, but change from gold to black and every shade in between depending on the light.
23rd Jan '15 4:06:36 PM H.TorranceGriffin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MagicByAnyOtherName: The Lakewalkers tend to be very [[Insist

to:

* MagicByAnyOtherName: The Lakewalkers tend to be very [[Insist[[InsistentTerminology insistent]] that ground is ''not'' magic, but have trouble explaining why not.
** Possibly they're so firm about it because a [[{{Muggles}} Farmer's]] idea of "magic" tends to skew towards "[[AWizardDidIt unlimited powers]]" rather than the [[MagicAIsMagicA limited]] and [[FunctionalMagic logical]] applications of groundwork.
* MagneticHero: Not the actual heroine, Fawn, who only attracts two characters. Rather, it's Dag who attracts twenty-one more through a combination of [[FamedInStory martial fame]], magical ineptitude, and a disregard for tradition.
* TheMagocracy: Strongly implied the world of the story was once one of these, before the malices were unleashed and brought it all down.
* TheMaidenNameDebate: Lakewalkers use a matrilineal system of naming and inheritance (husband normally takes wife's 'tent' name, and households are passed to the eldest daughter), while [[{{Muggles}} farmers]] use a patrilinal one. As Dag Bluefield (ne Redwing) earned himself a spot in multiple ballads under his ''prior'' married name (Dag Wolverine of Leech Lake Camp) this leads to a degree of confusion.
* MalignedMixedMarriage: [[{{Muggles}} Farmer]][=/=][[WitchSpecies Lakewalker]] pairings are looked at askance more often than not by just about everyone, but the latter tend to be rather more dogmatic about the matter. Unlike most cases, [[JustifiedTrope there are objective reasons]], Lakewalkers need to keep their groundsense (and hence, bloodlines) strong since TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed, and having sex with {{Muggles}} tends to inadvertently MindRape them.
* MarionetteMaster: Both malices and Lakewalkers gone bad.
* MayflyDecemberRomance: A mild version; the hero's life expectancy is roughly twice the heroine's and he's already middle-aged [[MayDecemberRomance (as in, older than her father)]] when they meet.
-->'''Whit Bluefield''': "I don't know if he's robbing the cradle, or if she's robbing the grave!"
* MercyKill: Sharing can be this, as is slaying mud-men after the malice is killed.
* MindlinkMates: Lakewalker marriage essentially involves becoming a limited form of this.
* MissConception: Sunny tells Fawn she can't get pregnant her first time. She doesn't know if he was lying to get in her pants or if he actually believed it, but either way it's a costly mistake.
* MoodyMount: Dag's "evil" horse Copperhead.
* MundaneUtility: When they're not busy killing malices, Lakewalkers use ground manipulation for all sorts of everyday tasks, to include chasing flies off your horse, or luring fish right into your boat.
* {{Muggles}} (Lakewalkers call them all farmers, regardless of their occupation or where they live).
* MyGreatestFailure: Twenty years ago in what became known as the Battle of Wolf Ridge; Dag lost all but three of his command, his left hand, and ''his wife'' in the space of an hour. It does not help that more than one epic poem[=/=]song has been composed about it, and he tends to make himself scarce when one some pup decides to sing one at a celebration.
* NewPowersAsThePlotDemands: Dag in the later books.
* NoOntologicalInertia: When a malice is killed, its mud-men slaves revert to their animal minds--and then die, trapped in the wrong bodies--and the spell is lifted from any mind-controlled humans who have been enslaved by it, though they may or may not be able to go back to their old selves; though the Ontological Inertia is present in the case of the mud-men/animals, who die slowly, trapped in bodies they do not know how to use.
* NotBrainwashed: Alder, Fawn.
** In the fourth book, half-blood Calla thinks she has magically beguiled Sage into marrying her. When Dag discovers the persuasion, he tells Calla she cast a love spell on a boy that was already in love with her.
* OlderThanTheyLook: Fawn[[note]](after finding out that the man she had been sleeping with was older than her 50-odd father)[[/note]] makes a habit of adding an extra fifteen or twenty years to the estimated age of any Lakewalker that looks older than 30 or so. It is usually accurate.
** Fawn's own size and features work to convince most that she is closer to 12 than 18.
* {{Polyamory}}: A rare example of a woman married to two husbands. It's not really accepted practice among Lakewalkers, but they have no actual law against it, and the three are happy together, so the rest of the clan just kind of adjusted to it.
** It's also quite clear that the husbands [[BiTheWay are also married to each other]].
* PoorCommunicationKills: Setting aside the [[BurnTheWitch repeated incidents]] rooted in rumor caused by quarter-understood glimpses of Lakewalker customs; it is clear that Malices emerging under a farmer town where no one would recognize the signs of them even if they believed such creatures existed is in many ways the most dangerous scenario possible.
* PowerPerversionPotential: Used benignly, Lakewalker ground manipulation can ''greatly'' enhance sexual encounters. Used unethically, it can "persuade" a reluctant partner into consenting.
