History Literature / TheSagaOfTheVolsungs

19th Feb '16 2:22:52 PM devtom
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19th Feb '16 2:22:41 PM devtom
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5th Feb '16 3:48:57 AM Arawn999
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''Völsunga saga'', or ''Saga of the Volsungs'', is an [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic Legendary Saga]], easily the single most prominent work of that group. It was composed in the late 13th century (though the only extant manuscript dates from c. 1400). The German version of the myth, the ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'', is the earliest complete telling of the legend, though the ''Völsunga saga'' is thought to preserve earlier elements of the narrative. Like most of the Icelandic sagas, it is of anonymous authorship. The author obviously worked along the [[NarrativePoem heroic lays]] collected in the ''Literature/CodexRegius''.

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''Völsunga saga'', or ''Saga of the Volsungs'', is an [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic Legendary Saga]], easily the single most prominent work of that group. It was composed in the late 13th century (though the only extant manuscript dates from c. 1400). The German version of the myth, the ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'', is the earliest complete telling of the legend, though the ''Völsunga saga'' is thought to preserve earlier elements of the narrative. Like most of the Icelandic sagas, it is of anonymous authorship. The author obviously worked along the [[NarrativePoem heroic lays]] collected in the ''Literature/CodexRegius''.



In 1888, Creator/WilliamMorris made a translation that can be read [[http://omacl.org/Volsunga/ here.]]

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In the early 13th century, the ''Völsunga saga'' was [[AdaptationalExpansion adapted and expanded]] into the ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'' by an anonymous author. Despite having been written down earlier, it contains anachronistic alterations not present in the versions recorded in the ''Völsunga saga'' and ''Literature/TheEddas'', which are thought to preserve earlier elements of the story. In 1888, Creator/WilliamMorris made a translation that can be read [[http://omacl.org/Volsunga/ here.]]
5th Feb '16 3:35:36 AM Arawn999
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''Völsunga saga'', or ''Saga of the Volsungs'', is an [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic Legendary Saga]], easily the single most prominent work of that group. It was composed in the late 13th century (though the only extant manuscript dates from c. 1400). Like most of the Icelandic sagas, it is of anonymous authorship. The author obviously worked along the [[NarrativePoem heroic lays]] collected in the ''Literature/CodexRegius''.

to:

''Völsunga saga'', or ''Saga of the Volsungs'', is an [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic Legendary Saga]], easily the single most prominent work of that group. It was composed in the late 13th century (though the only extant manuscript dates from c. 1400). The German version of the myth, the ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'', is the earliest complete telling of the legend, though the ''Völsunga saga'' is thought to preserve earlier elements of the narrative. Like most of the Icelandic sagas, it is of anonymous authorship. The author obviously worked along the [[NarrativePoem heroic lays]] collected in the ''Literature/CodexRegius''.



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23rd Sep '15 4:43:53 PM nombretomado
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Structurally, ''Völsunga saga'' is a sprawling GenerationalSaga, starting with Sigi, supposedly a son of [[NorseMythology Odin]], who commits murder of a slave. For this, he is banished from his homeland (the identity of which is never disclosed), eventually becoming a sea-rover and conquering himself a kingdom. Sigiís son Rerir is the father of Völsung, who marries a {{Valkyrie|s}} and from whom the lineage receives its name, the Völsungs.

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Structurally, ''Völsunga saga'' is a sprawling GenerationalSaga, starting with Sigi, supposedly a son of [[NorseMythology [[Myth/NorseMythology Odin]], who commits murder of a slave. For this, he is banished from his homeland (the identity of which is never disclosed), eventually becoming a sea-rover and conquering himself a kingdom. Sigiís son Rerir is the father of Völsung, who marries a {{Valkyrie|s}} and from whom the lineage receives its name, the Völsungs.
6th Apr '15 7:59:41 AM LordGro
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* SnakePit: The manner of Gunnar's death.

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* SlainInTheirSleep: Gutthorm sneaks into Sigurd's bed chamber three times, but backs down twice because Sigurd is not fully asleep. Only when he finds him sound asleep, he dares to stab him "so that the sword point stuck in the bed under him".
* SnakePit: The manner of Gunnar's death.Atli has Gunnar thrown into a snake pit for execution.
24th Jan '15 4:47:11 AM LordGro
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* BrokeYourArmPunchingCthulu: Sigmund attempts to attack Odin disguised as an old man on the battlefield with the sword Odin gave him. Attacking a god and especially the supposed ancestral father of your clan with a sword he provided is certainly a case for the department of very bad ideas. Odin causes to sword to break and Sigmund is killed.

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* BrokeYourArmPunchingCthulu: BrokeYourArmPunchingOutCthulhu: Sigmund attempts to attack Odin disguised as an old man on the battlefield with the sword Odin gave him. Attacking a god and especially the supposed ancestral father of your clan with a sword he provided is certainly a case for the department of very bad ideas. Odin causes to sword to break and Sigmund is killed.
24th Jan '15 4:45:57 AM LordGro
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* EvilMakesYouMonstrous: After murdering his own father for Andvari's gold, Fafnir turns into a dragon to constantly guards his treasure.

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* EvilMakesYouMonstrous: After murdering his own father for Andvari's gold, Fafnir turns into a dragon to constantly guards guard his treasure.treasure. It is unclear whether this is a voluntary or involuntary transformation, but Fafnir never leaves his dragon shape afterwards.
24th Jan '15 4:38:30 AM LordGro
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24th Jan '15 4:37:37 AM LordGro
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Brynhildr. In the Saga of the Volsungs she and Sigurd are a victim of Grimhild's scheme. In the Poetic Edda, Grimhild does not appear and Brynhildr decides that Sigurd is the man she wants instead of Gunnar and [[IfICantHaveYou if she can't have him no one will]] and manipulates Gunnar into the conspiration to murder Sigurd.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheSagaOfTheVolsungs