History Literature / TheSaint

3rd Oct '16 9:52:59 AM DocWildNole
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Added DiffLines:

* BlackmailBackfire: Type 2 in ''The Art Photographer'', among others.
2nd Oct '16 6:47:19 PM DocWildNole
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By the mid-1930s, Conway, Tremayne, Sheridan, and Kent had left the field, and Templar worked with Patricia, Peter Quentin -- who first appeared as a con victim whom Templar saves from a long prison term -- and good old Hoppy Uniatz, a not-overly-bright but unswervingly loyal and courageous, not to mention [[QuickDraw handy with a Colt 1911 .45 semi-auto]], veteran of the [[TheRoaringTwenties Prohibition-era]] [[BigRottenApple NYC underworld]]. As time went on, only Hoppy would appear. Finally, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward.

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By the mid-1930s, Conway, Tremayne, Sheridan, and Kent had left the field, and field. Templar worked carried on with Patricia, Peter Quentin -- who first appeared as a con victim whom Templar saves from a long prison term -- and his most unusual associate, good old Hoppy Uniatz, Uniatz. Mr. Uniatz was a not-overly-bright but unswervingly loyal and courageous, not to mention [[QuickDraw handy with a Colt 1911 .45 semi-auto]], veteran of the [[TheRoaringTwenties Prohibition-era]] [[BigRottenApple NYC underworld]]. As He was also (according to Charteris) the first BreakoutCharacter in the series, to the point that as time went on, Simon would appear with only Hoppy would appear. Finally, as support. Eventually, though, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward.



* SympatheticInspectorAntagonist: Chief Inspector Claude Eustace Teal; one of (perhaps) two policemen whom the Saint considers a truly WorthyOpponent, his ongoing entanglement with the Saint is a constant bright spot in the pre-WWII books. Simon loves very few things more than poking Teal both verbally and physically, in Teal's well-padded midsection. But when the chips are down, Simon speaks of him with both affection and respect. The Saint alternates helping Teal solve the good Inspector's toughest cases (other than those that Simon committed himself, that is), and leaving Teal grasping at thin air when he attempts to nail Simon for the Saint's crimes. Further, Teal is shown to be a more-than-competent detective (for example, in ''The Unusual Ending'') in every respect; it's simply that, as the books put it, "Simon Templar was cut from no common clay; and Teal, who was of the good red earth earthy, recognized this without resentment." Finally, he and Simon have each saved the other's life at least once, in ''The Story of a Dead Man'' and ''The High Fence'' respectively.

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* SympatheticInspectorAntagonist: Chief Inspector Claude Eustace Teal; one of (perhaps) two policemen whom the Saint considers a truly WorthyOpponent, his ongoing entanglement with the Saint is a constant bright spot in the pre-WWII books. Simon loves very few things more than poking Teal both verbally and physically, in Teal's well-padded midsection. But when the chips are down, Simon speaks of him with both affection and respect. The Saint alternates helping Teal solve the good Inspector's toughest cases (other than those that Simon committed himself, that is), and leaving Teal grasping at thin air when he attempts to nail Simon for the Saint's crimes. Further, Teal is shown to be a more-than-competent detective (for example, in ''The Unusual Ending'') in every respect; it's simply that, as the books ''The Lawless Lady'' put it, "Simon Templar was cut from no not common clay; and Teal, who was of the good red earth earthy, recognized this without resentment." Finally, he and Simon have each saved the other's life at least once, in ''The Story of a Dead Man'' and ''The High Fence'' respectively.



* UnderhandedHero: Simon Templar is a ConMan who has repeatedly taken out criminals by kidnapping them, tricking them into killing each other and even performing {{Vigilante Execution}}s.
* VigilanteExecution: Templar rarely resorts to this; he generally prefers to let the Ungodly engineer their own dooms. However, rarely is not never, as certain of ''The Unlicensed Victuallers'' and Mr. Jones of ''The Gold Standard,'' amongst others, learn to their great sorrow.

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* UnderhandedHero: Simon Templar is a ConMan who has repeatedly taken out criminals by kidnapping them, tricking them into killing each other and even performing {{Vigilante Execution}}s.
Execution}}s (see below).
* VigilanteExecution: Templar rarely resorts to this; he generally prefers to let the Ungodly engineer their own dooms. However, rarely is not never, as certain of the Ungodly in ''The Unlicensed Victuallers'' and Mr. Jones of ''The Gold Standard,'' amongst others, learn to their great sorrow.



* WhatTheHellHero: The only time Patricia calls Simon out on anything in real anger occurs in ''The Melancholy Journey of Mr. Teal.'' The good Chief Inspector has almost nailed the Saint, when Simon informs him that [[spoiler: without Teal's knowledge, Simon has been depositing money into Teal's account, making it appear that the detective is a DirtyCop]] -- which the world, and Teal's superiors at UsefulNotes/ScotlandYard in particular, will all too readily accept as the ''real'' reason Teal's never caught the Saint. Teal proceeds with the case anyway, knowing it will lead to his own ruin. This in turn causes Simon one of his ''extremely'' few attacks of [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone conscience]]. The Saint reverses himself and not only does not proceed with the plot, he makes amends by giving Teal the GreatBigBookOfEverything of London crime that Simon has taken years to compile. [[spoiler: Of course, Simon arranges for he, Patricia, and the boodle to escape anyway.]]

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* WhatTheHellHero: The only time Patricia calls Simon out on anything in real anger occurs in ''The Melancholy Journey of Mr. Teal.'' The good Chief Inspector has almost nailed the Saint, when Simon informs him that [[spoiler: without Teal's knowledge, Simon has been depositing money into Teal's account, making it appear that the detective is a DirtyCop]] -- which the world, and Teal's superiors at UsefulNotes/ScotlandYard in particular, will all too readily accept as the ''real'' reason Teal's never caught the Saint. Teal proceeds with the case anyway, knowing it will lead to his own ruin. This in turn causes Simon one of his ''extremely'' few attacks of [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone attacks of conscience]]. The Saint reverses himself and not only does not proceed with the plot, he makes amends by giving Teal the GreatBigBookOfEverything of London crime that Simon has taken years to compile. Of course, [[spoiler: Of course, Simon arranges for he, Patricia, and the boodle to escape anyway.]]
1st Oct '16 8:12:45 AM DocWildNole
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* CorruptCorporateExecutive: Just in the pages of ''The First Saint Omnibus'', the Saint encounters Messrs. Hugo Campard, W. Titus Oates, Grant Lasser, and Sir Melvin Flager. Distaste for scum who pretend respectability is something Simon seems to more than share with the general public -- only the Saint can do something about it.

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* CorruptCorporateExecutive: Just in the pages of ''The First Saint Omnibus'', the Saint encounters Messrs. Hugo Campard, Campard (stock manipulator turned oil tycoon), W. Titus Oates, Oates (shady financier and philatelist), Grant Lasser, Lasser (importer of wine, spirits and other things), and Sir Melvin Flager. Flager (trucking magnate and tyrannical boss). Distaste for scum who pretend respectability is something Simon seems to more than share with the general public -- only the difference being, the Saint can do something about it.


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** Both Simon and Hoppy refer to Hoppy's trusty equalizer as "Betsy."
1st Oct '16 8:02:57 AM DocWildNole
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Master thief Simon Templar, also known by his nickname "the Saint" due to his initials S.T., as well as the fact that his heroic exploits fly in the face of a nefarious reputation. Templar's usual targets are those he considers "Ungodly", such as corrupt politicians, warmongers, and other unsavory types, leading to comparisons, both favorable and otherwise, to RobinHood. However, Templar is willing to ruin the lives of the Ungodly or even kill them, justifying these admitted murders as necessary to defend the lives of the innocent.

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Master thief criminal Simon Templar, also Templar is better known by his nickname "the Saint" due to his initials S.T., as well as the fact that his heroic exploits fly in the face of a nefarious reputation. Templar's usual targets are those he considers "Ungodly", such as corrupt politicians, warmongers, and other unsavory types, leading types. The fortunate ones amongst the Ungodly escape merely with vastly-reduced ill-gotten fortunes, a portion of which Templar donates to charity and the remainder to himself. This obviously leads to comparisons, both favorable and otherwise, to RobinHood. RobinHood. However, when his unique moral code demands it, Templar is willing to ruin the lives of the Ungodly or even kill them, justifying these admitted murders as necessary to defend the lives of the innocent.



By the mid-1930s, Conway, Tremayne, Sheridan, and Kent had left the field, and Templar worked with Patricia, Peter Quentin -- who first appeared as a con victim whom Templar saves from a long prison term -- and good old Hoppy Uniatz, a not-overly-bright but unswervingly loyal and courageous former [[BigRottenApple Prohibitiion-era NYC]] hoodlum. As time went on, only Hoppy would appear. Finally, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward.

to:

By the mid-1930s, Conway, Tremayne, Sheridan, and Kent had left the field, and Templar worked with Patricia, Peter Quentin -- who first appeared as a con victim whom Templar saves from a long prison term -- and good old Hoppy Uniatz, a not-overly-bright but unswervingly loyal and courageous former courageous, not to mention [[QuickDraw handy with a Colt 1911 .45 semi-auto]], veteran of the [[TheRoaringTwenties Prohibition-era]] [[BigRottenApple Prohibitiion-era NYC]] hoodlum.NYC underworld]]. As time went on, only Hoppy would appear. Finally, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward.


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* TheAlibi: Simon Templar is a past master of these; further, his associates learn well from him. In ''The Gold Standard'', immediately upon the Saint's return to the UK from a trip abroad, a small but nasty specimen of the Ungodly is knocked out and robbed blind. The only clue is the Sign of the Saint, left behind by the perp. Unfortunately for the long-suffering enforcers of the Law, Simon is having a lengthy chat with Chief Inspector Teal in a provincial police station at the exact time the crime occurred. Of course, [[spoiler: it was quick-thinking Patricia who took advantage of the opportunity -- as noted above, she was far above average for the time.]]
11th Jul '16 7:49:12 PM IronicMouse
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* UnderhandedHero: Simon Templar is a ConMan who has repeatedly taken out criminals by kidnapping them, tricking them into killing each other and even performing {{Vigilante Execution}}s.
29th Apr '16 12:27:18 PM DocWildNole
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* AchievementsInIgnorance: In "The Newdick Helicopter", one of the Ungodly buys plans for a 'helicopter' (actually an autogyro) to use as bait for unwary small investors. When the ConMan assembles the helicopter, he discovers it cannot take off vertically as he expected it to. Assuming he had put it together wrong, he starts tinkering with it and ends up inventing a fully functioning helicopter. (Note that this story was published in 1933, several years before the first [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Focke-Wulf_Fw_61 fully functioning helicopter]] was built.)

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* AchievementsInIgnorance: In "The ''The Newdick Helicopter", Helicopter'', one of the Ungodly buys plans for a 'helicopter' (actually an autogyro) to use as bait for unwary small investors. When the ConMan assembles the helicopter, he discovers it cannot take off vertically as he expected it to. Assuming he had put it together wrong, he starts tinkering with it and ends up inventing a fully functioning helicopter. (Note that this story was published in 1933, several years before the first [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Focke-Wulf_Fw_61 fully functioning helicopter]] was built.)



* InternalDeconstruction: The late short story "The Spanish Cow" deconstructs Simon's usual attitudes and behaviour. He comes close to seducing and stealing from an unattractive, middle-aged, ''nouveau riche'' woman, and only realises at the last minute that he is about to do something truly evil to another person just because she isn't sexy and cool.

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* InternalDeconstruction: The late short story "The story''The Spanish Cow" Co'' deconstructs Simon's usual attitudes and behaviour. He comes close to seducing and stealing from an unattractive, middle-aged, ''nouveau riche'' woman, and only realises at the last minute that he is about to do something truly evil to another person just because she isn't sexy and cool.



* KnightInShiningArmour: In "The Last Hero", one of the earlier Saint novels (1931), Simon Templar takes backstage to his gallant and tragic associate Norman Kent, who falls in love hopelessly with Templar's girlfriend Patricia Holm (who hardly notices him) and at the end of the book [[spoiler: sacrifices his life]] to let Templar and his other comrades-in-arms escape the current villain and fight again another day.
** A book called "Knights Errant of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries" by Caroline Whitehead and George Mc Leod says it all: "Norman Kent is an archetypal knight-errant. Though formally a man of 20th Century England, he lives (and dies) by the Code of Chivalry. He loves totally his Lady, Patricia Holm - who, like Don Quixote's Dulcinea, is not aware of that love. He is totally loyal to his Liege Lord, Simon Templar. Like Sir Gawain in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight", Norman Kent takes on the threats to his Lord. Not only physicial threats to life and limb, but also the sometimes inavoidable need to take dishourable acts which would have reflected badly on the reputation of King Arthur/Simon Templar is taken on, wholly and without reservation, by Sir Gawain/Norman Kent."

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* KnightInShiningArmour: In "The ''The Last Hero", Hero'', one of the earlier Saint novels (1931), Simon Templar takes backstage to his gallant and tragic associate Norman Kent, who falls in love hopelessly with Templar's girlfriend Patricia Holm (who hardly notices him) and at the end of the book [[spoiler: sacrifices his life]] to let Templar and his other comrades-in-arms escape the current villain and fight again another day.
** A book called "Knights ''Knights Errant of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries" Centuries'' by Caroline Whitehead and George Mc Leod says it all: "Norman Kent is an archetypal knight-errant. Though formally a man of 20th Century England, he lives (and dies) by the Code of Chivalry. He loves totally his Lady, Patricia Holm - who, like Don Quixote's Dulcinea, is not aware of that love. He is totally loyal to his Liege Lord, Simon Templar. Like Sir Gawain in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight", Norman Kent takes on the threats to his Lord. Not only physicial threats to life and limb, but also the sometimes inavoidable need to take dishourable acts which would have reflected badly on the reputation of King Arthur/Simon Templar is taken on, wholly and without reservation, by Sir Gawain/Norman Kent."



* PsychoSidekick: Hoppy Uniatz to the nth degree. Simon is no shrinking violet himself, yet several times the Saint gets the Ungodly to talk simply by threatening to leave them alone with good old Hoppy. It doesn't help that Hoppy will do ''anything'' the Saint asks, and interprets everything through his [[WrongSideOfTheTracks unorthodox upbringing]] and [[NeighbourhoodFriendlyGangsters previous profession]]. In "The Case of the Frightened Innkeeper," Templar forgets this. Meaning for Hoppy to escort some of the Ungodly from the Saint's presence, Simon carelessly says "Get rid of them;" Hoppy [[DeadlyEuphemism does]].

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* PsychoSidekick: Hoppy Uniatz to the nth degree. Simon is no shrinking violet himself, yet several times the Saint gets the Ungodly to talk simply by threatening to leave them alone with good old Hoppy. It doesn't help that Hoppy will do ''anything'' the Saint asks, and interprets everything through his [[WrongSideOfTheTracks unorthodox upbringing]] and [[NeighbourhoodFriendlyGangsters previous profession]]. In "The ''The Case of the Frightened Innkeeper," Innkeeper'', Templar forgets this. Meaning for Hoppy to escort some of the Ungodly from the Saint's presence, Simon carelessly says "Get rid of them;" Hoppy [[DeadlyEuphemism does]].



* SafeCracking: Simon's larcenous expertise includes this too; "The Man From St. Louis" has him open and empty a gangster's safe "offscreen" -- i.e. so easily that Charteris doesn't bother to write the scene.

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* SafeCracking: Simon's larcenous expertise includes this too; "The ''The Man From St. Louis" Louis'' has him open and empty a gangster's safe "offscreen" -- i.e. so easily that Charteris doesn't bother to write the scene.