* PsychicRadar Groundsense can be used for this. It's more literally lifeforcesense; allowing a practitioner to detect and sense lifeforce around them, from other humans to animals and even the malices.
* RapeIsLove: Averted. To be exact, "Seduction by a Lakewalker is [[MindRape mind raping]] you into obsession with him or her for the rest of your life." One of the reasons Dag's clan opposes his marriage is that they think he did this to Fawn.
* RescueRomance: How Fawn and Dag met. Partially averted in that each of them credits the other for killing the malice they were fighting.
* {{Retcon}}: Later books go into more detail about how groundsense and beguilement work, sometimes contradicting earlier books.
* RomanceNovel: The first book is essentially a bodice-ripper "in disguise." The fantastic elements are there, but primarily as a vehicle for Dag and Fawn's budding relationship. The sequels shift the focus to the actual fantasy, although with the love story still as the central role.
* SavvyGuyEnergeticGirl: Dag and Fawn.
* ScarsAreForever: Even minor wounds inflicted directly by a [[EnemyToAllLivingThings malice]] are unusually slow to heal, and fade to an odd silvery color once they eventually do.
* SecondLove: Both Dag and Fawn for each other, Dag coming after Fawn's (disastrous) infatuation with Sunny Sawman and Fawn coming after Dag's twenty-years-deceased wife Kauneo.
* SettlingTheFrontier: The farmers are trying to reclaim and settle new land, even when the Lakewalkers deem it unsafe.
* ShownTheirWork: The ''Passage'' riverboats, details about low tech farming. The river bandits in ''Passage'' also have their roots in fact, probably inspired by the Cave-in-Rock pirates of the Ohio River in the 19th century.
* SuddenlyAlwaysKnewThat: In book four it turns out that Dag is not the first [[spoiler:Groundsetter]]. Every Lakewalker in the south seems to know about this specialty, strangely Dag doesn't even though he once spent a year patrolling in the south.
* [[SuicideByCop Suicide By]] EldritchAbomination: Attempted in Dag's backstory. After Dag's first wife died, he passed the DespairEventHorizon and essentially tried to commit suicide by repeatedly going for the kill on every malice he faced. He ended up killing over twenty five, when the most experienced Lakewalker commanders normally rack up maybe five or so in their lifetimes. Many Lakewalkers almost consider him a PhysicalGod by now..
* SwissArmyAppendage: Dag, played fairly realistically in that the attachments take time to switch, are often inferior to regular tools, and cause a lot of physical wear and tear to Dag.
* ThoseTwoGuys: Barr and Remo, especially in ''Passage'' but also for a bit in ''Horizon''. Bo and Hod might also qualify. Razi and Utau take on this duty in the first two books.
* TrueCompanions: Most of the cast in ''Passage'' end up becoming this.
* VillainousLegacy: In the long-ago BackStory of the books, the ancestors of the Lakewalkers managed to kill their villainous sorcerer-king that threatened to destroy the world. However, it split into fragments and spread over most of a continent, each piece able to grow into a ''[[EldritchAbomination malice]]''. The Lakewalkers in the books are still clearing those out, several hundred years later.
* VirginityMakesYouStupid: Fawn got swept up by romantic feelings during a wedding, making it easy for Sunny to take advantage of her.
* WalkingWasteland: A sufficiently large malice can kill every animal and plant in a region and leach the life from the soil for a millenium.
* WhatTheHellHero: Dag uses CharmPerson on an ObstructiveBureaucrat near the beginning of ''Horizons'' after having taken taken one of his young wards to task for doing it in the previous book. He gets called on it almost immediately. Turns out he was seriously stressed because he thought he was turning into a malice.
* WitchSpecies: The Lakewalkers think of themselves as one, and use it to justify their arrogance towards the farmers. They're wrong--magic can appear in farmers as well, albeit in rudimentary form.
* WizardsLiveLonger: But only about twice as long as "farmers".
* TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed: In the "staving off disaster" rather than "recycled apocalypse" sense -- if any malice ever goes undetected long enough to go critical, it will wipe out all life and civilization.
* YouWillBeAssimilated: Any living thing a malice doesn't [[CharmPerson "beguile,"]] it "ground-rips," powderizing it and gaining its strength, knowledge, and to a certain degree abilities. A malice that eats lots of humans can plan tactics, a malice that eats bats can fly, and so on. This incidentally justifies the BishonenLine, as a malice that's eaten many, many animals and has grown to tremendous size is often less dangerous than one that has eaten enough humans to [[ItCanThink think]].
----
23rd Jan '15 2:33:19 PM frogpatrol
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''The Sharing Knife: 'Beguilement''

to:

* ''The Sharing Knife: 'Beguilement''Beguilement''
23rd Jan '15 2:32:50 PM frogpatrol
Is there an issue? Send a Message
This list shows the last 10 events of 53. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheSharingKnife