History Literature / TheSaint

6th Feb '16 6:11:35 PM DocWildNole
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* CouldSayItBut: During one of the rare and wonderful times Chief Inspector Teal and The Saint are not only on the same side, but actually working together, Claud Eustace indulges in a great deal of this to help Simon bring down ''The Appalling Politician''. It works, but not quite as Claud Eustace expects.

* DiabolicalMastermind: Rayt Marius, war profiteer and utter blackguard, earns his status as Simon's arch-foe, even striking out at Simon one last time from beyond the grave in ''The Simon Templar Foundation''.

* DirtyCop: ''The High Fence'' reveals an example at the very end.

* HighHeelFaceTurn: "Straight Audrey" Perowne, and Kathleen "The Mug" Allfield are wooed to the side of the Saints by the charms, ''not'' of The Saint, but of Dicky Tremayne and Peter Quentin respectively.

* ImpersonatingAnOfficer: Used more than once; for example, Simon in ''Knight Templar'', and Peter Quentin in ''The Affair of Hogsbotham''.

* TheMafia: In ''Vendetta for the Saint,'' Simon takes on [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia the actual Sicilian Mafia]].

* SlummingIt: In ''The Wonderful War,'' Simon pretends to be a BananaRepublic peon -- and even lets himself be arrested! -- to bring about his master plan.
to:
* SlummingIt: In ''The Wonderful War,'' Simon pretends to be a BananaRepublic peon -- and even [[CapturedOnPurpose lets himself be arrested! arrested!]] -- to bring about his master plan.
4th Feb '16 7:32:53 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added namespaces.
* CallingCard: The familiar haloed stick figure was Simon's trademark, often sent before an adventure as a warning, during as an ominous reminder, and after as a signature to a completed work. Even after his identity is made public, Simon continues to use it; as Inspector Teal observes glumly, ScotlandYard knows it's his trademark, but the fact that everyone in England knows it too allows Simon to claim that some cheap crook was just copying it. ** In one of the stories in ''The Saint in London'', one of the Ungodly finally tries a FrameUp using the Sign of the Saint. Simon is only surprised that it's taken someone so long. He further muses that perhaps every other crook who thought of it was smart enough to realize that it would only attract his attention, and that it's far better to take their chances with ScotlandYard than with The Saint.
to:
* CallingCard: The familiar haloed stick figure was Simon's trademark, often sent before an adventure as a warning, during as an ominous reminder, and after as a signature to a completed work. Even after his identity is made public, Simon continues to use it; as Inspector Teal observes glumly, ScotlandYard UsefulNotes/ScotlandYard knows it's his trademark, but the fact that everyone in England knows it too allows Simon to claim that some cheap crook was just copying it. ** In one of the stories in ''The Saint in London'', one of the Ungodly finally tries a FrameUp using the Sign of the Saint. Simon is only surprised that it's taken someone so long. He further muses that perhaps every other crook who thought of it was smart enough to realize that it would only attract his attention, and that it's far better to take their chances with ScotlandYard UsefulNotes/ScotlandYard than with The Saint.

* WhatTheHellHero: The only time Patricia calls Simon out on anything in real anger occurs in ''The Melancholy Journey of Mr. Teal.'' The good Chief Inspector has almost nailed the Saint, when Simon informs him that [[spoiler: without Teal's knowledge, Simon has been depositing money into Teal's account, making it appear that the detective is a DirtyCop]] -- which the world, and Teal's superiors at ScotlandYard in particular, will all too readily accept as the ''real'' reason Teal's never caught the Saint. Teal proceeds with the case anyway, knowing it will lead to his own ruin. This in turn causes Simon one of his ''extremely'' few attacks of [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone conscience]]. The Saint reverses himself and not only does not proceed with the plot, he makes amends by giving Teal the GreatBigBookOfEverything of London crime that Simon has taken years to compile. [[spoiler: Of course, Simon arranges for he, Patricia, and the boodle to escape anyway.]]
to:
* WhatTheHellHero: The only time Patricia calls Simon out on anything in real anger occurs in ''The Melancholy Journey of Mr. Teal.'' The good Chief Inspector has almost nailed the Saint, when Simon informs him that [[spoiler: without Teal's knowledge, Simon has been depositing money into Teal's account, making it appear that the detective is a DirtyCop]] -- which the world, and Teal's superiors at ScotlandYard UsefulNotes/ScotlandYard in particular, will all too readily accept as the ''real'' reason Teal's never caught the Saint. Teal proceeds with the case anyway, knowing it will lead to his own ruin. This in turn causes Simon one of his ''extremely'' few attacks of [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone conscience]]. The Saint reverses himself and not only does not proceed with the plot, he makes amends by giving Teal the GreatBigBookOfEverything of London crime that Simon has taken years to compile. [[spoiler: Of course, Simon arranges for he, Patricia, and the boodle to escape anyway.]]
2nd Feb '16 4:59:49 PM DocWildNole
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* CorruptCorporateExecutive: Just in the pages of ''The First Saint Omnibus'', the Saint encounters Messrs. Hugo Campard, W. Titus Oates, Grant Lasser, and Sir Melvin Flager. Distaste for scum who pretend respectability is something Simon seems to more than share with the general public -- only the Saint can do something about it.

* GoodIsNotSoft: The Saint's entire modus operandi is built on this trope.

* HeelFaceTurn: It doesn't happen often -- possibly because the Ungodly often meet the Saint just before they meet their Maker -- but by the end of the story, ''The Sleepless Knight'' is a changed man. It may not be a coincidence that this is one of a very few stories in which the Saint makes not a penny of profit.

* KansasCityShuffle: Another thing The Saint loves with a holy love.
to:
* KansasCityShuffle: Another thing The Saint loves with a holy love. ''The Prince of Cherkessia'', for example, is warned of the exact day on which the Saint will -- for a variety of good reasons -- steal the crown that has just been made for him by London's finest jewelers. Chief Inspector Teal guards the Prince and his crown practically as well as England's own Crown Jewels, and yet the crown is ''still'' stolen -- because Claud Eustace could never imagine that [[spoiler: the "Prince" is actually The Saint in disguise, and has been all along]].

* KansasCityShuffle: Another thing The MoralGuardians: Few things that are not actual felonies raise Simon's ire more than these. One, Mr. Ebenezer Hogsbotham, sets off an adventure that Charteris himself, in ''The First Saint loves with Omnibus,'' called "a story that in its own way would summarize them all". By the end of ''The Affair of Hogsbotham'', though Mr. H. never appears in person, the Saint has given him a holy love.most satisfactory comeuppance -- while also [[spoiler: solving a bank robbery, arranging for the sudden decease of said robbers, and enriching himself and his associates to the tune of fifteen thousand pounds]].

* WorthyOpponent: The Prince and The Saint view each other as one; as noted above, so do Templar & Teal.
to:
* WorthyOpponent: The Prince Rudolf and The Saint view each other as one; as noted above, so do Templar & Teal.
2nd Feb '16 4:02:11 PM DocWildNole
Is there an issue? Send a Message
14th Jan '16 4:14:33 PM DocWildNole
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* BookcasePassage: In ''The Affair of Hogsbotham,'' Simon's country house has a tiny room concealed behind a bookcase secret door. As one might expect from the Saint, though, the opening mechanism is far more complex than the usual pull-the-right-book trick.
14th Jan '16 3:29:37 PM DocWildNole
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* BatmanGambit: The Saint loves these with a holy love. A prime example is in ''The Man From St. Louis,'' where he manipulates a vicious wannabe-bigshot mook into disposing of a white slaver -- and in such a way that Chief Inspector Teal immediately arrests said look.
to:
* BatmanGambit: The Saint loves these with a holy love. A prime example is in ''The Man From St. Louis,'' where he manipulates a vicious wannabe-bigshot mook into disposing of a white slaver -- and in such a way that Chief Inspector Teal immediately arrests said look.mook.
6th Jan '16 10:12:30 AM DocWildNole
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* BatmanGambit: The Saint loves these with a holy love.
to:
* BatmanGambit: The Saint loves these with a holy love. A prime example is in ''The Man From St. Louis,'' where he manipulates a vicious wannabe-bigshot mook into disposing of a white slaver -- and in such a way that Chief Inspector Teal immediately arrests said look.
4th Jan '16 9:22:21 PM DocWildNole
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Charteris told Templar's story in different formats: novels, novella collections and short stories. Initially, Templar was usually depicted as working with a team that included his OldRetainer Orace, girlfriend Patricia Holm, right-hand-man Roger Conway, Richard "Dicky" Tremayne, Archie Sheridan, and Norman Kent. These four eventually went their own ways, and Templar worked with Patricia, Peter Quentin -- who first appeared as a con victim whom Templar saves from a long prison term -- and good old Hoppy Uniatz, a not-overly-bright but unswervingly loyal and courageous former [[BigRottenApple Prohibitiion-era NYC]] hoodlum. Later, this was slimmed down to just Hoppy. Finally, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward.
to:
Charteris told Templar's story in different formats: novels, novella collections and short stories. Initially, Templar was usually depicted as working with a team that included number of other adventurous young men: his OldRetainer Orace, girlfriend Patricia Holm, right-hand-man Roger Conway, Richard "Dicky" Tremayne, Archie Sheridan, and [[spoiler: doomed hero]] Norman Kent. These four eventually went their own ways, Occasionally, the team included his OldRetainer Orace, though mainly in a background/support role. And, very often, Templar heavily relied on his true love, Patricia Holm, who was far more competent than the average heroine of her day. By the mid-1930s, Conway, Tremayne, Sheridan, and Kent had left the field, and Templar worked with Patricia, Peter Quentin -- who first appeared as a con victim whom Templar saves from a long prison term -- and good old Hoppy Uniatz, a not-overly-bright but unswervingly loyal and courageous former [[BigRottenApple Prohibitiion-era NYC]] hoodlum. Later, this was slimmed down to just Hoppy.As time went on, only Hoppy would appear. Finally, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward.

Charteris told Templar's story * FramingTheGuiltyParty: Done masterfully by The Saint in different formats: novels, novella collections and short stories. Initially, Templar was usually depicted as working with a team that included his OldRetainer Orace, girlfriend Patricia Holm, right-hand-man Roger Conway, Richard "Dicky" Tremayne, Archie Sheridan, and Norman Kent. These four eventually went their own ways, and Templar worked with Patricia, Peter Quentin -- who first appeared as a con victim whom Templar saves from a long prison term -- and good old Hoppy Uniatz, a not-overly-bright but unswervingly loyal and courageous former [[BigRottenApple Prohibitiion-era NYC]] hoodlum. Later, this was slimmed down to just Hoppy. Finally, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward. ''The Death Penalty''.

* MasterActor: The Saint.
to:
* MasterActor: The Saint. He often appears as a wealthy, amiable and helium-headed aristocrat (see below) but, when circumstances demand it, can appear to be a down-at-heel lorry driver, a haughty but corrupt barrister, or even a Central American peasant with little more than a change of clothes. * MercyLead: The Saint has come to the apartment of Tex Goldman, ''The Man From St. Louis'', for a rare VigilanteExecution; before he can make his move, though, he overhears part of a conversation between Tex and what Simon thinks is just the gangster's moll. When Simon does move, he gets the drop on both and tells Tex that he's there to kill ''both'' of them. Tex faces the Saint down, saying that whatever Simon thinks, he's wrong, but that Tex can take it for both of them-- because they were just married that day. Simon is so touched, he not only lets the girl go (whom he never really intended to kill anyway), he also [[spoiler: lets Tex flee with her, and even gives them back some of the loot that he, Simon, has just lifted from Tex's safe]].

* MysteriousPast: We never find out much about The Saint's past apart from that "Templar" is a pseudonymous surname he chose as a young man or boy. * NeverGetsDrunk: Hoppy Uniatz's ability to imbibe is a source of wonder and bemusement to all who know him, including and especially the Saint. In view of Hoppy's unusual personality, he is probably a type 2. On the other hand, Simon hypothesizes he simply does not drink ''enough'', which given the descriptions of how much and what he drinks would make him Type 3.
to:
* MysteriousPast: We never find In one of the later adventures, ''The Saint In Pursuit'', an American intelligence officer awkwardly tries to draw Simon out much by mentioning that he hasn't been completely briefed about The Saint's past apart from that "Templar" is a pseudonymous surname he chose as a young man or boy. Templar's background. Simon's answer: "Nobody has." * NeverGetsDrunk: Hoppy Uniatz's ability to imbibe is a source of wonder and bemusement astonishment to all who know him, including and especially the Saint. In view of Hoppy's unusual personality, he is probably a type 2. On the other hand, Simon hypothesizes he simply does not drink ''enough'', which given the descriptions of how much and what he drinks would make him Type 3.

* ThePardon: In ''Knight Templar'', the one time the bobbies had him dead to rights, all Detective-Inspector Carn can say to him is, "I think the King is waiting to speak to you." Simon [[spoiler: had just prevented the bombing of a train carrying His Majesty and other members of the royal family]].
to:
* ThePardon: In ''Knight Templar'', the one time the bobbies had him dead to rights, all Detective-Inspector Carn can say to him is, "I think the King is waiting to speak to you." Simon had just [[spoiler: had just prevented the bombing of a train carrying His Majesty and other members of the royal family]].

* SympatheticInspectorAntagonist: Chief Inspector Claude Eustace Teal; one of (perhaps) two policemen whom the Saint considers a truly WorthyOpponent, his ongoing entanglement with the Saint is a constant bright spot in the pre-WWII books. Simon loves very few things more than poking Teal both verbally and physically (in Teal's well-padded midsection). But when the chips are down, Simon speaks of him with both affection and respect. The Saint alternates helping Teal solve his almost-toughest cases, and leaving Teal grasping at thin air when he attempts to nail Simon for the Saint's crimes. Further, Teal is shown to be a more-than-competent detective (for example, in ''The Unusual Ending'') in every respect; it's simply that, as the books put it, "Simon Templar was cut from no common clay; and Teal, who was of the good red earth earthy, recognized this without resentment." Finally, he and Simon have each saved the other's life at least once, in ''The Story of a Dead Man'' and ''The High Fence'' respectively. * TermsOfEndangerment: Templar tends to use pet names or terms of endearment when talking to villains; the sweeter, the more inappropriate, and the more frequent the endearments get, the closer the villains are to death.
to:
* SympatheticInspectorAntagonist: Chief Inspector Claude Eustace Teal; one of (perhaps) two policemen whom the Saint considers a truly WorthyOpponent, his ongoing entanglement with the Saint is a constant bright spot in the pre-WWII books. Simon loves very few things more than poking Teal both verbally and physically (in physically, in Teal's well-padded midsection).midsection. But when the chips are down, Simon speaks of him with both affection and respect. The Saint alternates helping Teal solve his almost-toughest cases, and leaving Teal grasping at thin air when he attempts to nail Simon for the Saint's crimes. Further, Teal is shown to be a more-than-competent detective (for example, in ''The Unusual Ending'') in every respect; it's simply that, as the books put it, "Simon Templar was cut from no common clay; and Teal, who was of the good red earth earthy, recognized this without resentment." Finally, he and Simon have each saved the other's life at least once, in ''The Story of a Dead Man'' and ''The High Fence'' respectively. * TermsOfEndangerment: Templar tends to use pet names or terms of endearment when talking to villains; the sweeter, the more inappropriate, and the more frequent the endearments get, the closer the villains are to death.doom.

* VigilanteExecution: Templar, especially in the earlier books, would often force a baddie he considered too dangerous (and too likely to get off) to fight him in a duel to the death (he generally preferred not to kill in cold blood because it didn't seem quite sporting).
to:
* VigilanteExecution: Templar, especially in the earlier books, would often force a baddie Templar rarely resorts to this; he considered too dangerous (and too likely to get off) to fight him in a duel to the death (he generally preferred prefers to let the Ungodly engineer their own dooms. However, rarely is not never, as ''The Unlicensed Victuallers'' learn to kill in cold blood because it didn't seem quite sporting).their sorrow.
12th Dec '15 7:53:37 AM DocWildNole
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* TheTrickster: The Saint. Oh hallowed heavens, The Saint!
to:
* TheTrickster: The Saint. Oh hallowed heavens, The Saint!Saint! Perhaps the most extreme example comes in ''The Million Pound Day'', when Simon purchases a trick matchbox from a toy & novelty shop, and uses it to return to the main villain a gift said villain intended for Simon. Let's just say TheJoker would've been proud....
12th Dec '15 7:44:33 AM DocWildNole
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Charteris told Templar's story in different formats: novels, novella collections and short stories. Initially, Templar was usually depicted as working with a team that included girlfriend Patricia Holm. Later, this was slimmed down to just Hoppy, his right hand man. Finally, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward. Beginning in the 1960s, Charteris occasionally updated stories for reprints, replacing outdated references to movie stars, etc. with more modern references. By the 1970s, he stopped doing that.
to:
Charteris told Templar's story in different formats: novels, novella collections and short stories. Initially, Templar was usually depicted as working with a team that included his OldRetainer Orace, girlfriend Patricia Holm. Holm, right-hand-man Roger Conway, Richard "Dicky" Tremayne, Archie Sheridan, and Norman Kent. These four eventually went their own ways, and Templar worked with Patricia, Peter Quentin -- who first appeared as a con victim whom Templar saves from a long prison term -- and good old Hoppy Uniatz, a not-overly-bright but unswervingly loyal and courageous former [[BigRottenApple Prohibitiion-era NYC]] hoodlum. Later, this was slimmed down to just Hoppy, his right hand man.Hoppy. Finally, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward. Beginning in the 1960s, Charteris occasionally updated stories for reprints, replacing outdated references to movie stars, etc. with more modern references. By the 1970s, he stopped doing that.

Charteris told Templar's story in different formats: novels, novella collections and short stories. Initially, Templar was usually depicted as working with a team that included girlfriend Patricia Holm. Later, this was slimmed down to just Hoppy, his right hand man. Finally, Templar was featured working solo in most stories published from the late 1940s onward. Beginning in the 1960s, Charteris occasionally updated stories for reprints, replacing outdated references to movie stars, etc. with more modern references. By the 1970s, he stopped doing that. * HeroicSacrifice: In ''The Last Hero,'' made by [[spoiler: Norman Kent]]

Charteris told Templar's story in different formats: novels, novella collections and short stories. Initially, Templar was usually depicted as working * IOweYouMyLife: Downplayed with a team Peter Quentin; it's unlikely that included girlfriend Patricia Holm. Later, this was slimmed down to just Hoppy, his right hand man. Finally, Templar was featured working solo the stretch in most stories published His Majesty's Gaol from the late 1940s onward. Beginning in the 1960s, Charteris occasionally updated stories for reprints, replacing outdated references which The Saint saves him would've been fatal, but as Simon himself notes, it certainly isn't healthy; and, without ever mentioning it again, Peter goes on to movie stars, etc. with more modern references. By the 1970s, he stopped doing that. become a valuable member of Simon's team.

* KnightInShiningArmour: In "The Last Hero", one of the earlier Saint novels (1931), Simon Templar takes backstage to his gallant and tragic associate Norman Kent, who falls in love hopelessly with Templar's girlfriend Patricia Holm (who hardly notices him) and at the end of the book sacrifices his life to let Templar and his other comrades-in-arms escape the current villain and fight again another day.
to:
* KnightInShiningArmour: In "The Last Hero", one of the earlier Saint novels (1931), Simon Templar takes backstage to his gallant and tragic associate Norman Kent, who falls in love hopelessly with Templar's girlfriend Patricia Holm (who hardly notices him) and at the end of the book [[spoiler: sacrifices his life life]] to let Templar and his other comrades-in-arms escape the current villain and fight again another day.

Added DiffLines:
* KnightInShiningArmour: In "The Last Hero", one of the earlier Saint novels (1931), Simon Templar takes backstage to his gallant ** Hoppy Uniatz and tragic associate Norman Kent, who falls in love hopelessly with Templar's girlfriend Patricia Holm (who hardly notices him) and at the end of the book sacrifices his life to let Templar and his other comrades-in-arms escape the current villain and fight again another day. Scotch whiskey.
This list shows the last 10 events of 131. Show all.