* SwordCane: In the early stories, particularly in "The Man Who Was Clever," Simon is shown to be a master with one; since in those days a cane was still appropriate for upper-class gentlemen, he was also "seldom without it."
* SympatheticInspectorAntagonist: Chief Inspector Claude Eustace Teal; one of (perhaps) two policemen whom the Saint considers a truly WorthyOpponent, his ongoing entanglement with the Saint is a constant bright spot in the pre-WWII books. Simon loves very few things more than poking Teal both verbally and physically, in Teal's well-padded midsection. But when the chips are down, Simon speaks of him with both affection and respect. The Saint alternates helping Teal solve his almost-toughest cases, and leaving Teal grasping at thin air when he attempts to nail Simon for the Saint's crimes. Further, Teal is shown to be a more-than-competent detective (for example, in ''The Unusual Ending'') in every respect; it's simply that, as the books put it, "Simon Templar was cut from no common clay; and Teal, who was of the good red earth earthy, recognized this without resentment." Finally, he and Simon have each saved the other's life at least once, in ''The Story of a Dead Man'' and ''The High Fence'' respectively.

to:

* SwordCane: In the early stories, particularly in "The ''The Man Who Was Clever," Clever'', Simon is shown to be a master with one; since in those days a cane was still appropriate for upper-class gentlemen, he was also "seldom without it."
* SympatheticInspectorAntagonist: Chief Inspector Claude Eustace Teal; one of (perhaps) two policemen whom the Saint considers a truly WorthyOpponent, his ongoing entanglement with the Saint is a constant bright spot in the pre-WWII books. Simon loves very few things more than poking Teal both verbally and physically, in Teal's well-padded midsection. But when the chips are down, Simon speaks of him with both affection and respect. The Saint alternates helping Teal solve his almost-toughest cases, the good Inspector's toughest cases (other than those that Simon committed himself, that is), and leaving Teal grasping at thin air when he attempts to nail Simon for the Saint's crimes. Further, Teal is shown to be a more-than-competent detective (for example, in ''The Unusual Ending'') in every respect; it's simply that, as the books put it, "Simon Templar was cut from no common clay; and Teal, who was of the good red earth earthy, recognized this without resentment." Finally, he and Simon have each saved the other's life at least once, in ''The Story of a Dead Man'' and ''The High Fence'' respectively.



* ThisBearWasFramed: In "The Convenient Monster", a murderer kills his victim with a Polynesian club studded with shark teeth and attempts to place the blame on ''the Loch Ness Monster''!

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* ThisBearWasFramed: In "The ''The Convenient Monster", Monster'', a murderer kills his victim with a Polynesian club studded with shark teeth and attempts to place the blame on ''the Loch Ness Monster''!
1st Apr '16 11:25:26 PM mlsmithca
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Charteris told Templar's story in different formats: novels, novella collections and short stories. Initially, Templar was usually depicted as working with a number of other adventurous young men: his right-hand-man Roger Conway, Richard "Dicky" Tremayne, Archie Sheridan, and [[spoiler: doomed hero]] Norman Kent. Occasionally, the team included his OldRetainer Orace, though mainly in a background/support role. And, very often, Templar heavily relied on his true love, Patricia Holm, who was far more competent than the average heroine of her day.

to:

Charteris told Templar's story in different formats: novels, novella collections and short stories. Initially, Templar was usually depicted as working with a number of other adventurous young men: his right-hand-man Roger Conway, Richard "Dicky" Tremayne, Archie Sheridan, and [[spoiler: doomed hero]] hero Norman Kent. Occasionally, the team included his OldRetainer Orace, though mainly in a background/support role. And, very often, Templar heavily relied on his true love, Patricia Holm, who was far more competent than the average heroine of her day.
18th Mar '16 8:09:00 PM DocWildNole
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* DecoyDamsel: Pat occasionally does a heroic version of this, allowing herself to get captured to further some plan of Simon's.

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* DecoyDamsel: Pat occasionally (for example, in ''The Gold Standard'') does a heroic version of this, allowing herself to get captured to further some plan of Simon's.



* JustLikeRobinHood: The Saint steals from criminals and gives all but 10% of it to charities (unless it can be determined where the stolen valuables or money was stolen or extorted from in the first place, in which case The Saint gives it all back to its rightful owners).

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* JustLikeRobinHood: In the very earliest stories, The Saint steals from criminals and gives all but 10% of it to charities (unless it can be determined where the stolen valuables or money was ill-gotten gains were stolen or extorted from in the first place, in which case The Saint gives it all back to its rightful owners).owners). As the series goes on, the percentage varies, but The Saint never wavers in his philosophy -- in ''The Man From St. Louis,'' Simon even sends some of his boodle to a ''policeman'' who'd been shot by the eponymous bad guy.



* VigilanteExecution: Templar rarely resorts to this; he generally prefers to let the Ungodly engineer their own dooms. However, rarely is not never, as ''The Unlicensed Victuallers'' learn to their sorrow.

to:

* VigilanteExecution: Templar rarely resorts to this; he generally prefers to let the Ungodly engineer their own dooms. However, rarely is not never, as certain of ''The Unlicensed Victuallers'' and Mr. Jones of ''The Gold Standard,'' amongst others, learn to their great sorrow.


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* TheWorldIsNotReady: In ''The Gold Standard,'' Simon encounters the inventor of a modern, {{DieselPunk}}-ish PhilosophersStone process, and the criminal who is murderously determined to make the process work for him. By the end of the story, [[spoiler: everyone who knew the secret of the process is dead, leaving no records behind]], and The Saint believes that's a good thing.
15th Feb '16 4:15:38 PM DocWildNole
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Master thief Simon Templar, also known by his nickname "the Saint" due to his initials S.T., as well as the fact that his heroic exploits fly in the face of a nefarious reputation. While he uses many aliases, usually also incorporating the intitials S.T., his true name is unknown. Instead, he took his inspiration for the name Simon Templar from reading about the exploits of the Knights Templar.

Templar's usual targets are those he considers "Ungodly", such as corrupt politicians, warmongers, and other unsavory types, leading to comparisons, both favorable and otherwise, to RobinHood. However, Templar is willing to ruin the lives of the Ungodly or even kill them, justifying these admitted murders as necessary to defend the lives of the innocent.

to:

Master thief Simon Templar, also known by his nickname "the Saint" due to his initials S.T., as well as the fact that his heroic exploits fly in the face of a nefarious reputation. While he uses many aliases, usually also incorporating the intitials S.T., his true name is unknown. Instead, he took his inspiration for the name Simon Templar from reading about the exploits of the Knights Templar.\n\n Templar's usual targets are those he considers "Ungodly", such as corrupt politicians, warmongers, and other unsavory types, leading to comparisons, both favorable and otherwise, to RobinHood. However, Templar is willing to ruin the lives of the Ungodly or even kill them, justifying these admitted murders as necessary to defend the lives of the innocent.



* GoToAlias: Sebastian Tombs

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* GoToAlias: Sebastian TombsTombs; eventually, this alias becomes almost as well known as Simon's nom de guerre.
6th Feb '16 6:11:35 PM DocWildNole
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* CouldSayItBut: During one of the rare and wonderful times Chief Inspector Teal and The Saint are not only on the same side, but actually working together, Claud Eustace indulges in a great deal of this to help Simon bring down ''The Appalling Politician''. It works, but not quite as Claud Eustace expects.



* DiabolicalMastermind: Rayt Marius, war profiteer and utter blackguard, earns his status as Simon's arch-foe, even striking out at Simon one last time from beyond the grave in ''The Simon Templar Foundation''.



* DirtyCop: ''The High Fence'' reveals an example at the very end.



* HighHeelFaceTurn: "Straight Audrey" Perowne, and Kathleen "The Mug" Allfield are wooed to the side of the Saints by the charms, ''not'' of The Saint, but of Dicky Tremayne and Peter Quentin respectively.



* ImpersonatingAnOfficer: Used more than once; for example, Simon in ''Knight Templar'', and Peter Quentin in ''The Affair of Hogsbotham''.



* TheMafia: In ''Vendetta for the Saint,'' Simon takes on [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia the actual Sicilian Mafia]].



* SlummingIt: In ''The Wonderful War,'' Simon pretends to be a BananaRepublic peon -- and even lets himself be arrested! -- to bring about his master plan.

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* SlummingIt: In ''The Wonderful War,'' Simon pretends to be a BananaRepublic peon -- and even [[CapturedOnPurpose lets himself be arrested! arrested!]] -- to bring about his master plan.
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